The Insomniac Libertarian

Examiner.com just sent out this policy change to its local writers. Many states and localities (Karl Dickey in south Florida, Garry Reed in Dallas) have “libertarian Examiners.” It’s easy to imagine the climate of Obama censorship created by FCC regulation of the internet and The Department of Justice subpoenas and ga orders against reason magazine and its readers being involved in this. It will be worth measuring whether politically incorrect Examiners don’t get “whitelisted” and Hillary and Obama supporters do.

Over the past several months, Examiner.com has gradually put more emphasis on content quality. Weve removed content, coached a variety of writers, and weve reduced the number of topics we choose to cover. Now we are really excited to take the next step and increase this important focus with you!

Effective immediately, we are implementing a standard content review process. This process will include revised guidelines that we will enforce for all content published to our website.

How does this affect you?

This new policy will affect each contributor differently. By default, contributors will be set to review, meaning we will look at your content prior to your work publishing live to our website. We have scheduled our staff accordingly, and will strive to review each piece of content within 30 minutes, on average.

The Whitelist Team

Many of you have shown us that writing high-quality content is second nature. Those selected for this group will be notified individually and will be a part of our whitelist team. People in this select group will continue to publish directly to the website without review. This is the group we encourage everyone to achieve and we will help guide you there.

For now, new Examiners and those who have not yet demonstrated an ability to meet our guidelines will continue to have their work reviewed until they can be switched to a non-review status. We will be regularly reviewing contributors for inclusion on the whitelist.

Newsworthy

Lets get started!

Excerpt from:

The Insomniac Libertarian

Seven ecosystem services valued at more than EUR100 …

May 13, 2015 Environmental systems analysis is a quantitative and multidisciplinary research field aimed at analyzing, interpreting, simulating and communicating complex environmental problems from different perspectives.

The annual contribution of seven ecosystem services to the economy of Limburg, the southernmost province of the Netherlands, can be estimated at around 112 million. This was the conclusion of a study conducted by Roy Remme, Matthias Schrter and Lars Hein of Wageningen University, in collaboration with Bram Edens. The aim of the study was to develop knowledge about the monetary contribution of ecosystems to the regional economy. The study has been published in the journal Ecological Economics.

The researchers modelled and valued seven ecosystem services: crop production, fodder production, drinking water production, air quality regulation, carbon sequestration, nature tourism and hunting. The study was conducted to test part of the ‘System of Environmental-Economic Accounts’, a framework for ecosystem accounting that was developed under the auspices of the United Nations Statistics Division . The aim of ecosystem accounting is to develop knowledge about the contributions of ecosystems to the economy. In this study, monetary ecosystem service models were developed to specify the spatial distribution of these contributions in Limburg province. The ecosystem services with the highest monetary value were the contributions to crop production (46 million) and nature tourism (39 million). Carbon sequestration and air quality regulation had the lowest values (2 million). Areas with the highest values were found in the South Limburg hills, especially due to nature tourism and drinking water abstraction areas. The municipalities of Gennep and Echt-Susteren had relatively high values due to their existing drinking water abstraction areas.

The study provides insight into the valuation methods that can be used for ecosystem accounting. Monetary valuation for ecosystem accounting takes into account economic production and consumption; it therefore differs from a welfare-based valuation approach, which also accounts for the values that people assign to certain services. Moreover, some ecosystem services, such as experiential value, are still difficult to value in ecosystem accounting. The outcome of the study should therefore not be interpreted as the total monetary value of ecosystem services in Limburg province.

The study signals that investments are required to collect the ecosystem service data that is used to develop monetary accounts for all ecosystem services. In combination with physical accounting, monetary accounting can provide a good picture of the contribution of ecosystems to economic activities, and how changes in ecosystems will affect the economy. Ecosystem accounting can provide relevant information for policy-makers in land-use planning and spatial planning. It can also act as an early warning system to signal the loss of ecosystem services and their possible consequences.

Explore further: How can we measure the contribution of ecosystems to our prosperity?

Systematic measurements of the condition of ecosystems and their contribution to our prosperity are vital in a world undergoing rapid environmental change. Changes in ecosystems and the climate are often …

A new report, drawing on behavioural economics literature from 2001 to 2012, has examined how cognitive factors influencing people’s choices and preferences can affect the values that they place upon ecosystem services and …

An international group of scientists, industry representatives and policymakers wants to set guidelines for the science behind valuing nature.

A team of international scientists has shown that assigning a dollar value to the benefits nature provides agriculture improves the bottom line for farmers while protecting the environment. The study confirms …

Original post:

Seven ecosystem services valued at more than EUR100 …

Doubling of coastal erosion by mid-century in Hawai'i

New research from scientists at the University of Hawaii at Mnoa and the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources brings into clearer focus just how dramatically Hawaii beaches might change as sea level rises in the future.

Chronic erosion dominates the sandy beaches of Hawaii, causing beach loss as it damages homes, infrastructure and critical habitat. Researchers have long understood that global sea level rise will affect the rate of coastal erosion.

For the study “Doubling of coastal erosion under rising sea level by mid-century in Hawaii,” published this week in Natural Hazards, the research team developed a simple model to assess future erosion hazards under higher sea levels — taking into account historical changes of Hawaii shorelines and the projected acceleration of sea level rise reported from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The results indicate that coastal erosion of Hawaii’s beaches may double by mid-century.

“Business as Usual” leads to double erosion

Like the majority of Hawaii’s sandy beaches, most shorelines at the 10 study sites on Kauai, Oahu and Maui are currently retreating. If these beaches were to follow current trends, an average 20 to 40 feet of shoreline recession would be expected by 2050 and 2100, respectively.

“When we modeled future shoreline change with the increased rates of sea level rise (SLR) projected under the IPCC’s “business as usual” scenario, we found that increased SLR causes an average 16-20 feet of additional shoreline retreat by 2050, and an average of nearly 60 feet of additional retreat by 2100,” said Tiffany Anderson, lead author and post-doctoral researcher at the UH Mnoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology.

“This means that the average amount of shoreline recession roughly doubles by 2050 with increased SLR, compared to historical extrapolation alone. By 2100, it is nearly 2.5 times the historical extrapolation. Further, our results indicate that approximately 92 percent and 96 percent of the shorelines will be retreating by 2050 and 2100, respectively, except at Kailua, Oahu which is projected to begin retreating by mid-century.”

Preparing for the future

The model accounts for accretion of sand onto beaches and long-term sediment processes in making projections of future shoreline position. As part of ongoing research, the resulting erosion hazard zones are overlain on aerial photos and other geographic layers in a geographic information system to provide a tool for identifying resources, infrastructure and property exposed to future coastal erosion.

“This study demonstrates a methodology that can be used by many shoreline communities to assess their exposure to coastal erosion resulting from the climate crisis,” said Chip Fletcher, associate dean at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology and co-author on the paper.

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Doubling of coastal erosion by mid-century in Hawai'i

New research predicts a doubling of coastal erosion by mid-century in Hawai'i

IMAGE:Chronic beach erosion is a global problem. Modeling now indicates that, in Hawai’i, increased sea level rise associated with the climate crisis may cause a doubling of this problem by… view more

Credit: C. Fletcher, UH SOEST.

Chronic erosion dominates the sandy beaches of Hawai’i, causing beach loss as it damages homes, infrastructure, and critical habitat. Researchers have long understood that global sea level rise will affect the rate of coastal erosion. However, new research from scientists at the University of Hawaii – M?noa (UHM) and the Hawai’i Department of Land and Natural Resources brings into clearer focus just how dramatically Hawai’i beaches might change.

For the study, published this week in Natural Hazards, the research team developed a simple model to assess future erosion hazards under higher sea levels – taking into account historical changes of Hawai’i shorelines and the projected acceleration of sea level rise reported from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The results indicate that coastal erosion of Hawai’i’s beaches may double by mid-century.

Like the majority of Hawaii’s sandy beaches, most shorelines at the 10 study sites on Kauai, Oahu, and Maui are currently retreating. If these beaches were to follow current trends, an average 20 to 40 feet of shoreline recession would be expected by 2050 and 2100, respectively.

“When we modeled future shoreline change with the increased rates of sea level rise (SLR) projected under the IPCC’s “business as usual” scenario, we found that increased SLR causes an average 16 – 20 feet of additional shoreline retreat by 2050, and an average of nearly 60 feet of additional retreat by 2100,” said Tiffany Anderson, lead author and post-doctoral researcher at the UHM School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology.

“This means that the average amount of shoreline recession roughly doubles by 2050 with increased SLR, compared to historical extrapolation alone. By 2100, it is nearly 2.5 times the historical extrapolation. Further, our results indicate that approximately 92% and 96% of the shorelines will be retreating by 2050 and 2100, respectively, except at Kailua, Oahu which is projected to begin retreating by mid-century.”

The model accounts for accretion of sand onto beaches and long-term sediment processes in making projections of future shoreline position. As part of ongoing research, the resulting erosion hazard zones are overlain on aerial photos and other geographic layers in a geographic information system to provide a tool for identifying resources, infrastructure, and property exposed to future coastal erosion.

“This study demonstrates a methodology that can be used by many shoreline communities to assess their exposure to coastal erosion resulting from the climate crisis,” said Chip Fletcher, Associate Dean at the UHM School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology and co-author on the paper.

Mapping historical shoreline change provides useful data for assessing exposure to future erosion hazards, even if the rate of sea level rise changes in the future. The predicted increase in erosion will threaten thousands of homes, many miles of roadway and other assets in Hawai’i. Globally the asset exposure to erosion is enormous.

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New research predicts a doubling of coastal erosion by mid-century in Hawai'i

Halla Visteon Climate Control wins IR52 Jang Young-Shil Award

HVCC-developed heat pump system for electric vehicles recognized for innovative power-saving technology

SEOUL, KOREA — March 9, 2015: Leading automotive thermal management solution provider Halla Visteon Climate Control Corp. (KS: 018880) has been named a co-winner of the IR52 Jang Young-Shil Award with Hyundai Motor Company for its new heat pump system.

The IR52 Jang Young-Shil Award is presented to companies in Korea with technologically outstanding and innovative new products. Jointly sponsored by Korea Industrial Technology Association and Maeil Business Newspaper, a leading Korean business publication, the award is presented in the name of the Minister of Science and Technology.

The award-winning heat pump system developed by HVCC is designed to significantly reduce power consumption from heating battery-powered vehicles including electric vehicles. Unlike a conventional electric heater, which only uses power supplied from the battery to heat the cabin, heat pumps draw heat from external air, thereby reducing power consumption. HVCC’s new heat pump system also utilizes the waste heat recycled from the vehicle’s motor and inverter as an additional heat source, further extending the vehicle’s drive range by decreasing the power drain on the battery.

With this breakthrough innovation, waste heat is harvested by the heat pump to support the vehicle’s heating system and meet the desired cabin temperature, even in challenging sub-zero temperatures. This function helps dramatically reduce the vehicle’s energy consumption and increases the driving range on a single battery charge by more than 20 percent.

“As an integrated thermal management system, HVCC’s heat pump system can be further implemented in eco-friendly vehicles including plug-in hybrid and fuel cell vehicles,” said YH Park, president and CEO of HVCC. “We are honored to receive this award and believe this innovative system will bring value to our customers worldwide.”

HVCC’s heat pump system is in production on several vehicles sold globally and will be showcased at the Seoul Motor Show in April 2015.

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Halla Visteon Climate Control wins IR52 Jang Young-Shil Award

Warm March expected to continue

KHQ Weather Authority Become a KHQ Weather Watcher! Become a KHQ Weather Watcher! Do you want to be aWeatherWatcherfor KHQ Local News? You just need the ability to Skype or UStreamfrom your computer or smart phone.>> Do you want to be aWeatherWatcherfor KHQ Local News? You just need the ability to Skype or UStreamfrom your computer or smart phone.>> SPOKANE, Wash. – People are loving this first part of March. Warm temperatures, golf courses opening up early It feels that Spring has sprung around the Inland Northwest and that it is here to stay, and it looks like the National Weather Service and the Climate Prediction Center or CPC agree.

February ended as the 8th warmest February on record with an average high temperature of 47.1 degrees! A full 7.1 degrees above normal. Now this March has seen two back to back days above 60 and the next seven days are looking to continue above average temperatures. Keep in mind that Spring officially starts on March 20th.

Lots of people wondering though, will this last? Can we continue to see upper 50’s and low 60’s through the rest of the month and even farther out.

Take a look at the next 8-14 day outlook below. An almost sure chance that we stay, in the Inland Northwest, well above average for the next two weeks.

(8-14 day outlook)

Then look at the rest of March, again well above average for our temperatures.

(March)

Your next thought might then be, well with this nice Spring we are having, what about the summer months? Good news for those love heat and dry conditions because that is the trend. The June-July-August outlook provided by the CPC showing a warm trend, especially true for the western half of the United States, and this could mean disaster for fire season.

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Warm March expected to continue

Cruise and climate change top the agenda for World Responsible Tourism Awards 2015 at WTM

Brighton, UK (PRWEB UK) 2 March 2015

The prestigious awards scheme, co-founded and organised by Responsible Travel, is part of World Travel Markets World Responsible Tourism Day the largest day of responsible tourism action in the world which takes place on Wednesday, 4 November and celebrates the most inspiring and innovative examples of responsible tourism in practice globally.

Tourism businesses, organisations, initiatives and destinations across the industry are now being invited to submit themselves for consideration in the 2015 awards at http://www.worldresponsibletourismawards.com/submissions by Monday 6th April 2015.

Commenting on the variety of organisations expected to submit themselves for consideration, Responsible Travel managing director Justin Francis says The principles of responsible tourism can apply to any business, mainstream or niche its what makes the awards so exciting.

We want to play an active role in creating and encouraging a more caring tourism industry and the winners of these awards, big or small, will set examples the rest of the tourism industry can and should follow.

Im very excited about being able to discover and share their stories this year.

The 2015 Awards reflect some of the key trends in responsible tourism with a new category Best Innovation for Carbon Reduction searching out some of the most successful, replicable examples of innovation in carbon reduction in the tourism industry in light of the UN Climate Change Conference in Paris later this year. 2015 will also see the return of a category for cruise lines, with submissions invited for the Best Sea or River Cruise.

Chair of Judges, Harold Goodwin, Professor of Responsible Tourism at Manchester Metropolitan University and Director of the International Centre for Responsible Tourism explains why the cruise category is so important this year. The cruise industry is one of the largest sectors of the tourism market, but also one of the most irresponsible, and progress towards more responsible cruising has generally been slow.

One of the primary purposes of the Awards is to identify good practice and to challenge and inspire others to follow.

After the success of the panel on freshwater cruising at WTM in November 2014 where three businesses were able to report in detail on their impressive Responsible Tourism practices, we are keen to see how far the cruise industry has come and what can be learnt from this years Awards.

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Cruise and climate change top the agenda for World Responsible Tourism Awards 2015 at WTM

NASA Request for Information Ground Systems and Mission Operations 2

Synopsis – Feb 24, 2015 Draft Document – Posted on Feb 24, 2015 General Information Solicitation Number: RFI-GSMO2-2015 Posted Date: Feb 24, 2015 FedBizOpps Posted Date: Feb 24, 2015 Recovery and Reinvestment Act Action: No Original Response Date: Mar 15, 2015 Current Response Date: Mar 15, 2015 Classification Code: R — Professional, administrative, and mgmt support services NAICS Code: 541330 Contracting Office Address NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 210.Y, Greenbelt, MD 20771 Description This notice is issued by NASA/GSFC to post a draft Statement of Work via the internet, and solicit responses from interested parties for engineering support services for GSFC ground systems and mission operations support in all phases of mission life cycle. Potential support includes the Earth Observing System (EOS), the Data and Operations System (EDOS), the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES), the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN), the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), and the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) amongst others. This document is for information and planning purposes and to allow industry the opportunity to verify reasonableness and feasibility of the requirement, as well as promote competition. Prospective offerors are invited to submit written comments or questions to: Jason D. Lou via email Jason.D.Lou@nasa.gov , no later than 4:00pm, March 15, 2015. When responding reference RFI-GSMO2-2015. NASA/GSFC is seeking capability statements from all interested parties, including Large, Small, Small Disadvantaged (SDB), 8(a), Woman-owned (WOSB), Veteran Owned (VOSB), Service Disabled Veteran Owned (SD-VOSB), Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone) businesses, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU)/Minority Institutions (MI) for the purposes of determining the appropriate level of competition and/or small business subcontracting goals for Ground Systems and Mission Operations-2. The Government reserves the right to consider a Small, 8(a), Woman-owned (WOSB), Service Disabled Veteran (SD-VOSB), or HUBZone business set-aside based on responses hereto. This request for information (RFI) is not to be construed as a commitment by the Government, nor will the Government pay for the information submitted in response. Respondents will not be notified of the results. No solicitation exists; therefore, do not request a copy of the solicitation. If a solicitation is released it will be synopsized in FedBizOpps and on the NASA Acquisition Internet Service. It is the potential offerors responsibility to monitor these sites for the release of any solicitation or synopsis. NASA Clause 1852.215-84, Ombudsman, is applicable. The Center Ombudsman for this acquisition can be found at http://prod.nais.nasa.gov/pub/pub_library/Omb.html . Any documents related to this RFI will be available over the Internet. These documents will reside on a World Wide Web (WWW) server, which may be accessed using a WWW browser application. The Internet site, or URL, for the NASA/GSFC Business Opportunities home page is http://prod.nais.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/eps/bizops.cgi?gr=D&pin=51 It is the offeror’s responsibility to monitor the Internet cite for the release of the solicitation and amendments (if any). Potential offerors will be responsible for downloading their own copy of the solicitation and amendments, if any. Point of Contact Name:Jason Daniel Lou Title:Contracting Officer Phone:301-286-2533 Fax:301-286-0383 Email:Jason.D.Lou@nasa.gov

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NASA Request for Information Ground Systems and Mission Operations 2

Letters to the editor: We must do more to stop terrorists

These people did nothing wrong but exercise their basic rights: the freedom of assembly, freedom of speech and freedom of religion.

It used to be the case that you actually had to blaspheme to become a target of Islamist extremists. Now, apparently, you just have to talk about those principles to arouse the murderous intent of those who disagree with our way of life. Or it could simply be because of who you are, if you happen to be a European Jew, such as the murdered security guard who protected the central synagogue.

While it is difficult to halt lone wolf attacks of this kind, much more must be done by political leaders to tackle this growing threat in Europe. We must move the climate of discussion away from condemnation to action, and how to prevent its recurrence. If we fail to do so, we can expect further attacks to occur. Dr Alan Mendoza, executive director, The Henry Jackson Society

The latest terrorist outrages in Copenhagen, shortly after similar events in Paris, confirm the sad reality of the role that Jews and anti-Semitism play in jihadist ideology and terrorist targeting.

Each terrorist attack raises the need and the demand for further security, and so Jewish communities have reacted by implementing ever more onerous security measures. These have become a sad part of of Jewish life but they should never be regarded as normal.

Across Europe, governments and police have reacted in various ways, with Britain generally regarded as the best in nearly every aspect. UK politicians could not have been stronger in their condemnations of anti-Semitism. But this sits in stark contrast to the profound silence of many civil society groups, who ought to oppose such hatreds but seem paralysed from doing so to any remotely meaningful extent. Mark Gardner, Community Security Trust

Reactions to these sorts of heinous killings must be measured. In its crudest form, an attack such as this craves speculation and hysteria. It is, in a sense, a most ugly form of attention seeking.

We need no more reminders of Islamic States dangerous social media presence. Guessing whether it was a copycat massacre in the style of Charlie Hebdo just fuels Islamic States strategy of saturating the news media.

Let the security services deal with the mechanics of the attack, and let the public focus on what we can do to prevent such monstrous events in the future namely through standing in solidarity against extremism of all kinds with all those who despise such barbarism. Terrorists seek to divide us. Let us not allow that to happen. Nazish Khan, researcher, Quilliam

This week Which? published its annual rail passenger satisfaction survey. The bottom six operators in the survey all serve London, scoring less than 50 per cent overall for passenger satisfaction.

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Letters to the editor: We must do more to stop terrorists

NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 29, 2015

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational UseNASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visithttp://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.Questions about this opportunity should be directed toGSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New AppendixNASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.The deadline for proposals has been extended toJan. 30, 2015.For more information regarding theMIRO solicitation, please visit theNASA EONSpage on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at:http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2015 NOAA Undergraduate ScholarshipThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.Applications are dueJan. 30, 2015.For more information and to submit an online application, visithttp://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed toEPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 InternshipsThe George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change, or YLCC,builds a pathway for exemplary students in higher education to apply cutting-edge climate change knowledge to park management. The program provides paid summer internships to highly accomplished graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to work on diverse issues related to climate change and its effects in national parks. Participants gain valuable work experience, explore career options and develop leadership skills under the mentorship and guidance of the National Park Service.The program features structured projects in one or more of the following interdisciplinary areas: climate change science and monitoring; resource conservation and adaptation; policy development; sustainable park operations; facilities adaptation; and communication/interpretation/education. Interns who successfully complete the YLCC will be eligible to be hired noncompetitively into subsequent federal jobsonce they complete their degree programs. These jobs would be in the Department of Interior, National Park Service or one of the other bureaus within the Department of Interior. An intern must qualify for the job in order to be hired noncompetitively.Internships are full-time positions (40 hours/week) lasting 11-12 weeks. Interns are paid $14/hour plus benefits, and are employees of the University of Washington. Most positions come with free or subsidized housing in dormitories or other shared accommodations in parks. Internships offer rigorous and challenging projects that demand high-level academic knowledge and skills, allowing interns considerable autonomy and opportunity for leadership under an effective mentor.The application deadline is12:01 pm PST on Jan. 30, 2015.For additional information and to apply for a YLCC internship, visithttp://parksclimateinterns.org/.Questions about this program should be directed to Tim Watkins atclimate_change@nps.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 InternshipsThe NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.Applications for summer 2015 internships are dueFeb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are dueJune 1, 2015.For more information, visithttp://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry atbill.barry@nasa.gov.

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.

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NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 29, 2015

Yes, we can live well and avoid climate disaster, says UK government

The world can enjoy higher standards of living and more travel, while drastically cutting emissions to avoid dangerous climate change but only with sweeping changes to our infrastructure, the natural world and agriculture, a new analysis has found.

The UK government analysis also assumes that billions of people will remain in dire poverty at mid-century, despite efforts to lift them to greater prosperity, as the population rises to an estimated nine billion people.

Dealing with greenhouse gas emissions will require a transformation of electricity generation, including an expansion of renewable energy and nuclear power, as well as more public transport and changes to the built environment, according to the key findings of the Global Calculator, an online software tool developed by the Department of Energy and Climate Change (Decc), with partners.

The calculator is intended to show the likely outcomes of a variety of choices that policymakers and the public can make to tackle global warming, such as investing in nuclear, insulating houses, making electrical appliances more efficient and using electric vehicles.

Some of the findings are likely to be controversial. The analysis suggests that to cope with the food demands of a rising population, much more land will need to be brought under cultivation, which could have harmful side effects on biodiversity, and genetically modified crops may be needed to boost yields.

Far more intensive agriculture will be necessary, with the amount of beef raised in confined systems vast cattle warehouses in which the animals rarely or never see grass accounting for as much as 15% of the global herd by mid-century. Consumers must also switch away from eating beef to poultry and vegetables.

The analysis also found that deforestation must be halted and the extent of forested land increased by between 5% and 15% by 2050 a mammoth task, given the failure of efforts so far to halt forest destruction.

However, the analysis depends on several key factors. For instance, within the emissions limits required to hold global warming to less than 2C above pre-industrial levels, in theory it ought to be possible for everyone in the world to travel 12,400 KM a year, up from an average of 8,300 KM a year at present.

Currently, people in the US travel an average of 16,000 KM a year, and in the EU about 10,000 KM, while the average Indian travels 6,000 KM and Chinese less than 2,000 KM a year. So the increases in air travel in the developed world seen in recent years, thanks to the proliferation of cheap flights, will have to be severely limited in future to stay within these levels.

Similarly, nutrition that fulfills our daily needs, of 2,100 calories a day, is possible for the entire planet, but is unlikely to reach everyone without a transformation in global equity. According to the models used to develop the calculator, billions of people are likely to remain in poverty at mid-century, and they are unlikely to benefit much in the form of the better nutrition, better housing or increases in travel which are theoretically possible.

See more here:

Yes, we can live well and avoid climate disaster, says UK government

Red Hill, Victoria: Travel guide and things to do

Jan 27 2015 at 4:03 PM

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Red Hill is essentially a somewhat diffuse rural borough located in the Mornington Peninsula’s hinterland which is in fact an entirely different world to the calm foreshores of Port Phillip Bay and the rugged coastline on the southern side of the peninsula. As you head into the middle of the peninsula, from either side, there is a major change in the natural environment as you climb up into virtual high country which is characterised by gum trees, quiet lanes, hilly terrain, dirt roads, farms, orchards, small general stores and, tucked away amidst the trees and hills, some cafes and restaurants and plenty of galleries and vineyards. There has been a profusion of the latter in recent years as the terrain, temperate climate and fertile soil have proved ideal for oenology. The area is noted for its pinot noir, shiraz and chardonnay. Land here is quite expensive and so an air of exclusivity hangs in the air. Former prime minister, Malcolm Fraser, has recently taken up residence in the area.

Red Hill was first settled in 1862 and became known for its fruit orchards. With a 1996 population of 960, it is located 73 km south of Melbourne and about five kilometres east ofDromana. To get there head out of Dromana via McCulloch Rd which passes under the freeway then take a right turn onto Arthurs Seat Rd which becomes the Red Hill toShorehamRd.

Middens on the peninsula indicate that Aborigines used the area on a seasonal basis for hundreds if not thousands of years before the arrival of Europeans. The first white settlers at what is now Red Hill were James Wideman and John Arkwell who arrived in 1862.

The Red Hill Community markets are held in Red Hill Rd on the first Saturday of each month from 8.00 a.m. to 1.00 p.m., September to May. The Red Hill Agricultural Show is held each year in March, the Cool Climate Wine Show in April, Art Red Hill in May, the Queen’s Birthday Winter Wine Weekend in June, the Red Hill Garden Festival in October and the Red Hill Country Music and Truck Festival in December.

Tourist Information The Dromana Visitor Information Centre is located on Point Nepean Rd atDromana, tel: (03) 5987 3078 or (1800) 804 009.

Walking Track The Red Hill to Merricks Walking Track (8 km return) starts from the car park at Blue Moon Junction in Red Hill, near the shops. It follows the old railway line through forest and farmland and past wineries to Merricks Station Reserve on Merricks Rd.

Eldridge Estate Eldridge Estate, established in 1986, is located in Arthurs Seat Rd (formerly Red Hill Rd), 100 m east of Andrews Lane. They specialise in chardonnay and pinot noir but also produce a fruity gamay and a sparkling pf. The cellar door is open from 11.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. on weekends but every day in January and most school holidays or by appointment, tel and fax: (03) 5989 2644. The email address is fizz@ eldridge-estate.com.au

Darling Park Vineyard Darling Park Vineyard, established in 1987, is a boutique vineyard located in Red Hill Rd, between McIlroys Rd and Stanleys Rd. It is open weekends, public holidays and every day in January from 11.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m., tel: (03) 5989 2324, or fax: (03) 5989 2254. They produce a range of wines – merlot, cabernet merlot, querida (dry rose), pinot gris, shiraz, chardonnay (dry and late-picked), pinot noir and ‘Decadence’ (desert rose). Tartes flambees are served from a wood-fired oven on weekends, public holidays and by special request.

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Red Hill, Victoria: Travel guide and things to do

Why we need to address population growth's effects on global warming

Earlier this month, Pope Francis made news when he said that not only was climate change real, but it was mostly man-made. Then, last week, he said that couples do not need to breed like rabbits but rather should plan their families responsibly albeit without the use of modern contraception.

Though the pope did not directly link the two issues, climate scientists and population experts sat up and took notice. That’s because for years, they have quietly discussed the links between population growth and global warming, all too aware of the sensitive nature of the topic. Few of them can forget the backlash after then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in 2009 that it was strange to talk about climate change without mentioning population and family planning. Critics immediately suggested that she was calling for eugenics, thus shutting down the conversation and pushing the issue back into the shadows. The pope’s support of smaller families might help that discussion come back into the light, where it belongs.

Sensitive subject or not, the reality is that unsustainable human population growth is a potential disaster for efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions. These days, the biggest population growth is occurring in developing nations, which is why any discussion must be sensitive to the perception that well-off, industrialized nations the biggest climate polluters, often with majority-white populations might be telling impoverished people of color to reduce their numbers. In fact, person for person, reducing birth rates in industrialized nations has a bigger impact on greenhouse gas emissions because affluent people use more of the Earth’s resources and depend more heavily on fossil fuels.

In other words, population is not just a Third World issue. More than a third of the births in the United States are the result of unintended pregnancies, and this month the United Nations raised its prediction of population growth by the year 2050 because of unforeseen, rising birth rates in industrialized nations. So even though the highest rates of population growth are in the poorest and least educated countries Africa’s population is expected to triple by the end of the century any attempt to address the issue will have to target the industrialized world as well.

By 2050, world population is expected to increase from its current level of about 7 billion to somewhere between 8 and 11 billion. According to a 2010 analysis published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, keeping that growth to the lower number instead of even the mid-range 9.6 billion could play a significant role in keeping emissions low enough to avoid dangerous levels of climate change by 2050. A more recent report, though, casts doubt on whether it would be possible to bring about dramatic enough changes in population quickly enough to hold the total to 8 billion.

Another 2010 report, by the nonprofit Center for Global Development in Washington, D.C, predicted that fast-growing developing countries will become the dominant emitters of greenhouse gases within a generation. That’s partly because of their rising populations but also because of their poverty; they are less able to afford solar energy projects or other investments in non-fossil energy.

The report also notes that these countries and their people are far more vulnerable to the effects of climate change. A disproportionate number of impoverished countries are in low-lying areas where rising sea levels are expected to cause disastrous flooding. Agricultural productivity is expected to fall 40% in India and sub-Saharan Africa by the second half of this century.

The population issue is just beginning to get some of the public attention it deserves. The most recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the United Nations’ board of climate experts, included concerns about population size, saying, Globally, economic and population growth continued to be the most important drivers of increases in CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. For the first time in its five years of producing such reports, the panel acknowledged that family-planning programs could make a real difference, both in slowing the rate of warming and in helping vulnerable nations adapt to its effects.

And progress can be made without draconian or involuntary measures. According to Karen Hardee, director of the Evidence Project for the nonprofit Population Council, developing nations are already beginning to recognize the usefulness of family planning in preventing hunger and crowding and in combating climate change. She cites Rwanda, Ethiopia and Malawi as countries that are taking the first steps on their own.

But they and other nations need assistance on two fronts: education for girls and access to free or affordable family-planning services. The benefit of even minimal education is startling: Women in developing countries who have had a year or more of schooling give birth to an average of three children; with no schooling, the number is 4.5. Add more years of schooling and the number of births drops further. Women who have attended school also give birth later in life to healthier children.

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Why we need to address population growth's effects on global warming

NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 22, 2015

Search for NASA Educational Resources With New Search ToolAre you looking for a lesson plan about the planet Jupiter? Do you need a poster with information about the Wright Brothers’ first flight? Or maybe you’re hunting for a website with information about NASA’s deep space missions. NASA Education has a new tool to help you in your search!NASA’s new Educational Resource Search Tool can help you find lesson plans, posters, educator guides and other materials to supplement your science, technology, engineering and mathematics curriculum. Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keywords.To check out the new search tool and begin your educational resource hunt, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/education/materials/.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles Available for Educational UseNASA invites eligible U.S. educational institutions and museums to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles and other special items offered on a first-come, first-served basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.There will be a nominal shipping fee that must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visithttp://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.Questions about this opportunity should be directed toGSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Free Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series

Curious about icy bodies in the outer reaches of our solar system, the effects of space junk on deep-space observation, the latest discoveries about the origins of the universe and new ways galaxy formation is mapped? Come to the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series presented by Smithsonian researchers who are exploring the sun, the moon, planets, stars, galaxies and the universe. These speakers will share behind-the-scenes details about how their research is done and about technologies that advance new discoveries. The lectures will be held at the Albert Einstein Planetarium at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.Each lecture begins at 5:15 p.m. EST and is followed by a Q&A session. Stay after the lecture to visit the museum’s observatory, weather permitting.Jan. 24, 2015 — Observing the Origin of the Universe From the South PoleAfter three years of observing from the South Pole, scientists may have found confirmation that the universe underwent a burst of inflationary growth at the time of the Big Bang. Cosmologist Colin Bischoff will discuss these findings as well as the excitement of astronomy from Antarctica.Feb. 21, 2015 — Tracing the Structure of the Universe With Galaxy SurveysStudies of galaxy formation and cosmology have exploded in recent years due to the immense data obtained from large galaxy surveys. Postdoctoral fellow Cameron McBride will discuss how observational data and theory are combined to better understand fundamental questions in our universe, and will highlight some exciting results from ongoing research.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s Stars Lecture Series, visithttp://airandspace.si.edu/events/lectures/smithsonian-stars/.Questions about this lecture series should be directed to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________Sally Ride EarthKAM Announces the 2015 Winter MissionStudents and educators are invited to participate in the Sally Ride EarthKAM winter mission scheduled forJan. 27-30, 2015. Guide your students in hands-on research as they program a camera aboard the International Space Station to take pictures of specific locations on Earth. The optional online curricula at the Sally Ride EarthKAM website are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.For more information and to register for an upcoming mission, visit the Sally Ride EarthKAM home page athttps://earthkam.ucsd.edu/.If you have questions about the EarthKAM project, please emailek-help@earthkam.ucsd.edu.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014-2015 NASA Goddard OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff ChallengeNASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is launching the 2014-2015 TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Challenge, hosted by the Innovative Technology Partnerships Office. The purpose of the challenge is to raise awareness of NASA’s Technology Transfer Program and to inspire interest in all NASA missions, programs and projects.This year the scope of the contest is being expanded to include two challenges. In the first challenge, students in grades 3-12 are asked to submit a video describing their favorite NASA Goddard spinoff. In a new twist, participants in this years contest must also use the engineering design process to develop and propose a new spinoff application of their own for the technology. Spinoffs are technologies originally created for space and modified into everyday products used on Earth. Examples include memory foam, invisible braces and scratch-resistant lenses for eyeglasses.The second challenge, the TRANSFORMERS OPTIMUS PRIME InWorld Challenge, offers students in grades 6-12 an opportunity to take their video spinoff ideas to another level. Interested teams must study James Webb Space Telescope spinoff technology and post their completed spinoff videos for review by college engineering students. Engineering college mentors will select 20 teams to continue the collaborative design process within a multiuser virtual world to build a 3-D model of the teams design solutions.Winning students from each grade category will be invited to Goddard to participate in a behind-the-scenes workshop, attend a VIP awards ceremony and meet actor Peter Cullen, the voice of OPTIMUS PRIME.The new deadline to register and upload videos isJan. 28, 2015.For more information, visithttp://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/optimus/.Questions about this contest should be directed to Darryl Mitchell atDarryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. 2014 Hasbro. All rights reserved.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ DEADLINE EXTENDED: 2014 NASA EONS Solicitation New AppendixNASA’s Office of Education is accepting new proposals under the Education Opportunities in NASA STEM, or EONS, 2014 NASA Research Announcement for the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, Institutional Research Opportunity, or MIRO appendix. This effort was previously titled as the NASA University Research Centers Project, and has now been consolidated into the MUREP Program within the NASA Office of Education.Through the EONS omnibus solicitation, the opportunity MIRO has been released. Through MIRO awards, NASA aims to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM literacy and to enhance and sustain the capability of minority serving institutions to perform NASA-related research and education, which directly support NASA’s four mission directorates — Aeronautics Research, Human Exploration and Space Operations, Science, and Space Technology.The deadline for proposals has been extended toJan. 30, 2015.For more information regarding theMIRO solicitation, please visit theNASA EONSpage on the NASA Solicitation and Proposal Integrated Review and Proposal System, or NSPIRES, website at:http://nspires.nasaprs.com/external/solicitations/summary.do?method=init&solId=%7bB6C61D04-5793-EF52-3497-1AA57FA424A5%7d&path=open.______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2015 NOAA Undergraduate ScholarshipThe National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA, is accepting applications for its 2015 Educational Partnership Program, or EPP, Undergraduate Scholarship Program. The EPP Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to rising junior undergraduate students majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields that directly support NOAA’s mission.Participants receive total awards valued at up to $35,000 in total support during their junior and senior years. During the first summer, scholars complete a nine-week paid summer internship at NOAA in Silver Spring, Maryland. During the second summer, scholars complete paid internships at NOAA facilities across the country. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. At the end of both summer internships, students present the results of their projects at an education and science symposium in Silver Spring.Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution within the United States or U.S. Territories as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.Applications are dueJan. 30, 2015.For more information and to submit an online application, visithttp://www.epp.noaa.gov/ssp_undergrad_page.html.Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be directed toEPP.USP@noaa.gov.

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U.S. National Park Service’s Young Leaders in Climate Change — Summer 2015 InternshipsThe George Melendez Wright Initiative for Young Leaders in Climate Change, or YLCC,builds a pathway for exemplary students in higher education to apply cutting-edge climate change knowledge to park management. The program provides paid summer internships to highly accomplished graduate and upper-level undergraduate students to work on diverse issues related to climate change and its effects in national parks. Participants gain valuable work experience, explore career options and develop leadership skills under the mentorship and guidance of the National Park Service.The program features structured projects in one or more of the following interdisciplinary areas: climate change science and monitoring; resource conservation and adaptation; policy development; sustainable park operations; facilities adaptation; and communication/interpretation/education. Interns who successfully complete the YLCC will be eligible to be hired noncompetitively into subsequent federal jobsonce they complete their degree programs. These jobs would be in the Department of Interior, National Park Service or one of the other bureaus within the Department of Interior. An intern must qualify for the job in order to be hired noncompetitively.Internships are full-time positions (40 hours/week) lasting 11-12 weeks. Interns are paid $14/hour plus benefits, and are employees of the University of Washington. Most positions come with free or subsidized housing in dormitories or other shared accommodations in parks. Internships offer rigorous and challenging projects that demand high-level academic knowledge and skills, allowing interns considerable autonomy and opportunity for leadership under an effective mentor.The application deadline is12:01 pm PST on Jan. 30, 2015.For additional information and to apply for a YLCC internship, visithttp://parksclimateinterns.org/.Questions about this program should be directed to Tim Watkins atclimate_change@nps.gov.

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NASA History Program Office Summer and Fall 2015 InternshipsThe NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer and fall 2015 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.Applications for summer 2015 internships are dueFeb. 1, 2015. Fall 2015 internship applications are dueJune 1, 2015.For more information, visithttp://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry atbill.barry@nasa.gov.

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NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 22, 2015