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Technology – definition of technology by The Free Dictionary

technology (tk-nl-j) n. pl. technologies 1.

a. The application of science, especially to industrial or commercial objectives.

b. The scientific method and material used to achieve a commercial or industrial objective.

2. Electronic or digital products and systems considered as a group: a store specializing in office technology.

3. Anthropology The body of knowledge available to a society that is of use in fashioning implements, practicing manual arts and skills, and extracting or collecting materials.

1. the application of practical sciences to industry or commerce

2. the methods, theory, and practices governing such application: a highly developed technology.

3. (Sociology) the total knowledge and skills available to any human society for industry, art, science, etc

[C17: from Greek tekhnologia systematic treatment, from tekhn art, skill]

technological adj

technologically adv

technologist n

n., pl. -gies.

1. the branch of knowledge that deals with applied science, engineering, the industrial arts, etc.

2. the application of knowledge for practical ends.

3. a technological process, invention, or method.

4. the sum of the ways in which social groups provide themselves with the material objects of their civilization.

5. the terminology of a field; technical nomenclature.

tech`nological (-nld kl) tech`nologic, adj.

tech`nologically, adv.

technologist, n.

1. The use of scientific knowledge to solve practical problems, especially in industry and commerce.

2. The specific methods, materials, and devices used to solve practical problems: aerospace technology.

1. the methods and tools that a society has developed in order to facilitate the solution of its practical problems. 2. any specific application of such. technological, adj. technologist, n.

A technique is a method of doing something.

…the techniques of film-making.

…modern management techniques.

Technique is skill and ability which you develop through training and practice.

He went off to the Amsterdam Academy to improve his technique.

Technology is the use of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, for example in industry.

…our belief in the power of modern technology.

Computer technology can be expected to change.

Read the original:

Technology – definition of technology by The Free Dictionary

Blockchain Technology Is Set to Disrupt Every Industry–and Music Is Next – Inc.com

What is happening today with cryptocurrency and blockchain technology is how I imagine the dot-com gold rush in the 90s felt.

Since I was too young to experience those years (I was 5 years old), I am paying extra close attention to what is happening today. And for those that don’t realize it yet, Bitcoin and Ethereum are quickly changing the world. Age-old industries are being disrupted, the first (and potentially most foundational industry of all) being money.

Anyone who thinks Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are just a fad falls into the same category of people who thought “that Internet thing” was just a fad back in the 90s. That’s what makes these innovations so interesting is that they seem to be eliciting all the same reactions, meanwhile showing all the same signs of future success. Remember when we thought the concept of sending each other pictures over the Internet was “crazy” and would “never happen?” I swear, I have a family video from the early 90s of my uncle showing my dad his brand new laptop, and making a joke that one day they would press a button and the digital photo would just appear on the other person’s laptop. They both started laughing–as if that would never happen.

And then it happened just a few years later.

That’s what’s happening today with blockchain technology. It’s so dense and do difficult to explain (similar to the concept of the Internet back in the 90s) that it has yet to really become a mainstream topic of consideration. But to those paying close attention, blockchain has all the potential in the world to disrupt some very old, very big industries: banking, big pharma, insurance, voting, and entertainment, to name a few.

Here’s what interests me about blockchain technology and the entertainment industry:

How many times have we heard the infamous case study of a band being signed to a major label, only to sue them (and usually their manager) a few years later after realizing they’d been skimped on millions of dollars in royalties?

That has been happening since the days of Elvis.

What’s interesting about blockchain technology is that, by using what are called “smart contracts,” those contracts are executed on automatically through the blockchain. So, if a band signs to a label and their contract states that they receive 70% of every dollar made, with the label receiving 30%, those distributions happen every time a dollar enters the door–assuming all of this is being done on the blockchain. No more relying on a person to count the dollars. No more trusting other people to deliver on the contract. It all happens on the blockchain, and is validated through math.

The whole idea behind blockchain technology is trust. Transparency. Everything is out in the open, and anything that gets processed through the blockchain can be seen and validated by anyone on the blockchain.

Take that concept, and you can see why this is such threatening technology to such big industries. A lot happens behind closed doors, so to put it all out into the open is groundbreaking, to say the least.

Another way that blockchain technology is impacting the music industry is with royalty distributions on digital platforms.

As it stands, artists are victims of the system. If they want access to the massive user bases on Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal, etc., then they have to be OK with getting paid pennies on the dollar for people to listen to their music. What an artist makes on these streaming platforms is nothing compared to what artists in the 90s made on CD sales.

One startup that is looking to tackle this issue with blockchain technology is called OPUS, a streaming platform for artists to upload their music and receive 98% of the revenue. For those that don’t know, 98% is unheard of, and is leagues above what an artist would make selling their music on Apple Music, for example.

The idea behind OPUS is to solve for three massive issues in the music business: revenue share, censorship, and transparency. This is the beauty of using blockchain technology, because all three of those can be delivered on. The revenue share issue is solved by giving artists 98% of all royalties, the censorship issue because the power remains in the artists hands, and the transparency issue because labels can no longer hide money from the artists. And because it is built on the blockchain, none of these parameters can be changed down the road–whereas other services may decide one day to cut the percentage given to artists.

OPUS is currently raising funds through an ICO to continue working toward this vision of artist empowerment.

When you look at the landscape of digital music, I really do believe decentralizing the industry is the next logical step. Even SoundCloud, one of the most popular streaming platforms on the Internet, has reported that they are quickly running out of cash and exploring potential acquisition deals (not so much out of choice, but by necessity) because artists have no way to monetize their audiences. But with something like OPUS, artists still have to do the heavy lifting of marketing their own music, except they’re more handsomely rewarded for their efforts.

Blockchain technology will fundamentally change the way business is done in industries all over the world. I would encourage you to start paying attention now.

Original post:

Blockchain Technology Is Set to Disrupt Every Industry–and Music Is Next – Inc.com

Most Faculty Say Technology Has Made Their Jobs Easier – Campus Technology

Teaching with Technology Survey

Our 2017 Teaching with Technology Survey found that faculty have a positive outlook about technology’s impact on their work, teaching effectiveness, student learning and more.

In a survey of faculty members at colleges and universities across the United States, 73 percent of respondents said technology has made their jobs “easier” or “much easier.” And nary a one considered their job “much harder” thanks to tech.

Those findings came out of Campus Technology’s second annual Teaching with Technology Survey, in which we asked faculty to dish on their use of technology, likes and dislikes, views of the future and more. Their responses revealed a lot about the business of teaching and learning with technology today and how it has changed over the last year.

While 73 percent of faculty were positive about the impact of technology on their jobs, that count represented a slip of four percentage points from last year, when 77 percent believed the same. The number of faculty who think technology has made their jobs harder is holding steady (17 percent this year compared to 16 percent in 2016), and a growing faction feels that tech has not had an impact either way (10 percent this year compared to 6 percent in 2016).

Whether technology is making life hard or easy for faculty, the majority of respondents (85 percent) feel the effort is worthwhile, agreeing that “Technology has positively affected my ability to teach.” That number is slightly lower than last year, when 88 percent felt the same.

The results were similar when it came to technology’s impact on student learning. Eighty-one percent of respondents saw a positive effect, compared to 84 percent last year. And 13 percent feel tech hasn’t affected student learning one way or the other. “Technology is only as successful as the teacher who uses it,” noted one respondent from a public university in California.

Overall, faculty in our survey hold an upbeat view of technology’s value in higher education: Eighty percent think tech has had an “extremely positive” or “mostly positive” impact on education, similar to last year’s count of 81 percent who felt the same.

A handful of respondents were less sanguine, feeling that technology has had a “mostly negative” impact, and 19 percent saw both positive and negative effects. As one faculty member from a two-year institution in Texas asserted, “Technology is rampant, but the actual impact on learning is unknown. Random studies have been conducted, but no one really knows.”

“In some cases, technology is already overshadowing the learning process and making it more difficult,” opined a respondent from Illinois. “More technology is not always the answer and more technology cannot replace good instruction.”

“As with any facet of teaching and learning, there needs to be enough time for faculty to learn to properly use, adapt and implement for technology to be beneficial,” pointed out a respondent from a Florida university.

“Technology used badly can be horrible,” agreed a faculty member in Georgia. “Technology used to enhance student access to the world and their ability to collaborate and create can be awesome! It all depends on how you use it (like everything else).”

The full results of the Teaching with Technology Survey appear in the July digital issue of Campus Technology. Highlights from the survey will also be posted on this site over the coming months. You can check back for ongoing coverage in our Research section.

About the Author

About the author: Rhea Kelly is executive editor for Campus Technology. She can be reached at rkelly@1105media.com.

Excerpt from:

Most Faculty Say Technology Has Made Their Jobs Easier – Campus Technology

Blockchain Technology Is Set to Disrupt Every Industry–and Music Is Next – Inc.com

What is happening today with cryptocurrency and blockchain technology is how I imagine the dot-com gold rush in the 90s felt.

Since I was too young to experience those years (I was 5 years old), I am paying extra close attention to what is happening today. And for those that don’t realize it yet, Bitcoin and Ethereum are quickly changing the world. Age-old industries are being disrupted, the first (and potentially most foundational industry of all) being money.

Anyone who thinks Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are just a fad falls into the same category of people who thought “that Internet thing” was just a fad back in the 90s. That’s what makes these innovations so interesting is that they seem to be eliciting all the same reactions, meanwhile showing all the same signs of future success. Remember when we thought the concept of sending each other pictures over the Internet was “crazy” and would “never happen?” I swear, I have a family video from the early 90s of my uncle showing my dad his brand new laptop, and making a joke that one day they would press a button and the digital photo would just appear on the other person’s laptop. They both started laughing–as if that would never happen.

And then it happened just a few years later.

That’s what’s happening today with blockchain technology. It’s so dense and do difficult to explain (similar to the concept of the Internet back in the 90s) that it has yet to really become a mainstream topic of consideration. But to those paying close attention, blockchain has all the potential in the world to disrupt some very old, very big industries: banking, big pharma, insurance, voting, and entertainment, to name a few.

Here’s what interests me about blockchain technology and the entertainment industry:

How many times have we heard the infamous case study of a band being signed to a major label, only to sue them (and usually their manager) a few years later after realizing they’d been skimped on millions of dollars in royalties?

That has been happening since the days of Elvis.

What’s interesting about blockchain technology is that, by using what are called “smart contracts,” those contracts are executed on automatically through the blockchain. So, if a band signs to a label and their contract states that they receive 70% of every dollar made, with the label receiving 30%, those distributions happen every time a dollar enters the door–assuming all of this is being done on the blockchain. No more relying on a person to count the dollars. No more trusting other people to deliver on the contract. It all happens on the blockchain, and is validated through math.

The whole idea behind blockchain technology is trust. Transparency. Everything is out in the open, and anything that gets processed through the blockchain can be seen and validated by anyone on the blockchain.

Take that concept, and you can see why this is such threatening technology to such big industries. A lot happens behind closed doors, so to put it all out into the open is groundbreaking, to say the least.

Another way that blockchain technology is impacting the music industry is with royalty distributions on digital platforms.

As it stands, artists are victims of the system. If they want access to the massive user bases on Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal, etc., then they have to be OK with getting paid pennies on the dollar for people to listen to their music. What an artist makes on these streaming platforms is nothing compared to what artists in the 90s made on CD sales.

One startup that is looking to tackle this issue with blockchain technology is called OPUS, a streaming platform for artists to upload their music and receive 98% of the revenue. For those that don’t know, 98% is unheard of, and is leagues above what an artist would make selling their music on Apple Music, for example.

The idea behind OPUS is to solve for three massive issues in the music business: revenue share, censorship, and transparency. This is the beauty of using blockchain technology, because all three of those can be delivered on. The revenue share issue is solved by giving artists 98% of all royalties, the censorship issue because the power remains in the artists hands, and the transparency issue because labels can no longer hide money from the artists. And because it is built on the blockchain, none of these parameters can be changed down the road–whereas other services may decide one day to cut the percentage given to artists.

OPUS is currently raising funds through an ICO to continue working toward this vision of artist empowerment.

When you look at the landscape of digital music, I really do believe decentralizing the industry is the next logical step. Even SoundCloud, one of the most popular streaming platforms on the Internet, has reported that they are quickly running out of cash and exploring potential acquisition deals (not so much out of choice, but by necessity) because artists have no way to monetize their audiences. But with something like OPUS, artists still have to do the heavy lifting of marketing their own music, except they’re more handsomely rewarded for their efforts.

Blockchain technology will fundamentally change the way business is done in industries all over the world. I would encourage you to start paying attention now.

Read the original post:

Blockchain Technology Is Set to Disrupt Every Industry–and Music Is Next – Inc.com

Technology – definition of technology by The Free Dictionary

technology (tk-nl-j) n. pl. technologies 1.

a. The application of science, especially to industrial or commercial objectives.

b. The scientific method and material used to achieve a commercial or industrial objective.

2. Electronic or digital products and systems considered as a group: a store specializing in office technology.

3. Anthropology The body of knowledge available to a society that is of use in fashioning implements, practicing manual arts and skills, and extracting or collecting materials.

1. the application of practical sciences to industry or commerce

2. the methods, theory, and practices governing such application: a highly developed technology.

3. (Sociology) the total knowledge and skills available to any human society for industry, art, science, etc

[C17: from Greek tekhnologia systematic treatment, from tekhn art, skill]

technological adj

technologically adv

technologist n

n., pl. -gies.

1. the branch of knowledge that deals with applied science, engineering, the industrial arts, etc.

2. the application of knowledge for practical ends.

3. a technological process, invention, or method.

4. the sum of the ways in which social groups provide themselves with the material objects of their civilization.

5. the terminology of a field; technical nomenclature.

tech`nological (-nld kl) tech`nologic, adj.

tech`nologically, adv.

technologist, n.

1. The use of scientific knowledge to solve practical problems, especially in industry and commerce.

2. The specific methods, materials, and devices used to solve practical problems: aerospace technology.

1. the methods and tools that a society has developed in order to facilitate the solution of its practical problems. 2. any specific application of such. technological, adj. technologist, n.

A technique is a method of doing something.

…the techniques of film-making.

…modern management techniques.

Technique is skill and ability which you develop through training and practice.

He went off to the Amsterdam Academy to improve his technique.

Technology is the use of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, for example in industry.

…our belief in the power of modern technology.

Computer technology can be expected to change.

Original post:

Technology – definition of technology by The Free Dictionary

Technology | Definition of Technology by Merriam-Webster

noun technology tek-n-l-j

noun technology tek-n-l-j

1 : the use of science in solving problems (as in industry or engineering)

2 : a method of or machine for doing something that is created by technology

noun technology -j

1: the science of the application of knowledge to practical purposes : applied science

2: a scientific method of achieving a practical purpose

Read more from the original source:

Technology | Definition of Technology by Merriam-Webster

Technology – reddit

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/r/technology is a place to share and discuss the latest developments, happenings and curiosities in the world of technology; a broad spectrum of conversation as to the innovations, aspirations, applications and machinations that define our age and shape our future.

Submissions must be primarily news and developments relating to technology

Self posts must contribute positively to /r/technology and foster reasonable discussion.

Submissions relating to business and politics must be sufficiently within the context of technology in that they either view the events from a technological standpoint or analyse the repercussions in the technological world.

i) Submissions violating the guidelines.

ii) Images, audio or videos: Articles with supporting image and video content are allowed; if the text is only there to explain the media, then it is not suitable. A good rule of thumb is to look at the URL; if it’s a video hosting site, or mentions video in the URL, it’s not suitable.

iii) Requests for tech support, questions or help: submit to /r/techsupport, /r/AskTechnology, another relevant community or our weekly Support Saturday threads.

iv) Petitions, Surveys or Crowdfunding – submissions of this nature will be removed.

v) Submissions discussing the subreddit itself; they should be submitted to /r/TechnologyTalk, or messaged to the moderators of the subreddit.

vi) Submissions discussing one or more incidents of customer support.

vii) Mobile versions of sites, url shorteners: please directly submit the desktop version of a webpage in all cases.

Submissions must use either the articles title, or a suitable quote, either of which must:

adequately describe the content

adequately describe the content’s relation to technology

be free of user editorialization or alteration of meaning.

If you see a rule-breaking submission, please report it and message the moderators with your reason.

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Removed threads will either be given a removal reason flair or comment response; please message the moderators if this did not occur.

All legitimate, answerable modmail inquiries or suggestions will be answered to the best of our abilities within a reasonable period of time.

Rule violators will be warned. Repeat offenders will be temporarily banned from one to seven days. An unheeded final warning will result in a permanent ban. This may be reversed upon evidence of suitable behavior.

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Technology – reddit

The Center for Rehabilitation Engineering Science & Technology … – Clarkson University News (press release)

Rehabilitation engineering spans the entire engineering and research spectrum:

Institute of Medicine’s ’97 report, Enabling America, noted the following:

Rehabilitation engineering, science and technology education is hampered by a lack of clinically relevant, but engineering-basedteaching materials, laboratory experiencesand examples. At this point in the evolution of the science, there is a sufficient knowledge base and level of research to organize a rigorous scientific structure for the field. Such organization would accelerate multidisciplinary education, training and research, all of which would combine to advance the field of rehabilitation science and engineering and more effectively address the needs of people with disabling conditions.

Read more here:

The Center for Rehabilitation Engineering Science & Technology … – Clarkson University News (press release)

Apple focusing on self-driving technology, not building cars: report – MarketWatch

Apple Inc. AAPL, +1.63% is scaling back its plans to build self-driving cars, focusing instead on the software and technology for autonomous vehicles, according to a New York Times report late Tuesday. In June, Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook told Bloomberg News the company was “focusing on autonomous systems” but didn’t go into details. The Times said Apple’s pivot after years of work on the so-called Project Titan came after complications caused by the sheer size of the self-driving-car project and lack of a clear vision for the end product. After longtime Apple hardware executive Bob Mansfield took over the Titan project last year, he shifted its focus from building a car to the technology behind it, the Times said. Apple plans to test its technology with a self-driving shuttle van between its Silicon Valley campuses, the Times reported.

Here is the original post:

Apple focusing on self-driving technology, not building cars: report – MarketWatch

Technology Has Changed Advertising Forever – HuffPost

Throughout history, advancements in technology have played an important role in how individuals are exposed to new information. From the printing press, to radio, to television, and most recently, the internet, each successive innovation revolutionized and altered how individuals engaged with new concepts, products, companies, and brands. Yet, despite technological advancements, until the mid-to-late 1990s most companies and brands relied on a linear and symbiotic way to reach consumers: traditional media companies sold advertising space to fund their operations and companies bought advertising space to reach consumers.

With the rapid growth and adoption of internet connectivity, the long-established advertising norms have been uprooted. Increased connectivity has resulted in the democratization of media; anyone with a good strategy, an internet connection, and basic web design skills is now capable of competing with multi billion dollar enterprises for views and advertising dollars. Moreover, the increased use of social media platforms not only means that people are accessing information in new ways, it also means they are no longer as reliant on receiving information through traditional mediums.

Due to the proliferation of new ways to reach consumers and shifting consumer habits, companies, brands, advertising firms, and media outlets have been forced to adapt and develop new ways to reach audiences. While Americans still spend about three hours a day watching television, the internet is not far behind, with most Americans spending about two hours online. Social media has also played an important role in impacting the how people access information, with Americans reporting they spend an average of 1.7 hours a day using social media. Globally, social media has experienced similar trends, with adults reporting having accounts on over 5 social networks. In recognizing the importance of the online world to reaching consumers in the United States, companies spent $15 billion more on online ads versus television ads in 2016. Although television still remains popular, its projected growth rate of 1.3 percent from 2016-2021, pales in comparison to projected online ad spending which is expected to grow at a rate of 9.9 percent during the same period. Perhaps not surprisingly, its been estimated that in 2017, companies will spend $204 billion on digital ads, an increase of over $50 billion since 2015. Additionally, combined spending on mobile ads and social media, non-existent 15 years ago, is expected to reach $55 billion dollars in 2019, an over five time increase from 2016 levels of $10.9 billion.

While the proliferation of new avenues with which to reach consumers has increased exponentially, it has not always translated into greater consumer engagement. Surveys have found that two-thirds of internet users viewed online advertising in a negative light, with users having used annoying and distracting as the most common ways to describe online advertising. Furthermore, many consumers are taking matters into their own hands to avoid unwanted marketing and using ad-blocker technology to filter out advertising; accordingly, in 2016 ad-blocker use grew by 30 percent.

The growth of digital advertising and its corresponding hurdles have spurred entrepreneurs to develop systems and processes to facilitate digital advertising, track results, and optimize effectiveness. In 2016, Adtech, or Advertising Technology, saw nearly $2.2 billion of investor funds flow into the sector. From interactive advertising, to personalization, to value-exchange, to native advertising, Adtech entrepreneurs are using technology to develop innovative ways to connect companies with consumers.

I had the opportunity to interview, Mitchell Reichgut, the CEO of Jun Group, a New York City based Adtech company that seeks to optimize the ability of brands and companies to effectively share content with potential customers. Mitchell and I discussed his business, the impact of technology on advertising, and his views on entrepreneurship. Hope you enjoy!

Mitchell Reichgut, CEO of Jun Group

CG: Tell me about your company. What does Jun Group do?

MR: Jun Group gets millions of people to watch videos and visit web pages from Fortune 500 brands across devices. The word Jun means truth and the worlds best-known brands trust us to connect them to their customers because everything we do is viewable, brand-safe, and transparent.

CG: What solutions does your company provide to brands and publishers?

MR: Our job is to provide clear, unfettered access to the people our customers want to reach. We are uniquely suited for this because our technology reaches over 100 million people in mobile apps where consumers spend 90% of their smart phone time. Instead of interrupting people, we allow them to opt-in to gorgeous, full-screen branded experiences. This produces some of the best results in the industry: 93% completion rates for 30-second videos, 100% viewability, an average of 3-5% of viewers take actions after watching (clicks to websites, social media actions, etc.), and less than 2% non-human traffic according to independent measurements.

All this is powered by value exchange, which lets people unlock entertainment, points, or other digital content in exchange for their time. Major ad platforms like Google, Facebook, Newscorp, AOL, and Pandora are all using value exchange to drive results for their advertisers.

CG: Technology has revolutionized how consumers interact with brands and companies. In your view, what have been the major changes impacting the advertising industry?

MR: Mobile applications have fundamentally changed the ad industry. People are especially intolerant of interruptions on their mobile devices because they are so personal, and the age-old precept of reach and frequency is becoming outdated. Additionally, advertisers can pinpoint specific people they want to reach on any device rather than relying on editorial environments to attract them. On one hand, these factors are creating more efficient advertising mechanisms; on the other, the power is shifting to consumers who are demanding more relevant and entertaining experiences in exchange for their attention.

CG: From your perspective, given the aforementioned changes and the rapidly evolving business climate, what should brands and publishers be cognizant of as they seek to promote their products and services to consumers? What strategies are most effective?

Along with all the opportunities and advances, digital advertising has major problems. Ad fraud is expected to cost advertisers over $16 billion in 2017 and we believe thats a gross underestimate because so much fraud goes undetected. To enjoy the benefits of this new marketplace while avoiding its pitfalls, advertisers should follow three rules. First, demand complete transparency throughout the process: payments, placements, partners, and technology. Second, create content that is meaningful to people. It doesnt have to be hilarious or outrageous, just relevant. Finally, ad context is as important as ad contentadvertisers must carefully choose where and how to place their brands.

CG: Looking towards the future, over the next decade or so, how do you see Ad-Tech evolving?

MR: Digital advertising will become less interruptive and more relevant. Currently, anyone who can afford to pay about $12 per month can avoid ads on platforms like Amazon, YouTube, Netflix, etc. The onus will increasingly be on advertisers to provide value in exchange for peoples attention. Lets not forget, though, that AM radio is still a popular and effective mass medium. New media will never fully supplant the old guard.

CG: Entrepreneurship is rife with challenges. What advice would you give to other entrepreneurs seeking to launch their own innovative, technology startup?

MR: When people ask me how to be successful in digital media, I ask them a question in return: how bad do you want this? Elite athletes, top academics, great artists, and successful businesspeople are typically willing to make deep sacrifices over long periods of time because they are passionate about what they do. Digital media is no exception. Work hard, stick with it, learn from mistakes, and the rest will take care of itself.

MR: Ive enjoyed this conversation and I appreciate the opportunity to share my thoughts. Thank you!

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Link:

Technology Has Changed Advertising Forever – HuffPost

Technology – Wikipedia

This article is about the use and knowledge of techniques and processes for producing goods and services. For other uses, see Technology (disambiguation).

Technology (“science of craft”, from Greek , techne, “art, skill, cunning of hand”; and -, -logia[2]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods, and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, and the like, or it can be embedded in machines to allow for operation without detailed knowledge of their workings.

The simplest form of technology is the development and use of basic tools. The prehistoric discovery of how to control fire and the later Neolithic Revolution increased the available sources of food, and the invention of the wheel helped humans to travel in and control their environment. Developments in historic times, including the printing press, the telephone, and the Internet, have lessened physical barriers to communication and allowed humans to interact freely on a global scale. The steady progress of military technology has brought weapons of ever-increasing destructive power, from clubs to nuclear weapons.

Technology has many effects. It has helped develop more advanced economies (including today’s global economy) and has allowed the rise of a leisure class. Many technological processes produce unwanted by-products known as pollution and deplete natural resources to the detriment of Earth’s environment. Innovations have always influenced the values of a society and raised new questions of the ethics of technology. Examples include the rise of the notion of efficiency in terms of human productivity, and the challenges of bioethics.

Philosophical debates have arisen over the use of technology, with disagreements over whether technology improves the human condition or worsens it. Neo-Luddism, anarcho-primitivism, and similar reactionary movements criticize the pervasiveness of technology, arguing that it harms the environment and alienates people; proponents of ideologies such as transhumanism and techno-progressivism view continued technological progress as beneficial to society and the human condition.

The use of the term “technology” has changed significantly over the last 200 years. Before the 20th century, the term was uncommon in English, and it was used either to refer to the description or study of the useful arts[3] or to allude to technical education, as in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (chartered in 1861).[4]

The term “technology” rose to prominence in the 20th century in connection with the Second Industrial Revolution. The term’s meanings changed in the early 20th century when American social scientists, beginning with Thorstein Veblen, translated ideas from the German concept of Technik into “technology.” In German and other European languages, a distinction exists between technik and technologie that is absent in English, which usually translates both terms as “technology.” By the 1930s, “technology” referred not only to the study of the industrial arts but to the industrial arts themselves.[5]

In 1937, the American sociologist Read Bain wrote that “technology includes all tools, machines, utensils, weapons, instruments, housing, clothing, communicating and transporting devices and the skills by which we produce and use them.”[6] Bain’s definition remains common among scholars today, especially social scientists. Scientists and engineers usually prefer to define technology as applied science, rather than as the things that people make and use.[7] More recently, scholars have borrowed from European philosophers of “technique” to extend the meaning of technology to various forms of instrumental reason, as in Foucault’s work on technologies of the self (techniques de soi).

Dictionaries and scholars have offered a variety of definitions. The Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary offers a definition of the term: “the use of science in industry, engineering, etc., to invent useful things or to solve problems” and “a machine, piece of equipment, method, etc., that is created by technology.”[8]Ursula Franklin, in her 1989 “Real World of Technology” lecture, gave another definition of the concept; it is “practice, the way we do things around here.”[9] The term is often used to imply a specific field of technology, or to refer to high technology or just consumer electronics, rather than technology as a whole.[10]Bernard Stiegler, in Technics and Time, 1, defines technology in two ways: as “the pursuit of life by means other than life,” and as “organized inorganic matter.”[11]

Technology can be most broadly defined as the entities, both material and immaterial, created by the application of mental and physical effort in order to achieve some value. In this usage, technology refers to tools and machines that may be used to solve real-world problems. It is a far-reaching term that may include simple tools, such as a crowbar or wooden spoon, or more complex machines, such as a space station or particle accelerator. Tools and machines need not be material; virtual technology, such as computer software and business methods, fall under this definition of technology.[12]W. Brian Arthur defines technology in a similarly broad way as “a means to fulfill a human purpose.”[13]

The word “technology” can also be used to refer to a collection of techniques. In this context, it is the current state of humanity’s knowledge of how to combine resources to produce desired products, to solve problems, fulfill needs, or satisfy wants; it includes technical methods, skills, processes, techniques, tools and raw materials. When combined with another term, such as “medical technology” or “space technology,” it refers to the state of the respective field’s knowledge and tools. “State-of-the-art technology” refers to the high technology available to humanity in any field.

Technology can be viewed as an activity that forms or changes culture.[14] Additionally, technology is the application of math, science, and the arts for the benefit of life as it is known. A modern example is the rise of communication technology, which has lessened barriers to human interaction and as a result has helped spawn new subcultures; the rise of cyberculture has at its basis the development of the Internet and the computer.[15] Not all technology enhances culture in a creative way; technology can also help facilitate political oppression and war via tools such as guns. As a cultural activity, technology predates both science and engineering, each of which formalize some aspects of technological endeavor.

The distinction between science, engineering, and technology is not always clear. Science is systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.[16] Technologies are not usually exclusively products of science, because they have to satisfy requirements such as utility, usability, and safety.[citation needed]

Engineering is the goal-oriented process of designing and making tools and systems to exploit natural phenomena for practical human means, often (but not always) using results and techniques from science. The development of technology may draw upon many fields of knowledge, including scientific, engineering, mathematical, linguistic, and historical knowledge, to achieve some practical result.

Technology is often a consequence of science and engineering, although technology as a human activity precedes the two fields. For example, science might study the flow of electrons in electrical conductors by using already-existing tools and knowledge. This new-found knowledge may then be used by engineers to create new tools and machines such as semiconductors, computers, and other forms of advanced technology. In this sense, scientists and engineers may both be considered technologists; the three fields are often considered as one for the purposes of research and reference.[17]

The exact relations between science and technology in particular have been debated by scientists, historians, and policymakers in the late 20th century, in part because the debate can inform the funding of basic and applied science. In the immediate wake of World War II, for example, it was widely considered in the United States that technology was simply “applied science” and that to fund basic science was to reap technological results in due time. An articulation of this philosophy could be found explicitly in Vannevar Bush’s treatise on postwar science policy, Science The Endless Frontier: “New products, new industries, and more jobs require continuous additions to knowledge of the laws of nature… This essential new knowledge can be obtained only through basic scientific research.”[18] In the late-1960s, however, this view came under direct attack, leading towards initiatives to fund science for specific tasks (initiatives resisted by the scientific community). The issue remains contentious, though most analysts resist the model that technology simply is a result of scientific research.[19][20]

The use of tools by early humans was partly a process of discovery and of evolution. Early humans evolved from a species of foraging hominids which were already bipedal,[21] with a brain mass approximately one third of modern humans.[22] Tool use remained relatively unchanged for most of early human history. Approximately 50,000 years ago, the use of tools and complex set of behaviors emerged, believed by many archaeologists to be connected to the emergence of fully modern language.[23]

Hominids started using primitive stone tools millions of years ago. The earliest stone tools were little more than a fractured rock, but approximately 75,000 years ago,[24]pressure flaking provided a way to make much finer work.

The discovery and utilization of fire, a simple energy source with many profound uses, was a turning point in the technological evolution of humankind.[25] The exact date of its discovery is not known; evidence of burnt animal bones at the Cradle of Humankind suggests that the domestication of fire occurred before 1 Ma;[26] scholarly consensus indicates that Homo erectus had controlled fire by between 500 and 400 ka.[27][28] Fire, fueled with wood and charcoal, allowed early humans to cook their food to increase its digestibility, improving its nutrient value and broadening the number of foods that could be eaten.[29]

Other technological advances made during the Paleolithic era were clothing and shelter; the adoption of both technologies cannot be dated exactly, but they were a key to humanity’s progress. As the Paleolithic era progressed, dwellings became more sophisticated and more elaborate; as early as 380 ka, humans were constructing temporary wood huts.[30][31] Clothing, adapted from the fur and hides of hunted animals, helped humanity expand into colder regions; humans began to migrate out of Africa by 200 ka and into other continents such as Eurasia.[32]

Human’s technological ascent began in earnest in what is known as the Neolithic Period (“New Stone Age”). The invention of polished stone axes was a major advance that allowed forest clearance on a large scale to create farms. This use of polished stone axes increased greatly in the Neolithic, but were originally used in the preceding Mesolithic in some areas such as Ireland.[33]Agriculture fed larger populations, and the transition to sedentism allowed simultaneously raising more children, as infants no longer needed to be carried, as nomadic ones must. Additionally, children could contribute labor to the raising of crops more readily than they could to the hunter-gatherer economy.[34][35]

With this increase in population and availability of labor came an increase in labor specialization.[36] What triggered the progression from early Neolithic villages to the first cities, such as Uruk, and the first civilizations, such as Sumer, is not specifically known; however, the emergence of increasingly hierarchical social structures and specialized labor, of trade and war amongst adjacent cultures, and the need for collective action to overcome environmental challenges such as irrigation, are all thought to have played a role.[37]

Continuing improvements led to the furnace and bellows and provided, for the first time, the ability to smelt and forge of gold, copper, silver, and lead native metals found in relatively pure form in nature.[38] The advantages of copper tools over stone, bone, and wooden tools were quickly apparent to early humans, and native copper was probably used from near the beginning of Neolithic times (about 10 ka).[39] Native copper does not naturally occur in large amounts, but copper ores are quite common and some of them produce metal easily when burned in wood or charcoal fires. Eventually, the working of metals led to the discovery of alloys such as bronze and brass (about 4000 BCE). The first uses of iron alloys such as steel dates to around 1800 BCE.[40][41]

Meanwhile, humans were learning to harness other forms of energy. The earliest known use of wind power is the sailboat; the earliest record of a ship under sail is that of a Nile boat that dates back to the 8th millennium BCE.[42] From prehistoric times, Egyptians probably used the power of the annual flooding of the Nile to irrigate their lands, gradually learning to regulate much of it through purposely built irrigation channels and “catch” basins. Similarly, the early peoples of Mesopotamia, the Sumerians, learned to use the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers for much the same purposes. However, more extensive use of wind and water (and even human) power required another invention.

According to archaeologists, the wheel was invented around 4000 BCE probably independently and nearly simultaneously in Mesopotamia (in present-day Iraq), the Northern Caucasus (Maykop culture) and Central Europe.[43] Estimates on when this may have occurred range from 5500 to 3000 BCE with most experts putting it closer to 4000 BCE.[44] The oldest artifacts with drawings that depict wheeled carts date from about 3500 BCE;[45] however, the wheel may have been in use for millennia before these drawings were made. There is also evidence from the same period for the use of the potter’s wheel. More recently, the oldest-known wooden wheel in the world was found in the Ljubljana marshes of Slovenia.[46]

The invention of the wheel revolutionized trade and war. It did not take long to discover that wheeled wagons could be used to carry heavy loads. Fast (rotary) potters’ wheels enabled early mass production of pottery, but it was the use of the wheel as a transformer of energy (through water wheels, windmills, and even treadmills) that revolutionized the application of nonhuman power sources.

Innovations continued through the Middle Ages with innovations such as silk, the horse collar and horseshoes in the first few hundred years after the fall of the Roman Empire. Medieval technology saw the use of simple machines (such as the lever, the screw, and the pulley) being combined to form more complicated tools, such as the wheelbarrow, windmills and clocks. The Renaissance brought forth many of these innovations, including the printing press (which facilitated the greater communication of knowledge), and technology became increasingly associated with science, beginning a cycle of mutual advancement. The advancements in technology in this era allowed a more steady supply of food, followed by the wider availability of consumer goods.

Starting in the United Kingdom in the 18th century, the Industrial Revolution was a period of great technological discovery, particularly in the areas of agriculture, manufacturing, mining, metallurgy, and transport, driven by the discovery of steam power. Technology took another step in a second industrial revolution with the harnessing of electricity to create such innovations as the electric motor, light bulb, and countless others. Scientific advancement and the discovery of new concepts later allowed for powered flight and advancements in medicine, chemistry, physics, and engineering. The rise in technology has led to skyscrapers and broad urban areas whose inhabitants rely on motors to transport them and their food supply. Communication was also greatly improved with the invention of the telegraph, telephone, radio and television. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw a revolution in transportation with the invention of the airplane and automobile.

The 20th century brought a host of innovations. In physics, the discovery of nuclear fission has led to both nuclear weapons and nuclear power. Computers were also invented and later miniaturized utilizing transistors and integrated circuits. Information technology subsequently led to the creation of the Internet, which ushered in the current Information Age. Humans have also been able to explore space with satellites (later used for telecommunication) and in manned missions going all the way to the moon. In medicine, this era brought innovations such as open-heart surgery and later stem cell therapy along with new medications and treatments.

Complex manufacturing and construction techniques and organizations are needed to make and maintain these new technologies, and entire industries have arisen to support and develop succeeding generations of increasingly more complex tools. Modern technology increasingly relies on training and education their designers, builders, maintainers, and users often require sophisticated general and specific training. Moreover, these technologies have become so complex that entire fields have been created to support them, including engineering, medicine, and computer science, and other fields have been made more complex, such as construction, transportation and architecture.

Generally, technicism is the belief in the utility of technology for improving human societies.[47] Taken to an extreme, technicism “reflects a fundamental attitude which seeks to control reality, to resolve all problems with the use of scientific-technological methods and tools.”[48] In other words, human beings will someday be able to master all problems and possibly even control the future using technology. Some, such as Stephen V. Monsma,[49] connect these ideas to the abdication of religion as a higher moral authority.

Optimistic assumptions are made by proponents of ideologies such as transhumanism and singularitarianism, which view technological development as generally having beneficial effects for the society and the human condition. In these ideologies, technological development is morally good.

Transhumanists generally believe that the point of technology is to overcome barriers, and that what we commonly refer to as the human condition is just another barrier to be surpassed.

Singularitarians believe in some sort of “accelerating change”; that the rate of technological progress accelerates as we obtain more technology, and that this will culminate in a “Singularity” after artificial general intelligence is invented in which progress is nearly infinite; hence the term. Estimates for the date of this Singularity vary,[50] but prominent futurist Ray Kurzweil estimates the Singularity will occur in 2045.

Kurzweil is also known for his history of the universe in six epochs: (1) the physical/chemical epoch, (2) the life epoch, (3) the human/brain epoch, (4) the technology epoch, (5) the artificial intelligence epoch, and (6) the universal colonization epoch. Going from one epoch to the next is a Singularity in its own right, and a period of speeding up precedes it. Each epoch takes a shorter time, which means the whole history of the universe is one giant Singularity event.[51]

Some critics see these ideologies as examples of scientism and techno-utopianism and fear the notion of human enhancement and technological singularity which they support. Some have described Karl Marx as a techno-optimist.[52]

On the somewhat skeptical side are certain philosophers like Herbert Marcuse and John Zerzan, who believe that technological societies are inherently flawed. They suggest that the inevitable result of such a society is to become evermore technological at the cost of freedom and psychological health.

Many, such as the Luddites and prominent philosopher Martin Heidegger, hold serious, although not entirely, deterministic reservations about technology (see “The Question Concerning Technology”[53]). According to Heidegger scholars Hubert Dreyfus and Charles Spinosa, “Heidegger does not oppose technology. He hopes to reveal the essence of technology in a way that ‘in no way confines us to a stultified compulsion to push on blindly with technology or, what comes to the same thing, to rebel helplessly against it.’ Indeed, he promises that ‘when we once open ourselves expressly to the essence of technology, we find ourselves unexpectedly taken into a freeing claim.'[54] What this entails is a more complex relationship to technology than either techno-optimists or techno-pessimists tend to allow.”[55]

Some of the most poignant criticisms of technology are found in what are now considered to be dystopian literary classics such as Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, Anthony Burgess’s A Clockwork Orange, and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four. In Goethe’s Faust, Faust selling his soul to the devil in return for power over the physical world is also often interpreted as a metaphor for the adoption of industrial technology. More recently, modern works of science fiction such as those by Philip K. Dick and William Gibson and films such as Blade Runner and Ghost in the Shell project highly ambivalent or cautionary attitudes toward technology’s impact on human society and identity.

The late cultural critic Neil Postman distinguished tool-using societies from technological societies and from what he called “technopolies,” societies that are dominated by the ideology of technological and scientific progress to the exclusion or harm of other cultural practices, values and world-views.[56]

Darin Barney has written about technology’s impact on practices of citizenship and democratic culture, suggesting that technology can be construed as (1) an object of political debate, (2) a means or medium of discussion, and (3) a setting for democratic deliberation and citizenship. As a setting for democratic culture, Barney suggests that technology tends to make ethical questions, including the question of what a good life consists in, nearly impossible, because they already give an answer to the question: a good life is one that includes the use of more and more technology.[57]

Nikolas Kompridis has also written about the dangers of new technology, such as genetic engineering, nanotechnology, synthetic biology, and robotics. He warns that these technologies introduce unprecedented new challenges to human beings, including the possibility of the permanent alteration of our biological nature. These concerns are shared by other philosophers, scientists and public intellectuals who have written about similar issues (e.g. Francis Fukuyama, Jrgen Habermas, William Joy, and Michael Sandel).[58]

Another prominent critic of technology is Hubert Dreyfus, who has published books such as On the Internet and What Computers Still Can’t Do.

A more infamous anti-technological treatise is Industrial Society and Its Future, written by the Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and printed in several major newspapers (and later books) as part of an effort to end his bombing campaign of the techno-industrial infrastructure.

The notion of appropriate technology was developed in the 20th century by thinkers such as E. F. Schumacher and Jacques Ellul to describe situations where it was not desirable to use very new technologies or those that required access to some centralized infrastructure or parts or skills imported from elsewhere. The ecovillage movement emerged in part due to this concern.

This section mainly focuses on American concerns even if it can reasonably be generalized to other Western countries.

The inadequate quantity and quality of American jobs is one of the most fundamental economic challenges we face. […] What’s the linkage between technology and this fundamental problem?

In his article, Jared Bernstein, a Senior Fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities,[59] questions the widespread idea that automation, and more broadly, technological advances, have mainly contributed to this growing labor market problem. His thesis appears to be a third way between optimism and skepticism. Essentially, he stands for a neutral approach of the linkage between technology and American issues concerning unemployment and declining wages.

He uses two main arguments to defend his point. First, because of recent technological advances, an increasing number of workers are losing their jobs. Yet, scientific evidence fails to clearly demonstrate that technology has displaced so many workers that it has created more problems than it has solved. Indeed, automation threatens repetitive jobs but higher-end jobs are still necessary because they complement technology and manual jobs that “requires flexibility judgment and common sense”[60] remain hard to replace with machines. Second, studies have not shown clear links between recent technology advances and the wage trends of the last decades.

Therefore, according to Bernstein, instead of focusing on technology and its hypothetical influences on current American increasing unemployment and declining wages, one needs to worry more about “bad policy that fails to offset the imbalances in demand, trade, income and opportunity.”[60]

Thomas P. Hughes stated that because technology has been considered as a key way to solve problems, we need to be aware of its complex and varied characters to use it more efficiently.[61] What is the difference between a wheel or a compass and cooking machines such as an oven or a gas stove? Can we consider all of them, only a part of them, or none of them as technologies?

Technology is often considered too narrowly; according to Hughes, “Technology is a creative process involving human ingenuity”.[62] This definition’s emphasis on creativity avoids unbounded definitions that may mistakenly include cooking technologies,” but it also highlights the prominent role of humans and therefore their responsibilities for the use of complex technological systems.

Yet, because technology is everywhere and has dramatically changed landscapes and societies, Hughes argues that engineers, scientists, and managers have often believed that they can use technology to shape the world as they want. They have often supposed that technology is easily controllable and this assumption has to be thoroughly questioned.[61] For instance, Evgeny Morozov particularly challenges two concepts: Internet-centrism and solutionism.”[63] Internet-centrism refers to the idea that our society is convinced that the Internet is one of the most stable and coherent forces. Solutionism is the ideology that every social issue can be solved thanks to technology and especially thanks to the internet. In fact, technology intrinsically contains uncertainties and limitations. According to Alexis Madrigal’s review of Morozov’s theory, to ignore it will lead to unexpected consequences that could eventually cause more damage than the problems they seek to address.”[64] Benjamin R. Cohen and Gwen Ottinger also discussed the multivalent effects of technology.[65]

Therefore, recognition of the limitations of technology, and more broadly, scientific knowledge, is needed especially in cases dealing with environmental justice and health issues. Ottinger continues this reasoning and argues that the ongoing recognition of the limitations of scientific knowledge goes hand in hand with scientists and engineers new comprehension of their role. Such an approach of technology and science “[require] technical professionals to conceive of their roles in the process differently. [They have to consider themselves as] collaborators in research and problem solving rather than simply providers of information and technical solutions.”[66]

Technology is properly defined as any application of science to accomplish a function. The science can be leading edge or well established and the function can have high visibility or be significantly more mundane, but it is all technology, and its exploitation is the foundation of all competitive advantage.

Technology-based planning is what was used to build the US industrial giants before WWII (e.g., Dow, DuPont, GM) and it is what was used to transform the US into a superpower. It was not economic-based planning.

The use of basic technology is also a feature of other animal species apart from humans. These include primates such as chimpanzees,[67] some dolphin communities,[68] and crows.[69][70] Considering a more generic perspective of technology as ethology of active environmental conditioning and control, we can also refer to animal examples such as beavers and their dams, or bees and their honeycombs.

The ability to make and use tools was once considered a defining characteristic of the genus Homo.[71] However, the discovery of tool construction among chimpanzees and related primates has discarded the notion of the use of technology as unique to humans. For example, researchers have observed wild chimpanzees utilising tools for foraging: some of the tools used include leaf sponges, termite fishing probes, pestles and levers.[72]West African chimpanzees also use stone hammers and anvils for cracking nuts,[73] as do capuchin monkeys of Boa Vista, Brazil.[74]

Theories of technology often attempt to predict the future of technology based on the high technology and science of the time. As with all predictions of the future, however, technology’s is uncertain.

Futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts that the future of technology will be mainly consist of an overlapping “GNR Revolution” of Genetics, Nanotechnology, and Robotics, with robotics being the most important of the three.[75]

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Technology – Wikipedia

5 Ways Technology Can Improve Your Home, and its Value. – Inc.com

Upping your tech game at home can be fun – before you know it, you’ll feel like you’re living in “The Jetsons.” But creating a smart house is about more than your own entertainment; it’s also about saving cash and time. Many tech products are easy to install on your own, while others require a professional. Either way, technology can change your home for the better. Here are five ways it can improve your life:

Leaving a light on overnight doesn’t seem like a big deal, but if you do it often enough, you’re bound to burn through bulbs and notice a difference in your electric bill. With smart lighting, you can dim your lights using an app on your smartphone from another room or even another city. So, if you forget to turn off the hallway light as you leave for vacation, it won’t burn the entire time you’re gone. You’ll just turn it off with a few taps on your phone and then sleep easy. You can also set a timer for your smart lights, ensuring they always dim or turn off at bedtime.

Sitting comfortably in your armchair and feeling too lazy to get up and turn down the heat? This is not a problem when you have a smart thermostat. Like smart lighting, this easy-to-use gadget can be controlled manually, but you can also access it from your smartphone. Some products, including Nest, are even able to sense when you’re home, versus when you’re away, and adjust the temperature as needed.

Smart lighting and a smart thermostat can cut your electric bill in half, but there are ways to save even more. Invest in solar panels and you may save more than $1,000 per year on utilities. While there is a significant cost associated with installing solar panels (around $10,000), tax credits are available to help you reduce your out-of-pocket expenses. Whether you’re going to be in your home for the long haul or you just care about reducing your home’s carbon footprint, solar panels are a great alternative to remaining on the grid.

Popular systems like Amazon Echo and Alexa add unprecedented convenience to your home. Want to find out the weather? Just ask out loud and get a response. Want to play your favorite song over an in-home speaker? These systems can be voice activated to play music. You can even Google a random factoid that escapes your memory just by asking your Amazon system to do it.

Creating a smart home may do more than make your life easier and your utilities more bearable. It can also increase the value of your home. More permanent solutions like solar panels can lead to a five-figure value increase, and smart thermostats are appealing to potential buyers. Given how easy many tech upgrades are to install and implement, using smart technology is certainly worth the effort.

Adding technology to your home is a surefire way to create a more comfortable and convenient living experience. Better yet, your pocket book may thank you. With tech advancements ever-evolving, it’s becoming less and less expensive to make meaningful changes to your abode.

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Avi Savar is CEO and Managing Partner of Dreamit, a top venture accelerator and early stage investment fund. He is the author of Content to Commerce and consults globally on trends in digital media, disruptive technologies and corporate innovation. He has been featured on Fox News, Forbes, Mashable, Business Insider, TechCrunch, VentureBeat, the New York Times and is a contributing editor for Inc.

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Source list:

http://www.designyourway.net/blog/inspiration/30-cool-high-tech-gadgets-to-give-your-home-a-futuristic-look/

https://www.upnest.com/1/post/7-smart-home-technology-upgrades-that-increase-the-value-of-your-home/

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/best-smart-home-gadgets,review-2008.html

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5 Ways Technology Can Improve Your Home, and its Value. – Inc.com

This Bay Area startup is arming retailers with the technology to take on Amazon Go – GeekWire

Amazon is still tinkering with the checkout-free technology behind its Amazon Go retailer concept, but Palo Alto, Calif. startup Standard Cognition is moving to the front of the line, releasing an alternative technology with a similar goal of eliminating the checkout process that it will supply to retailers.

The startup, part of Y Combinators Summer 2017 batch, today embarked on the initial launch of its artificial intelligence-based system that lets consumers shop and pay without stopping to check out. The company bills its technology as a way for retailers to cut labor costs by eliminating cashiers, better use store space, track inventory and protect against theft.

The company said it is in advanced talks to set up pilots of its technology with several retailers. The technology uses machine vision and artificial intelligence to identify each item and detect when items are picked up, put back or left somewhere else in the store.

It works with a pair of apps, one for the shopper and one for the store. All shoppers have to do is open the app, check in, grab their stuff and leave. The bill will be charged to the app. Those without the app will be directed by store staff to automated kiosks, similar to self-checkout stations, where they can pay with cash or credit.

The store app tells staff where customers are in the store and what they are buying. The system tracks shoppers, so if someone is trying to pocket items and walk out without paying, the technology uses predictive path finding technology to alert store employees.

The checkout-free Amazon Go concept, using similar technology to that of driverless cars, made waves when the company announced it last year. It has been in beta testing since then, with a planned public launch of early 2017. Reports indicate that Amazon has had some trouble with the technology, delaying its public debut.

We saw the need in the market for a bettercommerce solutionfor brick-and-mortar retailers that would leverage the latest AI technology to help them dramatically cut costs, get better analytics, get insight into inventory and shrinkage, and improve the checkout experience for their customers, Michael Suswal, co-founder and chief operating officer of Standard Cognition, said in a statement. It seems other companies have delayed their launches because of technical glitches caused by using out-of-date machine-learning techniques.

Amazon isnt the only retail giant looking at automating the checkout process, a move that could fundamentally shift the retail industry and have a significant impact on jobs. Walmart earlier this month debuted its Scan & Go app, which resembles a manual version of Amazon Go.

Amazon Go and Scan & Go are, at least for now, in-house technologies whereas Standard Cognition is offering its tech for retailers of all kinds.

For 99 percent of retailers who dont have the resources to deal with lost profit margins from cashier overhead, product theft and shrinkage, they are going to go out of business, Suswal said. We want to help retailers both small and large thrive and eliminate the cumbersome, expensive checkout experience as it exists today.

Suswal, the companys COO, and CEO Jordan Fisher both did stints at the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission. Several of the co-founders worked together at Pwnee Studios, a New York computer game studio.

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This Bay Area startup is arming retailers with the technology to take on Amazon Go – GeekWire

Technology | Definition of Technology by Merriam-Webster

noun technology tek-n-l-j

noun technology tek-n-l-j

1 : the use of science in solving problems (as in industry or engineering)

2 : a method of or machine for doing something that is created by technology

noun technology -j

1: the science of the application of knowledge to practical purposes : applied science

2: a scientific method of achieving a practical purpose

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Technology | Definition of Technology by Merriam-Webster

The very dirty history of on-demand video technology – Ars Technica

Enlarge / It’s the Sony U-Matic in all its analog glory. This device was used in the early 1970s to stream X-rated video to hotel rooms, often using a closed-circuit broadcasting device on the hotel roof.

Wikimedia

In 1973, a young Roger Ebert reviewed the movie Deep Throat. He was not yet a household name or a Pulitzer Prize winner, but he was a respected film critic. The fact that he and his peers regularly reviewed pornographic films suggested that wed entered a new era in filman era in which pornography might be viewed as art.

Turns out that wasnt the case. More than 40 years later, people are still arguing about whether porn can be art. But that doesnt mean the early ’70s werent a turning point for porn. The year before Roger Ebert saw Deep Throat, the Hotel Commodore in New York City shocked the nation by announcing that it had installed a system which would let viewers watch X-rated titles in their hotel rooms. It might not be art, but porn had become a testing bed for new kinds of on-demand video technologies.

The United States was not the nation to lead the world into this new era. Japan got there first. Technology-friendly Osaka had hotels built specifically for many different combinations of sex and video. Some hotel rooms came equipped with video cameras, as well as, presumably, both an overworked technical staff and an overworked cleaning staff. Other rooms simply had a television that picked up the signal of a closed-circuit broadcasting device on the roof, creating an early form of streaming video. In 1971, one hotel’s device made contact with a steel safety railing. This considerably increased the broadcast range and gave surrounding houses a glimpse of movies that not everyone appreciated.

Scandalized reports about Osakas hotels made their way across the Pacific to Los Angeles. There, groups of entrepreneurs snapped up Japanese technologynamely the Sony U-matic machineand made their own dirty little hotels with dirty little porn channels. This turned out to be a good deal both for the hotels and for Sony. The U-matic machines, which used cartridges to play different films, were too expensive for the consumer market. But they were worth it for motels, which could show the same few films over and over.

The motels, meanwhile, were explicit about what separated them from a generic family motor lodge. Advertisements encouraged patrons to rent rooms for a few days or for a few hours. Guests could unwind in luxury and privacy, watching X-rated films in their own rooms rather than going to theaters, peep shows, or arcades. That being said, a person spotted checking into an adult motel could no more argue their innocence than they could if they were spotted going into a peep show or an adult movie theater. Police raided the hotels regularly, prostitutes strolled outside, and no amount of repetition of the word luxury could make the hotels into something swank.

Museum of the City of New York

Thats why the Hotel Commodore made headlines. This was a legitimate hotel, for ordinary guests (the historic hotel was later torn down by Donald Trump, who turned it into the Grand Hyatt). Papers across the nation picked up the Commodore story, focusing on the technology as much as the films themselves. The Waukesha Daily Freeman, in Waukesha, Wisconsin, wrote about the hotel’s alliance with a company called Player’s Cinema Systems to deliver unedited X-rated films to its guests’ hotel rooms. The films, the paper notes, are popular with businessmen. (You don’t say.)

New York Magazine went further in depth on the technology behind the films: The Player’s system, called The Movie Box, uses playback units with cartridges containing twelve tracks of twelve minutes each. Thus movies of up to two hours and twenty-four minutes can be put on one cartridge. The Movie Box, with the desired cartridge already installed, was delivered by a bellman to a room upon request. Guests would play it via a projection system made by Zeiss-Ikon. This, representatives of the hotel stressed, would allow responsible hotel employees to make sure that no children saw Russ Meyer’s Vixen. It was custom content, delivered to your door.

The X-rated titles outsold the family fare, at least according to the hotel’s general manager. This, in hindsight, was not remarkable. What was remarkable was that the hotel sold both. A family could watch Beware the Blob in one room, while a businessman watched something far less family friendlyin the next. Player’s Cinema Systems could offer X-rated filmsto anyone over eighteen years old. The only problem was space: if they showed The Godfather, half an hour of running time would have to be edited out in order for the movie to fit on the cartridge.

Before the 1970s, when any movie was by necessity a public show, adult entertainment was segregated from the mainstream. It had its own theaters and sometimes its own section of town. Technology, and the promise of a great deal of money, made it just another thing to watch in a hotel roomand not the kind of hotel that gets raided by the police. What began in hotel rooms in the 1970s wound up on VCRs in the 1980s, and on the Web in the ’90s and beyond. Today, a lot of adult entertainment is being streamed again. Only now it’s streamed live, with performers who interact with viewers, rather than broadcast to hotel rooms from a cartridge in a U-matic. In a round-up of his porn reviews, Ebert writes, The huge cultural change since the 1970s is that now its consumed at home on video and the Web, not in steamy movie theaters and dank peep-show booths.

This was a cultural change brought about almost entirely by scientists, programmers, and engineers. In a sense, technology was what allowed respectable people to watch pornographynot by making porn into art, but by making it something we could watch in private.

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The very dirty history of on-demand video technology – Ars Technica

3 US technology solutions to war with North Korea – Dallas News

2. Cyberwarfare. The U.S. should also unleash cyber capabilities it has steadily built over the last decade. Computer viruses alone can’t prevent North Korea from launching nuclear missiles, but they could degrade the Kim regime’s ability to conduct research and development, test and control weapons and gather intelligence. Cyberwarfare could also complement economic sanctions by freezing North Korean offshore bank accounts, paralyzing communications and disrupting Chinese companies that continue to trade with Pyongyang.

3. Space weapons. With launch costs falling (thank you SpaceX), and the capabilities of precision-guided munitions improving, the U.S.could rush the development of a space-based anti-missile system. Though still on the drawing board, space weapons will someday be able to target intercontinental ballistic missiles during their initial boost phase, when the large plume of their engines makes them easiest to detect and their slow upward ascent makes them most vulnerable.

Using advanced technology should appeal to a commander in chief who rails against the “waste” of American blood and treasure expended abroad and at the same time deplores “the very sad depletion of our military.” “Fire and fury” and “America first” mesh poorly, unless technology is employed to resolve the paradox.

The potential is clear. In the Kosovo air war, the U.S. Air Force dropped graphite bombs to disable the Serbian electrical grid; in the Iraq invasion, allied air power crippled Saddam Hussein’s military and civilian transportation network. New technologies can create those pressures and more with far greater effect, less permanent damage and less risk to troops. They can be deployed quickly and precisely in a crisis, and they provide strategic deterrence as well.

The main obstacle to deploying such weapons will be hearts and minds in the West. There are already calls to ban new weapons because they are destabilizing. United Nations officials, for example, attacked President Barack Obama’s drone campaign because it made war too easy to wage. Elon Musk, founder of SpaceX, recently called artificial intelligence “the greatest risk we face as a civilization” and predicted that it could trigger wars. These critics fear a new technology arms race that will encourage the promiscuous use of these weapons.

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3 US technology solutions to war with North Korea – Dallas News

Monday Sector Laggards: Energy, Technology & Communications – Nasdaq

Looking at the sectors faring worst as of midday Monday, shares of Energy companies are underperforming other sectors, showing a 0.9% loss. Within the sector, Chesapeake Energy Corp. (Symbol: CHK) and Newfield Exploration Co (Symbol: NFX) are two large stocks that are lagging, showing a loss of 4.7% and 3.1%, respectively. Among energy ETFs , one ETF following the sector is the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (Symbol: XLE), which is down 0.7% on the day, and down 16.72% year-to-date. Chesapeake Energy Corp., meanwhile, is down 46.23% year-to-date, and Newfield Exploration Co, is down 39.46% year-to-date. Combined, CHK and NFX make up approximately 0.9% of the underlying holdings of XLE.

The next worst performing sector is the Technology & Communications sector, showing a 0.3% loss. Among large Technology & Communications stocks, Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (Symbol: AMD) and Micron Technology Inc. (Symbol: MU) are the most notable, showing a loss of 3.4% and 2.5%, respectively. One ETF closely tracking Technology & Communications stocks is the Technology Select Sector SPDR ETF ( XLK ), which is down 0.2% in midday trading, and up 18.71% on a year-to-date basis. Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., meanwhile, is up 5.34% year-to-date, and Micron Technology Inc. is up 35.15% year-to-date. Combined, AMD and MU make up approximately 0.8% of the underlying holdings of XLK.

25 Dividend Giants Widely Held By ETFs

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.

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Monday Sector Laggards: Energy, Technology & Communications – Nasdaq

A few things that may surprise you about seniors and technology – Dayton Daily News

A few years ago when I wrote about technology of benefit to elders, there was limited interest and adoption by much of the older adult population.

Take, for example, the smartphone. According to the Pew Research Center, four in 10 seniors own smartphones, which is more than double the number of users than in 2013. In these past few years, more elders have been going online with an estimated 67 percent of adults over 65, plus adults regularly logging on. Younger seniors are also using social media with increased frequency. Social media platforms such as Facebook and Skype are very effective in helping to stay in touch with both local and

Younger seniors are also using social media with increased frequency. Social media platforms such as Facebook and Skype are very effective in helping to stay in touch with both local and long-distance friends and family and provide many with the opportunity to reconnect with old acquaintances. This can be very beneficial in helping many to feel less isolated. As elders continue to embrace this new world, technology companies are focusing much of their energies toward addressing interests and preferences of this population.

When conducting a very informal Internet search on technology and older adults, I was presented with pages of results. Furthermore, as reported in Tech Crunch (a leading technology website) when the App Store debuted in 2008, it grew to 5,000 apps by the end of its first year, and that growth has continued to be explosive ever since. By the end of 2015, it reached 1.75 million apps, and today hosts 2 million apps worldwide.

One particular area that seems to be of great interest is the technology focused on helping older adults who may be experiencing some memory challenges. There are now, for example, a number of smart pill boxes and apps to help remind people about their medication regimen. This might include visual and auditory reminders. This supportive assistance extends beyond the user and can be programmed to alert a family member if a loved one may have forgotten to take prescribed medication. There are now activity sensors that can be placed around the home to provide a family member a snapshot of a loved ones daily routine. Should something seem off such as a suspected fall, or little activity in the home emergency contacts will be alerted. Although likely somewhat intrusive for the elder, there are now indoor video cameras that enable a loved ones activity to be monitored on a family member or caregivers smartphone.

A recent online posting from the website Aging in Place Technology Watch highlighted some exciting new innovations. As seen in a recent episode of the television series Saturday Night Live, voice activated technologies can function as a virtual assistant. Among countless other applications, these devices can adjust the thermostat, help to stay informed about current events, provide weather reports, answer questions, create personalized music play lists, and provide reminders of upcoming appointments. It is not too far in the future that these devices will become more interactive with additional capabilities directed toward keeping elders engaged and self-reliant.

Please feel free to email me if you would like additional information on this topic. It is important to note that if there is an understanding that an elder requires supportive assistance, even the most sophisticated technology cannot take the place of a human caregiver.

Marci Vandersluis is a licensed social worker and has a masters degree in gerontology. She is employed as a care manager assisting older adults in the community connect with needed services. Email: marcirobinvandersluis@gmail.com.

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A few things that may surprise you about seniors and technology – Dayton Daily News

Kenyan Girls Use Technology to Combat Genital Cutting – Voice of America

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CALIF.

Its still fresh in my mind, the scene of female genital mutilation, said Purity Achieng, a 17-year-old from Kenya.

Achieng was speaking on stage in the finals of the Technovation Challenge World Pitch Summit, a competition that invites girls from around the world to come up with tech solutions to local community problems. Since it began in 2009, 15,000 girls from more than 100 countries have participated in the competition.

Achieng and her team of four other Kenyan teen girls call themselves The Restorers. They are taking on Female Genital Mutilation or FGM. They have created an app, called i-Cut, which connects girls at risk of FGM with rescue agents and offers support for those who have already been cut. It also provides information for anyone seeking to learn more about the practice.

The pain of having your clitoris cut just because someone wants to have you go through a rite of passage, said Achieng, during her pitch at the competition. Its painful and no one wants to listen to you. You cry and there you are, almost dying but nobody is caring about that.

At least 200 million girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation or FGM in 30 countries, reports UNICEF.And 44 million are girls 14 and younger. The practice involves cutting out all or part of a womans clitoris, which is said to eliminate almost completely a womans sexual pleasure, in hopes of ensuring her virginity and keeping her faithful in marriage.

The Kenyan girls in this competition have not experienced FGM firsthand, as their tribe does not practice it, but they have friends who have. One of Achiengs best friends was forced to drop out of school and into an early marriage at 15 after FGM, which greatly affected Achieng.

I think for teenagers to be able to identify problems around them and provide a solution, that is really, really inspiring, said Dorcas Owinoh, the teams mentor, who works as a community manager at LakeHub, a technology innovation hub in Kisumu, Kenya. It was Owinoh who brought the idea of the Technovation Challenge to the team.

Achieng said it was her friend dropping out of school after FGM that inspired the team to create the app.

Other teams in the international event came from Armenia, Kazakhstan, Canada, Cambodia, the U.S. and other countries. The Restorers were the only team who qualified from the African continent.

Its always better when the people who face the problems, come up with their own solutions because theyre the most organic, said Tara Chklovski, founder and CEO or Iridescent, the nonprofit behind Technovation.

Though the i-Cut app has the potential to save lives, it has not been embraced by all Kenyans.

One village elder drove six hours to their school to protest the app because, according to him, thats an African culture and the girls are being, according to him, Westernized, Owinoh said.

The man had learned of the app after local media reported of the girls acceptance into Technovation. Owinoh said school leaders and teachers remained calm, spoke with him, and then asked him to leave.

Technovation comes at a time when women in tech are facing blowback, not just in Kenya, but even at the Google headquarters where the competition was held.A Google employee was recently fired after writing a memo positing that women are biologically inferior to men in regards to working in technology.

I know the journey wont always be easy but to the girls who dream of being an engineer or an entrepreneur and who dream of creating amazing things, I want you to know that theres a place for you in this industry, theres a place for you at Googledont let anyone tell you otherwise, Google CEO Sundar Pichai told the girls.

The Restorers did not win the Technovation Challenge, but they will continue their fight against FGM and hope to get i-Cut into the Google Play Store soon.

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Kenyan Girls Use Technology to Combat Genital Cutting – Voice of America


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