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Workplace and spirituality: Meeting of opposites – The Manila Times

CHITRA KHARI

I am sure that you will all agree with me, that despite the Philippines being a Christian nation, there is a possibility of having room for different perspectives of spirituality. Yet, we would nod to the fact that spirituality is a universal human experience and forms the core of our fundamental nature. Since ages, human beings have walked the path of spirituality to search for the meaning of their existence.

Spirituality relates with finding a connection with some higher power. The literary definition of spirituality relates with finding meaning, purpose and connectedness (with all entities). Now the big question comes: Can spirituality be experienced only in meditation halls, temples, churches, mosques or can it be experienced even within the organizational context? And, if yes, then how is this experience made possible within organizations, and what benefit can organizations and individuals derive out of it. This is a broader question which I am trying to answer here.

You might be wondering why there is there a need of spirituality at workplaces. The answer lies in todays complex, ambiguous, uncertain and highly volatile business environment. Things are interrelated like never before (yet we feel disconnected). The recession at one part of the globe has a ripple effect on the other sides of the planet. Downsizing, layoffs, constant pressure from jobs, use of temporary workforce, long working hours and changes in social structures (downfall of joint families and rising nuclear families) have generated the feeling of alienation in individuals. People feel that despite being connected through the Internet of things, they are isolated, empty and find their life meaningless. All this outer turmoil has triggered an inner journey towards finding meaning and purpose in life.

As people spend most of their substantial time in the office, organizations can take charge of filling this inner void in individuals through providing them meaning, purpose and a sense of strong connectedness with the larger society. Organizations can provide purpose and meaning to employees by integrating and practicing universal spiritual values such as benevolence, integrity, compassion, mutuality and respect. Such organizations are kind, careful and affectionate towards all the stakeholders (internal and external); mindful of their actions towards others and show congruence between their words and actions.

For example, these organizations focus on serving the larger community (or society) by producing earth-friendly products and avoid actions that harm other entities. Workplace spirituality make people realize how ones organization is fitting in the larger picture, with respect to meeting the economic and social goals in a balancing manner. This would generate social value along with the economic value that in turn, would make organizations meaningful for employees as they will feel that they are part of a larger cause.

Employees engaged in such organizations would sense the contribution towards organizational vision through their work that marks a difference in others lives which in turn, instills a sense of self-worth in them. Employees feel their life has meaning, feel more connected with the larger community and develop deep emotional bonding with their respective organizations. The notion of making a difference in others lives enhances positive feelings and well-being of the individuals (doing the kind act). Positive feelings act as antidote to stress, and we know that happy employees are the most productive employees. Organizations with a spiritual element enjoy good public reputation which further reinforces employees reputation in society, making employees glued to the organization for a longer time.

Thus, integrating spirituality in the workplace is a win-win approach due to its benefits for employees, organizations and of course, the larger society. I hope to have set a favorable tone for a spiritual element in organizations. I leave it to you readers to decide.

Dr. Chitra Khari is an assistant professor at the Institute of Management at Nirma University in India, where she teaches organizational behavior and emotional intelligence. She is a member of the Management, Spirituality and Religion Interest Group of the Academy of Management where De La Salle University is a part. Email: chitrakhari045@gmail.com

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Workplace and spirituality: Meeting of opposites - The Manila Times

The spiritual meaning of St. Michaels name reminds us how we should live our lives – Aleteia EN

St. Michael is widely known as the archangel who fought back Satan and cast him from Heaven. It is believed that his name, Michael, is closely associated with this spiritual battle and reminds us all how we should live our lives.

According to theSt. Andrew Daily Missal, The name Michael means, in Hebrew, who is like God? and recalls the battle in heaven between the prince of the heavenly host and the devil, a battle which began with Lucifers rebellion and continues down the ages.

It is believed that Michaels battle cry was exactly that Who is like God? enacting judgement on Satans desire to be like God. Many images of St. Michael contain this phrase in Latin on his shield, Quis ut Deus?

This is in fact the definition of Michael in the Hebrew language and further recalls the temptation in the Garden, when Satan tried to lure Adam and Eve into taking the fruit by saying, you will be like God.

The meaning of St. Michaels name reminds us that we should not try to be like God. This may seem like an obvious statement, but how often do we play God in our lives?

We tend to want to be in complete charge, and often get upset when things dont go our way. At a subconscious level we somehow think that we rule the world and should control every aspect of it.

In other words, the more prideful we become, the more like God we think we are.

The true heart of a Christian is to be close to the ground, humble, in every sense of the word. This does not mean we need to let others trample over us like a used carpet, but that we need to recognize our place in the world as created beings, entirely dependent on God.

When we truly realize that and let it sink into our heart, our lives will radically change. The next time something goes wrong in our lives, instead of getting angry and doing something even worse, we will be able to accept it from God.

Humility is the key to holiness, and even St. Michaels name reminds us of that simple fact.

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The spiritual meaning of St. Michaels name reminds us how we should live our lives - Aleteia EN

Kourtney Kardashian Opens Up About Her New Venture and Why She Wont Force Spirituality on Her Kids – PEOPLE.com

Kourtney Kardashian Won't Force Spirituality on Her Kids | PEOPLE.com Top Navigation Close View image

Kourtney Kardashian Opens Up About Her New Venture and Why She Won't Force Spirituality on Her Kids

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Kourtney Kardashian Opens Up About Her New Venture and Why She Wont Force Spirituality on Her Kids - PEOPLE.com

This Spiritual Fitness Experience Is Coming to Philly for the First Time Ever – phillymag.com

Fitness

The Class by Taryn Toomey, the New York City-based yoga and boot camp fusion, willswing throughPhiladelphia on October 19th.

The Class by Taryn Toomey has been described as a spiritual experience. Find out for yourself when the NYC-based yoga and boot camp fusion visits Philly on October 19th. / Photograph courtesy of the Class by Taryn Toomey

Its no secret that maintaining an active lifestyle can benefit not just your body but your mind, too. Aside from boosting heart health and overall longevity, exercise can improve your mental and emotional health, partly because working out helps your brain release endorphins and, in our best Elle Woods voice: endorphins make you happy.

But sometimes, fitness can feel transformative for that intangible part of ourselves: the soul. In fact, many fitness enthusiasts consider their beloved boutique gyms and studios a kind of church due to the emphasis on community, ritual, and self-reflection. While some chains have received backlash for commodifying their quasi-spiritual, self-care experiences, its tough to deny that working out, whether solo or with others, can help us feel fulfilled and more in tune with ourselves and our surroundings.

This October, youll get another opportunity to experience fitness as a potential spiritual practice. The Class by Taryn Toomey, the ber popular movement-based workout, just announced an East Coast metro tour, including a one-day stopover in Philadelphia.

The Class will pop up in Philly for the very first time on October 19th with two 60-minute sessions. Even better: Both classes will be taught by Taryn Toomey herself, founder and owner of the Class. The tour will also feature live music from guitarist and vocalist Conner Youngblood and drummer Caleb Spaulding.

Based in New York City, the Class by Taryn Toomey consists of simple, repetitive cardio and strength-based exercises that results in an energetic fusion of yoga and plyometrics. The Class works one muscle group at a time, repeating that one movement the entire length of a single song. As a result, students often claim they undergo a physical, mental, emotional, and even partial transcendent journey that usually involves the releasing of unexpressed emotions and physical discomfort. As Toomey put it, the Class is a a wringing out, literally and figuratively, of the body, mind, and soul.

Toomey officially founded the Class in 2013, after teaching step aerobics and yoga for a number of years, but felt herself longing for something more. Through my own research and discovery, using myself as a case study, I started using my self-prescribed medicine of music and movement coupled with community and strength to work out certain life experiences and emotions, Toomey says. I began sharing my medicine [which later became the Class] with friends and community in the basement of my apartment building, donating all proceeds to a charity in Peru. The music- and movement-driven practice blew up, becoming popular among celeb devotees like Drew Barrymore and Naomi Watts.

The idea of an East Coast metro tour came directly from the Class enthusiasts who arent based in New York City but wanted to experienceToomeys workout anyway. Toomey decided to bring the Class to cities where it has never been (but heard a lot from) in order to expand the empowering workout to more people. The tour will kick off in its hometown of NYC and include additional stopovers in Boston, D.C., Chicago, Nashville, and Atlanta.

Tickets for the Philly classes, which will be held at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., cost $65. Buy themhere. Both classes will be held at City Winery in Center City (990 Filbert Street). Make sure to BYO mat!

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This Spiritual Fitness Experience Is Coming to Philly for the First Time Ever - phillymag.com

4 Misconceptions That Keep You From Growing Spiritually – Patheos

Vittore Buzzi

Every Christian should want to grow spiritually, but spiritual growth is not automatic. Just like malnutrition can stunt physical growth and a traumatic event can stunt emotional growth, these four misconceptions can hinder your spiritual growth.

1. Spiritual age does not equal spiritual maturity.If youve been a Christian for 40 years, that doesnt automatically mean that you are more mature than someone whos been a Christian for only a few years. We see this in everyday life. Sometimes youll find a 16-year-old that is more mature than a 40-year-old. Age doesnt automatically equal maturity.Spiritual growth isnt automatic. Its something you have to be intentional about.

2. Spiritual growth is not simply you trying harder to be holy, but allowing God to work in you and transform you.This is the whole point of the book of Galatians. Spiritual growth is not a checklist of things you have to do to earn Gods approval.The Apostle Paul talked about the difference between living by the flesh and walking in the Spirit. Living by the flesh is you trying on your own to be a more holy person. That will absolutely wear you out.

Living by the Spirit is like having a navigation app tell you where to go when you drive somewhere new. Living by the Spirit is not one of those self-driven cars that does all the work for you. Living by the Spirit doesnt mean you dont take responsibility. Living by the Spirit is like having a navigation map point out where to go and where to turn. The Holy Spirit is guiding you. Butnot only is the Holy Spirit your guide through life, Hes your power. Hes the engine in the car of your life, propelling you forward. Its still up to you to turn the steering wheel where the Spirit tells you to go. Its still up to you to push the little pedal on the bottom of the floorboard, but when you push the pedal its the engine that makes it go. The Holy Spirit will guide you and the Spirit will empower you to grow, but you still have a part to play.

3. Agreement is not the same as obedience.This is the flip side of #2. Its important to understand that there is a huge difference between agreement and obedience. Let me illustrate it this way: I think we would all agree that eating healthy is good for you.If you struggle with your weight or perhaps your health, I would bet that you would agree that you need to make healthier choices when you eat. Agreement is not the issue. Its following through with what you agree with that makes all the difference.To grow, we actually have to do something.

4. Spiritual disciplines dont exist to punish you, but to free you.Anytime you hear the word discipline, we automatically associate negative thoughts to it. No one likes to be disciplined. No one likes discipline. But we need it. Spiritual disciplines dont exist to punish you and steal your joy.And spiritual growth is definitely not a checklist of things you have to do to keep God happy. Again, go back to the book of Galatians.

God doesnt give us spiritual disciplines as a way to punish us or keep us in chains, but as a way to free us.Think of it like diet and exercise. Diet and exercise are both disciplines. And we can look as diet and exercise as a way to punish you and make you miserable, which will pretty much guarantee that you wont stick with diet and exercise.In reality, diet and exercise dont exist to punish you, but to free you. To free you with more energy, with a better outlook on life, to free you with better health and to free you from the complications of obesity and bad health.

In the moment, no one is saying diet and exercise are amazing! But once you seeand feel the results, arent you glad that you diet and exercise?Spiritual disciplines operate in the same way. They dont exist to punish you, but to free you.

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4 Misconceptions That Keep You From Growing Spiritually - Patheos

‘My Year of Living Spiritually’ is a book for the spiritual but not religious – rabble.ca

My Year of Living Spiritually by Anne Bokma(Douglas and McIntyre, 2019, 24.95)

I'll admit, it's been a very long time since I have been able to sit down and read a book. Don't get me wrong, I love reading. In fact, I read at least one newspaper a day -- sometimes more, seemingly endless articles and reports, and information to make me a better teacher. Still I wasn't able to sit down and read a book from beginning to end. That is, until I started devouring Anne Bokma's new release, My Year of Living Spiritually.

The Hamilton-based award-winning freelance journalist and creator of the fantastically popular 6-Minute Memoir which tasks locals with creating themed short stories about their lived experiences, has outdone herself one more time.

We meet Bokma in mid-life. She is not in crisis, but she is looking for something more. That lays the groundwork for her year of living spiritually, chronicling each month's journey to find greater depth of meaning, connection, simplicity and ultimately, inner peace.

This book is for those who think for themselves and want to have a spiritual life without the baggage associated with organized religion. Bokma, who left the Dutch-Calvinist Canadian Reformed Church at 20, joined the growing group of individuals who may or may not believe in God, but who share a deep connection to nature and the Earth. Known collectively as spiritual but not religious (SBNR), Bokma tells us it's the fastest -growing faith group in the Western world.

Making use of her eagerness to find answers to life's questions yet relying on her reporter's skepticism to remain objective, Bokma invites readers to vicariously experience her 12-month sampling of spirituality.

January, the month of hope and fresh starts. A chance to try out new morning routines and to once and for all, put an end to that obsession women have with busyness. By the end of the year, only the most essential practices remain.

February finds Bokma creating sacred space on a budget while trying to avoid spiritual appropriation. Ultimately, Bokma morphs her alter into a collection of meaningful keepsakes and personal items that show she is charting her own spiritual path.

In celebration of a secular Lent, Bokma gives up her beloved wine for 40 days beginning in March. Fortunately, Bokma's husband let her in on a well-kept secret: Catholics have a fallback plan that allows them to "break the fast" on each of the six Sabbaths of Lent. This makes getting through the ritual much more manageable and agreeable for everyone concerned.

In April, Bokma explores improving her inner dialogue with the help of a "soul coach." She also spends quiet time in a sensory-deprivation chamber better known as a float tank.

When that quest for quiet goes well, Bokma opts to spend 48 hours alone in a secluded luxury tree-house retreat where she rediscovers the wonders of spending time disconnecting from technology and reconnecting with nature.

May finds Bokma "forest bathing" -- walking in the woods and talking with the trees to find out how to make life matter. During this existential experience Bokma observes, "How like a dew drop we are, I think, so often trembling and hanging on for dear life." Ain't that the truth.

Her spiritual journey takes her on a pilgrimage to Concord, Massachusetts, where Henry David Thoreau spent two years living, walking, playing his flute and writing about the local plants and animals.

Thoreau was also a founding member of transcendentalism, which is based on the belief that people and nature are inherently good. Transcendentalism established the distinction between religion and spirituality.

It's in Thoreau's beloved Walden Pond that Bokma conducts her own spiritual baptism.

June brings the antithesis of May when Bokma actively searches for her voice. She starts the chapter with a quote from the French singer Edith Piaf: "Singing is a way of escaping. It's another world. I'm no longer on Earth."

Many of us are unable to relate to Piaf's adoration of singing. Possibly someone told us when we were young that we couldn't carry a tune, or perhaps, like Bokma, our first solo performance in front of a sizable crowd didn't sound quite the way we thought it would.

Joining a weekly neighbourhood drop-in group that sing together at a local pub gives Bokma the confidence and freedom to toss aside her self-consciousness, "like a bouquet thrown by a drunken bride," and find her true voice.

Then a private music lesson goes well and Bokma is encouraged to keep singing, "for the joy of it." Her next stop is the Hamilton-based choir, Singin' Women, made up of homeless and precariously housed women and their allies. Yet, all cares evaporate when the singing begins.

After a couple of revelationary singing retreats as well as some time spent with a choir singing for chronically ill and dying patients, Bokma realizes singing in a group is not only good for body and soul, it also increases social connectedness, a sense of belonging and all of that is good.

This is a powerful chapter that can trigger tear-filled moments. It's a good place to stop reading for the day in order to process Bokma's spiritual journey through the first half of 2017 as well as the intense feelings that readers may experience.

July is certainly a great month to take a trip, but it's a psychedelic trip with therapeutic overtones that Bokma embarks on with the help of an ayahuasca ceremony, holotropic breathwork, and some magic mushrooms. Her guided experiences take Bokma through the process of letting go of children and motherhood and realizing the everlasting bond between mothers and daughters, but it also gives the reader a brutally honest account of her relationships with her own two daughters and especially her husband, Jeff.

August is a busy month dealing with religious trauma syndrome (RTS) that encapsulates pretty much the entire dogma of organized religion and leaves individuals suffering from anxiety, depression, shame, guilt, perfectionism, and a sense of being unlovable.

It's also the chapter that asks you to think of Jesus as a protector and a radical who challenged the authorities of his time.

This is also the time that Bokma explores her local Unitarian church whose welcoming philosophy includes believing in inherent worth and dignity, a free and responsible search for truth and meaning, and respect for the interdependent web of all existence.

Bokma also explores a very long list of secular gatherings including drumming circles, secular alcoholics anonymous meetings, storytelling events, death cafes, and the Women's March on Washington, in order "to nurture that shared ethical basis."

September brought an exploration of supernatural states like chakras, reiki, tarot card readings, past-life regression therapy and mediums.

October is spent meeting Tim, the brother Bokma never knew she had. It was also spent exploring all aspects of death and coming to terms with it over dinner with a group of women friends.

November ushers in the ultimate spiritual practice -- gratitude as well as rebuilding relationships.

December becomes the month Bokma lets go of exhausting Christmas traditions (two years ago I also decided to give money, chocolate, and a few trinkets, go out for Chinese food, and then see a movie), and decluttered and organized not only her house but her personal life.

Being the same age as Bokma, I often found myself thinking, I tried reiki or tarot readings, "OMG that same thing happened to me at that age," or I remember feeling the exact same way when I encountered that situation. There's a familiarity, unity, perceived sisterhood, and natural comfortableness that comes with these shared experiences.

Interspersed throughout Bokma's spiritual journey are interesting, often heart-wrenching stories of her life. It was a privilege to share in Bokma's year of self-discovery and learning to love herself. I can hardly wait for the next chapter.

Doreen Nicoll is a freelance writer, teacher, social activistand member of several community organizations working diligently to end poverty, hunger and gendered violence.

Image: My Year of Living Spiritually/Facebook

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'My Year of Living Spiritually' is a book for the spiritual but not religious - rabble.ca

Religion and Spirituality Books Preview: October 2019 – Publishers Weekly

Nonfiction

Oct. 1

Jesus in Me: Experiencing the Holy Spirit as a Constant Companion by Anne Graham Lotz (Multnomah, $23.99, ISBN 978-0525651048). The Bible teacher and daughter of Billy Graham unpacks key biblical lessons alongside personal insights to explore how she sees the Holy Spirit shaping her everyday life.

The Preachers Wife: The Precarious Power of Evangelical Women Celebrities by Kate Bowler (Princeton Univ., $29.95, ISBN 978-0691179612) Historian Bowler examines the rise of Christian women celebrities (in particular, those in what she calls a celebrity preachers wife role, like Joyce Meyer, Beth Moore, and Victoria Osteen) to explore how they balance the demands of celebrity culture and a conservative, male-dominated faith.

7 Days of Christmas by Jen Hatmaker (Abingdon, $21.99, ISBN 978-1-5018-8827-4) addresses seven key areasfood, clothes, spending, media, possessions, waste, stresswhose practices Christian readers can consider during Christmas for reducing consumption to bring more joy into ones life.

Bible Prophecy and You: Predictions, Fulfillments, and What to Watch for Next by Len Woods and Christopher D. Hudson (Barbour, $14.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-64352-097-1) describes predictions about Israel, other biblical kingdoms, and Jesus, before detailing predictions about Israel and the end-times found in scripture.

Reclaiming Judaism from Zionism: Stories of Personal Transformation, edited by Carolyn L. Karcher (Interlink, $20 paper, ISBN 978-1-62371-914-2). Forty Jewish activists and scholars share autobiographical essays describing how they, as devout American Jews, disentangled themselves from Zionism.

52 Promises from God: Reflections to Soothe Your Soul by Jessie Seneca (Momosa, $15 paper, ISBN 978-0-9844804-3-2) asks readers to jump-start their faith and assures them that God fulfills promises to those who follow his word.

How to Pray: A Simple Guide for Normal People by Pete Greig (NavPress, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-64158-188-2). Greig, cofounder of the 24-7 Prayer movement, urges readers to pray with passion, explaining to Christians how prayer is conversation with God.

Strong, Brave, Loved: Empowering Reminders of Who You Really Are by Holley Gerth (Revell, $18.99, ISBN 978-0-8007-2955-4). Blogger and life coach Gerth offers 60 short devotions geared toward empowering women, as well as prompts for journaling and personal reflection.

Everything You Need by David Jeremiah (W, $26.99, ISBN 978-0-7852-2393-1). Jeremiah, founder of the international ministry Turning Point, explores 2 Peter 1:510 to highlight seven critical tools: virtue, knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, kindness, and love.

Rhythms of Renewal: Trading Stress and Anxiety for a Life of Peace and Purpose by Rebekah Lyons (Zondervan, $24.99, ISBN 978-0-310-35614-1) details the four rhythms that she believes lead to a vibrant life: rest, renew, connect, and create.

Prosperity Magick: Spells for Wealth by Cassandra Eason (Sterling, $16.95, ISBN 978-1-4549-3678-7). Druid magical practitioner Eason describes spells intended to help readers get promotions, win the lottery, overcome debt, and avoid costly scams, among others.

Oct. 4

The Godman and the Sea: The Empty Tomb, the Trauma of the Jews, and the Gospel of Mark by Michael J. Thate (Univ. of Pennsylvania, $79.95, ISBN 978-0-8122-5151-7). An associate research scholar at Princeton closely examines the Gospel of Mark, judging it an exemplary text that responds to and makes meaning of the trauma arising from the crucified and missing body of Jesus.

Oct. 8

Unfollow: A Memoir of Loving and Leaving the Westboro Baptist Church by Megan Phelps-Roper (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Phelps-Roper, a granddaughter of Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps, provides a vivid account of her upbringing and explains her reasons for leaving the controversial church.

Bitchcraft: Simple Spells for Sweet Revenge and Everyday Annoyances by Kerry Colburn (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $15.99, ISBN 978-0-358-19698-3) provides spells to empower the modern woman to exact revenge and take charge.

Breathing as Spiritual Practice: Experiencing the Presence of God by Will Johnson (Inner Traditions, $14.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-62055-687-0). Buddhist retreat leader Johnson offers a close look at the importance of breath in each major religion, including within the Jewish teachings of ruach and the Islamic poetry of Rumi.

The Ancient Magick of Trees: Identify and Use Trees in Your Spiritual and Magickal Practice by Gregory Michael Brewer (Llewellyn, $24.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7387-6162-6). Part field guide and part magical resource, this compendium seeks to help readers identify more than 100 common trees across North America and Europe, as well as discover their medicinal and magical properties.

Modern Tantric Buddhism: Embodiment and Authenticity in Dharma Practice by Justin Von Bujdoss (North Atlantic, $19.95 paper, ISBN 978-1-62317-395-1) is a guide for practitioners, dharma teachers, chaplains, and clergy who want to understand and apply Vajrayana (tantric) Buddhism in the context of contemporary life.

Domestic Monastery by Ronald Rolheiser (Paraclete, $16, ISBN 978-1-64060-372-1). Friar Rolheiser examines how the life of the monastery can apply to those who dont live inside the walls of the cloister.

A Theory of Everything (That Matters): A Brief Guide to Einstein, Relativity, and His Surprising Thoughts on God by Alister McGrath (Tyndale Momentum, $22.99, ISBN 978-1-4964-3807-2) examines the life and work of Einstein.

Welcoming the Unwelcome: Wholehearted Living in a Brokenhearted World by Pema Chdrn (Shambhala, $24.95, ISBN 978-1611805659). Chdrn, a Buddhist nun and internationally bestselling author and poet, asks readers to embrace suffering to cultivate courage, love, and connection in this collection of essays and meditations.

Oct. 11

The Flowing Grace of Now: Encountering Wisdom Through the Weeks of the Year by Macrina Wiederkehr (Sorin, $15.95 paper, ISBN 978-1-932057-18-8). Benedictine Wiederkehr offers weekly reflections in order to reveal the spirituality of everyday life, inviting readers to take in the quotes of renowned teachers and learn from their wisdom.

Oct. 15

Mary Magdalene Never Wore Blue Eye Shadow: How to Trust the Bible When Truth and Tradition Collide by Amanda Hope Haley (Harvest House, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7369-7512-4) connects scripture to popular literature, providing Christian readers a reference point for its interpretations.

The Will of God: Understanding and Pursuing His Ultimate Plan for Your Life by Charles F. Stanley (Howard, $26, ISBN 978-1-982104-79-5). Pastor Stanley seeks to help readers discover Gods purpose in this guide to discovering how scripture addresses everyday decisions and challenges.

Start with Jesus: How Everyday Disciples Will Renew the Church by Julianne Stanz (Loyola, $17.95 paper, ISBN 978-0-8294-4884-9) aims to help Christians grows in relationship with Jesus through individual journaling and group exercises.

Hexing the Patriarchy: 26 Potions, Spells, and Magical Elixirs to Embolden the Resistance by Ariel Gore (Seal, $22, ISBN 978-1-58005-874-2) offers a blueprint for the feminist uprising, offering incantations, enchantments, rituals, and wisdom designed to protect women and bring down the patriarchy.

Be the Bridge by Latasha Morrison (WaterBrook, $17.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-525-65288-5). A community organizer and advocate for racial reconciliation offers a call for Christians to move toward deeper bonds of friendship and more empathetic understanding of others as a response to the current divisive culture.

Oct. 16

Qigong and the Tai Chi Axis: Nourishing Practices for Body, Mind, and Spirit by Mimi Kuo-Deemer (Ixia, $16.95 paper, ISBN 978-0-486-83737-6). This introduction to qigong and the yin-yang balance of tai chi, the ancient Chinese art of movement meditation, offers insights into these practices benefits.

Oct. 22

Ash and Starlight: Prayers for the Chaos and Grace of Daily Life by Arianne Braithwaite Lehn (Chalice, $18.99, ISBN 978-0-8272-0080-7). Pastor Braithwaite Lehn provides prayers for confession, transition, waiting, and struggle.

Oct. 29

Speaking of God: An Essential Guide to Christian Thought by Anthony G. Siegrist (Herald, $18.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-5138-0606-8). Pastor and theologian Siegrist aims to help readers recover a basic language around Christian theology, explaining concepts such as creation, sin, redemption, the church, and discipleship.

The Karma of Cats: Spiritual Wisdom from Our Feline Friends (Sounds True, 17.95 paper, ISBN 978-1-68364-253-4). Spiritual teachers, writers, and animal experts share stories and reflections on lessons learned from their feline friends, exploring the unique ways cats embody core spiritual values.

Fiction

Oct. 1

What Comes My Way by Tracie Peterson (Bethany House, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7642-1904-7). Ella Fleming, a member of the Brookstone Wild West Extravaganza, a wild west show comprising all-female performers, is on the run in the third installment of the Brookstone Brides series.

The More the Merrier: An Amish Christmas Romance by Linda Byler (Good Books, $14.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-68099-470-4). Set during the Great Depression, this romance centers on the Miller family and the death of patriarch Eli Miller, an event that rallies their Amish community around Elis wife and eight children, but only for a brief period.

Stitches in Time by Suzanne Woods Fisher (Revell, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-8007-2752-9). Horse trainer Sam Schrock feels a new lease on life when schoolteacher Mollie Graber moves to the Amish community of Stoney Ridge.

Oct. 8

Synapse by Steven James (Thomas Nelson, $16.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7852-2525-6). Thirty years in the future, when Kestrel Hathaway, a pastor in Cincinnati, witnesses a terror attack, shes drawn into a world of conspiracies and lies that she and Jordan, her cognizant robot, have to untangle before its too late.

The Last Man at the Inn: A Novel of One Mans Quest to Believe by R. William Bennett (Shadow Mountain, $17.99, ISBN 978-1-62972-603-8) imagines how a contemporary of JesusSimon, an ordinary spice merchantintersects with the Christian messiah at the major milestones of his life and ministry.

Oct. 14

A Cross to Kill by Andrew Huff (Kregel, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-8254-2274-4). John Cross, a mild-mannered small-town pastor, used to be an assassin for the CIAand his old life is coming back to haunt him in this first book of Huffs Shepherd Suspense series.

Oct. 22

The Bright Unknown by Elizabeth Byler Younts (Thomas Nelson, $16.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7180-7568-2). Brighton and her friend escape a rural Pennsylvania asylum, which has been the only home shes ever known. With no real name or money, they embark upon a journey across 1940s Middle America in search of a new home.

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Religion and Spirituality Books Preview: October 2019 - Publishers Weekly

Critic’s Notebook: ‘This Way Up’ Is More Than a Spiritual Cousin to ‘Fleabag’ – Hollywood Reporter

As the Emmys and seemingly everyone watching in the audience and at home poured out love for Phoebe Waller-Bridge and her Fleabag, the little show that could but almost didn't (three years ago in this same month a number of rave reviews still had a hard time convincing people to watch), I thought about a different show:This Way Up. It's a series bought by Hulu from its British originators and, well, more on that shortly.

But I also thought how different the massive love for Fleabag this week was from the situation the show was in three years ago, which is helpful when considering an overlooked show like This Way Up, which some are already calling a cousin of sorts to Fleabag.

For starters, five weeks before Fleabag's first seasonpremiered on Amazon as a co-production I wrote a column about how Amazon was struggling, as a new content provider, in differentiating its originals from shows it had streaming rights to, having bought them from others. In short: Amazon shows weren't getting much special love; they were tossed in with the rest of the offerings, like products. It was hard to get noticed that way since people were very new to the idea that Amazon made its own TV series in addition to selling toilet paper and watches, etc.

There wasn't much hype for Fleabag, or advertising. There were 19 reviews for it (including mine) before it aired a paltry amount, but the reviews were glowing (it had a score of 88 on Metacritic, which equates to "universal acclaim"). Still, what followed was months of critics saying, "You should watch this show on Amazon called Fleabag. It's brilliant!" And people would say, "Amazon makes TV shows? And what's a Fleabag? Is sounds gross?"

So, yeah, three years later and four Emmy wins in big categories series, lead actress, writing, directing and the only thing that's changed for other small, dying-to-be-discovered gems is thatit's exponentially harder. Peak TV very clearly hasn't peaked.

But here's the thing This Way Up really is brilliant. Irish actress and comic Aisling Bea (pronounced Ash-ling) created, wrote and stars as a troubled Irish Londoner, recovering from a mental breakdown of unknown origin and gingerly putting her life back in order, but slipping by degrees every day.

When This Way Up came out on Aug. 21, only a measly four outlets reviewed it four! THR's own Dan Fienberg reviewed it favorably, but I happen to like it a lot more than he does (even when critics agree they tend to disagree on the little things). Three of the four reviews mentioned Fleabag (and Catastrophe, another British co-pro from Amazon that starred Sharon Horgan, who is also excellent in This Way Up, which comes from her production company). The gist from those reviews is that This Way Up is really good but flawed and, hey, if you miss Fleabag, this will fill that void, but come up short in the process.

Well, sure, which shows wouldn't? Fleabag is a real rarity, particularly the first season. It's interesting that the four reviews of This Way Up I know three of the critics and like them very much, I will note in case you're getting the wrong vibe here mention that it's not particularly plot-driven and that it tends to ramble a bit.

To which I would add: So does Fleabag season 2 (that's a show I adore and will fight over to prove it but, come on all the resolution comes from the secondary characters and there's a lot of rambling about for our troubled heroine). Other shows that have indistinct plots: Atlanta, Master of None andabout 29 others.

What I saw in This Way Upare all the excellent parts that my three peers also saw, plus a perfectly fine structure, interactions that effectively defined the state of Aisling's character, Aine (pronounced Anya), and an ending that set up a second season I'm extremely eager to know will be coming.

In This Way Up, we meet Aine as she's getting out of a treatment facility (or "spa") after suffering a breakdown. Aine's sister Shona (Horgan) picks Aine up and takes her home, and we flash four months ahead to when Aine looks, on the surface, like she's functioning well enough, just adrift when she's not filling the air with non-stop joking and whipsaw banter. Aisling infuses Aine with that manic sense of "If I just smile and joke around everything will be fine or at least everyone will think I'm fine."

But Shona knows better she worries about Aine walking alone at night, tracking her movements by phone. Her obsessing is our hint that it was more than a breakdown. I thought This Way Upwas excellent at illustrating that the "normal" things going to work, interacting with strangers, cohabitating with a roommate were the moments in Aine's day where she was most vulnerable, where her joys were fleeting, her connections superficial and her separation from family a little too much to bear. For me, the season was about a person trying to cope with life and getting it about 60 percent right on her best days.

The introduction of people beyond Shona her boyfriend (played by Aasif Mandvi), his family, Aine's roommate's family, a humorless employer (Tobias Menzies) who slowly starts falling for her, etc. was less random than it appeared; these were small encounters that brought glimpses of potential light to Aine or further delineated her woes.

What I also saw was something precise and outstanding Aisling herself. It's that feeling I got when Waller-Bridge was at the Television Critics Association summer press tour in August of 2016 andyou just knew. You could see it on the screen and you could see it in person. Aisling has the same kind of tour-de-force sense of humor and her writing in This Way Up is utterly fantastic. She injects her own character with a manic self-deprecation used to keep others at bay just as Waller-Bridge does as Fleabag.

But Fleabag and Aine are suffering from different things it's more well-defined for Fleabag in the first season, without a doubt, but I'd argue the same relative underlying unhappiness she's living through in the second season is just as amorphous as what Aine is going through trying to be happy for a day.

An argument could be made that Fleabag only really and truly cares about Boo in the first season and that vulnerable, unprotected nerve shines through only when she stops using humor and scathing asides as a defense mechanism, just as Aine cares most deeply for others who are suffering and keeps her guard up with family (but only half-up with Shona, whom Aine relies on for emotional support). Both Fleabag and Aine are complex women feeling deep hurt and discontent, the latter often an unexplained or ill-defined emotion which rings so true. Often with depression there's no one reason or easy explanation for why a person is spiraling. And that relentlessly nagging sense of unhappiness is hard to shake precisely because the root of it is indeterminate.

Over the course of six episodes of a mere 23 minutes each, Aisling's writing is a real revelation and her comedic sensibility spot-on. I was surprised at how often I would rewind scenes, marvel at the nuances in the writing scathing humor, bubbling sadness or delight in Aisling's fearless, all-in performance. This series, I thought, is vastly under-appreciated, in addition to having been completely lost in the Peak TV crush (a sentiment that was familiar from three years ago with Fleabag).

I hope more people discover how excellent This Way Up truly is and celebrate its own identity not just flatter it briefly before calling it a cousin to something else.

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Critic's Notebook: 'This Way Up' Is More Than a Spiritual Cousin to 'Fleabag' - Hollywood Reporter

Knead & Seed is a haven for spiritual, emotional wellness in Sag Harbor – Northforker

There was a time when Juli Everett was hesitant to call herself a witch, or use the word in relation to her work.

Lately, she has shed that inhibition.

The 32-year-old licensed massage therapist was always called to help others through her lifelong interest in herbology, astrology and other techniques that foster spiritual and emotional wellness. She recalled being a middle school student in Sag Harbor and, after school, walking to Metaphysical Books and Tools, the now defunct Main Street store, to satisfy that innate curiosity at a time when alternative approaches to medicine, healing and self-care were not the trendy cultural fascination is today.

Throughout the years, she has come to reclaim the definition of what it means to be witch.

I believe the definition of a witch is a Woman In Total Control of Herself, she said, before adding, with emphasis, Period.

Personally, my belief is that every woman who walks the earth is a witch. The things that youre the absolute best at, and the things you can create, thats what youre a witch of.

Everett founded Knead and Seed two years ago, and it grew faster, and in different ways than she anticipated, becoming so much more than a massage business. The shop is located in a two-story house on a picturesque piece of property in a secluded and wooded area off Merchants Path, on the border of Sag Harbor and East Hampton.

The space where Everett operates her multi-faceted business is an extension of her personality. A large shelf covers one wall, stacked with books on astrology, massage and other forms she practices. The mantle over a large fireplace features, among other things, photos of both her great-grandmother and aunt, who she cites as big influences in her life. A chalkboard in the small working kitchen has a new message everyday; a deck of oracle cards are fanned out, face down, on a nearby counter.

Everett uses many methods to work with her clients, but usually starts by asking them to pull an oracle card. The simple action is usually enough to get the tears flowing or bring out emotions. Then she takes a look at their chart. Even people who start off as skeptics usually come back for more, she says. Its human nature.

People want to be told about themselves, she said. Thats why were here. We have to help ourselves so that whatever we decide to push out into the universe is successful. Otherwise its BS.

Though she never intended to portray herself as a jack of all trades, she sees a synergy in everything provided at the shop. Among the most popular offerings are the full moon and new moon goddess circle gatherings, where women are invited to come and share what theyve been experiencing and carrying with them in their lives in a judgment-free zone. In less than two years, more than 130 different women have attended the circles, which initially began as a one-time gathering of a few of her closest friends in the first week she was open.

Juli makes you feel accepted, and encourages you to show your truth in a safe environment surrounded by women who are supportive, said client Melissa Lynch. Its very hard to put into words. You just have to try it to understand it. Its something everyone should experience at least once.

She has magic hands, Lynch added. When you walk into Knead and Seed, you immediately feel welcomed.

Creating that feeling of acceptance is exactly what Everett intended. And though Knead and Seeds caters to all, there is no denying its devoted female clientele. Helping women harness their power is at the core of what Everett does, and she hopes to expand that mission with Knead and Seed as time goes by.

I wanted to start a place thats a safe space for women to land and feel validated, she said. I think they come with a sense of wanting to be spiritually connected to themselves with a group of women where everyone can feel validated.

She plans to expand her teaching abilities in the future, and wants to host more retreats, which is a service shes offered more recently. For now, she says she is simply grateful for the people who have walked through her doors, and is proud not only of what she has done for them, but what they have done for themselves.

Im just so thankful to all of the women that have stepped in and have been such a support to this place, she said. But mostly, that they keep showing up for themselves. Im just really thankful that people are becoming more open.

Knead and Seed is located at 146 Merchants Path, Sag Harbor

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Knead & Seed is a haven for spiritual, emotional wellness in Sag Harbor - Northforker

This Darshan and one-day retreat in Eagle will bring spiritual awareness to all who attend – Vail Daily News

Experience a one-day Darshan retreat with spiritual guide Louix Dor Dempriey this weekend in Eagle. All are welcome to attend Darshan with Louix on Friday, Sept. 27 at 7:30 p.m. (by donation). The next day, Dempriey is hosting a one-day retreat from 10 a.m. 6 p.m. Both events will be held at Brush Creek Pavilion Studio.

Darshan is a gift from a spiritual master that can clear away karmic blocks and open chakran. The experience has been known to bring healings, clear the mind and induce states of bliss as well as bring peace and balance. Some have even had epiphanies.

Darshan with Dempriey provides the opportunity for people of all ages, faiths, beliefs, and walks of life to receive a personal blessing to the backdrop of world devotional music. Demprieys darshan can have profound transformational effects, which often evokes exalted states of bliss, kundalini rising and even healing of physical ailments.

During the one-day retreat, guests can immerse themselves in wisdom, grace, love and humor while receiving blessing and guidance to move into deeper levels of self-mastery. Throughout the day, participants will experience illuminating discourses and guided meditations. The retreat fee includes a vegan lunch.

For more information, pricing and registration for the one-day retreat, visit louix.org.

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This Darshan and one-day retreat in Eagle will bring spiritual awareness to all who attend - Vail Daily News

Panday honoured in Tobago by Spiritual Baptist – Trinidad Guardian

Shastri Boodan

Former prime minister Basdeo Panday was honoured on Saturday by the Tobago Circuit of the National Evangelical Spiritual Baptist Faith under the patronage of His Grace Archbishop Glenroy Jack.

Panday told the gathering at the Rovanels Resort and Conference Centre that he has not given up hope to see a nation united regardless of ethnic and cultural differences.

So that we can become the great nation that God intended us to be. he said.

Panday said the name Spiritual Shouter Baptist is unique to T&T as it is the only country to have a public holiday in its honour.

The former PM also gave an historical account of the decades of struggles of the Shouter Baptist movement to gain recognition.

He said his administration 1996-2001 also gave recognition to persons of the Orisha faith through the passing of the Orisha Marriage Act that legalised Orisha marriages in T&T.

He said the Orishas were treated in the same manner as the Hindus and Muslims under the British colonial government whose aim was to divide and rule the nation for the sake of power.

Panday later told Guardian Media that T&T is no closer to achieving the unity he dreams of because the constitution is causing the differences with people. He said unless constitutional reform takes place discrimination would always continue.

Panday also said he has no problem with a name change of the Piarco International Airport once the facility is operated with efficiently.

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Panday honoured in Tobago by Spiritual Baptist - Trinidad Guardian

Institute for Priestly Formation puts spiritual lives of priests front and center – The Catholic Spirit

Auxiliary Bishop Andrew Cozzens talks with George Esseff of California, an emeritus member of the Institute for Priestly Formations Mission Advisory Council, during IPFs 25th anniversary celebration in July in Omaha, Nebraska. COURTESY FORD JACOBSEN

And it centered on a highly influential but, aside from those directly involved, little-known institute in Omaha, Nebraska.

The Institute for Priestly Formation, which this year is celebrating its 25th anniversary, offers retreats, spiritual direction and guidance, with a focus on seminarians and diocesan priests. Its offerings include a nine-week summer program on the campus of Creighton University, which this year attracted 177 seminarians from more than 60 U.S. dioceses, including five from the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis.

The institute also conducts retreats for bishops and seminary theologians, days of reflection for laity, theological forums and other programs.

Bishop Cozzens estimates that about 40 priests of the archdiocese have gone through spiritual direction training at IPF. Others have benefited from retreats and taught summer courses at the institute.

Bishop Cozzens said he first heard about IPF as a priest of the archdiocese in 2006, when he started work in seminary formation. He went on a 30-day IPF silent retreat at Creighton in the summer of 2008.

I would say that the retreat was for me a very life-changing experience. I joke, sometimes, that for me theres been two lives, one was before the retreat and one was after the retreat. And the one after was a whole lot better than the one before.

That retreat, with silence and time to be alone with God, brought a new way for Bishop Cozzens to view himself and his daily life with the Lord.

You cant escape yourself, he said. You have to deal with yourself. And then you learn that that allows you to engage the world in a different way.

It gave me a desire to have that be part of my whole life, that I would always live in Gods presence, that I would always try to be with him.

That focus on spirituality and carving out time to develop it is critically important, Bishop Cozzens said. Seminaries are busy places where much is accomplished but time is limited, he said.

And as Priesthood Sunday approaches Sept. 29 this year, a day set aside by Serra International to honor priests and affirm the role of the priesthood in the life of the Church people might reflect on ways to support the spiritual lives of their pastors and other priests, Bishop Cozzens said.

There are many ways to advance spiritual development, not just IPF, the bishop said. But it could be said that IPF has had a greater impact on the seminarians and priests in the United States than almost any other organization in the last 25 years, in terms of the depth of their impact helping priests and seminarians appreciate and grow in a life of prayer and in the skills of spiritual direction, said Bishop Cozzens, who is on IPFs corporate board as treasurer as well as its bishops and mission advisory councils. Father Joseph Taphorn, a native of Omaha who has been involved as a spiritual director with IPF and in January began serving as rector of The St. Paul Seminary School of Divinity, said it wasnt the case before, but now the archdiocese is asking its seminarians to attend an IPF summer session as they enter their studies at the graduate level seminary.

It gives a man an opportunity to have a very intentional and focused relationship with our Lord, Father Taphorn said of the sessions, which begin with an eight-day silent retreat. Its a chance to say, this is what were about this summer.

Father Jonathan Kelly, who teaches at the undergraduate St. John Vianney College Seminary in St. Paul, has been on two, 30-day retreats at the institute, in 2007 and 2017. He also has taught at IPF and helped direct the 30-day retreats, which he calls transformational.

Transformational is the Lord doing the work and speaking to us in a way that well never forget, Father Kelly said. The silence of a 30-day retreat and a good spiritual director (guiding the retreat) who stays silent, who might see it but waits for the Lord to say it, that is transformational.

As priests and seminarians develop their spiritual lives, they can help others grow in similar fashion, Bishop Cozzens said.

It really helps priests strengthen their own identity as a spiritual father and as a spiritual director as they serve in the priesthood, Bishop Cozzens said.

They (IPF) teach people how to bring their real lives into relationship with God, and that affects a mans preaching, that affects the way a man cares for people in very positive ways, Bishop Cozzens said. Its why we want our seminarians when possible to go through at an early stage, so that they early on begin to recognize that their lives are being brought into this relationship with God. And then they can help others to do that.

Tags: Priestly formation

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Institute for Priestly Formation puts spiritual lives of priests front and center - The Catholic Spirit

Music and spirituality at the end of life – OUPblog

Music and spirituality are two mediums frequently almost ubiquitously partnered in cultures around the world with the intention of enhancing engagement with the divine. Spiritual practices are infused with music to intensify the transpersonal components of worship, meditation, and ritual. Correspondingly, musical encounters are infused with spiritually-based beliefs and practices to provide individuals connections with themselves and others in uniquely powerful ways.

For many, this easy, reciprocal flow from music to spirituality may come as no surprise: both are malleable mediums responsive to the people engaging with them and the settings in which they are engaged. For instance,Amazing Graceperformed at a funeral in a church with a large congregation might be led with a louder volume, increased pressure, and heightened resonance to match the congregations energy as they worship through song. In contrast,Amazing Graceperformed bedside in a hospital room with a patient and caregivers might embody quieter, more prayerful qualities intending to comfortingly hold the patient in their depleted physical state and engender intimate musical sharing.

As music and spirituality intertwine, their boundaries become increasingly fluid to the point that distinguishing between one and the other becomes trivial. To be spiritual is to be musical, and to be musical is to be spiritual.

A similar malleability is also present in individuals health journeys. Objective characteristics of health such as symptom acuity/chronicity; treatment dosage and frequency; and curative versus palliative outcomes are subjectively experienced in response to the individuals values, morals, and disease trajectory. For instance, one persons 6 out of 10 pain is their daily baseline and thus easily managed, while anothers 6 out of 10 pain is breakthrough and requires treatment. Similarly, one person may prioritize the improved quality of life offered by palliative care while another may prioritize the potential increased longevity offered by curative treatments.

These dynamic, emergent qualities of music, spirituality, and health are a result of each being culturally situated phenomena. That is, the manner in which music, spirituality, and health are conceptualized and engaged with is directly informed by the distinct cultures in which they manifest. This leads to a fraught but important question: If music, spirituality, and health are each unto themselves complex phenomena derived from cultural factors, how do all three interact when they intersect in a singular encounter?

Board-certified music therapists frequently navigate this encounter in hospice. Hospice is a philosophy of care that prioritizes quality of life with six months or less to live, putting critical health issues at the forefront with limited time to facilitate resolution and closure. At such a juncture, spirituality can be a critical resource for patients and families who are simultaneously managing in the moment and preparing for the future. The type of resource spirituality can become (e.g., comfort in ritual, strength from scripture or peace through prayer/meditation/worship) is determined by the specific faith traditions of the patient not just an identified denomination but the explicit experiences patients engaged in as part of their spiritual practice.

Music therapists assess those faith traditions for each patient and, coupled with a similar assessment of patients music traditions, craft music experiences that help patients become aware of and engage with their spiritually-based resources. These culturally informed clinical music processes interweave music, spirituality, and health in a way that affords patients agency in dictating the circumstances of their death. Yet, contemporary discussions in the music therapy literature have tended to frame spirituality from such a broad and generic stance that it becomes difficult for music therapists to locate spiritually-based resources in patients.

To address this limitation, my co-author (Cathleen Flynn) and I recently authored a paper that explored a specific culturally informed music, spiritual, and health intersection: music therapy for Christian patients and caregivers during imminent death. Using this intersection as a foundation, we developed a theoretical model positioning music therapy as a psychospiritual ministry providing patients and caregivers access to a faith-based resource the Holy Spirit that assists with transcendence as end-of-life transitions neared.

Transcendence, a difficult concept to lock down, is a movement beyond the typical, readily accessible experiences that define our day-to-day to experience the self and other in new ways that push beyond our known thresholds. For Christian patients who are imminently dying, that transcendence is vertical, an upward trajectory that moves them closer to an integration with the divine as they move beyond the corporeal. For Christian caregivers, that transcendence is horizontal, an outward trajectory that moves them closer to mortal support structures that assist in their transition to bereavement. The Holy Spirit, an intermediary between the mortal and divine, is the faith-based avenue through which these different but concomitant transcendences occur. From this vantage point, the music therapist assumes a ministerial role, constructing dynamic music experiences that facilitate interactions with the Holy Spirit promoting patient and caregiver transcendence.

Such explicit framing is ethically fraught. First, we do not argue that adopting a Christian lens is the only way or the correct way for music therapy to be practiced in hospice; rather, we introduce this theoretical model as a broad template for conducting spiritual assessments of patients from diverse traditions and beliefs. Second, this is a person-centered model wherein any implementation of Christian theology into music therapy processes is cued by the patient rather than introduced by the music therapist; this is an essential aspect as it avoids the perception that music therapists might leverage privilege to proselytize to patients. Third, there are numerous avenues for ethical and effective clinical support of Christian patients and families at the end of life, and this model is not meant to be a linear prescription; rather, it is an exploratory avenue that opens a multitude of additional doorways for providing psychospiritual care.

As the baby boomer generation continues to advance in age, it will be increasingly important that healthcare systems are well positioned to provide comprehensive end-of-life care addressing mind, body, and spirit as equal partners in whole-person health. Music and spirituality continue to be important day-to-day aspects for many people, and exploring diverse permutations of music, spirituality, and health intersections can be an important contribution to this pursuit of the good death.

Featured Image Credit: selective focus photo of brown guitar on white pillow by Kari Shea. Royalty free viaUnsplash.

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Music and spirituality at the end of life - OUPblog

Kourtney Kardashian Opens Up About Her New Venture and Why She Wont Force Spirituality on Her Kids – PEOPLE.com

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Kourtney Kardashian Opens Up About Her New Venture and Why She Won't Force Spirituality on Her Kids

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Kourtney Kardashian Opens Up About Her New Venture and Why She Wont Force Spirituality on Her Kids - PEOPLE.com

Denzel Curry finds spirituality in boxing and reveals his most treasured memory – 88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Radio Milwaukees new video seriesYours Trulybrings you up-close portraits of artists reflecting on their creative journey. For this installment, we sat down with 24-year-old Florida rapper Denzel Curry, who is enjoying a breakout year thanks to his excellent new album Zuu. Pitchfork described it as the best, most dynamic, and altogether hardest album of his career.

In this intimate conversation, Denzel explains his love of UFC and anime. He also shares his background in drawing and teases a graphic novel hes been working on. And, of course, we ask him what his childhood smelled like.

For more videos with artists we love, subscribe to88Nine Radio Milwaukees YouTube channel.

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Denzel Curry finds spirituality in boxing and reveals his most treasured memory - 88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Religion and Spirituality Books Preview: October 2019 – Publishers Weekly

Nonfiction

Oct. 1

Jesus in Me: Experiencing the Holy Spirit as a Constant Companion by Anne Graham Lotz (Multnomah, $23.99, ISBN 978-0525651048). The Bible teacher and daughter of Billy Graham unpacks key biblical lessons alongside personal insights to explore how she sees the Holy Spirit shaping her everyday life.

The Preachers Wife: The Precarious Power of Evangelical Women Celebrities by Kate Bowler (Princeton Univ., $29.95, ISBN 978-0691179612) Historian Bowler examines the rise of Christian women celebrities (in particular, those in what she calls a celebrity preachers wife role, like Joyce Meyer, Beth Moore, and Victoria Osteen) to explore how they balance the demands of celebrity culture and a conservative, male-dominated faith.

7 Days of Christmas by Jen Hatmaker (Abingdon, $21.99, ISBN 978-1-5018-8827-4) addresses seven key areasfood, clothes, spending, media, possessions, waste, stresswhose practices Christian readers can consider during Christmas for reducing consumption to bring more joy into ones life.

Bible Prophecy and You: Predictions, Fulfillments, and What to Watch for Next by Len Woods and Christopher D. Hudson (Barbour, $14.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-64352-097-1) describes predictions about Israel, other biblical kingdoms, and Jesus, before detailing predictions about Israel and the end-times found in scripture.

Reclaiming Judaism from Zionism: Stories of Personal Transformation, edited by Carolyn L. Karcher (Interlink, $20 paper, ISBN 978-1-62371-914-2). Forty Jewish activists and scholars share autobiographical essays describing how they, as devout American Jews, disentangled themselves from Zionism.

52 Promises from God: Reflections to Soothe Your Soul by Jessie Seneca (Momosa, $15 paper, ISBN 978-0-9844804-3-2) asks readers to jump-start their faith and assures them that God fulfills promises to those who follow his word.

How to Pray: A Simple Guide for Normal People by Pete Greig (NavPress, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-64158-188-2). Greig, cofounder of the 24-7 Prayer movement, urges readers to pray with passion, explaining to Christians how prayer is conversation with God.

Strong, Brave, Loved: Empowering Reminders of Who You Really Are by Holley Gerth (Revell, $18.99, ISBN 978-0-8007-2955-4). Blogger and life coach Gerth offers 60 short devotions geared toward empowering women, as well as prompts for journaling and personal reflection.

Everything You Need by David Jeremiah (W, $26.99, ISBN 978-0-7852-2393-1). Jeremiah, founder of the international ministry Turning Point, explores 2 Peter 1:510 to highlight seven critical tools: virtue, knowledge, self-control, perseverance, godliness, kindness, and love.

Rhythms of Renewal: Trading Stress and Anxiety for a Life of Peace and Purpose by Rebekah Lyons (Zondervan, $24.99, ISBN 978-0-310-35614-1) details the four rhythms that she believes lead to a vibrant life: rest, renew, connect, and create.

Prosperity Magick: Spells for Wealth by Cassandra Eason (Sterling, $16.95, ISBN 978-1-4549-3678-7). Druid magical practitioner Eason describes spells intended to help readers get promotions, win the lottery, overcome debt, and avoid costly scams, among others.

Oct. 4

The Godman and the Sea: The Empty Tomb, the Trauma of the Jews, and the Gospel of Mark by Michael J. Thate (Univ. of Pennsylvania, $79.95, ISBN 978-0-8122-5151-7). An associate research scholar at Princeton closely examines the Gospel of Mark, judging it an exemplary text that responds to and makes meaning of the trauma arising from the crucified and missing body of Jesus.

Oct. 8

Unfollow: A Memoir of Loving and Leaving the Westboro Baptist Church by Megan Phelps-Roper (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). Phelps-Roper, a granddaughter of Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps, provides a vivid account of her upbringing and explains her reasons for leaving the controversial church.

Bitchcraft: Simple Spells for Sweet Revenge and Everyday Annoyances by Kerry Colburn (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, $15.99, ISBN 978-0-358-19698-3) provides spells to empower the modern woman to exact revenge and take charge.

Breathing as Spiritual Practice: Experiencing the Presence of God by Will Johnson (Inner Traditions, $14.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-62055-687-0). Buddhist retreat leader Johnson offers a close look at the importance of breath in each major religion, including within the Jewish teachings of ruach and the Islamic poetry of Rumi.

The Ancient Magick of Trees: Identify and Use Trees in Your Spiritual and Magickal Practice by Gregory Michael Brewer (Llewellyn, $24.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7387-6162-6). Part field guide and part magical resource, this compendium seeks to help readers identify more than 100 common trees across North America and Europe, as well as discover their medicinal and magical properties.

Modern Tantric Buddhism: Embodiment and Authenticity in Dharma Practice by Justin Von Bujdoss (North Atlantic, $19.95 paper, ISBN 978-1-62317-395-1) is a guide for practitioners, dharma teachers, chaplains, and clergy who want to understand and apply Vajrayana (tantric) Buddhism in the context of contemporary life.

Domestic Monastery by Ronald Rolheiser (Paraclete, $16, ISBN 978-1-64060-372-1). Friar Rolheiser examines how the life of the monastery can apply to those who dont live inside the walls of the cloister.

A Theory of Everything (That Matters): A Brief Guide to Einstein, Relativity, and His Surprising Thoughts on God by Alister McGrath (Tyndale Momentum, $22.99, ISBN 978-1-4964-3807-2) examines the life and work of Einstein.

Welcoming the Unwelcome: Wholehearted Living in a Brokenhearted World by Pema Chdrn (Shambhala, $24.95, ISBN 978-1611805659). Chdrn, a Buddhist nun and internationally bestselling author and poet, asks readers to embrace suffering to cultivate courage, love, and connection in this collection of essays and meditations.

Oct. 11

The Flowing Grace of Now: Encountering Wisdom Through the Weeks of the Year by Macrina Wiederkehr (Sorin, $15.95 paper, ISBN 978-1-932057-18-8). Benedictine Wiederkehr offers weekly reflections in order to reveal the spirituality of everyday life, inviting readers to take in the quotes of renowned teachers and learn from their wisdom.

Oct. 15

Mary Magdalene Never Wore Blue Eye Shadow: How to Trust the Bible When Truth and Tradition Collide by Amanda Hope Haley (Harvest House, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7369-7512-4) connects scripture to popular literature, providing Christian readers a reference point for its interpretations.

The Will of God: Understanding and Pursuing His Ultimate Plan for Your Life by Charles F. Stanley (Howard, $26, ISBN 978-1-982104-79-5). Pastor Stanley seeks to help readers discover Gods purpose in this guide to discovering how scripture addresses everyday decisions and challenges.

Start with Jesus: How Everyday Disciples Will Renew the Church by Julianne Stanz (Loyola, $17.95 paper, ISBN 978-0-8294-4884-9) aims to help Christians grows in relationship with Jesus through individual journaling and group exercises.

Hexing the Patriarchy: 26 Potions, Spells, and Magical Elixirs to Embolden the Resistance by Ariel Gore (Seal, $22, ISBN 978-1-58005-874-2) offers a blueprint for the feminist uprising, offering incantations, enchantments, rituals, and wisdom designed to protect women and bring down the patriarchy.

Be the Bridge by Latasha Morrison (WaterBrook, $17.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-525-65288-5). A community organizer and advocate for racial reconciliation offers a call for Christians to move toward deeper bonds of friendship and more empathetic understanding of others as a response to the current divisive culture.

Oct. 16

Qigong and the Tai Chi Axis: Nourishing Practices for Body, Mind, and Spirit by Mimi Kuo-Deemer (Ixia, $16.95 paper, ISBN 978-0-486-83737-6). This introduction to qigong and the yin-yang balance of tai chi, the ancient Chinese art of movement meditation, offers insights into these practices benefits.

Oct. 22

Ash and Starlight: Prayers for the Chaos and Grace of Daily Life by Arianne Braithwaite Lehn (Chalice, $18.99, ISBN 978-0-8272-0080-7). Pastor Braithwaite Lehn provides prayers for confession, transition, waiting, and struggle.

Oct. 29

Speaking of God: An Essential Guide to Christian Thought by Anthony G. Siegrist (Herald, $18.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-5138-0606-8). Pastor and theologian Siegrist aims to help readers recover a basic language around Christian theology, explaining concepts such as creation, sin, redemption, the church, and discipleship.

The Karma of Cats: Spiritual Wisdom from Our Feline Friends (Sounds True, 17.95 paper, ISBN 978-1-68364-253-4). Spiritual teachers, writers, and animal experts share stories and reflections on lessons learned from their feline friends, exploring the unique ways cats embody core spiritual values.

Fiction

Oct. 1

What Comes My Way by Tracie Peterson (Bethany House, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7642-1904-7). Ella Fleming, a member of the Brookstone Wild West Extravaganza, a wild west show comprising all-female performers, is on the run in the third installment of the Brookstone Brides series.

The More the Merrier: An Amish Christmas Romance by Linda Byler (Good Books, $14.99 paper, ISBN 978-1-68099-470-4). Set during the Great Depression, this romance centers on the Miller family and the death of patriarch Eli Miller, an event that rallies their Amish community around Elis wife and eight children, but only for a brief period.

Stitches in Time by Suzanne Woods Fisher (Revell, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-8007-2752-9). Horse trainer Sam Schrock feels a new lease on life when schoolteacher Mollie Graber moves to the Amish community of Stoney Ridge.

Oct. 8

Synapse by Steven James (Thomas Nelson, $16.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7852-2525-6). Thirty years in the future, when Kestrel Hathaway, a pastor in Cincinnati, witnesses a terror attack, shes drawn into a world of conspiracies and lies that she and Jordan, her cognizant robot, have to untangle before its too late.

The Last Man at the Inn: A Novel of One Mans Quest to Believe by R. William Bennett (Shadow Mountain, $17.99, ISBN 978-1-62972-603-8) imagines how a contemporary of JesusSimon, an ordinary spice merchantintersects with the Christian messiah at the major milestones of his life and ministry.

Oct. 14

A Cross to Kill by Andrew Huff (Kregel, $15.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-8254-2274-4). John Cross, a mild-mannered small-town pastor, used to be an assassin for the CIAand his old life is coming back to haunt him in this first book of Huffs Shepherd Suspense series.

Oct. 22

The Bright Unknown by Elizabeth Byler Younts (Thomas Nelson, $16.99 paper, ISBN 978-0-7180-7568-2). Brighton and her friend escape a rural Pennsylvania asylum, which has been the only home shes ever known. With no real name or money, they embark upon a journey across 1940s Middle America in search of a new home.

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Religion and Spirituality Books Preview: October 2019 - Publishers Weekly

This Darshan and one-day retreat in Eagle will bring spiritual awareness to all who attend – Vail Daily News

Experience a one-day Darshan retreat with spiritual guide Louix Dor Dempriey this weekend in Eagle. All are welcome to attend Darshan with Louix on Friday, Sept. 27 at 7:30 p.m. (by donation). The next day, Dempriey is hosting a one-day retreat from 10 a.m. 6 p.m. Both events will be held at Brush Creek Pavilion Studio.

Darshan is a gift from a spiritual master that can clear away karmic blocks and open chakran. The experience has been known to bring healings, clear the mind and induce states of bliss as well as bring peace and balance. Some have even had epiphanies.

Darshan with Dempriey provides the opportunity for people of all ages, faiths, beliefs, and walks of life to receive a personal blessing to the backdrop of world devotional music. Demprieys darshan can have profound transformational effects, which often evokes exalted states of bliss, kundalini rising and even healing of physical ailments.

During the one-day retreat, guests can immerse themselves in wisdom, grace, love and humor while receiving blessing and guidance to move into deeper levels of self-mastery. Throughout the day, participants will experience illuminating discourses and guided meditations. The retreat fee includes a vegan lunch.

For more information, pricing and registration for the one-day retreat, visit louix.org.

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This Darshan and one-day retreat in Eagle will bring spiritual awareness to all who attend - Vail Daily News

Critic’s Notebook: ‘This Way Up’ Is More Than a Spiritual Cousin to ‘Fleabag’ – Hollywood Reporter

As the Emmys and seemingly everyone watching in the audience and at home poured out love for Phoebe Waller-Bridge and her Fleabag, the little show that could but almost didn't (three years ago in this same month a number of rave reviews still had a hard time convincing people to watch), I thought about a different show:This Way Up. It's a series bought by Hulu from its British originators and, well, more on that shortly.

But I also thought how different the massive love for Fleabag this week was from the situation the show was in three years ago, which is helpful when considering an overlooked show like This Way Up, which some are already calling a cousin of sorts to Fleabag.

For starters, five weeks before Fleabag's first seasonpremiered on Amazon as a co-production I wrote a column about how Amazon was struggling, as a new content provider, in differentiating its originals from shows it had streaming rights to, having bought them from others. In short: Amazon shows weren't getting much special love; they were tossed in with the rest of the offerings, like products. It was hard to get noticed that way since people were very new to the idea that Amazon made its own TV series in addition to selling toilet paper and watches, etc.

There wasn't much hype for Fleabag, or advertising. There were 19 reviews for it (including mine) before it aired a paltry amount, but the reviews were glowing (it had a score of 88 on Metacritic, which equates to "universal acclaim"). Still, what followed was months of critics saying, "You should watch this show on Amazon called Fleabag. It's brilliant!" And people would say, "Amazon makes TV shows? And what's a Fleabag? Is sounds gross?"

So, yeah, three years later and four Emmy wins in big categories series, lead actress, writing, directing and the only thing that's changed for other small, dying-to-be-discovered gems is thatit's exponentially harder. Peak TV very clearly hasn't peaked.

But here's the thing This Way Up really is brilliant. Irish actress and comic Aisling Bea (pronounced Ash-ling) created, wrote and stars as a troubled Irish Londoner, recovering from a mental breakdown of unknown origin and gingerly putting her life back in order, but slipping by degrees every day.

When This Way Up came out on Aug. 21, only a measly four outlets reviewed it four! THR's own Dan Fienberg reviewed it favorably, but I happen to like it a lot more than he does (even when critics agree they tend to disagree on the little things). Three of the four reviews mentioned Fleabag (and Catastrophe, another British co-pro from Amazon that starred Sharon Horgan, who is also excellent in This Way Up, which comes from her production company). The gist from those reviews is that This Way Up is really good but flawed and, hey, if you miss Fleabag, this will fill that void, but come up short in the process.

Well, sure, which shows wouldn't? Fleabag is a real rarity, particularly the first season. It's interesting that the four reviews of This Way Up I know three of the critics and like them very much, I will note in case you're getting the wrong vibe here mention that it's not particularly plot-driven and that it tends to ramble a bit.

To which I would add: So does Fleabag season 2 (that's a show I adore and will fight over to prove it but, come on all the resolution comes from the secondary characters and there's a lot of rambling about for our troubled heroine). Other shows that have indistinct plots: Atlanta, Master of None andabout 29 others.

What I saw in This Way Upare all the excellent parts that my three peers also saw, plus a perfectly fine structure, interactions that effectively defined the state of Aisling's character, Aine (pronounced Anya), and an ending that set up a second season I'm extremely eager to know will be coming.

In This Way Up, we meet Aine as she's getting out of a treatment facility (or "spa") after suffering a breakdown. Aine's sister Shona (Horgan) picks Aine up and takes her home, and we flash four months ahead to when Aine looks, on the surface, like she's functioning well enough, just adrift when she's not filling the air with non-stop joking and whipsaw banter. Aisling infuses Aine with that manic sense of "If I just smile and joke around everything will be fine or at least everyone will think I'm fine."

But Shona knows better she worries about Aine walking alone at night, tracking her movements by phone. Her obsessing is our hint that it was more than a breakdown. I thought This Way Upwas excellent at illustrating that the "normal" things going to work, interacting with strangers, cohabitating with a roommate were the moments in Aine's day where she was most vulnerable, where her joys were fleeting, her connections superficial and her separation from family a little too much to bear. For me, the season was about a person trying to cope with life and getting it about 60 percent right on her best days.

The introduction of people beyond Shona her boyfriend (played by Aasif Mandvi), his family, Aine's roommate's family, a humorless employer (Tobias Menzies) who slowly starts falling for her, etc. was less random than it appeared; these were small encounters that brought glimpses of potential light to Aine or further delineated her woes.

What I also saw was something precise and outstanding Aisling herself. It's that feeling I got when Waller-Bridge was at the Television Critics Association summer press tour in August of 2016 andyou just knew. You could see it on the screen and you could see it in person. Aisling has the same kind of tour-de-force sense of humor and her writing in This Way Up is utterly fantastic. She injects her own character with a manic self-deprecation used to keep others at bay just as Waller-Bridge does as Fleabag.

But Fleabag and Aine are suffering from different things it's more well-defined for Fleabag in the first season, without a doubt, but I'd argue the same relative underlying unhappiness she's living through in the second season is just as amorphous as what Aine is going through trying to be happy for a day.

An argument could be made that Fleabag only really and truly cares about Boo in the first season and that vulnerable, unprotected nerve shines through only when she stops using humor and scathing asides as a defense mechanism, just as Aine cares most deeply for others who are suffering and keeps her guard up with family (but only half-up with Shona, whom Aine relies on for emotional support). Both Fleabag and Aine are complex women feeling deep hurt and discontent, the latter often an unexplained or ill-defined emotion which rings so true. Often with depression there's no one reason or easy explanation for why a person is spiraling. And that relentlessly nagging sense of unhappiness is hard to shake precisely because the root of it is indeterminate.

Over the course of six episodes of a mere 23 minutes each, Aisling's writing is a real revelation and her comedic sensibility spot-on. I was surprised at how often I would rewind scenes, marvel at the nuances in the writing scathing humor, bubbling sadness or delight in Aisling's fearless, all-in performance. This series, I thought, is vastly under-appreciated, in addition to having been completely lost in the Peak TV crush (a sentiment that was familiar from three years ago with Fleabag).

I hope more people discover how excellent This Way Up truly is and celebrate its own identity not just flatter it briefly before calling it a cousin to something else.

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Critic's Notebook: 'This Way Up' Is More Than a Spiritual Cousin to 'Fleabag' - Hollywood Reporter

Princess Diana’s Relationships With Psychics and Spiritual Healers – Showbiz Cheat Sheet

Princess Diana is known for her relationships with psychics and healers for critical information about her life. throughout her later years, she was becoming increasingly more paranoid. She felt like she couldnt trust anyone, and in turn she sought help from these types of people. According to the latest episode of Fatal Voyage Diana: Case Solved, she felt the need to check in with her numerous psychics all the time. She was definitely not the only famous woman to ask these types of people for help.

These psychics were there to listen to Diana only, not judge her, and that is understandable given her position that she would want someone to just listen. But it is plain to see that these people contributed to her paranoia. Sally Morgan, known as Psychic Sally, was one of these people whom Diana came to rely on.

I came into her life when she was really making decisionsfor her own happiness. And she had made a decision that shes the only one thatcould make herself happy, Morgan recalls. She wasnt going to rely on anyoneelse. I think she felt she had a lot of reasons to worry about an early death.She felt that. There were times when she would ring me three or four times aday and then there were times when she would ring me once a day, normally inthe morning.

Diana also looked to Simone Simmons a spiritual healer, forguidance. They would spend hours together on the phone. We met at the end ofthe 1993. By 95 we were firm friends. 96 I mean, we were literally, how do Iput it? Saw each other at least five times a week wherever Diana was in theworld she would phone me, Simmons says.

If Diana couldnt get through to Simmons, she would leavemessages for her instead. They became the best of friends. She wanted to constantlycheck in with her throughout the day and keep her updated on everything thatwas going on.

Its understandable how all this talk of the future anddeath could only fuel Dianas increasing paranoia. Another spiritual advisor,Rita Rogers, says she warned Princess Diana about an impending premonition.Rogers had regular visits with Diana and believed that the brakes in her car wouldbe tampered with. She also claims to have had a feeling of danger whenmeeting Dodi Fayed for the first time.

Simmons remembers how the psychic actually toldDiana that the Queen would die over a phone call. Such talk only increasedthe Princess clear paranoid state that something was about to happen.

She said, Rita has told me the Queen is going to die nextyear. This would be in 1994. She said that would mean that Charles would beKing and she would be Queen, Simmons recalls. Actually, I was shocked. Thefollowing year, she told me Rita had told her the Queen would abdicate. Shesaid it in all seriousness, she believed it. I asked her: I dont suppose thishas come from the same person who said the Queen was going to die?

Princess Diana also revealed to Simmons that she was driving home and her brakes appeared to fail. The scare really shook her to the core. One time she was driving home from seeing me and she said her brakes failed in heavy traffic. She bumped into the car in front of her and after making sure the driver was OK, she abandoned her car and jumped into a taxi to go home. Simmons says. She was terrified. She said Theyre trying to bump me off.

Princess Dianas relationships with healers, psychics, and the like only increased her ever-growing paranoid state. She was, however, correct that something was going to happen and she died in a tragic car accident in 1997.

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Princess Diana's Relationships With Psychics and Spiritual Healers - Showbiz Cheat Sheet

The New Moon Is In Libra, & Its Time To Get Romantic – Refinery29

Namely, we need to look at the positions of the other planets. One is the quincunx (a stressful aspect) this moon forms with wild-card Uranus, suggesting that something unexpected might be on the menu. This nervousness we feel relates to the anticipation that a sudden change is due within a certain relationship, Montfar says. Whats the secret to handling this frenetic energy? Going with the flow! When maverick Uranus is involved as it is now, we succeed when we dont resist and give in to the current of change because, at the end of the day, he brings whats best for us.

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The New Moon Is In Libra, & Its Time To Get Romantic - Refinery29


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