Reidsville police sergeant fired after material in search warrant appeared to be ‘reckless, without basis, misleading’ – WXII The Triad

Reidsville police sergeant fired after material in search warrant appeared to be ‘reckless, without basis, misleading’

Sergeant Lynwood Hampshire, of the Reidsville Police Department, was terminated July 14. His termination comes after wrong-doing, while executing a search warrant, was documented in a court memorandum opinion and order. Hampshire was also accused of being part of a Fourth Amendment violation.

RPD Major Ronnie Ellison confirmed the news to WXII 12 News Wednesday. Ellison says Hampshire was employed with the department since December 6, 2004, but had been involved with law enforcement for 17 years.

His ending salary was $46,574.96.

Ellison says Hampshire was terminated for violation of department policy and general order: operational duties and responsibilities.

“Members shall establish and maintain sufficient competency to effectively perform their duties and carry out their responsibilities of their position. They shall perform their duties in such a manner as to effectively and efficiently carry out the functions and objectives of the department,” said Chief of Police Robert Hassell.

Hampshire was initially placed on administrative leave. That action came after issues were listed in a search warrant involving former Greensboro police officer William White. White faces possession of stolen property charges after police say he was one of four people who stole $44,000 in lawn mowers in March.

Court documents state that on March 5, Hampshire applied for a warrant to search White’s property at 7102 Destiny Jo Road in Pleasant Garden, North Carolina. The warrant was issued by a state court judge the same day.

“When asked by the court at the hearing why he waited until March to secure the search warrant from which this case arises, Sgt. Hampshire stated: ‘Guilford County didn’t want to deal with it. My district attorney (Rockingham County) didn’t want it, and eventually, Alamance County took it over. I couldn’t find a district attorney that was willing to prosecute it,” court documents state.

According to the court memo, the state warrant sought evidence of the following crimes:

“The day following the issuance of the warrant, officers went to White’s home to conduct the search. Special Agent Cummings, a 15-year veteran of the SBI, testified he was present at the search and his duties that day were to document the crime scene in photographs, sketches and in words to include in a report later. Cummings was directed to the master bedroom, where Detective Ken Mitchell was already searching. When he walked into the bedroom, Cummings observed several firearms and other items that Mitchell had found in different locations and spread onto the bed. Cummings observed two rifles that contained a collapsible stock, with one of the rifles having a longer barrel than the other. Cummings seized the rifles and suppressors after viewing them. The day after the search, law enforcement checked the national firearms registry and learned that White had not registered the rifle and silencers,” court documents state.

White would later challenge the validity of the search warrant, contending:

White also contends that “even if the warrants were valid, seizure of the rifle and suppressors were not authorized because the registration status of these items was not something immediately apparent to law enforcement under the plain-view doctrine,” court documents state.

THE SEARCH WARRANT

The Fourth Amendment requires that warrants be based upon probable cause supported by oath and contain a particular description of the place to be search and things to be seized. White contested whether those elements have been satisfied.

STALENESS

White says the affidavit in support of the search warrant failed to provide probable cause because it was based on information that was four to six months old.

White argued that paragraphs one through nine of Hampshire’s warrant affidavit involved conduct related to White’s alleged acquisition of and sale of the lawn mowers in August and September of 2016; five to six months prior to the warrant being sought. He argues further that paragraphs 10 through 15 of the affidavit contain no dates and fail to demonstrate that there would be evidence present at White’s home five to six months after the fact.

Paragraph 16 of Hampshire’s affidavit states that based on his training and experience, suspects often keep these types of evidence readily accessibly in residences, vehicles, businesses, or on their person. Further, with respect to the omission of certain relevant dates, the affidavit does contain a number of investigatory steps Hampshire undertook to determine White’s involvement with the stolen tractor, albeit without the dates.

“Considering all of the facts and circumstances, specifically the nature of the evidence to be seized in this case, and giving the issuing judge’s determination great deference as required, (the) court concludes that White’s staleness argument must fail,” court documents state.

THE PARTICULARITY REQUIREMENT

The warrant affidavit in paragraphs one to 11, under the heading “Property to be Seized,” lists specific items of the property that are to be taken away. White had an issue with the language in paragraph nine of Hampshire’s affidavit, which stated: “any and all property belonging to the victims and/or suspects of this [sic] crimes.” He contends the broad language makes the warrant an unconstitutional general warrant.

“While the language in paragraph nine appears overly broad, the other ten paragraphs under the section entitled “Property to be Seized” outlines with specificity the types of evidence to be seized and connects the language to the alleged crimes under North Carolina law,” court documents state.

The court concluded the warrant does not fail because of lack of particularity.

FRANK’S HEARING REQUEST

White argued the warrant affidavit contains an intentionally false and misleading statement, or a statement made in reckless disregard for the truth.

White said paragraph 14 of the warrant affidavit includes false statements. The court agreed.

Paragraph 14 of the warrant affidavit states, in relevant part:

During the interview, William White made the comment “he was here to talk about the mower he stole[.]” He immediately recanted the “stole” to say “sold.”

“Upon review of the video recording introduced at the hearing, the Court concludes that this statement in the warrant was so totally taken out of context that it was intentionally misleading and demonstrates a reckless disregard for truth,” court documents state.

The relevant portion of the video of White’s interview with Hampshire and Agent Denny demonstrates the following:

Denny: Has [Sgt. Hampshire] explained to you why we’re here today?

White: He has told [pause] he told me a lawn mower I stole was stolen. First he told me I stole it. It was stolen. But, uh, he told me it was stolen.

Denny: Okay, alright. Do you remember selling [inaudible]

White: I guess I’ll have to explain to you guys I flip stuff. So, you’ll have to be…

Denny: [interrupts] Okay.

White: [continues] …very specific with me. Houses, cars, lawn mowers, you name it. I do it all. So, you have to be extremely specific with me.

Denny: Okay.

The court document stated that not only is the statement in paragraph 14 of Hamphsire’s warrant affidavit not a direct quote from White, the recording makes it clear that White was responding to the question that was posed to him by Agent Denny about whether he knew the basis for the interview.

“No reasonable person would conclude that White’s statement was anything other than a response to Agent Denny’s question,” the court document reads.

“Specifically, Hampshire testified: ‘I originally told [White] that I needed him to come in to speak to me about the lawn mower that he had stolen and then I said sold,'” court documents state. “Clearly, White was responding not only to Agent Denny’s question, but was sharing what Hampshire had said to him in the message the day before.”

According to the court memo, the statement made by Hampshire was intended to mislead the judge into believing White had admitted to stealing a tractor and, further, had recanted that admission.

“There is no question that the statement in paragraph 14 would compel a judge to find probable cause under the circumstances of this case. Thus, Hampshire’s inclusion of the statement outlined in paragraph 14 was reckless in that it was without basis, was misleading, and further it was material to the state court’s finding of probable cause,” court documents state.

PLAIN-VIEW DOCTRINE

White’s final argument is that the lawfulness of the rifle and silencers was not readily apparent to officers seizing them and the plain-view doctrine should not apply.

The government stands by the seizure of the rifle because the “incriminating character of the short-barreled rifle and modified suppressors was immediately apparent to Cummings.”

“Cummings testified that when he entered the master bedroom, he observed the short-barreled rifle and two suppressors lying in a gun case on the bed. The third suppressor was lying open in another gun case, likewise on the bed. Cummings testified that he did not observe Mitchell, who was in the room when he entered, move any of the items from their original location; nor could he tell the court why Mitchell needed to move these items from their original location to the bed,” court documents state.

According to the court memo, the government presented no evidence regarding the circumstances involving the search and the subsequent removal of the firearm and suppressors from their original location. The court, therefore, could not evaluate the government’s assertion that the items were in plain view when discovered, or whether the original seizure was valid.

“The government presented no argument as to how the rifle and silencers present in White’s home would be an immediately apparent violation of the statue prohibiting the possession of unregistered firearms,” court documents state.

White’s motion to suppress the evidence, the rifle and silencers seized from his home, from trial was granted.

The court document ends with: “The Fourth Amendment of the United States Constitution requires that individuals must be protected, particularly in their homes, from unreasonable searches and seizures. When it appears that law enforcement treats this sacred constitutional right as nothing more than an impediment to making their case, we all lose.”

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Reidsville police sergeant fired after material in search warrant appeared to be ‘reckless, without basis, misleading’ – WXII The Triad

In new school, Byzantine spirituality meets Montessori method – Crux: Covering all things Catholic

DENVER, ColoradoWith the goal of encountering children on a more personal level to meet their academic and spiritual needs, a Montessori school influenced by the Byzantine Catholic tradition is opening in Denver, Colorado.

Pauline Meert, who co-foundedSophia Montessori Academyalong with Irene OBrien, said the two wanted to combine Montessori and Catholicism because it just made so much sense.

Meert said the school aims to help children fulfill their God-given potential, and that the Montessori message really makes that possible for each child, not just for a classroom as a whole, but for each individual.

Students in Montessori schools work in periods of uninterrupted time ideally three hours having the freedom to choose from an established range of options.

The Montessori Method uses hands-on techniques in presenting concepts to individual children, rather than a group oriented, lecture-based approach to learning. The students involvement in his or her own work then gives the teacher freedom to spend time with each child and cater to each of their needs.

Sophia Montessori of Denver is in its final stages of its development, pending licensing and a few business inspections. Classes for children aged between three and six are expected to start in the fall of this year, and both Meert and OBrien hope the school, currently with 11 families enrolled, will grow in number and into the high school level.

When asked about the origin of the idea for the school, Meert discussed her connection to children and her dream helping bring about a childs full potential. She began her Montessori training in high school, and later envisioned Catholic teaching and the Montessori Method together.

Meert said the school has been four years in the making, but that she added the Byzantine spirituality aspect within the past year after she became a parishioner at Holy Protection Parish in Denver.

The Byzantine faith is going to be the foundation, she said, noting that the day will begin with a form of the Jesus prayer.

Montessori schools often begin the day with the silence game, in which children learn how to be calm and quiet in a time period of about 30 seconds to two minutes. Many schools have interpreted this freely, but she expressed a desire to tie this into the Byzantines Jesus Prayer.

The beauty about being Byzantine is that we do that through the Jesus prayer: Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Have mercy on us, your children, she said, You know because its kind of hard to call them sinners right away.

The school will also have the kissing of icons and will teach according to the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd.

The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd is a very hands-on way of teaching the children about who Jesus is in time and space: Through the parables, through infancy narratives, and through learning the nomenclature of the church.

Children want to be a part of the world of adults and understand the liturgy, she said, and so the teachers aim to give them direct experiences related to the tabernacle and liturgical seasons.

If we just tell them to be quiet and read a book during mass and during liturgy then we are not meeting their needs. They just want to know, they just want to be a part, they want to be welcomed by the church.

She said many people would be surprised at the theological discussions shes had with four-year-olds, as well as the harmony created in the classroom. The environment is surprisingly peaceful and calm, even though there are 20 three-to-six year-olds together.

Meert also described the trust needed to allow children the freedom to make choices within prescribed limitations. Three year-olds can do so much! she said.

Meert defined this freedom as not the freedom to do whatever you want, butthe freedom that Saint Thomas Aquinas talks about having freedom within responsibility, within boundaries and within awareness of other people.

In her interview with Catholic News Agency, she also voiced her hope to establish afternoon classes for homeschooled kids and support for parents.

We want to give parents tools and support. Some of the Montessori approach is common sense, but sometimes its a little trickier and parents just need extra support (or) someone to bounce ideas off of, she said.

We really want to be that support with those tools, and create a community that is often missing in our life.

See the original post here:

In new school, Byzantine spirituality meets Montessori method – Crux: Covering all things Catholic

We Will Extend Our Lives but Not Attain Immortality, Says Anti-Aging Researcher – Futurism

In BriefEric Verdin, a world-leading researcher on aging, recentlyshared what he has learned about the future of growing old. WhileVerdin views immortality as a fairy tale, he said that manypromising methods for extending life are being studied. The Future of Getting Old

The Population Reference Bureau has projectedthat the percentage of the population over the age of 65 will rise from the current 15 percent to a staggering 24 percent by 2060. This means that research into aging has never been more important.

Eric Verdin is at the forefront of this research and has become thePresident and CEO of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. The institute is the worlds biggest independent research facilitystudying the causes of growing old and how to combat them. Recently, he conducted an interview with Nautilus to discuss how aging is effecting our lives.

Verdin believes that the explosion in age-related research is due to researchers discovery in the 1990s that aging is not necessarily an inevitability. Instead, it is caused by mutations and scientists could make changes to the genome of other species that led to a lifetimes of up to twice as long. Verdin stated in the interview this resulted in a belief that there might be pathways to regulate aging, and if there are pathways that means there are proteins, and that means you can eventually develop drugs.

Despite this, he says, if you hear the word immortality, just run. There is no drug that can give you that. While Verdin believes we can increase the average human lifetime significantly, the fountain of youth is still just a fairy tale. Its just nonsense from my perspective, and I think we should really resist the I-word.

The best way to maximize your lifespan, he said in the interview, is to maintain your body well. Good nutrition and exercise are incredible anti-aging medicine. His general advice is to treat the cause rather than the symptom with a combination of lifestyle and pharmaceutical treatments to fight aging itself rather than dealing with Alzheimers, Parkinsons, or macular degeneration when they occur.

The human attraction to immortality has been present in our cultural landscape since the beginning of time the human mind seems to be unable to resist its lures. There are countless myths and stories based on it: the fountain of youth, the Wandering Jew, the philosophers stone, and the Bibles Enochare a few examples.

Recently, this mystical desire has birthed amyriad of promising methods forreversing the aging process which are currently underinvestigation: from transfusing young peoples blood into older people to give them more osteopontin, to digging into the role telemores play on the aging process, to developing anti-aging, bacteria-based pills.

However, when our increasing life expectancy is combined with the decrease in fertility that many nations are facing, the results arean aging population.In an interview with CNN, Elon Musk pointed out why this is undesirable, saying it causesa very high dependency ratio, where the number of people who are retired is very high relative to the number of people who are net producers an economically detrimental state of affairs.

Due to technological and therapeutic advancements, aging is looking less like an ugly inevitability of our condition and more likea new and exciting epoch in our lives. However,we must ensure that longer lives for people do not come at the expense of the environment, economy, orwellbeing of others.

Originally posted here:

We Will Extend Our Lives but Not Attain Immortality, Says Anti-Aging Researcher – Futurism

In new school, Byzantine spirituality meets Montessori method … – Catholic News Agency

Denver, Colo., Jul 16, 2017 / 04:01 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- With the goal of encountering children on a more personal level to meet their academic and spiritual needs, a Montessori school influenced by the Byzantine Catholic tradition is opening in Denver, Colorado.

Pauline Meert, who co-founded Sophia Montessori Academy along with Irene O’Brien, said the two wanted to combine Montessori and Catholicism because it just made so much sense.

Meert said the school aims to help children fulfill their God-given potential, and that the Montessori message really makes that possible for each child, not just for a classroom as a whole, but for each individual.

Students in Montessori schools work in periods of uninterrupted time ideally three hours having the freedom to choose from an established range of options. The Montessori Method uses hands-on techniques in presenting concepts to individual children, rather than a group oriented, lecture-based approach to learning. The student’s involvement in his or her own work then gives the teacher the freedom to spend time with each child and cater to each of their needs.

Sophia Montessori of Denver is in its final stages of its development, pending licensing and a few business inspections. But classes for children aged between three and six are expected to start in the fall of this year, and both Meert and O’Brien hope the school, currently with 11 families enrolled, will grow in number and into the high school level.

When asked about the origin of the school’s idea, Meert discussed her connection to children and her dream helping bring about a childs full potential. She began her Montessori training in high school, and later envisioned Catholic teaching and the Montessori Method together.

Meert said the school has been four years in the making, but that she added the Byzantine spirituality aspect within the past year after she became a parishioner at Holy Protection Parish in Denver.

The Byzantine faith is going to be the foundation, she said, noting that the day will begin with a form of the Jesus prayer.

Montessori schools often begin the day with the silence game, in which children learn how to be calm and quiet in a time period of about 30 seconds to two minutes. Many schools have interpreted this freely, but she expressed a desire to tie this into the Byzantine’s Jesus Prayer.

The beauty about being Byzantine is that we do that through the Jesus prayer: Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Have mercy on us, your children, she said, You know because its kind of hard to call them sinners right away.

The school will also have the kissing of icons and will teach according to the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd.

The Catechesis of the Good Shepherd is a very hands-on way of teaching the children about who Jesus is in time and space: through the parables, through infancy narratives, and through learning the nomenclature of the church.

Children want to be a part of the world of adults and understand the liturgy, she said, and so the teachers aim to give them direct experiences related to the tabernacle and liturgical seasons.

If we just tell them to be quiet and read a book during mass and during liturgy then we are not meeting their needs. They just want to know, they just want to be a part, they want to be welcomed by the church.

She said many people would be surprised at the theological discussions she’s had with four-year-olds as well as the harmony created in the classroom. The environment is surprisingly peaceful and calm, even though there are 20 three-to-six year-olds together.

Meert also described the trust needed to allow children the freedom to make choices within prescribed limitations. Three year-olds can do so much! she said.

Meert defined this freedom as not the freedom to do whatever you want, butthe freedom that Saint Thomas Aquinas talks about having freedom within responsibility, within boundaries and within awareness of other people.

In her interview with CNA, she also voiced her hope to establish afternoon classes for homeschooled kids and support for parents.

We want to give parents tools and support. Some of the Montessori approach is common sense, but sometimes it’s a little trickier and parents just need extra support (or) someone to bounce ideas off of, she said.

We really want to be that support with those tools, and create a community that is often missing in our life.

Read more:

In new school, Byzantine spirituality meets Montessori method … – Catholic News Agency

Miller: Artificial intelligence a life-altering technology – Auburn Citizen

The industrial revolution emerged in the 18th century and altered life for mankind. The computer age that came along in the 20th century did likewise. Now, artificial intelligence, an advanced technology that utilizes algorithms a sequence of actions that combines calculations, data processing and automated reasoning will allow computers to read, understand and analyze as the human mind does. Thus, America is poised to embark on an innovative boom of historic proportions that will transform our everyday life and make some alert investors very wealthy.

Ninety percent of all data produced and collected since the beginning of our time has been done in the last two years, and will be doubled (at the present rate) in the next five years. This incredible statement of facts is difficult to absorb even for the highly intelligent mind. The human brain has astonishing capability. Once our technologists are freed from the monotonous task of sorting out the billions of pages of data now published daily by computer software, our minds can focus on creative research such as medical science, financial analysis and robotics (to name only a few). Just recently, an automobile drove itself and four passengers through the Albany area for 6.1 miles in the first ever test of an autonomous vehicle in New York state.

Artificial intelligence will also enhance human productivity growth. The McKinsey Global Institute recently reported that almost half of all paid technology research work can be automated by AI. This would increase human productivity by .8 percent to 1.4 percent, compounded every year. This will give our country a substantial manpower economic boost.

Unfortunately, artificial intelligence has also empowered a cast of twisted minds, criminals and terrorists who are building a worldwide audience to promote their views. However, AI technologists are already busy creating algorithms that can sweep digital networks and automatically purge incorrect and extremist content.

Amy Hirsh Guarino, an expatriate from upstate New York (who happens to be my niece) has been living and working in Silicon Valley for many years now. Recently, she was recruited by Kyndi (kyndi.com), one of the leading companies in the growing field of artificial intelligence technologists. She is now chief operating officer and considered to be one of the top 100 women technologists in Silicon Valley.

The time is coming when humans can no longer keep up with the volume of reading in our modern age. We foresee a time when every technologist worker must be partnered with an artificial intelligence assistant, she told me during my interview with her. Next, Guarino explained digital forensics as understanding how and why something happens (the TV series “Forensic Files” is a dramatized example of digital forensics).

AI will be able to utilize all the current medical journal information plus medical reports and patient reports to tailor the diagnosis and treatment plans based on individual symptoms, genetics and patient history, Guarino said.

The key of artificial intelligence is being able to process lots of combinations of systems in real time, plus being aware of the latest research. AI will never replace doctors, but it will help them make the right decisions since the systems will be able to recall all known diseases, and, in theory, they dont have bias. With that said, doctors know their patients, and AI will help them provide a filter based on that knowledge.

America is entering a new age call it the information technology age where there will be wonderful opportunities among technologists, innovators and businessmen alike. The key to it all is education.

Harold Miller is a businessman and Auburn native. He can be reached at hmillermod@aol.com.

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Miller: Artificial intelligence a life-altering technology – Auburn Citizen

Through the Viewfinder: Pamela Ryder with Peter Markus – Brooklyn Rail

Pamela Ryder writes sentences like no other writer I know. I remember my first encounter with her fiction, a story called Hovenweep as it appeared as the opening story in Gordon Lishs The Quarterly #29, a story that begins, We are too much in the open here: sky, sky, slick rock, heat, and high above us the circling birds. What is this word Hovenweep? I remember asking myself. Might it be a made-up word to go along with the world of a made-up fiction? It was a dizzying reading experience right out of the gate, one filled with the sensations that I go out seeking when I pick up any work of fiction, any work of art: to be bewitched by what I see and hear, by what I hold. I was immediately held. And was not let go, and did not want to let go, for all the sentences that then followed. We are left too much unshadowed by the shape of them, the second sentence then went on to say, escaping past the canyon walls, winging down the stone, unshaded by the deer-stripped juniper that juts above the river. I knew I was in a place. I was placed inside this place: a place of shadow and light, stone and bird. I was sold, not so much by what was being said, but by how the sentences were being delivered and slung, fasted as they were to the page, and to my eye. I could not, I dared not, I did not want to look away. The magic of fiction was taking place here in this moment: the given being displaced by the made. I remember, too, soon after I read this story, taking it in with me to a fiction class I was teaching and reading the story aloud to my students, and trying not to stop at the end of each sentence to marvel at the joys to be found at the stoppage of every period: the shapes of the sounds, the rivers that Ryder was able to carve out of stone, the images of blood squeezed from ink. That story, Hovenweep, a word I still to this day dont know what it means or if it is a made up word or if it, perhaps, makes reference to a kind of flower, or weed, a thing of the actual world, later appeared in Ryders second book, the collection of stories A Tendency to Be Gone. Open this book to any page and read at random any one of the sentences youll find there and expect to be immediately transported to worlds made of dirt and stone and heart. Yes, more than anything else, Ryder is a writer of ferocity and the bravest of hearts. Her new book, Paradise Field, digs even deeper than ever before into the fertile ground of family and fathers and daughterhood and tells us what it is to live and die with strength and grace and indignity and meaning, what it means and what it feels to be, in the end, left alone to our own devices. What it means, in the end of all endings, to tend to those emotionally loamy gardens, to give due passage and a ritualized bidding adieu to those we call our ownin this case the father of this book, a WWII fighter pilot, a man who most often, in Ryders own words, was a man gone, flying to parts far-flung. I had the pleasure of asking Ryder some questions by email about this latest book and her life as a writer and what it is that keeps driving her sentences.

Peter Markus (Rail): I don’t know where to begin. I have so much I want to say. Let’s begin at the beginning, then. What gave rise to the writing of this book? And before even this book: what gave rise to you reaching for a pencil? As a writer of such lush, lyrical fictionsa writer, I often say, unlike any otherwhat is it that keeps you coming back?

Pamela Ryder: Peter, these are complex questions, so I need to break it down a bit. So to begin with, What keeps me writing? Its the singleness of itthe separateness of writingthat is a reflection of how I see myself in the world: somehow not fitting in very well, and now, finally, getting older, not wishing it were any other way. Writing is a solitary business, as is all of this lifeof this everything, and in the end, no matter what comfort one attempts to cultivate to convince ourselves that we are loved, or that we will never be abandoned, or that we will be rememberedit is all rubbish, you see. Standing alone: that is what remains. Separateness is what endures. That being said, writing is a form of preparation for mea humbling practice for that final aloneness. A trial of sorts, for what is coming: a journey unaccompanied, unattended. Traveling light.

As to: Why did I start to write? I was an utterly dismissible child: awkward, unattractive. Little was expected of me. My childhoodessentially one of self-loathing, was interruptedno: redeemedby my solitary rambles outdoors, not in deep and lovely woods, but in shabby, empty tracts of land in our neighborhood where whole blocks of suburban houses had once stood, having been smashed flat and hauled off to make way for an interstate highway coming through. The old yards and gardens went to weeds, the driveways cracked. As a kind of wilderness grew in that ruined landscape, so did a peculiar pantheism grow within me. I collected stones and seeds and leaves and featherstook them to my roomcherished objectsa solace. And when, at some point during my adolescence, I was requiredcommandedas perhaps we all had been in school, to go home and write a poem, I wrote The Highway. The poem was quite long. Rhyming. I mourned my scrubby little Eden coming to an end as the surveyors made their marks for road-cuts and as the asphalt rolled in. But I knew that, now no matter what happened to those beloved and blighted yards which had been a sanctuary, they were there on the pageand would endure, would remain there, safe on the page. When I turned it inthis poemI was told (teachers, principal), Oh, come on, you didnt write this yourselfnot you. Not someone like me. But it was me. It was more me than me. I had written something so wonderful it couldnt have been me. Dismissible me. And I felt something akin to joy.

I did not continue writing after that, however. The old patterns of self-doubt and insecurity, of fear of failure, kept me from writing for decades. But the objects stayed with me. I pick up stones to this day. Pebbles in the gutter. Leaves. Twigs. Anything. They fill my stories.

I came to write Paradise Fieldthe stories about the final years of a WWII bomber pilot and the adult daughter who cares for the old manbecause of my fathers death. The book is my father and I. His flight from the family. His final years, final indignities. My ineptitude, resentments, recollections. The unfathomable notion of approaching death, and the decrepit attempts to keep it at bay. Paradise Field was a way to preserve him, preserve us. He was gone, the years he was my father had vanished, and it was too late to do anything about it except to write it. Too late to make amends for the words never spoken, the regrets. I knew I had to write it because it so pained me to do so. I remember Gordon Lish speaking on what to write about. He advised that we recognize those objects that we find so engaging, so beguiling, that we cannot look away from them. Write that, he said. But he also advised that we attend to those objects from which we want to turn away. From which we want to avert our gaze. Those, too. Write that.

Rail: There are these sentences which make me think of you, your way as a writer: There is grit in her nails, a twig in her hair, a found piece of bone in her pocket. She is a child who peeks under rocks, who likes the millipede that rolls into a perfect sphere when touched. Though likely not intended, these words serve as a kind of metaphor to the kind of writer I believe you to be: the dirt beneath the nails, the world you are so attuned with in your hairtwig, flower, skythe found objects you carry in your pockets and pull out and pull sentences and stories that are rooted and then chiseled to such things: bone, stone, rock, father. Would you say that I am onto something here in terms of your approach to writing fiction?

Ryder: The writing is indeed rooted in the objects that draw me to them. I almost said the objects that fascinate me, but that isnt it at allno, no. I believeI knowthat the artifacts I hold dear have lives of their own and, therefore, stories of their own. You dig a hole for whatever reason (to find water, or plant a rosebush, or bury a father) and you find there in the dirt: a shard, a rusty buckle, a boneand now in your hand are the artifacts that make the story. And it neednt be many objects to make the story. (In fact, if there are too many objects in the story, the objects wont cling to each other, but will run away from the writerscamper off the page, setting the story adrift.) And you take those artifactsthe buckle, the bone, the shardand place them in the mindset of a magic pouch, and spill them onto the table, and as conjurer, you present those now sacred pieces in what only appears to be a chanced arrangement, then toss again, place them this way and that, here and there, now you see them, now you dont and now you do again.

Rail: The word daughter is such a charged word in this book. Some words, I often say, in the hands of one writer, mean so much more than they do in the hands of every other writer. Daughter, Id go so far as to say, is a word that now belongs to you. You have claimed all authority over this word, have made it entirely your own. You also place the name, Pamela, in the few places where and when the daughter is given a name. In choosing to do so, are you making it a point to say that this fiction is truth? Not that a fiction that is made up is any less true, yes? But Im curious to hear you speak to that sometimes fine line that this book in particular seems to be straddling and maybe even going so far as to call it into question?

Ryder: This is a startling question. But, yes. The word, daughter is charged. I hadnt accepted this notion until you asked. Charged. Daughterthe sound and meaning of it seems peculiar to me, almost alien. Daughter as outsider. And yes, again: that giving the daughter my name is a way of saying that the stories are true. And, where the daughter needs to be named, what better name could I give her? What other name would do? But back to what is true and what is not: when it comes to writing, what is truth outdoes what is true. What is true must be shaped into a greater, more powerful truthin the telling of it. At the end of As Those Who Know the Dead Will Do, the daughter and father go looking for an old B-17. So sure the father is of the location of an old airfield, that they hikethe father: heart-sore, the daughter: dubiousat night, in the desert, towards the shape of what seems to be a junked plane up ahead. But it is not a plane at all. Just a boulder looming in the desert dark.

What was true was that we actually did find the planehe and Irusting to pieces at the end of an overgrown runway. We climbed up into the ruined, crumbling cockpit, and he sat in what was left of the pilots seat. But I was afraid we were trespassing, that we might be caught. Lets get out of here, I said. Hell, my father said, I flew this thing. But I made us go. I made him leaveus leavetoo, too quickly. His storyand minecut short by my foolishness, my faintness of heart. So, when I made it into a story, I wrote that we never found a plane at all, which was the same as running away from it, leaving it too soon. What we had lost.

Rail: You speak about the writers solitude, the fact that we stand alone, and your fiction certainly is singular, and perhaps through its separateness it will, I hope, endure. Of course its also true that those books and writers who seek out their own singularity, or can’t help but be because such separateness is the source and nature of their song, are also those books already on a trial of sorts, for what is coming: a journey unaccompanied, unattended. I love that. Here’s the question I am trying to ask: Is it possible, though, that language itself might connect us, or make us at least a little less alone? Or doesnt it quite work like that, in the end of ends, especially?

Ryder: No. Never less alone. If anything: more alone. Listen: Heres how it goes. I have terrible-looking hands. I was always ashamed of my hands. I remember Gordon Lish advising the writer to acknowledge his othernessbecause thats where the story is. Easier said than done, confessing ones otherness, and then finding a way to turn it into prose fiction.

The day I faced up to my hands was this: I was about to be married. A wedding band was required. The ring salesman (I say salesman, because there is a crassness to the word, instead of jeweler) had me put my hands right up there on the counter, on a velvet pillow, on display. A spectacle of the grotesque. The ring man had a hard time pushing the ring over my big knuckle. And the ringa simple bandwhen finally forced onto mewas an absurdity on my hands. An excrescence. I went home and wrote it, and freed myself: My hands are not hands you would like to have. Hard, you might say, if you saw my hands, homely, big-knuckled hard and unpretty. And then there it wasan admission of my peculiarity which would be the story, confirmed by the language, the delivery, the diction.

Rail: The anecdote about your first poem and the something akin to joy that it delivered to you as a childeven if your teachers rejected it and didn’t believe that such a thing could come from the Pam that they believed they knew you to bedoes the fiction that you deliver to the page nowand specifically in this new and, dare I say it, your strongest, most tenderly dangerous book, though I relish every sentence you’ve ever delivered to the pages of all of your three booksis there in them that sensation that is something akin to joy?

Ryder: Yes. Akin. When it comes out right on the page.

Rail: Id like to hear more about Lishs dare. Look away but say. Or look closer at what you might not want your gaze to see. To say what otherwise might not besaid, seen, otherwise not seen. And what you do saythe act of its sayingis an act of, what? Would the word love suffice? The solitude of such a momentthat wish to turn away, to avert, but in the end being able to stay: the making that might come of that! Paradise Field, its really spectacular. How I wish I had a better word. But a spectacle, a marvel, no doubt! Thank you!

Ryder: No. Not love. Not at all. You say you wish you had a better way of saying it. Me too. But I have often thought that banana feverSeymour Glasss afflictionwould certainly do.

Rail: Twice now youve mentioned the advice, the teachings, the influence of Gordon Lisha writer, editor, a man famous, Delillo once said, for all the wrong reasonson you and your work. What else might you have to say about how Lishs words and his approach to being a writer have shaped you and your fiction?

Ryder: He told me: One day youll thank me for all the times I said, No. And I do. Simply put: If not for Gordon Lish, I would not be a writer.

Rail: Talk to me some more about the delivery of your fiction, its diction, how a story is, in your words, confirmed by the language. How often does the language fall short and fail to offer up its blessings?

Ryder: If the language falls short, I have only myself to blame. And if the language fails, so does the story. Language always prevails over content. Youve got to let the language win out, even if it changes what you think you want to say. When it appeared my father wasnt getting better, I asked him what song hed like sung at his funeral, just in case was how I put it. He actually said, Off We Go Into the Wild Blue Yonderthe Air Corps song. But the language of that title didnt fit the story and didnt sound right. So the storythe retelling, became this (the father speaking first):

No flowers. A song might be nice. One of my favorites. Which one?just in case, the daughter said. You pick, he said.

Rail: My own father is in a similar landscape as the father here in your book: a mind in its own flight, a body that knows only the space that is his bed and the few tangible things still in view for him to latch hold of and see with his eyesluckily a river he always loved and taught me how to love. Your book really hits home. It is a hammer-song to the heart, and I know that others of our aging generation who are now caretakers of our parents will be moved by the story that youve delivered to us. Not that a work of fiction has to do or be anything, not that a story must instruct us in any way, and yet I find myself better prepared, more firmly footed, for what I know is ultimately coming, that “final aloneness. So here again, Pam, from the core of me my thanks.

Ryder: No, I thank you, for this interview. And for telling me the circumstances of you and your father, and that outside his window runs a riverthe tangible element of passage. What more suitable a view?

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Through the Viewfinder: Pamela Ryder with Peter Markus – Brooklyn Rail

Faith and the cosmos: An astrophysicist fields the big questions … – Salt Lake Tribune

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

How often do people ask you religious questions?

I get these kinds of questions all the time. Some are antagonistic. But most people are genuinely curious.

I have my own personal rule, which is I never, ever tell people what to believe. And I never, ever tell people they’re wrong. I share with them what I know and how I know it. If someone says, “Well, I think the Earth is a lot younger,” I say, “OK, fair enough. But give me the chance to explain why I think the universe is 13.8 billion years old.”

There’s a century of very difficult work that went into giving that answer and I think that how we got there is far more interesting than the actual number itself. I love the chance to explain that process.

What do you say when someone wants to know how science dovetails with their faith?

These kinds of questions are a lot harder than those coming from people whose faith conflicts with science. Of course I have my own personal beliefs. But when I’m in front of the public I’m not Paul Sutter the human being with complex beliefs. I’m Paul Sutter the astrophysicist. So I’m only going to share what I know from science.

If someone says, “Help me understand the nature of divinity or this section from the Bible,” I honestly can’t help them. They might want to talk to a theologian or a philosopher. I’m in the astronomy department.

But when you tell people you can’t help them with their faith questions because you’re a scientist, aren’t you sending a message that there’s an incompatibility between faith and science?

I personally believe that there is only a conflict between science and religion if you want there to be one. People ask if scientists are religious. I tell them that I personally know many scientists who are atheists, and many scientists who are very devout Catholics, and Muslims and Jews and Hindus and they all seem to sleep at night and they all are able to get work done and they all are able to pray, if they’re the praying kind. And we all get along.

I bet you often get asked about your own religious beliefs or perhaps lack of beliefs.

Read more from the original source:

Faith and the cosmos: An astrophysicist fields the big questions … – Salt Lake Tribune

A New Suburban Utopia: An Interview With EMA – The Quietus

In the 2016 US Presidential election, Donald Trump won 61 per cent of the vote in the mid-west state of South Dakota. This was not a surprise South Dakotans had backed a Republican candidate since 1968. South Dakota is a red state. Erika M. Anderson hails from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, but for the past few years has resided in Portland, Oregon on the US Pacific Coast. In Portlands county Multnomah Hilary Clinton bagged over 73 per cent of the votes last November. Portland is a blue city.

Its the tension between these two versions of America the liberal coastal elite and the middle American that inspired much of EMAs third album, Exile In The Outer Ring. Its a staggering record, fuelled by class alienation, male rage as a society teeters on the verge of an implosive collapse. Its an album of heavy drones, self-loathing and Erikas gloriously twisted wit and feels like a sonic monument to the current fucked-up status of America in 2017.

However, Exile In The Outer Ring is a record aiming to build bridges. Amid all the dystopic energy lies a sliver of hope in the place EMA defines as the outer ring. According to Erika, this zone is where the two Americas collide. It can be found at the periphery of cities that have become too expensive for most, and its where the jobless from the countryside come to find a new life. Its a mass of faceless strip malls, vape shops and drive-thru fast-food joints and the good news is that the outer ring is culturally diverse, community-focussed and, as Erika tells me, is where all the weird shit is going down.

Its a place that suits Erika perfectly. She is still a mid-westerner at heart, but left Sioux Falls in part to remove herself from the suffocating misogyny of the towns punk rock community. Weve spoken before about her formative years (in an interview with fellow mid-westerner, Zola Jesus, in an article titled Empathy And The Red States) and Ive witnessed Erika visibly prickling at the lazy racist rednecks stereotypes bandied around by the coastal chattering classes.

I have interviewed Erika several times since a first meeting 2011, in the disused, top-floor storeroom in Salfords Islington Mill. She was touring her astounding debut album Past Life Martyred Saint and told me a terrible joke about an alien mattress salesman. Our most recent conversation was over a Skype video link for a tQ feature about her 2014 album, The Futures Void, a visceral and intense set of songs exploring online abuse, digital surveillance and media wrath. When we spoke, Erika was agitated and withdrawn. I was thinking about the last time I talked to you, Erika tells me, when we catch up to discuss Exile In The Outer Ring via another Skype video. I was a wreck and I was fucked up. I was not in a good place. This interview is very different.

Although I ask her some preposterous questions Erika has virtually fixed America by the time we are done she is on fine form and impassioned about an alternative vision for her wounded, flailing country. Exile and a desire to build bridges clearly suit EMA.

Congratulations on the new record. Three albums in, how close are we getting to the core DNA of EMA?

Erika M. Anderson: Well, I think I have done a pretty good job at being me on this record. It has all the things that I am interested in for as long as I have been making music – heavy drones, folk melodies, feedback and riffs. Its my language.

Thinking about the album title, can you give me an insight as to what you mean by the phrase outer ring.

EA: The outer ring is a term I came up with. Its the estuary between where the people who are being forced out of the cities, due to being economically disadvantaged, meet with the people who having to leave the countryside in order to get jobs. It has its own vibe and culture. And, where that place exists, is at the outer ring of a city. A lot of my work has been about spiritual transformations taking place in prosaic places. The outer ring to me is mess of chain stores and nondescript architecture, but also containing many super-unique elements the people. When I go to a city now, a lot of them are just all much of a muchness, with a culture and an aesthetic that makes them virtually identical. The fact that only wealthier people can live in the city, means they have become sterile. They all have the same kind of shops, bars and restaurants you could be in New York, London or Portland. Cities should be vibrant with culture and they still do house all of the cultural institutions but I think the outer ring is the place where the weird shit is going down.

Im also interested in a quote from the press release for this album, in which you describe your teenage self as a socialised male. What did you mean by that phrase?

EA: In my home town, any art or culture or anything interesting that was going on was strictly a boys club. Punk rock was the main art. There were definitely no girls that were playing music. I was the first woman to front a band in Sioux Falls. Even music fandom, if you wanted to hang out and learn about any of this stuff, all the people who were doing cool shit were dudes. They were also gnarly scumbags, but they were the people I had to learn from.

What impact did that have on you?

EA: Well, there are a couple of places on this record where I was going for a Guns N Roses vibe. It was me thinking about being six years old and getting the Appetite For Destruction tape and it containing a painting of a crumpled little girl who has just been raped by the huge robot. So, what did that do to me? I was taking in all of this culture the rage and the rebellion and it was all very male. When you are reading [Charles] Bukowski as a 12-year old girl, what does it do to you? Of course male rage is not hard to understand. It is everywhere. There are so many movies, so many books and so many songs that are fuelled by male rage. I have had to deal with male rage literally; by having crazy boyfriends who would destroy shit. I feel like I understand it. There is part of me that has been taking it in – artistically – for years, by observing, and then making something out of that rage.

The album explores some of the rage that fuelled the Presidential election. Why do you think that Trump was able to tap into so much frustration and anger?

EA: All the songs on this record were written before the US Presidential election. I think that one of the things I was tapping into, subconsciously, was a resentment of the liberal coastal elite in America. I dont know how to speak to the racism aspect [of Trump supporters] thats a whole different discussion but there is a resentment and rejection of liberal culture. That culture is not available to many people in America. And the liberal coastal elite, who may never have been to rural America, just think everyone there is racist and homophobic and judge them to be terrible people. They think there is nothing wrong to be making jokes about meth heads, who are actually a group of people with poverty-related drug issues. They dont see their own hypocrisy. I think this is a huge issue and one that cannot be ignored. Also, there is a dismissal of certain aspects of liberalism an almost wholesale rejection of multiculturalism and globalisation.

You are from South Dakota and I remember the article we did for tQ with Zola Jesus was entitled Empathy For The Red States. I am assuming you empathise with the demographic so reviled by the liberal coastal elite?

EA: I can pick up on that. I have a bit of that resentment. I can go a fancy bar or a boutique and it flips a switch in me, even though I have been living on the coast for a long time. I can still feel it, even if I havent been back home for a while. Having said that, I didnt really see Trump coming because he is such a conman. I could see the anger and a desire to say fuck you to the establishment and to the liberal elite, but how could you vote for a person who is a sleazy, New York City real estate mogul? Its beyond me.

Let me push you a little bit. While I understand your empathy, is it not true that there are many people in the Red States that are racist and homophobic and how do you square that away?

EA: Okay. I have a lot of thoughts going on. As for how to defend folk back home? I have been recently reading a lot about racism in America and the aspect that I can talk to and experienced when I was growing up in South Dakota, was about racism being linked to misbehaviour and shock value. I remember being in first grade and a kid carved a swastika into his desk. The teacher was so upset and the kid was getting into huge trouble. None of us knew what it meant at that point I didnt know and the kid didnt really know. He had no history of World War Two he just knew it caused a huge reaction. I think that is something I saw – kids being rebellious. Thats being going on forever. I was reading some stuff about the alt. right and some of them are these children who now have grown up and want to say the craziest things and make the most offensive memes. So, there is an aspect of that, which I remember as a kid. People would say racist shit and I would be like Dude, we are in South Dakota and everyone is white and you are obviously ignorant you literally have no clue what you are talking about at all. All they knew is that it would evoke a reaction. So, I had experience with this, when I was hanging out with some of the teenage scumbag boys. I dont have experience of actual hate crimes or of people who make that jump from saying stupid shit for shock value to piss people off, to the violent actions. I didnt grow up with that. I have no understanding of that. I dont know what thats about or how people can get that way. And, I dont know what to do about it.

Dont worry, Im not asking you to cure racism.

EA: Its frightening. There were people murdered recently on a train in Portland. Its insanity.

Have you a sense of what it means to be an American in 2017?

EA: This is the thing. I feel like an American and all this shit makes me want to reclaim it. I was so pissed when a group of people decided they were more American than I was. I dont believe any of the bullshit they try and put under the umbrella of what it means to be American. Since when has America just been about white people? We are all fucking immigrants what are they talking about? So, I definitely want to reclaim what it means to be American. Right now, the concept has been trashed.

How would EMA reclaim America? Sorry, thats a deeply unfair question.

EA: No. Let me think about this. What would I reclaim America as? I do want it to be a diverse country. As I am talking to you, I am thinking that the reason the outer ring might work as a place of unification is because its signifiers of geography are neutral. It has a neutral aesthetic – it is chain stores and parking lots. Its not the city with its dark wood espresso shops or the country with its dive bars. I dont know how to fix the cities and make affordable housing in the city. It seems pretty fucked cities seem like places people visit but not anywhere that anyone could live. They dont feel vibrant or integrated and interwoven anymore. The only thing I can hope for is some sort of suburban utopia. Isnt that what everyone at some point desires? Didnt America invent the suburbs?

Can you define your suburban utopia?

EA: The suburbs have always been like an American version of utopia and a reflection of their hopes and fears. Erikas version of American suburban utopia which I am renaming the outer ring is a diverse place, with affordable housing, the possibility for people to have small businesses (which is more realistic in the outer ring than in the city with its huge costs), decent public transportation and the ability to access art and cultural events. Thats my dream for America.

I think you might have just fixed America. Finally, is Exile In The Outer Ring a hopeful album?

EA: Well, you can always accuse my records of being harrowing or dark or bleak. There is processing of trauma on my records and I think my music does contain a lot of healing. As a person who has been watching others rage for years, instead of having my own tantrums, I keep the feelings inside until I can find a way of making them into music. The songs are like healing spells and it really works for me. When I really do a good job on a song, it gets rid of a weight. So, as far as hope goes, there is hope that you can heal through processing stuff and make it through to the other side. I think thats all I can hope for.

Exile In The Outer Ring is out on August 25 via City Slang.

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A New Suburban Utopia: An Interview With EMA – The Quietus

Mike Pondsmith Talks Creating Cyberpunk 2077 With CD Projekt Red – One Angry Gamer (blog)

(Last Updated On: July 13, 2017)

The creator of the Cyberpunk tabletop game franchise, Mike Pondsmith, has taken up an interview with another publication site to detail what its like to take Cyberpunk the board-game and turn it into the upcoming video game currently in development at CD Projekt Red.

According to the interview between Mike Pondsmith and publication site Rock, Paper, Shotgun, information on the progress of the game as well as Pondsmiths role in helping the development of Cyberpunk 2077 comes to light.

In an attempt to keep the whole thing short and readable, Pondsmith is said to be a key collaborator over the last four years of CD Projekt Reds involvement in the Cyberpunk 2077 game. Pondsmith shared that he feels he has been very important to the development process, and that his explanations surrounding the propertys world have been useful for the team:

At the beginning of the project, I talked to them a lot, every week. For a long time they didnt realise Id worked in digital, but Ive been doing pen and paper for 20 years and digital for fifteen. When I was explaining Cyberpunk to them, I was explaining the mechanics in a way that they understood and that helped them to realise I could contribute more to the actual design.

Although there are no videos showing any gameplay or in-game footage as of this moment, it is said that Pondsmith is trying to keep things level-headed along with CDPR so that the game can portray everything necessary at launch. Additionally, he explains how the team at CDPR is approaching putting content in the game that reflects features from the pen and paper version that will work in the 3D version of the tabletop game:

A lot of the conversations weve had on the team are not can we do this? We can do just about anything. Instead, its me explainingwhy I did it in pen and paper, and then we figure out if we need it again, and whether it serves a different purpose in a video game. I know why flying cars are there in the original but thats not necessarily the same functionality in 2077. Everything is taken apart in terms of what it does to the game, how it differs from tabletop, and getting the right feel.

In other words, both Pondsmith and CDPR know that they can put anything into Cyberpunk 2077, but instead of just throwing content into the game to make it cool, they instead are going through content and weighing what works in the pen and paper version and what will work in the 3D version. If each piece of content serves a purpose and propels the video game to becoming that much better, I can only hope that the content is well optimized and not a glitchfest.

Cyberpunk 2077 is in development as we speak, and although the game is slated to be for PC and the latest consoles, it will be ready when it is ready. Lastly, you can read the full interview between Mike Pondsmith and the publication site over on Rock, Paper, Shotgun.

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Mike Pondsmith Talks Creating Cyberpunk 2077 With CD Projekt Red – One Angry Gamer (blog)

Slate’s first virtual-reality talk show was a hilarious disaster – Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard

If, hypothetically, Georgia and Florida went to war, which state would win? That was one of the questions posed to actress Carrie Preston in the first episode of Conundrums, Slates new virtual reality Facebook Live talk show that launched Thursday.

Preston and host Dan Kois, Slates culture editor, were presented as legless avatars as the show is produced using Facebooks VR app Spaces, which was launched earlier this year as a way for Oculus Rift users to interact with each other as avatars. Facebook this week announced that it was adding a livestreaming feature to Spaces, and Slate says it is the first outlet to utilize this platform in this way.

Kois and Preston began their conversation outside of a Brooklyn-based brewery thats sponsoring the show before using the magic of virtual reality to transport themselves to Jekyll Island, Georgia one of Prestons favorite places in her home state. Hey, thats Driftwood Beach over there, she said as the pair arrived on a boardwalk.

The show was streamed from the perspective of a third avatar, a Slate producer, who controlled the locations and camera angles and also tried to help Preston when she had trouble operating some of the Spaces functionality.

Preston first answered the question of whether she preferred peach pie or peach cobbler (cobbler, she said). The conversation then turned to the important matter of who would win a Florida-Georgia War, but before she could answer the Facebook Live feed cut out. (Side note: I insist that any such war should be called The Worlds Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party.)

Slate was able to resume the broadcast a few minutes later in a new video I was skinnydipping, sorry Im back now, Preston joked as the show came back but the technical difficulties underscored the experimental nature of the show.

In fact, Slates first attempt at broadcasting the show cut out about a minute and a half in and they had to continue the broadcast in a new stream.

For Slate, this is a relatively low-risk way for the online publisher to dip its toes in the VR waters. Speaking to Digiday in May, Slate product head David Stern said the company was taking lessons from its successful podcasts and trying to implement them with VR. That meant focusing on conversations and publishing on a regular schedule. Podcasts taught us, you got to create that habit, Stern said.

The conundrum conceit is actually one that originated from its podcasts. On our Gabfest podcasts, weve been using conundrums to ask those really tough questions, Kois said on the show. Questions like: If one set of animals was going to all band together to eliminate humans forever, would it be dolphins or bees?

Slate is considering the show an experiment, but its going to try to continue to ask guests those wacky questions on a weekly basis while also finding ways to build an audience (and eventually monetize it).

And as Kois and Preston finished their interview by drinking virtual beers, Kois called the first episode an insane adventure that we have set forth on that has in many ways worked and in many ways been a hilarious disaster.

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Slate’s first virtual-reality talk show was a hilarious disaster – Nieman Journalism Lab at Harvard

Colbert Conundrum: The Liberal TV Host Tackles Atheism, the … – CBN News

Talk-show host Stephen Colbert is probably best known for his attacks on President Trump, most-notably a foul-mouthed reference to the president that resulted in an FCC inquiry in May. That’s why some are surprised to learn that he also talks a lot about faith on “The Late Show.”

According to The Week,Colbert is dedicated to his Catholic faith, despite his use of off-color language and harsh criticism of many conservative points of view.

In 2007, he spoke with NPR’s Terry Gross about God, theology of the afterlife and how he explains such concepts to his children.

His Comedy Central show, “The Colbert Report,” regularly featured religion segments in which debated the divinity of Jesus with religious scholar, Bart Ehrman and discussed the pope with a Jesuit priest.

When he moved to CBS as host of the Late Show, he continued to talk about faith. In the first month he asked Oprah about her favorite Bible verses.

Other faith segments include his interview with Joel Osteen about the pastor’s beliefs and a confrontation with atheist Bill Maher, where he tried to persuade him to accept Christ.

“The door is always open. Golden ticket, right before you,” Colbert said. “All you have to do is humble yourself before the presence of the Lord and admit there are things greater than you in the universe that you do not understand. Take Pascal’s wager. If you’re wrong, you’re an idiot. But if I’m right, you’re going to hell.”

When actor Andrew Garfield appeared on the show to promote the movie “Silence” about Jesuit missionaries in Japan, their talk turned to their beliefes about demons, angels, faith and doubt.

It was an exchange with comedian and atheist Ricky Gervais about the existence of God, however, that went viral, getting more than 3.5 million views on YouTube.

However, even when talking about religion Colbert can cross the line. A recent segment that demonstrates how some Catholic priests are using fidget spinners to explain the Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity features a make-believe interview with God that could be interprested as blasphemous.

Read more:

Colbert Conundrum: The Liberal TV Host Tackles Atheism, the … – CBN News

Colbert Conundrum: The Liberal TV Host Tackles Atheism, the Trinity, and the Bible – CBN News

Talk-show host Stephen Colbert is probably best known for his attacks on President Trump, most-notably a foul-mouthed reference to the president that resulted in an FCC inquiry in May. That’s why some are surprised to learn that he also talks a lot about faith on “The Late Show.”

According to The Week,Colbert is dedicated to his Catholic faith, despite his use of off-color language and harsh criticism of many conservative points of view.

In 2007, he spoke with NPR’s Terry Gross about God, theology of the afterlife and how he explains such concepts to his children.

His Comedy Central show, “The Colbert Report,” regularly featured religion segments in which debated the divinity of Jesus with religious scholar, Bart Ehrman and discussed the pope with a Jesuit priest.

When he moved to CBS as host of the Late Show, he continued to talk about faith. In the first month he asked Oprah about her favorite Bible verses.

Other faith segments include his interview with Joel Osteen about the pastor’s beliefs and a confrontation with atheist Bill Maher, where he tried to persuade him to accept Christ.

“The door is always open. Golden ticket, right before you,” Colbert said. “All you have to do is humble yourself before the presence of the Lord and admit there are things greater than you in the universe that you do not understand. Take Pascal’s wager. If you’re wrong, you’re an idiot. But if I’m right, you’re going to hell.”

When actor Andrew Garfield appeared on the show to promote the movie “Silence” about Jesuit missionaries in Japan, their talk turned to their beliefes about demons, angels, faith and doubt.

It was an exchange with comedian and atheist Ricky Gervais about the existence of God, however, that went viral, getting more than 3.5 million views on YouTube.

However, even when talking about religion Colbert can cross the line. A recent segment that demonstrates how some Catholic priests are using fidget spinners to explain the Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity features a make-believe interview with God that could be interprested as blasphemous.

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Colbert Conundrum: The Liberal TV Host Tackles Atheism, the Trinity, and the Bible – CBN News

Libertarian candidate for governor of Virginia calls for tax cut … – Richmond.com

Libertarian Cliff Hyra formally kicked off his campaign for governor Thursday, saying he would work to exempt the first $60,000 of household income from state income taxes, legalize marijuana and pardon people imprisoned solely for using drugs.

Hyra, 34, a lawyer who was raised in Northern Virginia and lives in Mechanicsville, called for an inclusive and innovative Virginia and for a state government that has respect for all Virginians, no matter their beliefs or their backgrounds.

Hyra, who is making his first bid for elective office, says his mother is a Democrat and his father is a Republican. He says he considered himself a Democrat until he went to college and that he has been a Libertarian for most of his adult life.

I feel strongly about empowering people to make their own choices, he said, because I care about other people and about our community and I fear the corrosive effects of a government that thinks that it knows whats best for everybody and is prepared to force everyone to act accordingly.

He made his announcement in bustling downtown Richmond at the corner of West Broad and North Jefferson streets. Hyra sometimes had to raise his voice to be heard above the din of passing buses and construction equipment working on the bus rapid transit project.

On taxes, Hyra would exempt the first $60,000 of household income. On his campaign website, he says he would avoid the massive marriage penalty by allowing individuals to exempt $30,000. Taxable income above that would be taxed at a flat 5.75 percent.

He says the average household would pay no state income tax and would have a savings of $3,000 per year.

During an interview Wednesday at the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Hyra said preliminary calculations indicate his plan would cost somewhere between $3 billion and $4 billion.

We have some work to square that, with the states finances, he said.

He said state revenues are projected to rise and that freezing growth of government will take us part of the way there.

He said he also is looking at recommendations by a panel headed by former Gov. L. Douglas Wilder which in 2002 made a series of suggestions about slimming state government.

He also wants to look at state-owned real estate that is sitting vacant or is underutilized and could be made more efficient. In addition, he said he wants to accrue savings through reforms in the criminal justice system.

Ed Gillespie, the Republican nominee for governor, is emphasizing an across-the-board tax cut as the centerpiece of his agenda.

Gillespies proposal centers on a 10 percent cut to the individual income tax rate, phased in over three years. For the states highest income bracket which covers income above $17,000 the rate would drop from 5.75 percent to 5.15 percent.

Gillespies campaign says his plan, once fully implemented, would save a typical Virginia family nearly $1,300 a year, a figure based on average household income of $135,000.

Using the median household income of $69,945, the savings would be $674, according to the Gillespie campaign.

As for the drug issue, Hyra said Thursday that Were spending too much money enforcing the counterproductive prohibition on marijuana use.

He said that as governor he would push to legalize marijuana and until legalization becomes possible I would order that enforcement of the marijuana prohibition is given the lowest possible priority.

He said he would pardon those in prison solely for their use of drugs.

In 2016, according to the Virginia State Police, contributing law enforcement agencies reported 39,666 drug-related arrests in Virginia and marijuana accounted for 58.7 percent of the arrests.

Those figures do not distinguish between simple possession and distribution or manufacturing.

Hyra said he favors putting marijuana on the same level as tobacco and alcohol, which he said would let the business grow and generate tax revenue and improve lives of Virginians.

Hyra also called for the establishment of more charter schools, saying: I want to put choice and competition into the education system here in Virginia.

Nine public charter schools are operating in Virginia, according to the Virginia Department of Education. Three are in Richmond the Patrick Henry School of Science and Arts, the Richmond Career Education and Employment Academy and the Metropolitan Preparatory Academy.

On health care, Hyra wants to leverage the power of choice and competition to improve access and decrease costs.

He said he wants to eliminate Virginias Certificate of Public Need program, which requires anyone who wishes to build a new hospital or imaging facility go through an application process with the state.

He is against two proposed natural gas pipelines, seeing them as the federal government taking private property to benefit private companies.

Hyra grew up in Falls Church and in the Springfield section of Fairfax County. He graduated from Virginia Tech with a degree in aerospace engineering and from George Mason Universitys law school.

Hyra started an intellectual property law practice in 2008. He joined Symbus Law Group as a partner in 2012 and specializes in patent and trademark law.

He and his wife, Stephanie, have three young children and are expecting a fourth in August. In 2015, they moved to Mechanicsville, Hyras wifes hometown.

In the 2013 race for governor in which Democrat Terry McAuliffe edged Republican Ken Cuccinelli Libertarian Robert Sarvis received 6.5 percent of the tally, garnering more than 146,000 votes.

Hyra asserted that hes proposing more substance than Gillespie or Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democratic nominee.

I want to push actual ideas, he said, adding: I think if you want actual change, you should support me.

Hyra stressed that he wants to run a civil campaign.

In the interview Wednesday at The Times-Dispatch, he said with a laugh: If I didnt respect people who disagree with me, I would not respect hardly anyone.

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Libertarian candidate for governor of Virginia calls for tax cut … – Richmond.com

Libertarian Republicans Powered by Billionaire Money Plan to Undo Gains of Last 100 Years – WMNF

Posted July 7, 2017 by Adam Flanery & filed under American History, Civil Rights, Labor, National Government, National Politics, News and Public Affairs, Social Services, State Government.

A lot of books have tried to explain the rise of conservative power that poses a direct challenge to the reforms that came about under the New Deal, the labor movement, the Civil Rights movement, and the Great Society.

In her new book, a Duke University professor reveals a little known conservative think tank that had its beginnings on the University of Virginia campus. With help from one of the Koch brothers, the think tank helped reframe the debate over the role of business, government and individuals.

The book is Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Rights Plan for America.

The author is Nancy MacLean. Shes the William H. Chafe Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University. Her previous book is Freedom is Not Enough. Host Rob Lorei interviewed her about her new book.

To listen back to this interview from Thursday, June 15, 2017 click here.

Tags: Koch brothers, Nancy MacLean

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Libertarian Republicans Powered by Billionaire Money Plan to Undo Gains of Last 100 Years – WMNF

[Exclusive Interview] Fatum: Sealed Fate – EDM Sauce

Have you ever wondered why you don’t notice when something impactful is about to happen in your lifethose seconds before your big break, a big announcement, a life changing moment? There are steps, events, that take place beforehand that eventually put you in that position, but one rarely notices them. In retrospect, you look back in your life and realize those specific moments led you to where you are at but you can never pinpoint those moments as they happen. Fate.

I had the opportunity to chat with one of the members of Fatum during EDC Week, and I’ll be frank, going into the interview I was unaware of who they were aside from a little research. I knew of a few tracks they had remixed or produced, but nothing else.

Fate, as it turns out, put me in the position to interview one of the most promising, rising electronic music artists out there and after the one-on-one, I realized that these guys were on to something big.

Fatum consists of Bill Hamel, Chad Newbold, Bruce Karlsson, and Daniel Davis. With releases at Anjunabeats, Ultra Records and Armada, this quadruplet force have quite a bright future ahead of them. Oh, and did I mention a GRAMMY NOMINATION for a remix of JES’s track Hold On?

Q: Welcome to the craziness of EDC Week. Hows it going?

A: Good, man. It’s been a tiring week here in Vegas but we’re powering through it.

Q: I’m really digging your remix of Late Night Alumni’s Only For Tonight. How’s the response been?

A: Good. The response is really, really, really good. When you take a little bit of a risk you never expect an outcome, but it seems like everyone is digging it.

Q: You’re gaining new fans because of that track. What kind of sound can they expect out of Fatum?

A: Right now we’re starting to mingle into the mainstream stuffnot too far, though. I wanted to come back into the trance scene and do it right. Everyone is calling it Trance 2.0, so let’s call it that, but I wanted to dip into the good mainstream stuff the melodic side of it.

Q: You had a pretty big Anjunabeats show in L.A. back in May. How did that go?

A: Great! I haven’t had a nice little adrenaline rush, especially coming back to trance, in a while. The trance fan’s energy is way different than other fans. The energy that night at The Belasco Theater was really heartfelt and I haven’t had that feeling in a long time.

Q: That energy is one of the main reasons I’m a trance fan, and as a trance fan, I look forward to Armin van Buuren’s annual A State of Trance’ compilation. You guys were featured on that, congratulations!

A: Thank you! I’m stoked about that. We had the track (Draco) ready for about half a year and we were just waiting and waiting telling ourselves, come on! Everyone will like this! and it finally happened.

Q: We’re in the middle of EDC Week. Do you guys see yourself ever playing a set at EDC Las Vegas?

A: Right now we’re right on the cusp of being able to play a big festival like EDC. For Fatum, I think if we hit it off this year with some good vocals, we may have a chance to gain a spot. EDC is tough, though. It was a lot easier back then, but now everyone’s a DJ.

Q: You guys are just making it big on the scene, what can we expect out of Fatum in the near future?

A: We have two new tracks with Angel Taylor and she’s been jumping on board and writing for us. Right now we’re seeking new vocalists, trying that approach and getting people more connected with the music and then get into the more mainstream stuff. I really would like the trance elitists’ to say, you know what, I can’t hate it.

Keep an eye out for these four, something tells me that fate is on their side.

Give Fatum a listen on their Soundcloud.

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[Exclusive Interview] Fatum: Sealed Fate – EDM Sauce

Cris Cyborg: Dana White said he made mistakes, maybe we can work together – Bloody Elbow

It has been a tough road for Cris Cyborg heading into the UFC. The establishment of the womens featherweight division was a tug-o-war, and UFC president Dana White himself recently admitted that there were some mistakes committed on their part.

To be honest with you, we made some mistakes when it comes to Cyborg. So, the least we can do is get our sh-t together and get this woman a fight for the title, White said in a recent MMA Junkie interview.

With Whites admission, Cyborg is now led to believe that better things could be coming her way. On Mondays MMA Hour episode, she expressed her optimism in terms of being treated by the company.

“I hope its gonna change. The last interview, Dana White said he did a lot of mistakes with Cyborg, maybe we can work together, Cyborg said (via MMA Fighting). I love my job. If my boss and my company loves working with me, were gonna have a lot of success together.

“I accepted that. Let’s see what’s gonna happen after that. Let’s see if not going to be just words, but if the practice in business is gonna change. We just have to work together. If you want to work together, for sure we can make a lot of money together.

But we need to work together. After this interview, I think he opened the door for getting better.”

Cyborg is widely considered as the most dominant female fighter today, and believes that she could have been a big star like Ronda Rousey, if only she was given the same push.

“Imagine now if they used the same machine they used to build Ronda Rousey, imagine if these people did it with me. The same people that watched Gina Carano against Cyborg, the same people watched my last fight. We made the same number, Cyborg said.

“Imagine if they build my like they did to Ronda Rousey, if I fought Holly Holm the same night Ronda Rousey fought Cat Zingano. If Ronda doesn’t want to fight me, protect her, thats fine, you build two stars. It would be amazing. Big stars is good for them. More stars, more money for them.”

Cyborg finally gets her due title fight at 145 pounds as she faces Tonya Evinger at UFC 214 on July 29th in Anaheim, California.

Continued here:

Cris Cyborg: Dana White said he made mistakes, maybe we can work together – Bloody Elbow

Pirates notebook: Andrew McCutchen to keep CF job; Starling Marte says he made ‘a mistake’ – Tribune-Review

Andrew McCutchen will remain the everyday center fielder even after Starling Marte rejoins the Pirates on July 18 after serving his suspension.

Manager Clint Hurdle revealed the decision Sunday, a day after he told McCutchen about it during a closed-door meeting.

On April 18, Marte was suspended 80 games by MLB for using steroids. On Sunday, he began a 15-day minor league rehab assignment with High-A Bradenton.

Marte is going to play left field and maybe (play) a game or two in center, in the minors, Hurdle said. Marte will come back (to the Pirates) as a left fielder.

Hurdle was asked if the move was made out of respect to McCutchen, who has enjoyed a renaissance at the plate and in the field during Marte’s absence.

That’s just where (Marte) needs to fit in, Hurdle said.

Last winter, Hurdle revamped the outfield alignment by moving Marte to center field and McCutchen to right. McCutchen reclaimed center when Marte was suspended.

We tried one thing, and it didn’t work, McCutchen said. With everything that went on, it made it a little tougher to be able to do that. We have to go back to the drawing board, and now we’re back to where we were in the past.

General manager Neal Huntington said McCutchen’s defensive stats have improved over last season, when management forced him to play shallow in center.

His metrics are better this year, Huntington said. Part of that is we’ve pushed him back a little bit to play to his strengths and to his confidence, playing gap to gap.

After scuffling offensively in April and May, McCutchen batted .411 with six homers and a National League-leading 1.193 OPS in June.

Like I said a long time ago, I knew I was going to be better, McCutchen said. I expected to be better. And now I’m better. It’s not a surprise for me. I just show up every day and get my work in. I don’t think about anything else outside of where I hit in the order, where I play in the outfield. I’m just here and ready to play.

Marte’s rehab plans

Before his first game with Bradenton, Marte spoke with media at LECOM Park. The Pirates provided an audio recording.

Marte said his suspension is the result of a mistake that I made, but did not get into specifics.

There’s always something that can help, to move forward, always trying to be better, Marte said through a translator. But it’s a mistake. I made that mistake. Now, I just want to move forward and help my team.

Later in the interview, Marte denied knowingly taking steroids and said the positive test result was a surprise to him.

It’s not that anybody gave me anything, Marte said. It’s something that I bought that might have induced this test positive. I was not aware that anything was in it.

Marte said he was told by MLB two weeks before the season began that he tested positive for Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid. That might account for his slow start Marte batted .241 in 13 games before his suspension was announced.

When you have issues and when you’re thinking about something, it does impact the way your mind stays focused, Marte said. I’m not going to say 100 percent that my performance was impacted by that, but, at the time, I was worried. I had all of these things in the back of my mind.

Marte has played in several extended spring training games in addition to working out twice daily at Pirate City.

Conditioning-wise, he should be in a good spot, Huntington said. Baseball movement- and activity-wise, he should be in a good spot. It’s now about speed of game.

Management wants Marte to play as many games as possible with Triple-A Indianapolis, starting sometime this week.

I anticipate him playing nine innings, full games, by the back half of next week, Hurdle said.

Cervelli on mend

Francisco Cervelli, who is on the disabled list recovering from a concussion, continues to do early work in the field. He has done some drills at shortstop, tutored by infield coach Joey Cora.

Cervelli will be back at catcher when he comes off the DL but might eventually be used at other positions. Cervelli has sustained at least eight head injuries while catching.

Although Huntington said changing roles is not a conversation we’re having at this time, Hurdle indicated it could be mulled in the future.

He wants to ignite (off the DL) from behind the plate, Hurdle said. The next conversation can be, How can we look at some other options?’

There remains no timetable for when Cervelli will be activated.

We’ve told Francisco his return needs to be when he is healthy, confident and comfortable and not a day before that, Huntington said.

Dominican prospect signs

On the first day of the two-week international signing period, the Pirates came to terms with outfielder Juan Pie, 16, of the Dominican Republic. Pie got a $500,000 signing bonus.

A left-handed batter, Pie (6-foot-2, 170 pounds) has been rated by evaluators as having average speed and an average arm.

We love the bat, Huntington said. There is a frame for growth and additional strength, but, primarily, we liked the bat attributes.

Rob Biertempfel is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at rbiertempfel@tribweb.com or via Twitter @BiertempfelTrib.

Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review

Pirates fan Stephen Boyd takes a photo with center fielder Andrew McCutchen during Fanfest before Sunday’s game against the Giants on July 2, 2017, at PNC Park.

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Pirates notebook: Andrew McCutchen to keep CF job; Starling Marte says he made ‘a mistake’ – Tribune-Review

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Gambian High School Robotics Team Denied US Visa For Global … – The Root

I guess the global robotics contest isnt so global after all. The United States has reportedly denied five Gambian high school students visas, consequently prohibiting them from accompanying their invention to a prestigious international competition taking place in the U.S.

According to Al Jazeera, the Gambian students are the second team that was refused entry into the U.S. to attend the FIRST Global robotics event that is taking place in the nations capital from July 16 to 18. An all-girls team from Afghanistan was also denied.

Moktar Darboe, the director for Gambias ministry of higher education, research, science and technology, told Al Jazeera that the team made up of high school students ages 17 to 18, were very disappointed.

They put in so much effort into building this, and now, after all the sacrifice and energy they put in, they have been left disheartened, Darboe said.

The robot the teens created is a ball sorting machine, and will be sent off to the U.S. without them, with the Gambian American Association representing them at the event. The teens will have to watch the event over Skype.

As Al Jazeera notes, the FIRST Global Challenge is open to students ages 15 to 18 across the world, with 158 countries, including 40 African countries, being represented. Currently, only the teams from Afghanistan and Gambia have had their visas denied.

Darboe said that they were given no explanation for the refusal, and were denied shortly after their interview at the U.S. embassy in the capital of Banjul in April. The students had to pay $170 each for their visa application.

We were only told we did not qualify and that we could try again, Darboe said. Their parents had to sacrifice a lot to pay this fee.

Fatoumata Ceesay, the teams programmer told the news site that the team overcame working in less than ideal conditions, working hard day and night, with little guidance over the holy fasting month of Ramadan. Gassam said that she was disappointed that she would not be able to represent her home country and show the world [that] yes, we can do it

But were not giving up, despite the challenges we face, we still continue to work hard, she said. Next year it will be somewhere else, so I think next year we have hope to get there.

Read more at Al Jazeera.

Originally posted here:

Gambian High School Robotics Team Denied US Visa For Global … – The Root

DNA testing – on the road to regenerative medicine – VatorNews

We recently had Dr. Craig Venter speak at our Splash Health 2017 event. Dr. Venter is the first person to sequence a human genome, simply put: the instructions and information about human development, physiology, and evolution. In his interview, he points out that 15 years ago, sequencing a human genome would have cost $100 million and take over nine months.

Oh how far weve come. Today, there are a number of companies helping us to analyze our genes, or basically our DNA, which make up genes, to understand our physiology. Advances in sequencing the human genome have been the foundation for this knowledge, and is ultimately paving the path toward personalized medicine – therapies that are personalized to a persons genetic code, and its cousin regenerative medicine – therapies that replace or enable damaged cells, organs to regenerate.

One company, Orig3n, is doing both. Boston-based Orig3n started out in 2014 collecting blood samples to conduct regenerative medicine studies, but later added in the ability to conduct DNA testing to learn more about a persons intelligence, or predisposition to learning languages, to knowing what vitamins theyre deficient in.

Its an interesting an unique funnel the company has created for itself on its way to solve big problems with regenerative medicine, which seems more in its infancy than DNA testing.

To that end, Orig3ns DNA testing business has taken off.

In order to be tested, you take a cotton swab and swab the inside of your cheek to collect DNA samples from the cells inside your mouth. Alternatively, one could spit in a tube, which is how 23andMe collects samples of DNA.

From there, Orig3n breaks down the cells to open up the DNA, which is inside the nucleus of the cell. The DNA is then purified and put into a genetic test panel. Your DNA is then analyzed against other DNA that have been collected and studied.

The analysis of the DNA is pretty standard. What differentiates its products, according to Robin Smith, Founder and CEO, is how the analysis is packaged and how quickly the results are turned around. The whole genome sequencing world has been around for 15 years and is fairly commoditized, said Smith. The same thing is happening with DNA detection. The biggest differentiator for Orig3n is that it delivers the data in ways that are understandable, said Smith.

For instance, on Orig3n, tests focus on an analysis of your skin to perfect your skincare routine, or about your strength and intelligence. Tests range from $20 to $100.

On Everlywell, you can take a DNA test to measure your sensitivity to foods. Or for around $239, it appears you can test to see if you have HIV, Herpes Type 2 and other sexual diseases.

On 23andMe, you can pay $199 to learn what proportion of your genes come from 31 populations worldwide, or what your genetic weight predisposes you to weigh vs an average and what are some healthy habits of people with your genetic makeup [though personally these habits seem to be good for anyone regardless of genetic makeup].

But for Orig3n, the DNA tests are just a good business while also a funnel to the bigger problem theyre trying to solve, and for which they recently raised $20 million for: Regenerative medicine.

Before offering the DNA tests, Orig3n was taking and continues to take blood samples, reprogramming cells to go back to a state three days prior. And from there, they can grow certain tissues. The purpose of Orig3n is to create cell therapies for various diseases and disorders.

In the next fives year, there will be real live therapies to repairing the degeneration of your eyes or performing some cardiac repair, Smith predicted. It feels like 1993 when I used a phone line to dial into the Internet, then seven years later we had the boom. We think regenerative medicine – getting your body to induce itself to rejuvenate parts that are broken – is where the Internet was in 1993.

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DNA testing – on the road to regenerative medicine – VatorNews

Meet Baptist Golden Triangle’s First Internal Medicine Residents – WCBI

COLUMBUS, Miss. (WCBI) Theyre from all over the country, and many have plans on making this area their future homes, once their three year residency ends.

A new chapter is in the works for these recent med school graduates.

Their residency here at Baptist, means theyre one step closer to practicing medicine on their own.

When that happens, the hospital hopes theyll continue practicing here.

Ive always wanted to help people. Somehow, someway, says Internal Medicine Resident, Dr. Chadwick Mayes.

Thats why Mayes has worked for years to get to where he is today.

Hes following in his dads footsteps, and plans on staying in Mississippi, caring for Mississippians.

Ive learned all the history about how, you know, Mississippi has a very large population of under-served areas. My dad is in primary care and all of that stuff, so Ive been kind of told, youre going to practice in Mississippi, and Ive grown to love Mississippi, so as far as that goes, Im staying. They cant get rid of me if they tried.

Resident Dr. Eileen Ramos calls the countryside of California home, and says its that country feel that attracted her to the Golden Triangle.

For a lot of us, this was our first choice. So, were really just so happy that even the hospital chose us as their first choice, so I mean, the match is so complex and so emotional, you know? You really want to be in a place where you feel home and I know for me, thats what I felt at the end of the interview, so its really like a dream come true to be here.

Politicians may debate healthcare, but these new doctors are committed to providing the best personal care possible.

We just have that kind of motivation to just work through it. No matter what, Im going to be that kind of doctor who is just going to figure out the system for my patient. It doesnt matter if there is a new a law, a new regulation, theres restrictions, whatever, Im going to be that person whose just going to learn it as fast as I can, says Internal Medicine Resident, Dr. Ramos.

Medicine is an art and for me personally, providing care and helping people, thats the number one priority. Now, as far as the business aspect side of it, or the political aspect of it, Im sure that will work itself out at some point or another, but from my end you know, were here to help people, says Internal Medicine Resident, Dr. Medhat Hamed.

The first class will graduate in 2020.

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Meet Baptist Golden Triangle’s First Internal Medicine Residents – WCBI