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Nanotechnology Journals | Scholarly articles list …

Journal of Nanomaterials & Molecular Nanotechnology is a peer-reviewed scholarlyjournal and aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in all major themes pertaining to Nanotechnology and making them accessibleonline freely without any restrictions or any other subscriptions to researchers worldwide.

Journal of Nanomaterials & Molecular Nanotechnology focuses on the topics that include:

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Nanotechnology is the manipulation or the engineering of functional matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. It is a science, engineering and technology conducted at Nanoscale level that involves the designing, manipulating and producing of very small objects or structures (products) ranged on the level of 100 nanometers.

Journals related to Nanotechnology

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Nature Nanotechnology, Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, International Journal of Nanotechnology, Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B:Nanotechnology and Microelectronics, Recent Patents on Nanotechnology.

Nanomaterials are one of the main objects or structures that are designed and produced by Nanotechnologies at the size level of approximately 1-100 nanometers. Nanomaterial research is a field that takes a materials science-based approach on nanotechnology.

Journals related to Nanomaterials

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Digest Journal of Nanomaterials and Biostructures, Journal of Nanomaterials, Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology, Nature Materials, Journal of Materials Chemistry, Advanced Materials, Advanced Energy Materials, Applied Physics Letters.

Nanoparticles are small objects, behaves as a whole unit in terms of its properties and transport. Fine particle ranges from 100 to 2500 nanometers whereas ultrafine particles size range from 1 to 100.

Journals related to Nanoparticle

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, International Journal of Nanoparticles, Journal of Nanoparticle Research, Solid State Sciences, Single Molecules, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Physica E: Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures.

Graphene is allotrope of carbon in the form of a two-dimensional, atomic-scale, hexagonal lattice in which one atom forms each vertex. Graphene has unwittingly produced small quantities for centuries through the use of pencils and other similar applications of graphite.

Journals related to Graphene

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nano Letters, ACS Nano, Nature Nanotechnology, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Nanoscale,Nano Today, Nano Research,Nanoscale Research Letters, Nanomedicine, Journal of Nanoparticle Research.

Carbon nanotubes are allotropes of carbon with a cylindrical Nano structure. Carbon nanotubes are long hollow structures and have mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical and chemical properties and these nanotubes are constructed with length to diameter ratio of 132,000,000:1.

Journals related to Carbon Nanotubes

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, International Journal of Nanotechnology, Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B:Nanotechnology and Microelectronics, Recent Patents on Nanotechnology,International Journal of Green Nanotechnology,RSC Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, International Journal of Green Nanotechnology: Materials Science and Engineering, Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology.

Nanomedicine is medical application of nanotechnology. Nanomedicine will employ molecular machine system to address medical problems. Nanomedicine will have extraordinary and far-reaching implications for the medical profession.

Journals related to Nanomedicine

Journal of Regenerative Medicine, Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, Nanomedicine, International Journal of Nanomedicine, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology, European Journal of Nanomedicine, Open Nanomedicine Journal.

Nanobiotechnology term refers to the intersection of nanotechnology and biology. Bionanotechnology and nanobiotechnology serve as blanket terms for various related technologies. It helps to indicate the merger of biological research with various fields of nanotechnology.

Journals related to Nanobiotechnology

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, Journal of Nanobiotechnology, IET Nanobiotechnology, Nanobiotechnology.

Quantum dots are nanocrystals or nanostructures made of semiconductor materials those are small enough to exhibit quantum mechanical properties and that confines motion of conduction band electrons valance band holes, or excitations in all three Spatial directions exhibiting unique electrical and optical properties which are useful potentially in biomedical imaging and other energy applications.

Journals related to Quantum Dots

Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, International Journal of Nanotechnology, eilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B:Nanotechnology and Microelectronics, Recent Patents on Nanotechnology,International Journal of Green Nanotechnology,RSC Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Nano Letters, ACS Nano, Nature Nanotechnology, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Nanoscale,Nano Today, Nano Research,Nanoscale Research Letters, Nanomedicine, Journal of Nanoparticle Research.

Molecular nanotechnology is a technology using molecular manufacturing, based on the ability to build structures to complex, atomic specification by means of mechanosynthesis. It would involve combining physical principles demonstrated by chemistry, nanotechnologies, and the molecular machinery of life with the systems engineering principles found in modern macroscale factories.

Journals related to Molecular nanotechnology

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, e-Journal of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Letters, Nanotechnology, Science and Applications, Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Nanotechnology Law and Business, 2003 Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show – Nanotech 2003, 2004 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show – NSTI Nanotech 2004, Journal of Nanotechnology in Engineering and Medicine, Nami Jishu yu Jingmi Gongcheng/Nanotechnology and Precision Engineering, IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, Journal of Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology, Cancer Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanotechnology.

Polymer nanocomposites consist of a polymer or copolymer having Nano particles dispersed in the polymer matrix. Polymer nanotechnology group will develop enabling techniques for the patterning of functional surfaces.

Journals related to Polymer Nanotechnology

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, Nanomedicine, International Journal of Nanomedicine, Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology, Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine and Nanotechnology, European Journal of Nanomedicine, Open Nanomedicine Journal, Nature Nanotechnology, Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine, IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, International Journal of Nanotechnology, Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology.

Nanoelectronics refers to the use of nanotechnology in electronic components and it covers a diverse set of devices and materials. They are so small that inter-atomic interactions and quantum mechanical properties need to be studied extensively.

Journals related to Nanoelectronics

Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering.

Nanodevices are the critical enablers that allow mankind to exploit the ultimate technological capabilities of magnetic, electronic, mechanical, and biological systems. Nanodevices will ultimately have an enormous impact on our ability to enhance energy conversion, produce food, control pollution, and improve human health and longevity.

Journals related to Nanodevices

Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering.

Nanosensors are chemical and mechanical sensors that can be used to detect the presence of chemical species and nanoparticles. These are any biological or surgery sensory points used to convey information about nanoparticles to the macroscopic world.

Journals related to Nanosensors

Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nano Research & Applications.

Nanorobotics is the technology of creating robots or machines at or close to the scale of nanometer. Nanorobotics refers to the nanotechnology engineering of designing and building nanorobots. Nanomachines are largely in the research and development phase.

Journasl related to Nanorobotics

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering.

Nanofabrication is the design and manufacture of devices with dimensions measured in nanometers. One nanometer is a millionth of millimeter. Topics of interest for Nanofabrication are all aspects of lithographic methods aiming at the submicron- to nanoscale, and the application of the created structures and devices in physical and biomedical experiments.

Journals related to Nanofabrication

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering.

Nanolithography is the branch of nanotechnology concerned with the study and application of fabricating nanometer-scale structures and art of etching, writing, or printing at the microscopic level. The dimensions of characters are on the order of nanometers.

Journals related to Nanolithography

Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Journal of Electrical Engineering and Electronic Technology, Nano Research & Applications.

Nanotoxicology is a branch of bioscience deals with the study and applications of toxicity of nanomaterials.Because of quantum size effects and large surface area to volume ratio nanomaterials have unique properties compared with their larger counterparts. Nanotoxicity is toxic effect of nanomaterial on biological system and environment.

Journals related to Nanotoxicology

Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Material Sciences & Engineering, Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Emerging Drugs, Journal of Regenerative Medicine, Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery.

Green nanotechnology is technology used to enhance the environmental sustainability of process producing negative externalities that include green nano products used in support of sustainability. This green nanotechnology described as the development of clean technologies to minimize potential environment and human health risks with the use of nanotechnology products.

Journals related to Green Nanotechnology

International Journal of Green Nanotechnology; International Journal of Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Nano Today, Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology, and Medicine

Nanotechnology is being employed in the pharmaceutical field for many reasons. The leading goals are to improve drug solubility or bioavailability or delivery to various sites of action. It provides two basic types of nanotools, those are nanomaterials and nanodevices.

Journals related to Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology

Journal of Molecular Pharmaceutics & Organic Process Research, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, Journal of Drug Delivery, Journal of Controlled Release, Bioconjugate Chemistry

Nanoethics is a emerging field of study that concerns with the study of ethical and social implications of nanoscale science and technology. With these implications of Nanotechnologies, there has always been the need of regulation concerned with the associated risks. Nanoethics focus on these public and policy issues related to the Nanotechnology research and development.

Journals related to Nanoethics

Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences & Emerging Drugs, Journal of Regenerative Medicine, Nano Research & Applications, Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, Journal of Nanomedicine & Biotherapeutic Discovery

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Nanotechnology Journals | Scholarly articles list …

Nanotechnology Brings Energy-Collecting Windows One Step Closer to Reality – R & D Magazine

Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Milano-Bicocca are bringing the dream of windows that can efficiently collect solar energy one step closer to reality thanks to high tech silicon nanoparticles.

The researchers developed technology to embed the silicon nanoparticles into what they call efficient luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). These LSCs are the key element of windows that can efficiently collect solar energy. When light shines through the surface, the useful frequencies of light are trapped inside and concentrated to the edges where small solar cells can be put in place to capture the energy.

The research is published today inNature Photonics, a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Nature Publishing Group.

Windows that can collect solar energy, called photovoltaic windows, are the next frontier in renewable energy technologies, as they have the potential to largely increase the surface of buildings suitable for energy generation without impacting their aestheticsa crucial aspect, especially in metropolitan areas. LSC-based photovoltaic windows do not require any bulky structure to be applied onto their surface and since the photovoltaic cells are hidden in the window frame, they blend invisibly into the built environment.

The idea of solar concentrators and solar cells integrated into building design has been around for decades, but this study included one key differencesilicon nanoparticles. Until recently, the best results had been achieved using relatively complex nanostructures based either on potentially toxic elements, such as cadmium or lead, or on rare substances like indium, which is already massively utilized for other technologies. Silicon is abundant in the environment and non-toxic. It also works more efficiently by absorbing light at different wavelengths than it emits. However, silicon in its conventional bulk form, does not emit light or luminesce.

In our lab, we trick nature by shirking the dimension of silicon crystals to a few nanometers, that is about one ten-thousandths of the diameter of human hair, said University of Minnesota mechanical engineering professor Uwe Kortshagen, inventor of the process for creating silicon nanoparticles and one of the senior authors of the study. At this size, silicons properties change and it becomes an efficient light emitter, with the important property not to re-absorb its own luminescence. This is the key feature that makes silicon nanoparticles ideally suited for LSC applications.

Using the silicon nanoparticles opened up many new possibilities for the research team.

Over the last few years, the LSC technology has experienced rapid acceleration, thanks also to pioneering studies conducted in Italy, but finding suitable materials for harvesting and concentrating solar light was still an open challenge, said Sergio Brovelli, physics professor at the University of Milano-Bicocca, co-author of the study, and co-founder of the spin-off company Glass to Power that is industrializing LSCs for photovoltaic windows Now, it is possible to replace these elements with silicon nanoparticles.

Researchers say the optical features of silicon nanoparticles and their nearly perfect compatibility with the industrial process for producing the polymer LSCs create a clear path to creating efficient photovoltaic windows that can capture more than 5 percent of the suns energy at unprecedented low costs.

This will make LSC-based photovoltaic windows a real technology for the building-integrated photovoltaic market without the potential limitations of other classes of nanoparticles based on relatively rare materials, said Francesco Meinardi, physics professor at the University of Milano-Bicocca and one of the first authors of the paper.

The silicon nanoparticles are produced in a high-tech process using a plasma reactor and formed into a powder.

Each particle is made up of less than two thousand silicon atoms, said Samantha Ehrenberg, a University of Minnesota mechanical Ph.D. student and another first author of the study. The powder is turned into an ink-like solution and then embedded into a polymer, either forming a sheet of flexible plastic material or coating a surface with a thin film.

The University of Minnesota invented the process for creating silicon nanoparticles about a dozen years ago and holds a number of patents on this technology. In 2015, Kortshagen met Brovelli, who is an expert in LSC fabrication and had already demonstrated various successful approaches to efficient LSCs based on other nanoparticle systems. The potential of silicon nanoparticles for this technology was immediately clear and the partnership was born. The University of Minnesota produced the particles and researchers in Italy fabricated the LSCs by embedding them in polymers through an industrial based method, and it worked.

This was truly a partnership where we gathered the best researchers in their fields to make an old idea truly successful, Kortshagen said. We had the expertise in making the silicon nanoparticles and our partners in Milano had expertise in fabricating the luminescent concentrators. When it all came together, we knew we had something special.

Funding for the research study includes a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Basic Science Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center and a grant from the European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme. Ehrenberg also received funding from a National Science Foundation (NSF) Fellowship and the Benjamin Y.H. and Helen Liu Fellowship.

To read the full research paper entitled Highly efficient luminescent solar concentrators based on Earth-abundant indirect-bandgap silicon quantum dots visit theNature Photonicswebsite.

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Nanotechnology Brings Energy-Collecting Windows One Step Closer to Reality – R & D Magazine

2016’s Top Patent and Trade Secret Developments for Chemistry and Nanotechnology – JD Supra (press release)

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2016’s Top Patent and Trade Secret Developments for Chemistry and Nanotechnology – JD Supra (press release)

Nanotechnology based technology to protect treated surfaces from dirt – The Sunday Times Sri Lanka

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Police and STF search cemetery for LTTE weapons, gold

Land Reform Commission director in Batticaloa injured in shooting

Sri Lankan investigators came looking for local asylum seekers who hid Snowden: Report

Protests held over shooting of Batticaloa Land Reform Comm. Director

Ecocorp Asia last week launched Nanorepel, a surface protection system from Germany that uses nanotechnology to provide a reliable do-it-yourself coating for every household in Sri Lanka.

The system uses incredibly thin layers of liquid glass or quartz glass to coat surfaces. In addition to the positive properties of glass such as temperature resistance or resistance to acids and alkalis, these layers are characterized by high flexibility and extensibility as well as excellent dirt repellency due its anti-adhesive effect. Thus, a simple water or light detergent rinse can help regain the original appearance of any protected surface, the company said in a media release.

The company has imported three ranges of protective systems for automobiles, home and outdoor care along with cleaners to optimize the coatings. This do-it-yourself range, with a simple 3-step process of clean, spray and protect, leaves surfaces with an invisible and odourless coating, which does not affect the appearance of the surface.

Sascha Schwindt, Managing Director of Nanopool GmbH, said, Developments, especially those concerning the key industries of the 21st century, including nanotechnology, are moving at a breathtaking pace. Due to the Nanorepel product line, we can offer more diverse, suitable solutions, especially for the end consumer.

Nanorepels Car Care range provides a comprehensive surface protection system that covers all surfaces of your car (interior and exterior). Whether it is rims, seats, windshields, or car body paint, Nanorepel has a specifically designed product for each surface.

The Home coating surface protection system can be used on several surfaces throughout the home, including glass and ceramic, textile and leather, and natural stone surfaces.

The Outdoor range offers added water repellent properties that prevent liquids such as rainwater from penetrating the surface. Coated clothes, shoes or bags remain breathable while mud and dirt can be easily removed with a simple water rinse.

Malik Fernando, CEO and Managing Director of Ecocorp Asia ( exclusive agents for Nanopool for Sri Lanka and the Maldives), said, Having come across this product four years ago, my in-house R&D team has conducted extensive research to ensure that the product we are introducing works in our climate conditions. Furthermore I find this product to be a cost-effective solution for Sri Lankans who need an easy to use, long lasting and safe product.

With the rising cost of living, investing in a bottle of Nanorepel will result in seldom having to replace anything from your shoes to your home furnishing because of the protective coating it provides.

Police and STF search cemetery for LTTE weapons, gold

Land Reform Commission director in Batticaloa injured in shooting

Sri Lankan investigators came looking for local asylum seekers who hid Snowden: Report

Protests held over shooting of Batticaloa Land Reform Comm. Director

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Nanotechnology based technology to protect treated surfaces from dirt – The Sunday Times Sri Lanka

Seminar held on emerging trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology – NYOOOZ

CHANDIGARH: The Department of Sciences at Guru Gobind Singh College for Women organised a national seminar on ” Emerging trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology ” on Saturday. The seminar was sponsored by the college development council, Panjab University, Chandigarh. The aim of the seminar was to provide a common platform to academicians and young researchers to exchange their new ideas and explore the various aspects of this Emerging Technology.College Principal Dr. Charanjeet Kaur Sohi welcomed chief guest Professor Navdeep Goyal, department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh. Gurdev Singh, IAS (Retd.), president of the SES, and colonel (Retired) Jasmer Singh Bala, secretary of the SES, encouraged the students to achieve new heights in the field of science and technology.Dr. Suvankar Chakraverty, scientist from Institute of Nano Science and Technology Mohali, deliberated on the topic “Nanostructured Devices” and highlighted the current state of understanding the future trends of research in the concerned field. Technologists, scientists, faculty members, research scholars and students from various regional colleges, university and research insti…

News Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/chandigarh/seminar-held-on-emerging-trends-in-nanoscience-and-nanotechnology/articleshow/57236451.cms

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Seminar held on emerging trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology – NYOOOZ

Seminar held on emerging trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology – Times of India

CHANDIGARH: The Department of Sciences at Guru Gobind Singh College for Women organised a national seminar on “Emerging trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology” on Saturday. The seminar was sponsored by the college development council, Panjab University, Chandigarh. The aim of the seminar was to provide a common platform to academicians and young researchers to exchange their new ideas and explore the various aspects of this Emerging Technology. College Principal Dr. Charanjeet Kaur Sohi welcomed chief guest Professor Navdeep Goyal, department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh. Gurdev Singh, IAS (Retd.), president of the SES, and colonel (Retired) Jasmer Singh Bala, secretary of the SES, encouraged the students to achieve new heights in the field of science and technology. Dr. Suvankar Chakraverty, scientist from Institute of Nano Science and Technology Mohali, deliberated on the topic “Nanostructured Devices” and highlighted the current state of understanding the future trends of research in the concerned field. Technologists, scientists, faculty members, research scholars and students from various regional colleges, university and research institutes attended the seminar and talked about the basics of nanoscience and anticipated that nanotechnology will contribute to building a better society. Dr CR Mariappan from department of physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra cited several facts on the development of nano-structured materials for energy storage devices. After the lecture, the seminar was followed by an interactive session. The seminar ended with vote of thanks note by Dr Asim K Chaudhary, assistant professor, GGSCW.

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Seminar held on emerging trends in nanoscience and nanotechnology – Times of India

Nanotechnology Playing a Key Role in the Growth of Food & Agriculture Industry – MENAFN.COM

(MENAFN Editorial) The global nanotechnology market is expected to grow at a CAGR of around 17% during the forecasted period of 2017-2024, says RNCOS in its Global Nanotechnology Market Outlook 2024 report.

The global nanotechnology market has witnessed significant growth in the recent years owing to new innovations in technology that are reshaping the global economy. Like many other industries, food & agriculture industry has witnessed significant impact through nanotechnology such as boosting nutritional value of food, restoring taste and odour etc.

The report Global Nanotechnology Market Outlook 2024 provides the current scenario and future estimates of the industry. Nanotechnology is considered to be one of the most important tools in modern agriculture, and agri-food nanotechnology is anticipated to become a driving economic force in the near future. Agri-food focuses on sustainability and protection of agriculturally produced foods, including crops for human consumption and animal feeding.

Nanotechnology further provides new agrochemical agents and new delivery mechanisms to improve crop productivity and to reduce pesticide use. It also plays an important role in boosting agricultural production, including other applications such s nanoformulations of agrochemicals for applying pesticides and fertilizers for crop improvement, the application of nanosensors/nanobiosensors in crop protection for the identification of diseases and residues of agrochemicals among others.

Owing to the wide range of applications, Nanotechnology is poised to significantly impact all sectors of agribusiness industry and hence revolutionize the agricultural and food sectors making the industry considerably greener and competitive.

For FREE SAMPLE of this report visit: http://www.rncos.com/Report/IM883.htm

Check Related REPORTS on: http://www.rncos.com/Science%20&%20technology.htm

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RNCOS is a leading industry research and consultancy firm incorporated in 2002. As a pioneer in syndicate market research, our vision is to be a global leader in the industry research space by providing research reports and actionable insights to companies across a range of industries such as Healthcare, IT and Telecom and Retail etc. We offer comprehensive industry research studies, bespoke research and consultancy services to Fortune 1000, Trade associations, and Government agencies worldwide.

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Nanotechnology Playing a Key Role in the Growth of Food & Agriculture Industry – MENAFN.COM

Nanotechnology-based gene editing study seeks to eradicate HIV in brain of drug abusers – FIU News

Opiate abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV infection, and in combination they can have a devastating effect on the brain. Scientists at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) are studying new therapies that can short-circuit HIV infection and mitigate the damaging effects that opiate addiction has on the central nervous system.

The ambitious $3.5 million five-year study, funded by the National Institutes for Health, is now underway and will be completed by 2021. Researchers hope the work will lead to a multipurpose platform for drugs targeting a variety of other difficult to treat diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimers, Parkinsons and Huntingtons diseases.

The Institute of Neuro-Immune Pharmacology at HWCOM, led by Chair and Associate Dean of the Department of Immunology Madhavan Nair, is teaming up with Kamel Khalili, chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple University, and the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple Universitys Lewis Katz School on a new study that will combine Khalils gene editing strategy using nanotechnology with Nairs work to help opiate users with HIV.

Despite significant advances in anti-retroviral therapy (ART), which is used to treat HIV patients, ART is unable to penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) after systemic administration. In addition, the elimination of HIV from the central nervous system and peripheral reservoirs remains challenging due to the HIV genomes ability to integrate itself into the host genome.

But advances in nanotechnology have expanded the possibilities for novel drug delivery systems that can cross the BBB to recognize and eradicate HIV in the brain. Nair and other scientists from the Institute of Neuro-Immune Pharmacology at HWCOM have combined nanotechnology with magneto electro nanoparticles (MENPs) as externally field triggered/controlled drug carriers that offer the unique capability of low energy and dissipation free on-demand drug release across the BBB.

Distinguished Professor Madhavan Nair in his lab at Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine.

Nairs MENP drug-based delivery system is now the basis for the partnership with Khalili, who developed the Cas9/gRNA system a genetic engineering tool that has shown great promise in finding and destroying copies of HIV that have burrowed into the hosts genome.

The partnership will use Cas9/gRNA to eliminate entire integrated copies of the HIV genome from the host chromosome with the MENP drug-based delivery system.

This is the first time that we are sending medicine to the brain that will eliminate latent HIV as well as deliver a morphine antagonist (methylnaltrexone) across the BBB in a non-invasive manner to protect neurons from morphine induced neurodegenerative effects, Nair says. MENP is non-invasive and fast-acting, and this newly created multi-disciplinary approach will also introduce unprecedented 3-D diagnostic views and allow clearance of the nanoparticles from the brain to the periphery by reverse external magnetic force once the cargo has been delivered.

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Nanotechnology-based gene editing study seeks to eradicate HIV in brain of drug abusers – FIU News

AAAS Annual Meeting: Taking a Green Approach to Nanotechnology – R & D Magazine

While nanotechnology has substantial benefit to society, its environmental impact is not well understood. Because it is such an emerging field, the design and production of the material is not yet fully optimized, sometimes resulting in significant inefficiencies and unnecessary waste.

However, this challenge offers opportunity for innovation, said James Hutchison, Ph.D., a professor of organic, organometallic and materials chemistry and founding director of the ONAMI Safer Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Initiative at the University of Oregon.

What is interesting is that nanotechnology is a very emerging technology; its not mature like other chemical production, said Hutchison. That allows us to be more proactive in trying to simultaneously meet societys needs for the material we are making, but at the same time reduce the environmental and health impacts earlier in the process.

Hutchison is an advocate of a green chemistry approach to nanomaterial production one which considers material design, processes and applications that have the potential to reduce environmental hazards at each stage of the life cycle.

He will discuss this concept in his presentation Nanomaterial Design Guided by the Principles of Green Chemistry, at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting, Saturday, February 18. He outlined the key points of his talk in an exclusive interview with R&D Magazine.

R&D Magazine: What are some of the environmental challenges related to nanotechnology?

Hutchison: Any new nanomaterial is a new chemical and with any new chemical, whether its nano or not, there is always the question of if it will potentially cause any harm to humans or the environment. Weve now studied nanomaterials in that vein for at least a decade if not longer and one of the things that we are finding is that there doesnt appear to be any nano-specific hazards associated with these materials. What we do find is that if we have toxic ions or elements within these nanomaterials and those can be leached out, then the nanomaterial can become a delivery vehicle for that toxic ion.

As an example, if you have a cadmium-containing nanoparticle, zinc oxide, or silver, each of those will because of the high surface area of the particles and therefor a lot of exposure of the surface of the particle to the environment likely leach out the toxic ions within them. In that case, the toxicity that one observes is just due to those ions.

That is one aspect of the environmental impact of nanotechnology. The other major aspect is the production of the material. Weve been studying nanomaterials really actively for over 20 years, but much of the effort has been on trying to identify new properties and not necessarily figuring out how we are going to manufacture these materials efficiently and cost-effectively. In most nanomaterial today, we are still pretty early on with respect to efficient and scalable production of the material. As a consequence of that, we are not making efficient use of the raw materials because the yields are low, and we are also producing waste streams because our conversion of those raw materials to products is usually low.

However, there are many environmentally beneficial applications of nanotechnology. One of the cool things that has come about in the last two years has been that, as we start to evaluate the life cycle, we have really tried to weigh what the benefit is versus what the implications are. This also then becomes a design vehicle. We can now say, if we can increase the efficiency of this material by X amount we will have a net environmental benefit. We can then design to enhance that net benefit. How do you tip the balance? One way is to dramatically increase the benefit. The other way is to significantly decrease the impact, or both.

What is green chemistry and how can it be applied to nanomaterials?

The whole concept of green chemistry is to try and design new chemicals or a new production process so that you systemically reduce the impacts on human health and the environment, but while also delivering high performance chemicals and products that are needed by society. That is the big picture. The tools or the principles that we use are things like, reducing the amount of volatile solvents that are used throughout the process. Solvents tend to cause damage in the environment.

We are also trying to systematically reduce the waste that is generated. When we take raw material and turn it into a product, we need to ensure that all or a substantial amount of the raw material ends up in the product and not in the waste instead. How do we reduce energy consumption during the process? We do that typically be using catalysts that will allow us to operate a chemical transformation at a lot lower temperature. These are some of the things that we do to try and reduce their overall impact on the environment.

Are there particular nanomaterials where adjustments can be made to achieve net environmental balance?

We can look at gold nanoparticles. One of the main applications of gold nanoparticles is for use in biological imaging and targeting in the biological system. One of the prerequisites to using those in any living organism is that they are non-toxic. Gold is already inert and nontoxic, but in order to make it function in a biological or medical application, you have to typically coat it with something so it stay stable and disbursable in water. Those coatings, depending on which ones you use, could make the process more or less toxic. Weve done systemic studies that have shown that you can achieve the same function with the right choice of material that makes it nontoxic, or the wrong choice, which makes it toxic. In that case, the benefit is the same you have something that can be freely dispersible in water and biocompatible. Its all about the surface coating or chemistry on the particle and how that allows you to maintain that high level of performance, but significantly reduce the hazard.

Silver on textiles for anti-odor capabilities is another example. It turns out that the substantial impact that silver has on the environment is actually the extraction of the silver from land, and the release of silver back into the environment. What you can do that will be most advantageous is to use the least amount of silver you can to still achieve the function that you need. Its simple, but it turns out that many of the technologies used a few years ago used thousands of times more silver on the coating of the fabric than necessary.

In that regard you dont get added performance, you dont get added anti-odor capabilities, but you are using a lot more silver. With the old technology that used lots of silver you can essentially never get a net environmental benefit, even though you may not wash the clothing as often and save water and electricity. However, if you are able to reduce the quantity down to what is essentially the therapeutic level by a factor of one-thousand, now it only takes not washing that garment by about two washes over the course of its lifetime to achieve a net environmental benefit. The green chemistry approach there was to actually weigh the performance that you want and the impact and then create a design process for that product to achieve that net environment benefit.

Are there still a lot of questions that remain regarding the environmental impact of nanomaterials?

One of the challenges when you are in the innovation business is that you innovate, you synthesize compounds all the time. If the only way that we had to assess their potential implications was to make them all and test them all, we would never keep up with that because the testing process would be really slow. A new strategy is really trying to develop predicable design rules where you can identify, based upon a body of evidence, which sorts of materials have the highest potential for great benefit and minimal harm. Then we can pursue those specifically based on design principals. We can then compliment that with high throughput screening.

The whole point of nanotechnology is that we identify new properties by manipulating matter at the nanoscale. So long as we continue to do that, and innovate in that way, we are going to be generating new materials that could potentially have some harm. There is always going to be some level of uncertainty, but I think weve made amazing progress in the last ten years in terms of zooming in on the areas that have the most possibility to cause a problem, and then using these high throughput screens to triage and figure out which few look like they may have a negative impact and study those in more detail.

In the last five to ten years, green chemistry has really been viewed as a way to innovate, its a way to think differently and discover new innovative solutions that might not have been on peoples radar if they havent been thinking about these challenges. Industry has really jumped on this because they see, not only the value of stewardship of the environments and customer satisfaction with their product, but money-saving potential of reducing the environmental impact as well.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length

Link:

AAAS Annual Meeting: Taking a Green Approach to Nanotechnology – R & D Magazine

#Nanotechnology Sees Big Growth in Products and Applications – MENAFN.COM

(MENAFN – Investors Ideas)

February 13, 2017 (Investorideas.com Newswire) Wellesley, Mass., Nanotechnology promises to impact many sectors of the global economy, as evidenced by double-digit growth rates of nanomaterials, nanotools, and nanodevices. BCC Research reveals in its new report that continuing moderate growth of the U.S. and world economies should significantly expand the nanotechnology industry.

Nanotechnology applications are defined comprehensively as the creation and use of materials, devices and systems through the manipulation of matter at scales of less than 100 nanometers. This report examines nanomaterials (nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanostructured materials and nanocomposites), nanotools (nanolithography tools and scanning probe microscopes) and nanodevices (nanosensors and nanoelectronics).

The global nanotechnology market should reach 90.5 billion by 2021 from 39.2 billion in 2016, growing at a five-year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 18.2%. This figure includes well-established commercial nanomaterials applications such as nanoparticle-based sunscreen products and nanocatalyst thin films for catalytic converters, as well as new technologies such as nano-thin film solar cells, nanolithographic tools and nanoscale electronic memory.

The nanomaterials market should reach 32.5 billion and 77.3 billion in 2016 and 2021, respectively, demonstrating a five-year CAGR of 18.9%. The nanodevices market should reach 195.9 million by 2021, up from 56.5 million in 2016, reflecting a five-year CAGR of 28.2%.

Nanomaterials, particularly nanoparticles and nanoscale thin films, dominated the market in 2015, accounting for 83.3% of the market. Nanotools totaled 16.6% of the market and nanodevices the remainder. By 2021, nanomaterials’market share is expected to increase to 85.3%, while nanotools’shar shrinks to 14.5%, and nanodevices’share increases slightly from 0.1% to 0.2%.

The largest end-user markets for nanotechnology in 2015 were environmental applications (38.8% of the total market), electronics (22.4%), and consumer applications (21.1%). Biomedical, consumer, and electronics applications should demonstrate the highest projected CAGR rates (i.e., 29.9%, 27.9%, and 20.5%, respectively) during the forecast period.

“Economic expansion will foster growth in the nanotechnology sector by stimulating industrial and consumer demand for products incorporating nanotechnology, and increasing corporate profits and government tax revenues needed to fund research and development activities,” says BCC Research analyst Andrew McWilliams.

The Maturing Nanotechnology Market: Products and Applications (NAN031G) analyzes the global markets for nanomaterials, nanotools, and nanodevices. Global market drivers and trends, with data from 2015, estimates for 2016, and projections of CAGRs through 2021 also are provided.

About BCC Research

BCC Research is a publisher of market research reports that provide organizations with intelligence to drive smart business decisions. By partnering with industry experts worldwide, BCC Research provides unbiased measurements and assessments of global markets covering major industrial and technology sectors, including emerging markets. For more information about BCC Research, please visit bccresearch.com. Follow BCC Research on Twitter at @BCCResearch.

Editors and reporters who wish to speak with the analyst should contact Steven Cumming at .

MENAFN1802201701420000ID1095252659

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#Nanotechnology Sees Big Growth in Products and Applications – MENAFN.COM

Nanotechnology in the Monitoring of Microbial Food Safety – AZoNano

By Benedette CuffariFeb 17 2017

Agencies such as the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Standards Agency of the United Kingdom are responsible for ensuring that food safety and quality assurance is monitored at every stage in the food production process.

As one of the most significant aspects present for food authorities and industries today, the need for providing safe food is facing unprecedented challenges around the world. It is estimated that the worldwide toll of foodborne diseases is estimated at a frightening 600 million cases and 420,000 deaths each year1. Some of the most frequent pathogens linked with these foodborne illnesses include diarrheal agents such as norovirus and Campylobactor spp, as well other bacterial pathogens such as Salmonella enterica and Typhi, Listeria and Brucella2.

While several different preventative methods exist in order to minimize the risks associated with foodborne illnesses, these approaches have significant drawbacks that are not in compliance with the current consumer trend for greener and chemical free approaches.

Of these methods include physical techniques, such as afreezing, heat and refrigeration storage, filtration, drying and chemical methods, as well as radiation and other thermal procedures. While effective, these techniques are often associated with high-energy costs, an increased possibility of degradation, as well as serious occupational and health implications.

In response to these problems, food industries are constantly looking towards developing more efficient, sustainable and low cost methods in order to ensure that food products remain microbial-free.

Nanotechnology, a rising field of interest in almost every industry, has found over 276 different applications in agricultural, food and feed markets1. Of the most common applications for nanotechnology in food safety and quality measures are nano-encapsulated agrochemicals, food additives and supplements, and antimicrobial active food packaging agents1.

One of the most common applications of nanomaterials in food industry is through the uses of nanoscale silver. Silver, a historically used antimicrobial agent, is used in a variety of applications such as dental implants, catheters, and wound healing dressings.

By reducing the particle size of silver to the nanolevel, this material exhibits an increased efficiency in its ability to control bacterial growth, while also improving its biocompatibility in mammalian systems3. Applications of silver nanoparticles in food packaging has involved its embedding into biodegradable coatings that have successfully inactivated bacteria.

Its addition as an anchor through the assistance of certain amino groups to common surfaces, such as glass, have found successful inhibition in the form of biofilms, and its combination with graphene oxide on these surfaces have even been found to inhibit almost 100% of bacterial attachment1.

Similar chemicals manipulated at the nanolevel such as titanium oxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO), cerium oxide (CeO), and others, have been used as photocatalytic agents in order to create surface reactive oxygen species (ROS) capable of damaging organic matter, such as bacteria, from developing.

Natural antimicrobial extracts, such as nano-encapsulated cinnamaldehyde, thyme oil emulsified with soluble soybean polysaccharide, and mandarin oil nano-emulsions, have all found to be successful additions and alternatives to harsh chemicals for these surfaces as well1. Food packaging products have also found the use of selenium and cellulose particles to successfully inhibit the production of ROS that can arise and degrade food quality.

One of the newest nano-enabled techniques that have risen in the fight against microbial agents in food is known as engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). These highly charged and mobile agents contain ROS, allowing for their successful interaction and inactivation of microorganisms on surfaces.

By being applied to water through either electrospraying and/or ionization processes, EWNS have a highly targeted capability to deliver their antimicrobial potential to food-related microorganisms, reaching what has been measured as up to a 99.99% reduction in organismal presence1.

While there are clearly advantageous aspects found in the application of nanotechnology into food and safety measurements, there is still a pressing need for further investigation into the potential toxicity that can occur following nanoparticle exposure.

Further regulation of nanomaterial applications in the food industry must also be thoroughly explored by governments across the world in order to develop standards to avoid possible health risks to humans and the environment.

References

Disclaimer: The views expressed here are those of the author expressed in their private capacity and do not necessarily represent the views of AZoM.com Limited T/A AZoNetwork the owner and operator of this website. This disclaimer forms part of the Terms and conditions of use of this website.

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Nanotechnology in the Monitoring of Microbial Food Safety – AZoNano

Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers – Phys.Org

February 15, 2017 Dr. Madhavan Nair oversees work in his lab at Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. Credit: Florida International University

Opiate abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV infection, and in combination they can have a devastating effect on the brain. Scientists at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) are studying new therapies that can short-circuit HIV infection and mitigate the damaging effects that opiate addiction has on the central nervous system.

The ambitious $3.5 million five-year study, funded by the National Institutes for Health is now underway and will be completed b7 2021. Researchers hope the work will lead to lead to a multi-purpose platform for drugs targeting a variety of other difficult to treat diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases.

The Institute of Neuro-Immune Pharmacology at HWCOM, led by Chair and Associate Dean of the Department of Immunology Madhavan Nair, is teaming up with Kamel Khalili, chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple University, and the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple University’s Lewis Katz School on a new study that will combine Khalil’s gene editing strategy using nanotechnology with Nair’s work to help opiate users with HIV.

Despite significant advances in anti-retroviral therapy (ART), which is used to treat HIV patients, ART is unable to penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) after systemic administration. In addition, the elimination of HIV from the central nervous system and peripheral reservoirs remains challenging due to the HIV genome’s ability to integrate itself into the host genome.

But advances in nanotechnology have expanded the possibilities for novel drug delivery systems that can cross the BBB to recognize and eradicate HIV in the brain. Nair and other scientists from the Institute of Neuro-Immune Pharmacology at HWCOM have combined nanotechnology with magneto electro nanoparticles (MENPs) as externally field triggered/controlled drug carriers that offer the unique capability of low energy and dissipation free on-demand drug release across the BBB.

Nair’s MENP drug-based delivery system is now the basis for the partnership with Khalili, who developed the Cas9/gRNA system; a genetic engineering tool that has shown great promise in finding and destroying copies of HIV that have burrowed into the host’s genome.

The partnership will use Cas9/gRNA to eliminate entire integrated copies of the HIV genome from the host chromosome with the MENP drug-based delivery system.

“This is the first time that we are sending medicine to the brain that will eliminate latent HIV as well as deliver a morphine antagonist (methylnaltrexone) across the BBB in a non-invasive manner to protect neurons from morphine induced neurodegenerative effects,” Nair says. MENP is non-invasive and fast-acting, and this newly created multi-disciplinary approach will also introduce unprecedented 3-D diagnostic views and allow clearance of the nanoparticles from the brain to the periphery by reverse external magnetic force once the cargo has been delivered.

Explore further: New nanotechnique to deliver life-saving drugs to the brain

(Phys.org) In a study published in today’s issue of Nature Communications, researchers from FIU’s Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine describe a revolutionary technique they have developed that can deliver and fully release …

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA – the virus responsible for AIDS – from the genomes …

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims’ DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University …

Stumped for years by a natural filter in the body that allows few substances, including life-saving drugs, to enter the brain through the bloodstream, physicians who treat neurological diseases may soon have a new pathway …

More and more scientists are using the powerful new gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9, a technology isolated from bacteria, that holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy …

A specialized gene editing system designed by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University is paving the way to an eventual cure for patients infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. In a study …

The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. Heat transport is of similar fundamental importance and its control is …

A new technique using liquid metals to create integrated circuits that are just atoms thick could lead to the next big advance for electronics.

The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is “significantly decreased” after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything …

Gadgets are set to become flexible, highly efficient and much smaller, following a breakthrough in measuring two-dimensional ‘wonder’ materials by the University of Warwick.

Finding practical solutions to detect proteins, cancer biomarkers, viruses and other small objects has been a key challenge for researchers worldwide for decades. These solutions hold promise for saving lives through more …

Lithium-ion batteries have become essential in everyday technology. But these power sources can explode under certain circumstances and are not ideal for grid-scale energy storage. Sodium-ion batteries are potentially a safer …

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Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers – Phys.Org

ECC officially opens nanotechnology building – Amherst Bee

Erie Community College officials, faculty and staff joined Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul and other officials on Friday for a celebration of the schools $5.75 million Center for Nanotechnology Studies on the North Campus.

ECC continues to be a leader in providing career-focused education for students pursuing professional opportunity, ECC President Jack Quinn said in a press release. In recent years, STEM-related job opportunities have multiplied not only across the country, but right here in our Buffalo backyard. Starting today, well be able to train students for these industries in this new facility.

STEM refers to science, technology, engineering and math.

The energy-efficient building

funded primarily by money secured in September 2015 through the State University of New Yorks 2020 Challenge Grant Program will house ECCs nanotechnology Associate in Applied Science degree program. According to the release, students have already begun training in the space.

The press release further said that with features informed by educational partners Genesee Community College and Penn State University, the space was designed to help prepare students for career opportunities in burgeoning Western New York fields such as semiconductor manufacturing, biotechnology and environmental science.

Within the next seven years, 3.5 million jobs in NYS will require at least an associate degree, like the new Associate

Degree of Applied Science in Nanotechnology here at Erie Community College, Hochul said. These students will graduate with a highly specialized skill, and they are going to walk out with their diplomas and walk right into new jobs.

According to the press release, the Center for Nanotechnology Studies provides approximately 6,100 square feet of new learning space; $1.5 million in fabrication and characterization equipment, and 36 solar roof panels to provide clean power; and a state-of-the-art energy recovery system to reduce heating and cooling costs and energy usage.

Additionally, the building also boasts network capabilities through the Remote Access Instruments for Nanotechnology network to collaborate on training with students across the country and the states only community college-hosted clean room for manipulating particles within an advanced manufacturing process.

ECC offers one of only three available semiconductor manufacturing associate degree programs in New York, and it is now the first and only community college to provide learning experiences to students in a clean room for manipulating particles as part of an advanced manufacturing process, said state Sen. Michael H. Ranzenhofer.

I am pleased that the states $5.75 million commitment has helped to make it happen, he said. The new nanotechnology annex is another educational tool for our students to get the skills they need to secure a STEM-related job.

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ECC officially opens nanotechnology building – Amherst Bee

Armenia, Iran to cooperate on nanotechnology – Panorama.am

Delegation headed by Armenian Deputy Minister of Economic Development and Investments Emil Tarasyan has been on a visited to the Islamic Republic of Iran from February 11-13 at the invitation of the Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council (INIC).

As the release issued by the ministry reads, the visit aimed at getting familiarized with structures of Iranian nanotechnology sector, its research and production activity and assess the prospects of cooperation on the sector.

According to the source, the Armenian delegation has had meetings with INIC Secretary-General Saeed Sarkar, Director of the INIC Committee of the Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council Ali Beitollahi, Director of Council Production and Market Development Reza Asadifardi. It has been stressed that nanotechnology sector is viewed as a priority branch of Iranian economy, while the country occupies leading position in the world market.

After the meetings a memorandum of understanding has been pre-signed on Armenian-Iranian bilateral cooperation in nanotechnology sector.

The ministry details that RA Minister of Economic Development and INIC Secretary-General plan to sign the memorandum in the coming future to facilitate the cooperation in the sector through the action plan to be drafted after the signing.

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Armenia, Iran to cooperate on nanotechnology – Panorama.am

Drilling Fluids Market – Forecasts from 2016 to 2021 – Implementation of Nanotechnology has led to a Large Number of … – Business Wire (press…

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “Drilling Fluids Market – Forecasts from 2016 to 2021” report to their offering.

Drilling fluids, also known as drilling mud, plays an important role in facilitating the drilling process by suspending cuttings, controlling pressure, stabilizing exposed rock, providing buoyancy, cooling and lubricating. Every drilling activity requires drilling fluids and they are used extensively across the globe. Drilling fluids are water, oil or synthetic-based, and each composition provides different solutions in the well.

Drilling fluids are essential to drilling success, as it maximizes recovery and minimizes the amount of time taken to achieve the required goal. Drilling deeper, longer and more challenging wells being practiced has been made possible by improvements in drilling technologies, including more efficient and effective drilling fluids.

The growing energy demand globally owing to population growth is the major driver for drilling fluids market. Also, with the successful implementation of nanotechnology in the oil and gas industry, a large number of companies have been investing heavily in drilling fluids. On the brighter side, most of the onshore locations in the global drilling fluids market are currently facing depletion which has prompted many companies to drill deeper. This requires a much larger amount of drilling fluid to function in an optimum condition which will create a higher demand for drilling fluids in most regions.

However, drilling fluids market faces challenges owing to various environmental and socio-economic risk factors associated with the drilling industry. Factors like huge demand for clean and renewable energy globally, highly volatile crude oil market, strict government laws and regulations and environmental concerns related to exploration activities may restrain the market growth.

Companies Mentioned

Key Topics Covered:

1. Introduction

2. Research Methodology

3. Executive Summary

4. Market Dynamics

5. Drilling Fluids Market Forecast by Application (US$ billion)

6. Drilling Fluids Market Forecast by Fluid Type (US$ billion)

7. Drilling Fluids Market Forecast by Geography (US$ billion)

8. Competitive Intelligence

9. Company Profiles

For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/x37mql/drilling_fluids

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Drilling Fluids Market – Forecasts from 2016 to 2021 – Implementation of Nanotechnology has led to a Large Number of … – Business Wire (press…

No research possible without the help of nanotechnology – NYOOOZ

Summary: Professor S. Subbiah, Vice Chancellor of Alagappa University said nanotechnology was emerging as the sixth revolution in the current era as no research was possible without the help of the technology, which played a crucial role in almost all fields of science. AwarenessProfessor K. Gurunathan, Head, Department of Nano Science and Technology said the objective of the seminar was to create awareness on the significance of nanotechnology applications in various fields. Nanotechnology is expected to be one of the next drivers of technology-based business and economic growth, and emphasized the need for product-based research from laboratory to end users. Vijayamohanan K Pillai, Director, CSIR-CECRI, in his inaugural address, highlighted the recent advances of nano science and technology in the fields of biotechnology, environmental remediation, sensors and semiconductors. The multifunctional application of nano material in industries played a great role in improving the economy of the country, he said.

Professor S. Subbiah, Vice Chancellor of Alagappa University said nanotechnology was emerging as the sixth revolution in the current era as no research was possible without the help of the technology, which played a crucial role in almost all fields of science. Addressing a two-day national seminar on Nano materials for specialised applications, organised by the department of Nano Science and Technology here on Thursday, he said after the Biotechnology revolution of 1990s, nano technology was becoming very popular nowadays. The technology helped to produce nano-materials that were more durable, effective and economical, he said adding no research is possible without the help of nano technology because today it plays a crucial role in almost all fields of science. Nano mission project Pointing out that 90 % of the nano-based products and patents have come from China, Germany, France, Japan, Switzerland, South Korea and USA, he said India has invested huge amount through the Nano mission project to bring in developments in the spheres of agriculture, textile technology, medicine, electronics and aerospace. Vijayamohanan K Pillai, Director, CSIR-CECRI, in his inaugural address, highlighted the recent advances of nano science and technology in the fields of biotechnology, environmental remediation, sensors and semiconductors. The multifunctional application of nano material in industries played a great role in improving the economy of the country, he said. Prof R Renganathan, UGC-Emeritus Fellow, School of Chemistry, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchi, in his address, emphasised the need for fabricating nano-materials that could pave the way for making novel nano-devices with significantly improved performance. Nanotechnology is expected to be one of the next drivers of technology-based business and economic growth, and emphasized the need for product-based research from laboratory to end users. Awareness Professor K. Gurunathan, Head, Department of Nano Science and Technology said the objective of the seminar was to create awareness on the significance of nanotechnology applications in various fields..

. . .

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Madurai/%E2%80%9CNo-research-possible-without-the-help-of-nanotechnology%E2%80%9D/article17279518.ece

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No research possible without the help of nanotechnology – NYOOOZ

Nanotechnology congress & Expo

Tracks & Sessions

Track Content: Nanomedicine & Nanobiotechnology

Nanomedicine can be defined as medical application of nanotechnology. Nanomedicine ranges from the medical applications ofnanomaterialsand biological devices,Nano electronicdevices & biosensors and possible future applications of molecular nanotechnology. Nanomaterials can be functionalised to interface with biological molecules & structures as the size of nanomaterials is comparable to most biological molecules and structures. Nanomaterials can be useful for both in vivo and in vitro biomedical research and applications and integration of nanomaterials with biology has led to the development of advanced diagnostic devices, physical therapy applications, analytical tools, contrast agents and drug delivery vehicles.Nanomedicinestrives for delivering valuable set of research tools & clinically useful devices and its industry sales reached $16 billion in 2015, with an average of $3.8 billion investment in nanotechnology R&D every year and increase of 45% per year global funding for emerging nanotechnology.

Related Conferences:

20thannual Nanotech 2017 Conference & Expo, Washington DC, USA. 2017 International Conference on Nanotechnology, Montreal, Canada. 12th IEEE Nanotechnology Materials and Devices Conference (NMDC 2017), Singapore. 12th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems(IEEE-NEMS 2017), Los Angeles, California, USA. The 11th IEEE international Conference on Nano/ Molecular Medicine and Engineering. 7th International Conference on Manipulation, Manufacturing and Measurement on the Nanoscale, Chongqing, China. MARSS-17 (International Conference on Manipulation, Automation and Robotics at Small Scales). NANOfIM 2017 (Nanotechnology for Instrumentation and Measurement Workshop). 3rd International Conference on Nanomaterials: Fundamentals and Applications (NFA 2017), Slovakia, Europe. 7th FEZA Conference on Zeolites – Materials with Engineered Properties, Bulgaria, Europe

Related Nanotechnology Associations:

Track 2:Advanced Nanomaterials- production, synthesis and processing

Track Content:

Nanotechnology has found a vast number of applications in many areas and its market grown at a rapid pace in recent years. This resulted in new horizons in materials science and many exciting new developments. The supply of new Nanomaterials, form the prerequisite for any further progress in this new area of science and technology. Nanomaterials feature specific properties that are characteristic of these materials, and which are based on surface and quantum effects. The control of composition, size, shape, and morphology of nanomaterials is an essential foundation for the development and application of Nanomaterials and Nano scale devices.

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Multifunctional, Hybrid and Nanomaterials, Portugal, Europe. Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules Conference 2017, Carlsbad, USA. 2nd International Conference on Materials Science, Agartala, India. 8th International Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (AMN8), Queenstown, New Zealand. International Conference on Nanotechnology research at San Antonio, Texas, USA. 4th World Congress and Expo on Nanotechnology and Materials Science, Barcelona, Spain. 2nd International Nanotechnology Conference & Expo, DUBAI, UAE. NanoWorld Conference (NWC-2017), Boston, USA. Nanotech France 2017 International Conference and Exhibition, Paris, France. 2017 International Conference on Materials Engineering and Nano Sciences, Singapore

Related Nanotechnology Associations:

Track 3:Nano-Electronic Devices and Micro/Nano systems

Track Content:

Nano-electronics hold a few responses for how we may build the capacities of gadgets while we lessen their weight and control utilization. Enhancing show screens on gadgets. This includes lessening power utilization while diminishing the weight and thickness of the screens. Specialists are adding to a kind of memory chip with an anticipated thickness of one terabyte of memory for each square crawl or more prominent. Lessening the measure of transistors utilized as a part of coordinated circuits

Related Conferences:

8thInternational Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications (ICNFA’17), Rome, Italy. NANOTEXNOLOGY 2017, Thessaloniki, Greece. 2nd International Conference on Design, Materials and Manufacturing (ICDMM 2017), Beijing, China. International Conference on Innovative and Smart Materials 2017 (ICISM 2017), Singapore. ICMENS 2017 International Conference on Materials Engineering and Nano Sciences, Singapore. ICNMS 2017 5th International Conference on Nano and Materials Science, San Diego, California, United States. ICAMR 2017 The 7th International Conference on Advanced Materials, Hong Kong, China. 2nd International Conference on Green Composite Materials (ICGCM 2017), Hong Kong, China. 2nd International Conference on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials in Energy(ICNNE 2017), Lyon, France

Related Nanotechnology Associations:

Track 4:Micro/ Nano-fabrication, Nano patterning, Nano Lithography & Nano Imprinting

Track Content:

Nano-fabrication is the configuration and production of gadgets with measurements measured in nanometers. One nanometer is 10 – 9 meters, or a million of a millimeter. Nanofabrication is of enthusiasm to PC engineers since it opens the way to super-high-thickness microchip s and memory chip s. It has been recommended that every information bit could be put away in a solitary iota. Conveying this further, a solitary molecule may even have the capacity to speak to a byte or expression of information. Nanofabrication has additionally gotten the consideration of the restorative business, the military, and the avionic business

Related Conferences:

International Conference on Frontiers of Characterization and Metrology for Nanoelectronics (FCMN), Monterey, California, United States. IEEE 17th International Conference on Nanotechnology, Pittsburgh, PA, United States. ICNN 2017 : 19th International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rome, Italy. International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. EuroNanoForum 2017, Valletta, Malta. International Conference on Advances in Biological Systems and Materials Science in NanoWorld, Varanasi, India. New Tools and Approaches for Nanomaterial Safety Assessment, Malaga, Spain. International Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Queenstown, New Zealand. nano tech 2017, Tokyo, Japan

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Track 5:Graphene and Applications

Track Content:

Researchers and companies consider the graphene, carbon sheets that are only one atom thick viable to be used as material in several fields. Potential applications include Fuel cells, Optoelectronics, Bio-micro robotics, Lower cost solar cells, Transistors, water desalination, sensors etc.

Related Conferences:

Nanomaterials for Applications in Energy Technology, Ventura, CA, USA. NANOTEK 2017, Hamburg, Germany. 10th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmaceutics & Novel Drug Delivery Systems, London, UK. International Conference on Smart Materials & Structures, Orlando, FL, USA. World Congress and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering, Dubai, UAE. Graphene 2017, Barcelona, Spain. The International Conference on Surfaces, Coatings and Interfaces, Incheon, South Korea. International Conference on Nanomedicine, Drug Delivery, and Tissue Engineering (NDDTE’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Conference on Nanotechnology and Environmental Issues (ICNEI’17), Barcelona, Spain

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Track 6:Computation, Simulation & Modeling of Nanostructures, Nano systems & devices

Track Content:

Functional Nano-scale structures frequently involve quite dissimilar materials which are difficult to characterize experimentally and ultimately be assembled, controlled, and utilized by manipulating quantities at the macro-scale a combination of features which puts unprecedented demands on theory, modelling and simulation.

Related Conferences:

International Conference on Nanotechnology Modeling and Simulation (ICNMS’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Conference on Nanobiotechnology (ICNB’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Conference on Nanomaterials, Nanodevices, Fabrication and Characterization (ICNNFC’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Workshop on Computational Nanotechnology, Windermere, UK. International Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications (ICNFA’17),Rome, Italy. Nano-Mechanical Interfaces, Hong Kong, P R China. Emerging Materials and Nanotechnology, Toronto, Canada. Nanoporous Materials & Their Applications, Andover, NH, USA. International Conference & Exhibition on Advanced & Nano Materials (ICANM 2017), Toronto, Canada. International Conference of Theoretical and Applied Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (TANN’17), Toronto, Canada. 2nd International Conference on Nanotechnology and Materials Science (NANOMS2017), Suzhou, China. Global Conference on Nanotechnology and Materials Science, Las Vegas, USA

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Track 7:Bio-Nanomaterials and biomedical devices, applications

Track Content:

The science and innovation of Nanomaterials has made awesome energy and desires in the most recent couple of years. The following decade is liable to witness significant steps in the arrangement, characterisation and abuse of Nanoparticles, Nanowires, Nanotubes, Nanorods, Nanocrystals, Nanounits and their congregations.

Related Conferences:

International Conference on Frontiers of Characterization and Metrology for Nanoelectronics (FCMN), Monterey, California, United States. IEEE 17th International Conference on Nanotechnology, Pittsburgh, PA, United States. ICNN 2017 : 19th International Conference on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rome, Italy. International Conference on Nanotechnology for Renewable Materials, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. EuroNanoForum 2017, Valletta, Malta. International Conference on Advances in Biological Systems and Materials Science in NanoWorld, Varanasi, India. New Tools and Approaches for Nanomaterial Safety Assessment, Malaga, Spain. International Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Queenstown, New Zealand. nano tech 2017, Tokyo, Japan

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Track 8:Nano photonics, Nano Imaging, Spectroscopy & plasmonic devices

Track Content:

Nanophotonics is an enabling technology which concerns with application of photonics at nanoscale dimensions, where field enhancement effects which result in new optical phenomena offering superior performance or completely new functionalities in photonic devices and encompasses a wide variety of topics, including metamaterials, plasmonics, high resolution imaging, quantum nanophotonics, functional photonic materials.This technology potential to impact across a wide range of photonics products such as high efficiency solar cells to ultra-secure communications to personalized health monitoring devices

Related Conferences:

International Conference on Nanotechnology Modeling and Simulation (ICNMS’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Conference on Nanobiotechnology (ICNB’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Conference on Nanomaterials, Nanodevices, Fabrication and Characterization (ICNNFC’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Workshop on Computational Nanotechnology, Windermere, UK. International Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications (ICNFA’17), Rome, Italy. Nano-Mechanical Interfaces, Hong Kong, P R China. Emerging Materials and Nanotechnology, Toronto, Canada. Nanoporous Materials & Their Applications, Andover, NH, USA. International Conference & Exhibition on Advanced & Nano Materials (ICANM 2017), Toronto, Canada. International Conference of Theoretical and Applied Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (TANN’17), Toronto, Canada. 2nd International Conference on Nanotechnology and Materials Science (NANOMS2017), Suzhou, China. Global Conference on Nanotechnology and Materials Science, Las Vegas, USA

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Track 9:Nanotechnology & Energy

Track Content:

Research into hydride materials for vitality applications commonly concentrates on upgrading gravimetric capacity thickness and particle transport of the materials. Then again, the necessities for stationary applications, for example, power devices can be essentially diverse and manageable to a more extensive class of potential materials. Various geophysical and social weights are driving a movement from fossil fills to renewable and practical vitality sources. To impact this change, we should make the materials that will bolster new vitality advances. Sun oriented vitality is the most extreme need to create photovoltaic cells that are productive and financially savvy.

Related Conferences:

Nanomaterials for Applications in Energy Technology, Ventura, CA, USA. NANOTEK 2017, Hamburg, Germany. 10th International Conference and Exhibition on Pharmaceutics & Novel Drug Delivery Systems, London, UK. International Conference on Smart Materials & Structures, Orlando, FL, USA. World Congress and Expo on Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering, Dubai, UAE. Graphene 2017, Barcelona, Spain. The International Conference on Surfaces, Coatings and Interfaces, Incheon, South Korea. International Conference on Nanomedicine, Drug Delivery, and Tissue Engineering (NDDTE’17), Barcelona, Spain. International Conference on Nanotechnology and Environmental Issues (ICNEI’17), Barcelona, Spain

Related Nanotechnology Associations:

Track 10:Nanotechnology Environmental effects and Industrial safety

Track Content:

As nanotechnology is advancing, so is the extension for its business development. The extensive variety of potential items and applications gives nanotechnology its tremendous development prospects. It has been estimated that the worldwide nanotechnology industry will develop to reach US$ 75.8 Billion by 2020. In such a situation, tremendous open door lies for industry members to tap the quickly developing business sector. Significant contributions are expected to environmental and climate protection from Nanotechnological products, processes and applications are expected to by saving raw materials, energy and water as well as by reducing greenhouse gases and hazardous wastes. Usage of nano materials promises certain environmental benefits and sustainability effects

Related Conferences:

5th International Conference on Multifunctional, Hybrid and Nanomaterials, Portugal, Europe. Non-Invasive Delivery of Macromolecules Conference 2017, Carlsbad, USA. 2nd International Conference on Materials Science, Agartala, India. 8th International Conference on Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (AMN8), Queenstown, New Zealand. International Conference on Nanotechnology research at San Antonio, Texas, USA. 4th World Congress and Expo on Nanotechnology and Materials Science, Barcelona, Spain. 2nd International Nanotechnology Conference & Expo, DUBAI, UAE. NanoWorld Conference (NWC-2017), Boston, USA. Nanotech France 2017 International Conference and Exhibition, Paris, France. 2017 International Conference on Materials Engineering and Nano Sciences, Singapore

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Track 11:Future prospects of Nanotechnologies and commercial viability

Track Content:

Nanoscience and Molecular Nanotechnology is the new outskirts of science and innovation in Europe and around the globe, working at the size of individual particles. Top researchers and in addition policymakers overall acclaim the advantages it would convey to the whole society and economy: a large portion of them demand the key part research would play in the quality creation procedure to create exploitable arrangement of innovations by the European business prompting a decision of remarkable applications, items, markets and productive income sources.

Related Conferences:

20thannual Nanotech 2017 Conference & Expo, Washington DC, USA. 2017 International Conference on Nanotechnology, Montreal, Canada. 12th IEEE Nanotechnology Materials and Devices Conference (NMDC 2017), Singapore. 12th IEEE International Conference on Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems(IEEE-NEMS 2017), Los Angeles, California, USA. 11th IEEE international Conference on Nano/Molecular Medicine and Engineering. 7th International Conference on Manipulation, Manufacturing and Measurement on the Nanoscale, Chongqing, China. MARSS-17 (International Conference on Manipulation, Automation and Robotics at Small Scales). NANOfIM 2017 (Nanotechnology for Instrumentation and Measurement Workshop). 3rd International Conference on Nanomaterials: Fundamentals and Applications (NFA 2017), Slovakia, Europe. 7th FEZA Conference on Zeolites – Materials with Engineered Properties, Bulgaria, Europe

Related Nanotechnology Associations:

Track 12:Nanometrology

Track Content:

Nanoscience and Molecular Nanotechnology is the new outskirts of science and innovation in Europe and around the globe, working at the size of individual particles. Top researchers and in addition policymakers overall acclaim the advantages it would convey to the whole society and economy: a large portion of them demand the key part research would play in the quality creation procedure to create exploitable arrangement of innovations by the European business prompting a decision of remarkable applications, items, markets and productive income sources.

Related Conferences:

8thInternational Conference on Nanotechnology: Fundamentals and Applications (ICNFA’17), Rome, Italy. NANOTEXNOLOGY 2017, Thessaloniki, Greece. 2nd International Conference on Design, Materials and Manufacturing (ICDMM 2017), Beijing, China. International Conference on Innovative and Smart Materials 2016 (ICISM 2016), Singapore. ICMENS 2017 International Conference on Materials Engineering and Nano Sciences, Singapore. ICNMS 2017 5th International Conference on Nano and Materials Science, San Diego, California, United States. ICAMR 2017 The 7th International Conference on Advanced Materials, Hong Kong, China. 2nd International Conference on Green Composite Materials (ICGCM 2017), Hong Kong, China. 2nd International Conference on Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials in Energy (ICNNE 2017), Lyon, France.

Related Nanotechnology Associations:

The innovative and emerging nanotechnologies have significantly reshaped the manufacturing, biotechnology, electronic, environmental and pharmaceutical markets. In-depth market analysis of these technologies as well as trends, forecasts and profiles of major players from different analytical reports from various analysts prove how valuable the growth of nanotechnology has become. Efficiency of nanotechnology has led to great discoveries in prescription drug products, photonics and has had a great environmental impact in the water treatment and decreasing the amount of pollutants that deplete the environment

Conference Series Ltd Conferences has taken the initiative to gather the world class experts both from academic and industry in a common platform at its Nanotechnology Conferences to share their recent research finding to the world and enlighten other esteemed delegates on latest trends in the field of nanotechnology. Nanoscience 2017 is second in its series of annual scientific events aimed to provide an opportunity for the delegates to meet, interact and exchange new ideas in the various areas of Nanotechnology.

Nanoscience-2017is an exciting opportunity to showcase the new technology, the new products of your company, the service your industry may offer to a broad international audience. It covers a lot of topics and it will be a nice platform to showcase their recent researches on Nanotechnology, Material Science and other interesting topics.

.INTENDED AUDIENCE:

Nanotechnology refers to a wide range of technologies conducted on functional systems at the nanometer scale. It can be said that nanotechnology is the ability that can be projected to construct items either using the bottom-up approach or using the top-down approach, whereby top-down nanotechnology is considered to be the most well-established form of nanotechnology. In the year 2015, Information and communication technology industry held the major share in the nanotechnology market accounting for almost 55% and followed by energy with a share of 25% during the forecast period of 2016 to 2025.

The nanotechnology market can be segmented by type, application, end-user and geography exclusively. The market is categorized in to various categories such as nanocomposites, nanofibers, nanoceramics, nanomagnetics and more based on the types of nanotechnology commercially available. Every single type of nanotechnology differs greatly and the composition is different with different technical specifications. The crucial user segments include electronics & semiconductors, biotechnology, textile, military, healthcare, pharmaceuticals, food, automobiles and others. Increasing importance on renewable and sustainable energy sector with the use of low cost materials fuels the growth of nanotechnology

The importance can also be measured by the increasing research expenditures worldwide: In 1998 governments all over the world spent around $600 million on research and development in nanotechnologies; in 2002, this expenditure totalled $2.1 billion; and in 2006 investments of nearly $6 billion were expected. European spending in development nanotechnology is similar to that of the US and Japan.

Nanotechnology in Austria

Gross domestic expenditure on research and development in Austria is well above the EU average. Investment from foreign companies in R&D in Austria has been rising for years and is at an extremely high level, while domestic industry has doubled expenditure on R&D over the last 10 years. There are many successfully exported Austrian products and services such as:

A Rich Scientific Heritage

In 1943 the Austrian Paul Eisler invented the printed circuit board, a device that supports and connects electrical components and which today is found in almost every electronic device. Today the Austrian company AT & S is the largest printed circuit board manufacturer in Europe and India and significantly involved in China. The company from Leoben has a top global position in the highest technology segment, HDI Microvia printed boards which are predominantly used in mobile devices. The group also operates successfully in the research and development of modern automotive circuit boards as well as in the industrial and medical technology sectors.

Solid Research Principles

Austrian scientists are today considered among the very best in the world in the field of quantum computer research. The two theoretical physicists from Innsbruck, Peter Zoller and Hans Briegel, along with the experimental physicist from Vienna, are among the worlds most cited experts in the field. The framework for developing new technologies is exceptionally favourable in Austria. The breadth of the Austrian research landscape is breathtaking: from traditional, principle-based research right through to cutting-edge areas of applied science. Operations research is often found in innovative SMEs.

Micro Technology and Nanotechnology

Micro technology and nanoscience represent highly promising technologies of the future and are given considerable weight in Austria, particularly as regards solid state electronics and materials science. The most important nanotechnology products and areas of application include Pigments and other additives for varnishes and plastics, Processors, Surface coatings (e.g. tiles, bathtubs, worktops), Manufacture of dental filling materials and Medical application of nanoparticles for new types of diagnosis and therapy. There are currently around 100 Austrian companies applying their knowledge of nanotechnology, while countless companies are active in areas where nanotechnology will play a key role in the future, such as microelectronics, optics, medical technology, sensor technology, materials science, pharmaceutical industry, automotive industry, textile industry, aviation and space travel.

In order to promote nanosciences and nanotechnologies in Austria specifically, the Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development (RFT), recommended setting up an Austrian NANO Initiative as early as 2002. In 2004, this initiative was established as a multi-annual funding program – aiming at increased networking, creating critical masses, making nanosciences and nanotechnologies utilizable for the economy and for society, and providing an adequate number of qualified technical staff. The Austrian NANO Initiative capitalizes on this variety as one of the strengths of their program and by intensive networking of science and industry enables the development of highly innovative state-of-the-art products with new physical or chemical properties.

The Austrian NANO Initiative places an emphasis on expanding the research competence by additional education and training opportunities, as well as by targeted funding of small and medium-sized enterprises. It funds innovative high technology at the interface between basic and application-oriented research and uses national potential for targeted internationalization, networking, and qualification measures. The Nano scale Sciences and Nanotechnologies (NANO) Initiative is a multi-annual funding program in Austria, which coordinates on national and regional levels and is supported by several Ministries, Federal provinces, and funding institutions under the overall control of the Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (BMVIT). Managed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) on behalf of the BMVIT, the focus and structure of the Austrian NANO Initiative were developed in cooperation with scientists, entrepreneurs, and stakeholders.

In the first period of the Austrian NANO Initiative (2004-2006), an overall public budget of 35 million was provided for highly innovative research and technology development projects. Seven outstanding RTD Project Clusters are currently funded, after undergoing an international peer review, and more than 100 industry partners and research organizations all over Austria participate in these successful NANO Clusters. The Clusters are encouraged to further enlarge their consortia by adding new projects.The Austrian NANO Initiative also provides funds for exploring innovative ideas as well as for conceiving, organizing and carrying out events.

Nanotechnology-related education and training in Austria

The Austrian NANO Initiative is providing funds to build up and expand the human resources required to ensure the qualitative and quantitative growth of NANO in Austria. Funding is provided for education and training measures for positive development within the higher education sector (universities, universities of applied sciences), the vocational training sector, and the general-education secondary school sector, as well as for the support of enterprises involving nanosciences and nanotechnologies.

Austrian businesses expect a significant deployment of nano products and production technologies by 2010. In addition to the projected increase in nano production, intensified fundamental nano research is expected. Two main developments can be extrapolated from this: The demand for highly qualified personnel for R&D positions will increase steeply, as will the demand for engineering personnel (graduates of vocational upper secondary schools, universities for applied sciences, and research universities). The latter need is based on the interest in projects that transfer research into marketable applications and products, as well as the demand for deployment of nano-related process innovations. Additional administrative and economic skills will become increasingly important for key personnel.

As in the business sector,nano-related employment in educational institutionsis expected to increase significantly until 2010. Programs with a nano-related research focus, as well as applied nano-related study programs, are currently being planned or developed for establishment during the next few years. Comparison of supply and demand for nano-relevant education and training programs shows mainly regional imbalances.

Distinct changes on the educational level are expected up until 2010 for nano-related job profiles. University graduates will slightly decrease from 70% to 60%, and graduates from universities of applied sciences will double to approximately 20%. Nano education at the (upper) secondary level is expected to reach and remain static at 15% by 2010. For nano-related topics, education and training are dominated mainly by universities, with well-developed centers in Vienna, Styria, Upper Austria, and the Tyrol. Presently, most programs focus on advanced students as well as students preparing master’s theses and PhD dissertations, and on postdoctoral programs.

NanoScience 2016

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Nanotechnology congress & Expo

No research possible without the help of nanotechnology – The Hindu

Professor S. Subbiah, Vice Chancellor of Alagappa University said nanotechnology was emerging as the sixth revolution in the current era as no research was possible without the help of the technology, which played a crucial role in almost all fields of science.

Addressing a two-day national seminar on Nano materials for specialised applications, organised by the department of Nano Science and Technology here on Thursday, he said after the Biotechnology revolution of 1990s, nano technology was becoming very popular nowadays.

The technology helped to produce nano-materials that were more durable, effective and economical, he said adding no research is possible without the help of nano technology because today it plays a crucial role in almost all fields of science.

Nano mission project

Pointing out that 90 % of the nano-based products and patents have come from China, Germany, France, Japan, Switzerland, South Korea and USA, he said India has invested huge amount through the Nano mission project to bring in developments in the spheres of agriculture, textile technology, medicine, electronics and aerospace.

Vijayamohanan K Pillai, Director, CSIR-CECRI, in his inaugural address, highlighted the recent advances of nano science and technology in the fields of biotechnology, environmental remediation, sensors and semiconductors.

The multifunctional application of nano material in industries played a great role in improving the economy of the country, he said.

Prof R Renganathan, UGC-Emeritus Fellow, School of Chemistry, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchi, in his address, emphasised the need for fabricating nano-materials that could pave the way for making novel nano-devices with significantly improved performance.

Nanotechnology is expected to be one of the next drivers of technology-based business and economic growth, and emphasized the need for product-based research from laboratory to end users.

Awareness

Professor K. Gurunathan, Head, Department of Nano Science and Technology said the objective of the seminar was to create awareness on the significance of nanotechnology applications in various fields.

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No research possible without the help of nanotechnology – The Hindu

Nanotechnology in the Food Industry: A Short Review – Food Safety Magazine

Nanotechnology | February/March 2017

By A. Wallace Hayes, Ph.D., and Saura C. Sahu, Ph.D.

The benefits of nanotechnology for the food industry are many and are expected to grow with time. This new, rapidly developing technology impacts every aspect of the food system from cultivation to food production to processing, packaging, transportation, shelf life and bioavailability of nutrients. Commercial applications of nanomaterials will continue to impact the food industry because of their unique and novel properties. Human exposure to nanomaterials, as a result, is increasing and will continue to increase with time. Therefore, the health impact of nanomaterials in food is of public interest and concern. Public acceptance of food and food-related products containing nanomaterials will depend on their safety. Consequently, a uniform international regulatory framework for nanotechnology in food is necessary.

Introduction The National Nanotechnology Initiative in the U.S. defines nanotechnology as the understanding and control of matter at a nanoscale where unique phenomena enable novel applications. Nanomaterials are further defined as substances between 1 and 100 nm in size showing physical, chemical and biological properties that are not found in bulk samples of the same material.[1] Their extremely small size and high surface area are associated with their greater strength, stability and chemical and biological activities. Therefore, nanotechnology enables development of novel materials with a wide range of potential applications. Nanomaterials are used in a variety of consumer, medical, commercial and industrial products.[1] Because nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly developing technology, very limited information about it is currently available.

What food technologists and engineers are doing to improve the safety of our food supply seems limited only by ones imagination, and nanotechnology opens the door to a whole new array of products (Figure 1). Fresh fruits, vegetables, meat and poultry products are potential vehicles for the transmission of human pathogens leading to foodborne disease outbreaks,[2] which draw public attention to food safety. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antimicrobials to ensure food safety. Because of the antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials, nanotechnology offers great potential for novel antimicrobial agents for the food and food-related industries. The use of nano-antimicrobial agents added directly to foods or through antimicrobial packaging is an effective approach. As a result, the use of nanotechnology by the food and food-related industries is expected to increase, impacting the food system at all stages from food production to processing, packaging, transportation, storage, security, safety and quality.[3,4]

Food Ingredients for Color, Texture and Flavor The food industry is beginning to use nanotechnology to develop nanoscale ingredients to improve color, texture and flavor of food.[5,6] The nanoparticles TiO2 and SiO2[7,8] and amorphous silica[8,9] are used as food additives. TiO2 is used as a coloring in the powdered sugar coating on doughnuts.

Food Production and Packaging Nanomaterials used for food packaging provide many benefits such as improved mechanical barriers, detection of microbial contamination and potentially enhanced bioavailability of nutrients. This is perhaps the most common application of nanotechnology in food and food-related industries.[10] A number of nanocomposites, polymers containing nanoparticles, are used by the food industry for food packaging and food contact materials.[11] The use of ZnO and MgO nanoparticles for food packaging has been reported.[7] Amorphous silica is used in food and in food containers and packaging.[5,8,9] Engineered water nanostructures generated as aerosols are very effective at killing foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli, Listeria and Salmonella on steel food production surfaces.[12] Such food contact substances containing nanomaterials have the potential of migrating from food packaging into food, so this technology still must demonstrate regulatory compliance before it gains wide-spread acceptance in the industry.

Nutrients and Dietary Supplements Nanomaterials are used as ingredients and additives (e.g., vitamins, antimicrobials, antioxidants) in nutrients and health supplements for enhanced absorption and bioavailability.[13]

Food Storage The antimicrobial properties of nanomaterials enable them to preserve food during storage and transport.[5,14,15] Nanosensors can be used for a variety of applications. Commercial use of nanosensors has been reported to check storage conditions[14] and during food transport in refrigerated trucks for temperature control.[15]

Food Nanosensors Nanomaterials are used as sensors to detect contamination and regulate the food environment. They can detect microbial and other food contaminants. Therefore, they are used as sensors in food production and at packaging plants. They can monitor the condition of food during transport and storage.[14,15] They can detect nutrient deficiency in edible plants, and dispensers containing nutrients can deliver them to plants when needed. Therefore, nanomaterials can be used as nanosensors and nanotracers with almost unlimited potential by the food industry.[16]

Food Safety Consumers are exposed to nanomaterials by consumption of food and beverages containing these extremely small particles of large reactive surface area of unknown safety. Once absorbed in the gastrointestinal system, they may bioaccumulate in various organs of the body, leading to potentially adverse effects. Thus, application of nanotechnology by the food industry is of public concern. Public acceptance of food and food products containing nanomaterials depends on their perceived safety. An editorial entitled Nanofood for Thought in the journal Nature Nanotechnology says, The food industry will only reap the benefits of nanotechnology if issues related to safety are addressed and companies are more open about what they are doing.[17]

In March 2009, the scientific committee of the European Food Safety Agency published an opinion on nanoscience and nanotechnology regarding food and animal feed safety.[18] A guidance document on how to assess potential risks associated with certain food-related uses of nanotechnology followed in May 2011, providing practical recommendations to regulators on how to assess applications from industry to use engineered nanomaterials in food additives, enzymes, flavorings, food contact materials, novel foods, food supplements, feed additives and pesticides. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a draft guidance for industry use of nanomaterials in animal feed.[19] However, more research is required to determine the impact of nanomaterials in food on human health to ensure public safety and improve public communication of the safe use of such materials in our food supply. Some test methods for nanomaterial safety assessment have been reported.[20,21] However, no internationally accepted standard protocols for toxicity testing of nanomaterials in food or feed are currently available. Such protocols are in the development stage by organizations such as the International Alliance for Nano Environment, Human Health and Safety Harmonization[22] and the U.S. National Research Council.[23] A uniform international regulatory framework for the evaluation of nanotechnology is a necessity for both food and animal feed.

Conclusions The benefits of nanotechnology use by the food industry are many and expected to grow. This new, rapidly developing technology impacts every aspect of the food system from production to processing, packaging, transportation, shelf life and bioavailability. Commercial applications of nanomaterials in the food industry will grow because of their unique and novel properties. Human exposure to nanomaterials will continue to increase. Therefore, the health impact of nanomaterials in food is of prime public concern. The ability to quantify the nanomaterial throughout the food life cycle is critical for manufacturing consistency, safety and potential benefits of the consumer product. Public acceptance of food and food-related products containing nanomaterials will depend on their safety. A uniform international regulatory framework for nanotechnology in food is a must.

The views presented in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of FDA.

A. Wallace Hayes, Ph.D., is a visiting scientist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Saura C. Sahu, Ph.D., is a research chemist at FDAs Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

References 1. http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d10549.pdf. 2. Berger, CN et al. 2010. Fresh Fruits and Vegetables as Vehicles for the Transmission of Human Pathogens. Environ Microbiol 12:23852397. 3. Cushen, M et al. 2012. Nanotechnologies in the Food Industry: Recent Developments, Risks and Regulation. Trends Food Sci Technol 24:3046. 4. Berekaa, MM. 2015. Nanotechnology in Food Industry: Advances in Food Processing, Packaging and Food Safety: A Review. Int J Curr Microbiol App Sci 4(5):345357. 5. Kessler, R. 2011. Engineered Nanoparticles in Consumer Products: Understanding a New Ingredient. Environ Health Perspect 119(3):A120A125. 6. Morris, VJ et al. 2011. Atomic Force Microscopy as a Nanoscience Tool in Rational Food Design. J Sci Food Agric 91:21172125. 7. Gerloff, K et al. 2009. Cytotoxicity and Oxidative DNA Damage by Nanoparticles in Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells. Nanotoxicol 3(4):355364. 8. Uboldi, C et al. 2012. Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles Do Not Induce Cytotoxicity, Cell Transformation or Genotoxicity in Balb/3T3 Mouse Fibroblasts. Mutat Res 745(1-2):1120. 9. Oberdorster, G et al. 2005. Nanotoxicology; An Emerging Discipline Evolving from Studies of Ultrafine Particles. Environ Health Perspect 113:823839. 10. Bradley, EL et al. 2011. Applications of Nanomaterial in Food Packaging with a Consideration of Opportunities for Developing Countries. Trends Food Sci Technol 22:604610. 11. Llorens, A et al. 2012. Metallic-Based Micro- and Nanocomposites in Food Contact Materials and Active Food Packaging. Trends Food Sci Technol 24:1920. 12. Pyrgiotakis, G et al. 2015. Inactivation of Foodborne Microorganisms Using Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS). Environ Sci Technol 49(6):37373745. 13. Chaudhry, Q et al. 2008. Applications and Implications of Nanotechnologies for the Food Sector. Food Addit Contam 25(3):241258. 14. Bouwmeester, H et al. 2009. Review of Health Safety Aspects of Nanotechnologies in Food Production. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 53:5262. 15. Buzby, JC. 2010. Nanotechnology for Food Applications: More Questions Than Answers. J Consumer Affairs 44(3):528545. 16. Moraru, CI et al. 2003. Nanotechnology: A New Frontier in Food Science. Food Technol 57:2429. 17. Nature Nanotechnology. 2010. Nanofood for Thought. Nature Nanotechnol 5:89. 18. http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/topics/topic/nanotechnology. 19. http://www.regulations.gov. 20. Handy, RD and BJ Shaw. 2007. Toxic Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials: Implications for Public Health, Risk Assessment and the Public Perception of Nanotechnology. Health Risk Society 9(2):125144. 21. iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1742-6596/617/1/012032/pdf. 22. Maynard, AD et al. 2006. Safe Handling of Nanotechnology. Nature 444:267269. 23. National Research Council. Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy (Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2007).

On January 4th, 2011 President Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) which updates the Food, Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1938, as well as other regulations related to food safety

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Nanotechnology in the Food Industry: A Short Review – Food Safety Magazine

What is nanotechnology (molecular manufacturing …

Nanotechnology, or, as it is sometimes called, molecular manufacturing , is a branch of engineering that deals with the design and manufacture of extremely small electronic circuits and mechanical devices built at the molecular level of matter. The Institute of Nanotechnology in the U.K. expresses it as “science and technology where dimensions and tolerances in the range of 0.1 nanometer (nm) to 100 nm play a critical role.” Nanotechnology is often discussed together with micro-electromechanical systems ( MEMS ), a subject that usually includes nanotechnology but may also include technologies higher than the molecular level.

There is a limit to the number of components that can be fabricated onto a semiconductor wafer or “chip.”. Traditionally, circuits have been etched onto chips by removing material in small regions. However, it is also possible in theory to build chips up, one atom at a time, to obtain devices much smaller than those that can be manufactured by etching. With this approach, there would be no superfluous atoms; every particle would have a purpose. Electrical conductors, called nanowire s, would be only one atom thick. A logic gate would require only a few atoms. A data bit could be represented by the presence or absence of a single electron .

Nanotechnology holds promise in the quest for ever-more-powerful computers and communications devices. But the most fascinating (and potentially dangerous) applications are in medical science. So-called nanorobot s might serve as programmable antibodies. As disease-causing bacteria and viruses mutate in their endless attempts to get around medical treatments, nanorobots could be reprogrammed to selectively seek out and destroy them. Other nanorobots might be programmed to single out and kill cancer cells.

Two concepts associated with nanotechnology are positional assembly and self-replication . Positional assembly deals with the mechanics of moving molecular pieces into their proper relational places and keeping them there. Molecular robots are devices that do the positional assembly. Self-replication deals with the problem of multiplying the positional arrangements in some automatic way, both in building the manufacturing device and in building the manufactured product.

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What is nanotechnology (molecular manufacturing …


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