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Printed solar cells thinner than your hair could power your phone – Phys.Org

June 27, 2017 by Steve Gillman, From Horizon Magazine Nanotechnology could give us extremely thin solar panels that could power phones. Credit: Flickr/ Krlis Dambrns

Extremely thin printable solar panels could power your phone and are amongst a range of new ways nanotechnology is opening the door to a clean energy and waste-free future.

Nanotechnology, a science that focuses on understanding materials on an atomic scale, is helping researchers and businesses introduce new technologies that could transform our economy into a greener, less wasteful one.

“Nanotechnology as a field has an enormous role to play in moving our planet to sustainable and intelligent living,” said Professor Martin Curley from Maynooth University in Ireland, speaking on 21 June at the EuroNanoForum conference, in Malta, organised by the Maltese Presidency of the Council of the European Union and co-funded by the EU.

He explained to an audience of businesspeople and researchers that nanotechnology holds the potential to spark ‘an explosion of innovation”.

One area where this innovation could have its biggest impact is with how we generate, use and consume energy.

Speaking at a session dedicated to nanotechnology in clean energy generation, Prof. Alejandro Prez-Rodrguez, from the department of electronics at the University of Barcelona, Spain, said solar energy and photovoltaic (PV) technology itself could be considered a nanotechnology sector.

“In all PV technologies and devices we put some nanotechnology If we want to move to devices with higher functionality, lower weight, higher flexibility, different colours, then we need to integrate more nanotechnologies into their materials and architecture.”

At the same session, Artur Kupczunas, co-founder of Saule Technologies, explained how his company is using nanotechnology to print solar panels using perovskite crystals, a cheap and highly sensitive mineral that was first found in the Ural Mountains of Russia in 1839.

They produce thin layers of solar cells that are somewhere near one-tenth of the thickness of a single human hair. This innovation could greatly reduce the cost of producing solar energy while transforming any surface into a solar panel, from walls and road-side barriers to the surface of your smartphone.

“The most interesting factor is the (reduction of) overall costs,” said Kupczunas, explaining that this means the technology could be easily scaled out across the market.

Fuel cell

At the same session, John Bgild Hansen, a senior scientist from Haldor Topse, a Danish chemical engineering company, explained how they have been using nanotechnology to look at the atomic level of gases in order to better understand their properties.

This knowledge contributed to creating a fuel cell for greener biofuel production. Their process extracts pure hydrogen from plant materials while reusing any CO2 emissions created during the process to help power the production cycle, preventing any fossil fuels entering the atmosphere.

This, he believes, is a way to ‘break the bottleneck’ on biofuels which currently struggle to get public and private support.

“If we want the conveniences we have today from liquid energy carriers (oil, natural gas etc.) for transport hydrocarbons (biogas) are the best,” he said.

Storing wind and solar energy during unstable weather is another gap in our sustainable energy future.

Professor Magnus Bergen and his team at Sweden’s Linkping University are looking into using nanotechnology to harness the molecular properties of a plastic conductive material called PEDOT:PSS. They combine this knowledge with nanocellulose, a product made from plants or oil, to create an organic material that stores energy.

“If we make a (PEDOT:PSS) battery the size of a refrigerator it can store (enough energy for) the needs of a family in a house or an apartment for a day,” he said.

Because of its ability to charge quickly, it could be a way to compensate for the under- or over- production of wind and solar energy during calm or cloudy days. This, in turn, could break cities’ dependency on fossil fuels.

“You need to store when you are over-producing and release when you are under-producing,” Prof. Bergen explained.

Waste-free

Nanotechnology also has the ability to make technology smaller, extend the life-cycle of electronics, improve manufacturing processes, all of which would mean less waste has to go to the landfill.

Speaking at one of the sessions, Joe Murphy, from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, an association in the UK dedicated to promoting waste as a resource, explained nanotechnologies ‘may enable us to create a new material palette’ that allows future products to be recycled more easily.

“At the moment we have a lot of barriers to recycling nanotechnology may enable us to do more,” he said.

Explore further: European nanotechnology project to design less toxic photovoltaic materials

The University Institute for Advanced Materials Research at the Universitat Jaume I (UJI) has participated in the European Project Sunflower to develop less toxic organic photovoltaic materials viable for industrial production. …

In the global race to create more efficient and long-lasting batteries, some are betting on nanotechnologythe use of minuscule partsas the most likely to yield a breakthrough.

In a new thesis from Uppsala University, Simon Davidsson shows that a rapid expansion of renewable energy technology is not necessarily sustainable. To find the best way forward in the coming transition towards renewable …

A Czech company opened on Monday a production line for batteries based on nanotechnology, which uses tiny parts invisible to human eyes. The batteries are touted as potentially more efficient, longer-lasting, cheaper, lighter …

The climate-friendly electricity generated by solar panels in the past 40 years has all but cancelled out the polluting energy used to produce them, a study said Tuesday.

Europe wants to reduce its needs for raw materials and raise the level of recycling of resources in the solar power industry. If this project is successful, greenhouse gas emissions from solar panel manufacture will fall …

A new and highly virulent outbreak of malicious data-scrambling software appears to be causing mass disruption across the world, hitting companies and governments in Europe especially hard.

After a seven-year legal battle, European authorities came down hard on Google on Tuesday for taking advantage of its dominance in online searches to direct customers to its own businesses, fining the tech giant a record …

While doing research at the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts, Sindy Tang learned of a remarkable organism: Stentor coeruleus. It’s a single-celled, free-living freshwater organism, shaped like a trumpet …

Mobile phone carriers scooped up airwaves no longer needed by television broadcasters last March in a $19-billion auction designed by UBC and Stanford University researchers.

Inside a cavernous northern Utah warehouse, hydraulic engineers send water rushing down a replica of a section of a dam built out of wood, concrete and steeltrying to pinpoint what repairs will work best at the tallest …

Paris’ Cathedral of Notre Dame has a ghost orchestra that is always performing, thanks to a sophisticated, multidisciplinary acoustics research project that will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston, the third joint meeting …

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Printed solar cells thinner than your hair could power your phone – Phys.Org

Capturing Energy with Nanotechnology – AltEnergyMag (press release)

One goal of nanotechnology is to improve photovoltaic solar electricity generation. The thermodynamic limit of 80% productivity is well beyond the capabilities of current photovoltaic technologies, whose performance now is only about 43%.

Len Calderone for | AltEnergyMag

Can using nanotechnology in the efficient capture of sunlight and its conversion to electricity drive economical fuel production processes? Engineers at UC San Diego have developed a nanoparticle-based material for concentrating solar power plants that converts 90% of captured sunlight to heat. With particle sizes ranging from 10 nanometers to 10 micrometers, the multiscale structure traps and absorbs light more efficiently and at temperatures greater than 700 degrees Celsius.

The multiscale structures can catch and soak up light, which contributes to the material’s high proficiency when run at higher temperatures. This new market of concentrating solar power is an ideal alternative for clean energy. It can produce roughly 3.5 gigawatts of power, which is sufficient to power more than 2 million homes. Since it uses the same process as existing power plants, it can be used as a retrofit for existing power plants.

One of the most common types of concentrating solar power systems uses more than 100,000 reflective mirrors to direct sunlight at a tower that has been painted with a light absorbing material. The material is designed to maximize sun light absorption and minimize the loss of light.

A small type of concentrator can capture sun light for local usage. A luminescent solar concentrator is a sunlight harvesting technology that changes the way we think about energy. It could turn any window into a daytime power source. In these devices, a fraction of light transmitted through the window is absorbed by nanosized particles (semiconductor quantum dots) dispersed in a glass window. The light is then re-emitted at the infrared wavelength invisible to the human eye, and wave-guided to a solar cell at the edge of the window. With this process, a virtually transparent window becomes an electrical generator, one that can power a rooms air conditioner on a hot day or a heater on a cold one.

A solar harvesting system uses small organic molecules to absorb specific nonvisible wavelengths of sunlight. They can be tuned to pick up just the ultraviolet and the near infrared wavelengths that then glow at another wavelength in the infrared. The “glowing” infrared light is guided to the edge where it is converted to electricity by thin strips of photovoltaic solar cells. Because the materials do not absorb or emit light in the visible spectrum, they look transparent to the human eye.

This technology opens a variety of markets to deploy solar energy in a non-intrusive way. It can be used on sky scrapers with lots of windows, or any kind of mobile device that demands high visual quality like a smart phone.

Another use for integrated photovoltaics is the agriculture industry by utilizing existing structures as a base for which luminescent solar concentrators can be installed. A waveguide coupled with photovoltaic cells utilizes fluorescent dyes that convert light unused by plants in greenhouses to wavelengths suitable for photosynthesis. The dye absorbs incident light and readmits it isotopically. Light that is not emitted in the escape cone is guided through total internal reflection to front-facing photovoltaic cells, thus providing the necessary light for plant growth and generating energy to power the greenhouse.

Researchers have demonstrated that sunlight, concentrated on nanoparticles, can produce steam with high energy efficiency. The solar steam device is intended to be used in areas of developing countries without electricity for applications such as purifying water or sterilizing medical instruments. The new solar steam method is so effective it can even produce steam from ice-cold water. This technology is meant for small conversions and cannot be used for a solar plant to drive steam engines

The efficiency of solar steam is owed to the light-capturing nanoparticles that convert sunlight into heat. The particles are very smallsmaller than a wavelength of lightwhich means they have an extremely small surface area to dissipate heat. This intense heating generates steam locallyright at the surface of the particle.

When submerged in water and exposed to sunlight, the particles heat up so quickly that they instantly vaporize water and create steam. In ice water, the change to steam takes only 5 seconds. The nanoparticles convert 80% of the energy they absorb with carbon particles demonstrating greater efficiency than metal.

Lighting based on field-induced polymer electroluminescent technology gives off soft, white light in contrast to fluorescents and LEDs, which many people consider irritating. A nano-engineered polymer matrix is used to convert the charge into light. The technology allows the researchers to create an entirely new light bulb.

The new bulbs have the advantage of being shatterproof and twice as efficient than compact fluorescence light bulbs. Some researchers are developing high efficiency LED’s using collections of nano-sized structures called plasmonic cavities.

The light is made of three layers of moldable white-emitting polymer blended with a small number of nanomaterials that glow when stimulated to create bright and perfectly white light, similar to the sunlight human eyes prefer. It can also be made in any color and any shape. This new light is at least twice as efficient as compact fluorescent (CFL) bulbs and on par with LEDs, but these bulbs wont shatter and contaminate a home like CFLs or emit a bluish light like their LED counterparts.

Researchers have used sheets of nanotubes to build thermocells that generate electricity when the sides of the cell are at different temperatures. These nanotube sheets could be wrapped around hot pipes, such as the exhaust pipe of a car, to generate electricity from heat that is usually wasted.

Efficiently harvesting the thermal energy currently wasted in industrial plants or along pipelines could create local sources of clean energy that could be used to lower costs. The new thermocells use nanotube electrodes that provide a 3-times increase in energy conversion efficiency over conventional electrodes.

One of the thermocells looks just like the button cell batteries used in watches, calculators and other small electronics. The key difference is that these new thermocells can continuously generate electricity, instead of running down like a battery. Research can create other thermocells, including electrolyte-filled, textile-separated nanotube sheets that can be wrapped around pipes carrying hot waste streams of manufacturing or electrical power plants. The temperature difference between the pipe and its surroundings produces an electrochemical potential difference between the carbon nanotube sheets, which thermocells utilize to generate electricity.

Nanotube Thermocells Harvest Energy From Car Exhaust

One goal of nanotechnology is to improve photovoltaic solar electricity generation.The thermodynamic limit of 80% productivity is well beyond the capabilities of current photovoltaic technologies, whose performance now is only about 43%. A multidisciplinary, experimental and theoretical effort is now needed to make changes in the way solar cells are designed and manufactured. Nanotechnology provides a promising way to reach this goal with substantial increases in photovoltaic efficiency and cost reductions.

For additional information:

https://www.nano.gov/sites/default/files/pub_resource/nsi_status_report_solar_12_2015.pdf

https://nepis.epa.gov

http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=40843.php

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The GreenFasten – GF1 system utilizes the patented watertight technology EcoFasten Solar is known for. The flashing is fit with our EPDM rubber bushing and when used with a compatible EcoFasten Solar compression bracket (milled with countersink), a watertight seal is created, which protects the integrity of the roof. Requiring just a single fastener (lag bolt or self-drilling), GreenFasten provides the fastest install in the industry and will not void roofing manufacturer’s warranties. Backed by IAPMO certification, GreenFasten delivers a mounting solution for all new or existing (retrofit) composition shingle roofs, and is the most cost-effective solution available. Like all of the solar roof mount solutions in our line of products, GreenFasten is made in the USA using recycled materials.

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Capturing Energy with Nanotechnology – AltEnergyMag (press release)

Germany Publishes Meeting Report from Expert Dialogue on Application of Nanotechnologies in the Construction Sector – Nanotechnology News

Home > Nanotechnology Columns > Bergeson & Campbell, P.C. > Germany Publishes Meeting Report from Expert Dialogue on Application of Nanotechnologies in the Construction Sector

Abstract: On June 1, 2017, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety published meeting documents from the Expert Dialogue on “Opportunities and Risks of the Application of Nanotechnologies in the Construction Sector.”

June 26th, 2017

On June 1, 2017, the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety published meeting documents from the Expert Dialogue on “Opportunities and Risks of the Application of Nanotechnologies in the Construction Sector.” The documents include a summary of discussion, meeting agenda, and report, Regulation of construction products and possibilities to address (new) risks from nanomaterials. See http://www.bmub.bund.de/fileadmin/Daten_BMU/Download_PDF/Nanotechnologie/nanodialog_5_fd1_zusammenfassung_en_bf.pdf ; http://www.bmub.bund.de/fileadmin/Daten_BMU/Download_PDF/Nanotechnologie/nanodialog_5_fd1_tagesordnung_en_bf.pdf ; and http://www.bmub.bund.de/fileadmin/Daten_BMU/Download_PDF/Nanotechnologie/nanodialog_5_bauprodukte_regulierung_en_bf.pdf During the Expert Dialogue, participants examined and discussed regulations for placing building products on the market and the general test procedures for reviewing their impact on the environment and human health. Topics covered included approaches that consider the whole life cycle of building products and the current status of knowledge about risks for workers and the environment. The summary states that participants saw potential risks in the production and application of nano construction products that could be managed using conventional protection measures. To date the particularities of nanomaterials have not been explicitly considered in the assessment of environmental and health impacts. An integration of respective requirements into the European Union (EU) standards is possible, according to the summary, but would require a longer process, which the EU Member States need to start. A stronger consideration of nanomaterials in national authorizations of construction products could be implemented in Germany via the principles for authorization or the integration of specific requirements in the model building law, respectively. Several stakeholders wished for more transparency on the benefits from the use of nanomaterials, as well as on the types and amounts of nanomaterials used in construction products. The summary states that “[a] comprehensive assessment and an understandable communication of benefits from nanomaterial-containing products as well as the potentially related risks from them, including from their disposal, was stated to be important for the acceptance of such products.”

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Germany Publishes Meeting Report from Expert Dialogue on Application of Nanotechnologies in the Construction Sector – Nanotechnology News

Printed solar cells thinner than your hair could power your phone – Horizon magazine

Nanotechnology, a science that focuses on understanding materials on an atomic scale, is helping researchers and businesses introduce new technologies that could transform our economy into a greener, less wasteful one.

Nanotechnology as a field has an enormous role to play in moving our planet to sustainable and intelligent living, said Professor Martin Curley from Maynooth University in Ireland, speaking on 21 Juneat the EuroNanoForum conference,in Malta, organisedby the Maltese Presidency of the Council of the European Union and co-funded by the EU.

He explained to an audience of businesspeople and researchers that nanotechnology holds the potential to spark an explosion of innovation.

One area where this innovation could have its biggest impact is with how we generate, use and consume energy.

Speaking at a session dedicated to nanotechnology in clean energy generation, Prof. Alejandro Prez-Rodrguez, from the department of electronics at the University of Barcelona, Spain, said solar energy and photovoltaic (PV) technology itself could be considered a nanotechnology sector.

In all PV technologies and devices we put some nanotechnology If we want to move to devices with higher functionality, lower weight, higher flexibility, different colours, then we need to integrate more nanotechnologies into their materials and architecture.

At the same session, Artur Kupczunas, co-founder of Saule Technologies, explained how his company is using nanotechnology to print solar panels using perovskite crystals, a cheap and highly sensitive mineral that was first found in the Ural Mountains of Russia in 1839.

They produce thin layers of solar cells that are somewhere near one-tenth of the thickness of a single human hair. This innovation could greatly reduce the cost of producing solar energy while transforming any surface into a solar panel, from walls and road-side barriers to the surface of your smartphone.

The most interesting factor is the (reduction of) overall costs, said Kupczunas, explaining that this means the technology could be easily scaled out across the market.

Fuel cell

At the same session, John Bgild Hansen, a senior scientist from Haldor Topse, a Danish chemical engineering company, explained how they have been using nanotechnology to look at the atomic level of gases in order to better understand their properties.

This knowledge contributed to creating a fuel cell for greener biofuel production. Their process extracts pure hydrogen from plant materials while reusing any CO2 emissions created during the process to help power the production cycle, preventing any fossil fuels entering the atmosphere.

This, he believes, is a way to break the bottleneck on biofuels which currently struggle to get public and private support.

If we want to move to devices with higher functionality, lower weight, higher flexibility, different colours, then we need to integrate more nanotechnologies into their materials and architecture.

Prof. Alejandro Prez-Rodrguez, University of Barcelona, Spain

If we want the conveniences we have today from liquid energy carriers (oil, natural gas etc.) for transport hydrocarbons (biogas) are the best, he said.

Storing wind and solar energy during unstable weather is another gap in our sustainable energy future.

Professor Magnus Bergen and his team at Swedens Linkping University are looking into using nanotechnology to harness the molecular properties of a plastic conductive material called PEDOT:PSS. They combine this knowledge with nanocellulose, a product made from plants or oil, to create an organic material that stores energy.

If we make a (PEDOT:PSS) battery the size of a refrigerator it can store (enough energy for) the needs of a family in a house or an apartment for a day, he said.

Because of its ability to charge quickly, it could be a way to compensate for the under- or over- production of wind and solar energy during calm or cloudy days. This, in turn, could break cities dependency on fossil fuels.

You need to store when you are over-producing and release when you are under-producing, Prof. Bergen explained.

Waste-free

Nanotechnology also has the ability to make technology smaller, extend the life-cycle of electronics, improve manufacturing processes, all of which would mean less waste has to go to the landfill.

Speaking at one of the sessions, Joe Murphy, from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, an association in the UK dedicated to promoting waste as a resource, explained nanotechnologies may enable us to create a new material palette that allows future products to be recycled more easily.

At the moment we have a lot of barriers to recycling nanotechnology may enable us to do more, he said.

If you liked this article, please consider sharing it on social media.

More than 32 million people in the EU are employed in the manufacturing industry and 75% of EU exports are manufactured products. ButEurope’s position as an industrial powerhouse has been eroding in recent years and its leadership in many important sectors is constantly challenged.

Nanotechnology could reverse this trend by increasing the competitiveness of these different sectors, from energy and pharmaceuticals to electronics and textiles.

The European Commission aims to support nanotechnologies within aEUR 1.8 billionfund for 2018-2020, which will also support next-generation materials as well as biotechnology and newmanufacturing processes.

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Printed solar cells thinner than your hair could power your phone – Horizon magazine

Nanotechnology in the food industry: ‘plenty of room’ to innovate – New Food

article

Nanotechnology has been referred to as one of the most interesting topics in food science and technology. The use of food grade structures at nanoscale levels have been showing interesting features and has been proposed as a new way to not only improve safety and quality of foods, but also for the development of new and innovative food products with unique properties. It is predicted that the nanotechnology market focused on food industry will increase from 7 billion US dollars in 2015 to 20.4 billion US dollar in 20201. In this article, Miguel Cerqueira and Lorenzo Pastrana from the International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL) discuss this exciting field of innovation.

First of all, it is important to mention that the presence of nanostructures in food products are not new. One example are the casein micelles in milk, they have always existed in milk and are responsible for the high stability of lipids in milk at the nanoscale2. The nanoscale dimension of materials shows great advantages when compared with micro- and macroscale. The impact of the nanoscale (i.e. 100,000,000 lower than the meter; for example, a sheet of paper presents a thickness of approximately 100,000 nanometers)in materials and systems are related with their large surface area-to-volume ratio leading to enhanced surface area, distinct optical behaviour, chemical and kinetic stability, and low density versus high mechanical properties.

These advantages over micro- and macroscale lead to a high interest for use in the food industry which can bring several advantages such as improved solubility, bioavailability and sensorial behaviour can be used to prevent undesirable chemical reactions and protect functional compounds against chemical degradation, and avoid compatibility problems between ingredients and the food matrix. In the last few years the benefits of applying nanotechnology have been driving the development of new and high performance materials for the food sector and thus the applications at laboratorial but also on an industrial scale have exponentially increased. In the last two decades the number of publications and patents increased 40% and 90%, respectively3. These numbers show the potential and interest of researchers and companies of using nanotechnology in the food sector and the high potential of using nanotechnology-based products in several food processes and applications. Moreover, the number of companies focusing their research and development with nanotechnology-based productsare more than 1,000 a number that should grow in the next years1.

Nanotechnology offers a great number of opportunities to the agricultural and food industry, for instance the agricultural and primary production sector could benefit from the use of pesticides with improved action (e.g. use of nanoemulsions in their dispersion); animal feeds with enhanced efficacy and higher nutrition value (e.g. nanoencapsulation for proteins and amino acids protection during the ruminants digestion process); diagnostic of animal disease, or for the detection of pathogenics in water (e.g. smart sensor). In the food industry, mainly during the processing, formulation, packaging and shipping, nanotechnology offers many other potential benefits for consumers and manufacturers. Figure 1 shows some examples of how nanotechnology can be integrated into the food supply chain. In food processing the use of membranes with nanoporous and a high surface area can be selective in filtration processes during separation of compounds. The immobilisation of enzymes in nanosized systems can also enhance their efficiency, stability and reuse, and thus reduce the cost of the process. Other possible ways of using nanotechnology in food processing are: the use of nanoscale structures to obtain new textural properties in foods, using nanofibrillar and aggregated proteins, and by the crystallisation of molecules having the ability to entrap oils in their nanosized crystalline structures. This can help in the reduction of material needed, change the optical properties, and the control of rheological behaviour by influencing of temperature, pH and enzymes.

In food packaging the advantages of nanotechnology are clear and, alongside with processing packaging, it is one of the areas where nanotechnology is more mature. In this field nanotechnology has been used to improve the materials properties (improved barrier and mechanical properties, light materials), but also in the development of active and intelligent packaging systems. The use of nanoscaled particles with antimicrobials properties (e.g. zinc oxide and silver nanoparticles) have been used to extend shelf-life of foods reducing microbiological growth during storage4. This can be very helpful in foods with reduced shelf-life (e.g. fresh meat, poultry and fish) where the increase in shelf life can bring several advantages for the industry (i.e. shipping for export purposes).

Another great possibility for nanotechnology is in intelligent packaging. Intelligent food packaging can monitor and give indication of the quality of the packaged food and thus guarantee their safety, not only during storage and shipping for industry and retailers but also to the consumers. Some of the examples are the sensors-enabled RFID (radiofrequency identification) tags and indicators that have been using nanotechnology to inform about the quality or freshness of the packed food products. This same nanotechnology has been used in food safety. In fact, the entire food supply chain benefits from improvements in the detection and control of chemical and microbiological hazards, thus promoting food safety while eventually leading to an improved market value of the foods. Nowadays, several sensors based on chemical and biological detections have been developed to detect and measure the presence of volatiles (e.g. oxygen) and bacteria (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes). These sensors are based on nanotechnology-based devices able to measure low amounts of several compounds that can help control the quality and safety of food products at a fast pace5. One of the trends in the food industry is the possibility to establish personalised nutrition schemes with on-demand health requirements and allow consumers to safely choose food products based on their best interests. This is possible with the fortification and enrichment of food products where nanotechnology can have avery important role. The use of nanoencapsulation can be used to protect and deliver functional compounds, improving stability, bioavailability, and known systems. It is possible to nanoencapsulate several compounds, such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, and achieve better stability (decrease coalescence and effect of environmental conditions such as light and temperature), improve organoleptic properties (low infl uence of fl avour and colour) and increase bioavailability (high absorption in the human gut with controlled release) when compared with the existing systems6. Figure 2 shows nanoparticles produced by a nanospray drier and electrospray using proteins from milk whey that can be used for the encapsulation of several bioactive compounds.

The increasing number of publications and patents shows a substantial increase of possible applications of nanotechnology in food industry. While for some applications such as packaging and food processing it can be considered a reality, some other applications still require some progress. Some years ago, the study of food structure at nanoscale looked to be a utopia, but today thanks to the great advances in equipment, analysis software and new preparation techniques (e.g. cryo-transmission electronic microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering spectroscopy), researchers are able to evaluate the food structure and develop new nanoscale systems. The aspects that most intrigue the food industry are the regulatory aspects and the consumer behaviour facing the use of new technologies. The regulatory aspects of using nanotechnology in food industry are well defi ned, although some doubts still exist among the stakeholders regarding the defi nition of nanomaterials (i.e. soft and soluble nanomaterials that solubilise during consumption should be considered separate from insoluble inorganic materials) is clear that according to the application their use should be carefully considered. Regarding consumers behaviour, work is still needed to manage and change the way that consumers see the use of nanotechnology in their daily consumed foods. Scientific awareness should be promoted amongst stakeholders to reduce the risk perception associated with nanotechnology in foods, and in this aspect the role of governmental organisations, academia and industry is very important. They should work together to show the consumers the advantages and safety of using nanotechnology in food products in order to increase the acceptance of nanotechnology-based products.

1. Helmut Kaiser Consultancy. Study: Nanotechnology in Food and Food Processing Industry. 2008-2010-2015. http://www. hkc22.com/nanofood.html (accessed 21 April, 2017).

2. Martin G.J., Williams R.P., Dunstan D.E. Comparison of Casein Micelles in Raw and Reconstituted Skim Milk. J Dairy Sci. 90(10) (2007) 4543-4551.

3. Cerqueira, M.A., Pinheiro, A.C., Ramos, O.L., Silva, H., Bourbon, A.I. and Vicente, A.A. Advances in Food Nanotechnology, In Micro and Nano Technologies, Rosa Busquets (Ed), Elsevier, Boston, 2017, pp. 11-38, Emerging Nanotechnologies in Food Science, ISBN 9780323429801

4. Mihindukulasuriya, S.D.F. and Lim, L.T. Nanotechnology Development in Food Packaging: A review. Trends in Food Science & Technology 40 (2014) 149-167.

5. Vanderroost, M. Ragaert, P., Devlieghere, F. and De Meulenaer, B. Intelligent Food Packaging: The next Generation. Trends in Food Science & Technology. 39 (2014) 47-62.

6. Cerqueira, M.A., Pinheiro, A.C., Silva, H.D., Ramos, P.E., Azevedo, M.A., Flores-Lpez, M.L., Rivera, M.C., Bourbon, A.I., Ramos, O.L., Vicente, A.A. Design of Bio-nanosystems for Oral Delivery of Functional Compounds. Food Engineering Reviews. 6 (2014) 119.

MIGUEL CERQUEIRA is Research Fellow at the Food Processing group at International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL). Since 2010 he is focused on the development of nanostructures for food applications. He authored more than 70 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, books and patents. In 2014 he won the Young Scientist Award organised by the International Union of Food Science and Technology.

LORENZO PASTRANA is the Head of the Life Sciences Department at INL. Formerly, he was Professor of Food Science at the University of Vigo and Director of Knowledge Transfer at the same University. He has lead several international and national projects and a research contracts with industry. He has a wide expertise in food nano and biotechnology and has authored more than one hundred peer-reviewed publications, patents and book-chapters.

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Nanotechnology in the food industry: ‘plenty of room’ to innovate – New Food

Nanotechnology Medical Devices Industry Report 2017 to 2022 – Equity Insider (press release)

Global Nanotechnology Medical Devices Market tracks the major market events including product launches, technological developments, mergers & acquisitions, and the innovative business strategies opted by key market players. Along with strategically analyzing the key micro markets, the report also focuses on industry-specific drivers, restraints, opportunities and challenges in the Nanotechnology Medical Devices market. This research report offers in-depth analysis of the market size (revenue), market share, major market segments, and different geographic regions, forecast for the next five years, key market players, and premium industry trends. It also focuses on the key drivers, restraints, opportunities and challenges.

Top companies operating in the global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market profiled in the report are Stryker, 3M, Smith & Nephew, Mitsui Chemicals, Dentsply International, ST. Jude Medical, AAP Implantate, Perkinelmer, Affymetrix, Starkey Hearing Technologies.

This report segments the global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market on the basis of types, Active Implantable Devices, Biochips, Implantable Materials, Medical Textiles and Wound Dressings, Others. On the basis of application, the global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market is segmented into Therapeutic Applications, Diagnostic Applications, Research Applications. For comprehensive understanding of market dynamics, the global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market is analyzed across key geographies namely North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India. Each of these regions is analyzed on basis of market findings across major countries in these regions for a macro-level understanding of the market.

Inquire for sample at :

https://www.marketinsightsreports.com/reports/062012235/2017-global-nanotechnology-medical-devices-market-professional-survey-report/inquiry

There are 15 Chapters to deeply display the global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market.

Chapter 1, to describe Nanotechnology Medical Devices Introduction, product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force;

Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Nanotechnology Medical Devices, with sales, revenue, and price of Nanotechnology Medical Devices, in 2016and 2017;

Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2016and 2017;

Chapter 4, to show the global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Nanotechnology Medical Devices, for each region, from 2012to 2017;

Chapter 5, 6, 7,8and 9, to analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in these regions;

Chapter 10and 11, to show the market by type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2012 to 2017;

Chapter 12, Nanotechnology Medical Devices market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2017to 2022;

Chapter 13, 14 and 15, to describe Nanotechnology Medical Devices sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, Research Findings and Conclusion, appendix and data source.

Avail complete report of this Research with TOC and List of Figures at :

https://www.marketinsightsreports.com/reports/062012235/2017-global-nanotechnology-medical-devices-market-professional-survey-report

This report provides in-depth analysis of the Nanotechnology Medical Devices and provides market size (US$ Million) and Cumulative Annual Growth Rate (CAGR (%)) for the forecast period: 2017 2022, considering 2016 as the base year. It elucidates potential revenue opportunity across different segments and explains attractive investment proposition matrix for this market. This study also provides key insights about market drivers, restraints, opportunities, new product launches, approvals, regional outlook, and competitive strategies adopted by the leading players. It profiles leading players in the global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market based on the following parameters company overview, financial performance, product portfolio, geographical presence, distribution strategies, key developments and strategies and future plans Key companies covered as a part of this study include. Insights from this report would allow marketers and management authorities of companies to make informed decision with respect to their future product launches, market expansion, and marketing tactics. The global Nanotechnology Medical Devices market report caters to various stakeholders in this industry, including investors, device manufacturers, distributors and suppliers for Nanotechnology Medical Devices equipment, government organizations, research and consulting firms, new entrants, and financial analysts. Various strategy matrices used in analyzing the Nanotechnology Medical Devices market would provide stakeholders vital inputs to make strategic decisions accordingly.

The vast market research data included in the study is the result of extensive primary and secondary research activities. Surveys, personal interviews, and inputs from industry experts form the crux of primary research activities and data collected from trade journals, industry databases, and reputable paid sources form the basis of secondary research. The report also includes a detailed qualitative and quantitative analysis of the market, with the help of information collected from market participants operating across key sectors of the market value chain. A separate analysis of macro- and micro-economic aspects, regulations, and trends influencing the overall development of the market is also included in the report.

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Nanotechnology Medical Devices Industry Report 2017 to 2022 – Equity Insider (press release)

Emphasis on nanotechnology, pharmaceutical science, forensics, food safety and bioanalytical for Pittcon’s annual … – News-Medical.net

June 20, 2017

The Program Committee is pleased to announce the call for papers for the Pittcon 2018 Technical Program. Abstracts are currently being accepted for contributed oral and poster presentations in all areas of analytic chemistry and applied spectroscopy in applications such as, but not limited to, environmental science, food science, energy research, and informatics.

Pittcon has also developed an extensive program in the life sciences and is seeking contributions in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, bioinformatics, neurochemistry, high throughput screening, and drug discovery.

Technical Program Chairman, Annette Wilson, commented, “We have been working for the past several years to coordinate the entire program the Technical Program, Short Courses, and Conferee Networking in order to give our conferees their best educational and networking experience.”

She added, In addition to requesting papers in the core scientific areas, we are especially interested in submissions related to hot topics and emerging trends in bioanalytical, food safety, forensics, pharmaceutical and nano-technology.

All abstracts must be submitted electronically through the Pittcon website The submission deadline to be included in the first round of reviews is Monday, August 14, 2017. Abstracts received after this date will be placed on a waiting list.

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Emphasis on nanotechnology, pharmaceutical science, forensics, food safety and bioanalytical for Pittcon’s annual … – News-Medical.net

New Off-Grid Desalination NanoTechnology Uses Solar Energy to Convert Salt Water into Drinking Water – AZoNano

Written by AZoNanoJun 20 2017

An off-grid technology using only the energy from sunlight to transform salt water into fresh drinking water has been developed as an outcome of the effort from a federally funded research.

This scaled up test bed of NEWTs direct solar desalination technology uses carbon black nanoparticles that convert as much as 80 percent of sunlight energy into heat. Results from an earlier prototype showed the technology could produce as much as six liters of freshwater per hour per square meter of solar membrane. (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

The desalination system uses a combination of light-harvesting nanophotonics and membrane distillation technology and is considered to be the first major innovation from the Center for Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT), which is a multi-institutional engineering research center located at Rice University.

NEWTs nanophotonics-enabled solar membrane distillation technology (NESMD) integrates tried-and-true water treatment methods with cutting-edge nanotechnology capable of transforming sunlight to heat. The recent online issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences presents a description of this technology.

Over 18,000 desalination plants function in 150 countries, however NEWTs desalination technology is unlike any other that is currently being used.

Direct solar desalination could be a game changer for some of the estimated 1 billion people who lack access to clean drinking water. This off-grid technology is capable of providing sufficient clean water for family use in a compact footprint, and it can be scaled up to provide water for larger communities.

Qilin Li, a Corresponding Author, Rice Scientist and Water Treatment Expert

Distillation is considered to be the oldest method that has been used for producing freshwater from salt water. In this method, salt water is boiled and the steam is captured and made to run through a condensing coil. This distillation method has been used for centuries, however it needs complex infrastructure and is considered to be energy inefficient because of the amount of heat needed for boiling water and producing steam. More than half the cost of running a water distillation plant is used for energy.

An emerging technology for desalination is membrane distillation. In this method, hot salt water is made to flow across one side of a porous membrane and cold freshwater is made to flow across the other. Water vapor is naturally drawn through the membrane from the hot to the cold side, and the energy requirements are less than they would be for standard distillation since the seawater need not be boiled. However, the energy costs are still important since heat is constantly lost from the membranes hot side to the cold side.

Unlike traditional membrane distillation, NESMD benefits from increasing efficiency with scale. It requires minimal pumping energy for optimal distillate conversion, and there are a number of ways we can further optimize the technology to make it more productive and efficient.

Naomi Halas, a Corresponding Author on the paper and the Leader of NEWTs Nanophotonics Research

The new technology developed by NEWT builds upon research performed in Halas lab in order to produce engineered nanoparticles capable of harvesting as much as 80% of sunlight to generate steam. NEWT added commercially available, low-cost nanoparticles to a porous membrane in order to significantly change the membrane itself into a one-sided heating element that is capable of heating the water all by itself in order to drive membrane distillation.

The integration of photothermal heating capabilities within a water purification membrane for direct, solar-driven desalination opens new opportunities in water purification, said Yale University’s Menachem Meny Elimelech, a Co-Author of the new study and NEWTs Lead Researcher for membrane processes.

In the PNAS study, Researchers provided proof-of-concept results based on the tests conducted with an NESMD chamber just a few millimeters thick and about the size of three postage stamps. A custom designed top layer of carbon black nanoparticles infused into a porous polymer was present in the distillation membrane in the chamber. The light-capturing nanoparticles heated the complete surface of the membrane when exposed to sunlight. A cool freshwater stream flowed below, and a thin half-millimeter-thick layer of salt water flowed on the top of the carbon-black layer.

Li, the leader of NEWTs advanced treatment test beds at Rice, stated that the water production rate significantly increased by concentrating the sunlight. The intensity got up 17.5 kilowatts per meter squared when a lens was used to concentrate sunlight by 25 times, and the water production increased to about 6 liters per meter squared per hour.

Li said NEWTs research team has earlier developed a much bigger system comprising of a panel that is about 70 cm by 25 cm. She stated that NEWT ultimately hopes to develop a modular system where users will be able to order as many panels as they require based on their daily water requirements.

You could assemble these together, just as you would the panels in a solar farm. Depending on the water production rate you need, you could calculate how much membrane area you would need. For example, if you need 20 liters per hour, and the panels produce 6 liters per hour per square meter, you would order a little over 3 square meters of panels.

Qilin Li, a Corresponding Author, Rice Scientist and Water Treatment Expert

NEWT, established by the National Science Foundation in 2015, focuses on developing mobile, compact, off-grid water-treatment systems capable of providing clean water to millions of people who do not have it and making U.S. energy production more cost-effective and sustainable. Over the next decade, NEWT is expected to leverage over $40 million in industrial and federal support and is considered to be the first NSF Engineering Research Center (ERC) in Houston and just the third in Texas since the ERC program was started by NSF in 1985. NEWT concentrates on applications for rural water systems, humanitarian emergency response and wastewater treatment and reuse at remote locations, including both offshore and onshore drilling platforms for gas and oil exploration.

Li is Rices Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Materials Science and Nanoengineering. Halas is Rices Stanley C. Moore Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Professor of Chemistry, Bioengineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Materials Science and Nanoengineering. Elimelech is Yales Roberto C. Goizueta Professor of Environmental and Chemical Engineering.

Additional study Co-Authors include Pratiksha Dongare, Alessandro Alabastri, Seth Pedersen, Katherine Zodrow, Nathaniel Hogan, Oara Neumann, Jinjian Wu, Tianxiao Wang and Peter Nordlander, all of Rice, and Akshay Deshmukh of Yale University.

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New Off-Grid Desalination NanoTechnology Uses Solar Energy to Convert Salt Water into Drinking Water – AZoNano

Global Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials Market Report 2017 … – GlobeNewswire (press release)

June 19, 2017 07:04 ET | Source: Research and Markets

Dublin, June 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “The Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027” report to their offering.

“The Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027”, at over 1000 pages long, is the most comprehensive assessment of the opportunities afforded by these remarkable technologies and materials.

We are facing unprecedented global challenges such as the depletion of natural resources and climate change, pollution, scarcity of clean water, providing food and energy to a growing world population and poverty. These problems are directly linked to current technologies for producing energy and manufacturing products.

The exploitation of nanotechnology and nanomaterials is the key development that can significantly address these global problems by changing both the products and the means of their production and addressing pressing market needs in security, communications and electronics.

Contents include:

Key Topics Covered:

1 Research Methodology 1.1 Nanomaterials Market Rating System 1.2 Commercial Nanotechnology Impact Rating System 1.3 Market Challenges Rating System

2 Introduction 2.1 Aims and objectives of the study 2.2 Market definition 2.3 Categorization

3 Executive Summary

4 Nanomaterials Regulations 4.1 Europe 4.2 United States 4.3 Asia

5 Global Funding And Policy 5.1 United States 5.2 Japan 5.3 China 5.4 South Korea 5.5 Taiwan 5.6 Germany 5.7 European Union

6 Patenting

7 The Global Market For Nanomaterials 7.1 Aluminium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.2 Antimony Tin Oxide Nanoparticles 7.3 Bismuth Oxide Nanoparticles 7.4 Carbon Nanotubes 7.5 Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.6 Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles 7.7 Copper Oxide Nanoparticles 7.8 Dendrimers 7.9 Fullerenes 7.10 Gold Nanoparticles 7.11 Graphene 7.12 Iron Oxide Nanoparticles 7.13 Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.14 Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles 7.15 Nanocellulose 7.16 Nanoclays 7.17 Nanodiamonds 7.18 Nanofibers 7.19 Nanosilver 7.20 Nanowires 7.21 Nickel Nanoparticles 7.22 Quantum Dots 7.23 Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles 7.24 Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles 7.25 Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles 7.26 Zirconium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.27 Other Nanomaterials 7.28 Other 2D Materials

8 Markets For Nanomaterials 8.1 Adhesives 8.2 Aerospace And Aviation 8.3 Automotive 8.4 Batteries 8.5 Biomedicine And Healthcare 8.6 Composites 8.7 Construction, Building Protection And Architectural Exterior Coatings 8.8 Cosmetics And Sunscreens 8.9 Electronics And Photonics 8.10 Filtration And Environmental Remediation 8.11 Food And Agriculture 8.12 Fuel Cells And Hydrogen Storage 8.13 Household Care And Sanitary 8.14 Lighting And UVC 8.15 Lubricants 8.16 Marine 8.17 Oil & Gas Exploration 8.18 Packaging 8.19 Security And Defence 8.20 Sensors 8.21 Solar 8.22 Supercapacitors 8.23 Textiles & Apparel 8.24 Tools & Manufacturing 8.25 3D Printing 8.26 Other Markets

9 References

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/j7w6pj/the_global_market

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Global Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials Market Report 2017 … – GlobeNewswire (press release)

Impact of nanotechnology – Wikipedia

The impact of nanotechnology extends from its medical, ethical, mental, legal and environmental applications, to fields such as engineering, biology, chemistry, computing, materials science, and communications.

Major benefits of nanotechnology include improved manufacturing methods, water purification systems, energy systems, physical enhancement, nanomedicine, better food production methods, nutrition and large-scale infrastructure auto-fabrication.[1] Nanotechnology’s reduced size may allow for automation of tasks which were previously inaccessible due to physical restrictions, which in turn may reduce labor, land, or maintenance requirements placed on humans.

Potential risks include environmental, health, and safety issues; transitional effects such as displacement of traditional industries as the products of nanotechnology become dominant, which are of concern to privacy rights advocates. These may be particularly important if potential negative effects of nanoparticles are overlooked.

Whether nanotechnology merits special government regulation is a controversial issue. Regulatory bodies such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Health and Consumer Protection Directorate of the European Commission have started dealing with the potential risks of nanoparticles. The organic food sector has been the first to act with the regulated exclusion of engineered nanoparticles from certified organic produce, firstly in Australia and the UK,[2] and more recently in Canada, as well as for all food certified to Demeter International standards[3]

The presence of nanomaterials (materials that contain nanoparticles) is not in itself a threat. It is only certain aspects that can make them risky, in particular their mobility and their increased reactivity. Only if certain properties of certain nanoparticles were harmful to living beings or the environment would we be faced with a genuine hazard. In this case it can be called nanopollution.

In addressing the health and environmental impact of nanomaterials we need to differentiate between two types of nanostructures: (1) Nanocomposites, nanostructured surfaces and nanocomponents (electronic, optical, sensors etc.), where nanoscale particles are incorporated into a substance, material or device (fixed nano-particles); and (2) free nanoparticles, where at some stage in production or use individual nanoparticles of a substance are present. These free nanoparticles could be nanoscale species of elements, or simple compounds, but also complex compounds where for instance a nanoparticle of a particular element is coated with another substance (coated nanoparticle or core-shell nanoparticle).

There seems to be consensus that, although one should be aware of materials containing fixed nanoparticles, the immediate concern is with free nanoparticles.

Nanoparticles are very different from their everyday counterparts, so their adverse effects cannot be derived from the known toxicity of the macro-sized material. This poses significant issues for addressing the health and environmental impact of free nanoparticles.

To complicate things further, in talking about nanoparticles it is important that a powder or liquid containing nanoparticles almost never be monodisperse, but contain instead a range of particle sizes. This complicates the experimental analysis as larger nanoparticles might have different properties from smaller ones. Also, nanoparticles show a tendency to aggregate, and such aggregates often behave differently from individual nanoparticles.

The health impacts of nanotechnology are the possible effects that the use of nanotechnological materials and devices will have on human health. As nanotechnology is an emerging field, there is great debate regarding to what extent nanotechnology will benefit or pose risks for human health. Nanotechnology’s health impacts can be split into two aspects: the potential for nanotechnological innovations to have medical applications to cure disease, and the potential health hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials.

Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology.[4] The approaches to nanomedicine range from the medical use of nanomaterials, to nanoelectronic biosensors, and even possible future applications of molecular nanotechnology. Nanomedicine seeks to deliver a valuable set of research tools and clinically helpful devices in the near future.[5][6] The National Nanotechnology Initiative expects new commercial applications in the pharmaceutical industry that may include advanced drug delivery systems, new therapies, and in vivo imaging.[7] Neuro-electronic interfaces and other nanoelectronics-based sensors are another active goal of research. Further down the line, the speculative field of molecular nanotechnology believes that cell repair machines could revolutionize medicine and the medical field.

Nanomedicine research is directly funded, with the US National Institutes of Health in 2005 funding a five-year plan to set up four nanomedicine centers. In April 2006, the journal Nature Materials estimated that 130 nanotech-based drugs and delivery systems were being developed worldwide.[8] Nanomedicine is a large industry, with nanomedicine sales reaching $6.8 billion in 2004. With over 200 companies and 38 products worldwide, a minimum of $3.8 billion in nanotechnology R&D is being invested every year.[9] As the nanomedicine industry continues to grow, it is expected to have a significant impact on the economy.

Nanotoxicology is the field which studies potential health risks of nanomaterials. The extremely small size of nanomaterials means that they are much more readily taken up by the human body than larger sized particles. How these nanoparticles behave inside the organism is one of the significant issues that needs to be resolved. The behavior of nanoparticles is a function of their size, shape and surface reactivity with the surrounding tissue. Apart from what happens if non-degradable or slowly degradable nanoparticles accumulate in organs, another concern is their potential interaction with biological processes inside the body: because of their large surface, nanoparticles on exposure to tissue and fluids will immediately adsorb onto their surface some of the macromolecules they encounter. The large number of variables influencing toxicity means that it is difficult to generalise about health risks associated with exposure to nanomaterials each new nanomaterial must be assessed individually and all material properties must be taken into account. Health and environmental issues combine in the workplace of companies engaged in producing or using nanomaterials and in the laboratories engaged in nanoscience and nanotechnology research. It is safe to say that current workplace exposure standards for dusts cannot be applied directly to nanoparticle dusts.

The extremely small size of nanomaterials also means that they are much more readily taken up by the human body than larger sized particles. How these nanoparticles behave inside the body is one of the issues that needs to be resolved. The behavior of nanoparticles is a function of their size, shape and surface reactivity with the surrounding tissue. They could cause overload on phagocytes, cells that ingest and destroy foreign matter, thereby triggering stress reactions that lead to inflammation and weaken the bodys defense against other pathogens. Apart from what happens if non-degradable or slowly degradable nanoparticles accumulate in organs, another concern is their potential interaction with biological processes inside the body: because of their large surface, nanoparticles on exposure to tissue and fluids will immediately adsorb onto their surface some of the macromolecules they encounter. This may, for instance, affect the regulatory mechanisms of enzymes and other proteins.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted initial research on how nanoparticles interact with the bodys systems and how workers might be exposed to nano-sized particles in the manufacturing or industrial use of nanomaterials. NIOSH currently offers interim guidelines for working with nanomaterials consistent with the best scientific knowledge.[10] At The National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory of NIOSH, studies investigating the filter penetration of nanoparticles on NIOSH-certified and EU marked respirators, as well as non-certified dust masks have been conducted.[11] These studies found that the most penetrating particle size range was between 30 and 100 nanometers, and leak size was the largest factor in the number of nanoparticles found inside the respirators of the test dummies.[12][13]

Other properties of nanomaterials that influence toxicity include: chemical composition, shape, surface structure, surface charge, aggregation and solubility,[14] and the presence or absence of functional groups of other chemicals.[15] The large number of variables influencing toxicity means that it is difficult to generalise about health risks associated with exposure to nanomaterials each new nanomaterial must be assessed individually and all material properties must be taken into account.

Literature reviews have been showing that release of engineered nanoparticles and incurred personal exposure can happen during different work activities.[16][17][18] The situation alerts regulatory bodies to necessitate prevention strategies and regulations at nanotechnology workplaces.

The environmental impact of nanotechnology is the possible effects that the use of nanotechnological materials and devices will have on the environment.[19] As nanotechnology is an emerging field, there is debate regarding to what extent industrial and commercial use of nanomaterials will affect organisms and ecosystems.

Nanotechnology’s environmental impact can be split into two aspects: the potential for nanotechnological innovations to help improve the environment, and the possibly novel type of pollution that nanotechnological materials might cause if released into the environment.

Green nanotechnology refers to the use of nanotechnology to enhance the environmental sustainability of processes producing negative externalities. It also refers to the use of the products of nanotechnology to enhance sustainability. It includes making green nano-products and using nano-products in support of sustainability. Green nanotechnology has been described as the development of clean technologies, “to minimize potential environmental and human health risks associated with the manufacture and use of nanotechnology products, and to encourage replacement of existing products with new nano-products that are more environmentally friendly throughout their lifecycle.”[20]

Green nanotechnology has two goals: producing nanomaterials and products without harming the environment or human health, and producing nano-products that provide solutions to environmental problems. It uses existing principles of green chemistry and green engineering[21] to make nanomaterials and nano-products without toxic ingredients, at low temperatures using less energy and renewable inputs wherever possible, and using lifecycle thinking in all design and engineering stages.

Nanopollution is a generic name for all waste generated by nanodevices or during the nanomaterials manufacturing process. Nanowaste is mainly the group of particles that are released into the environment, or the particles that are thrown away when still on their products.

Beyond the toxicity risks to human health and the environment which are associated with first-generation nanomaterials, nanotechnology has broader societal impact and poses broader social challenges. Social scientists have suggested that nanotechnology’s social issues should be understood and assessed not simply as “downstream” risks or impacts. Rather, the challenges should be factored into “upstream” research and decision-making in order to ensure technology development that meets social objectives[22]

Many social scientists and organizations in civil society suggest that technology assessment and governance should also involve public participation[23][24][25][26]

Over 800 nano-related patents were granted in 2003, with numbers increasing to nearly 19,000 internationally by 2012.[27] Corporations are already taking out broad-ranging patents on nanoscale discoveries and inventions. For example, two corporations, NEC and IBM, hold the basic patents on carbon nanotubes, one of the current cornerstones of nanotechnology. Carbon nanotubes have a wide range of uses, and look set to become crucial to several industries from electronics and computers, to strengthened materials to drug delivery and diagnostics. Carbon nanotubes are poised to become a major traded commodity with the potential to replace major conventional raw materials.[28]

Nanotechnologies may provide new solutions for the millions of people in developing countries who lack access to basic services, such as safe water, reliable energy, health care, and education. The 2004 UN Task Force on Science, Technology and Innovation noted that some of the advantages of nanotechnology include production using little labor, land, or maintenance, high productivity, low cost, and modest requirements for materials and energy. However, concerns are frequently raised that the claimed benefits of nanotechnology will not be evenly distributed, and that any benefits (including technical and/or economic) associated with nanotechnology will only reach affluent nations.[29]

Longer-term concerns center on the impact that new technologies will have for society at large, and whether these could possibly lead to either a post-scarcity economy, or alternatively exacerbate the wealth gap between developed and developing nations. The effects of nanotechnology on the society as a whole, on human health and the environment, on trade, on security, on food systems and even on the definition of “human”, have not been characterized or politicized.

Significant debate exists relating to the question of whether nanotechnology or nanotechnology-based products merit special government regulation. This debate is related to the circumstances in which it is necessary and appropriate to assess new substances prior to their release into the market, community and environment.

Regulatory bodies such as the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S. or the Health & Consumer Protection Directorate of the European Commission have started dealing with the potential risks posed by nanoparticles. So far, neither engineered nanoparticles nor the products and materials that contain them are subject to any special regulation regarding production, handling or labelling. The Material Safety Data Sheet that must be issued for some materials often does not differentiate between bulk and nanoscale size of the material in question and even when it does these MSDS are advisory only.

Limited nanotechnology labeling and regulation may exacerbate potential human and environmental health and safety issues associated with nanotechnology.[30] It has been argued that the development of comprehensive regulation of nanotechnology will be vital to ensure that the potential risks associated with the research and commercial application of nanotechnology do not overshadow its potential benefits.[31] Regulation may also be required to meet community expectations about responsible development of nanotechnology, as well as ensuring that public interests are included in shaping the development of nanotechnology.[32]

In “The Consumer Product Safety Commission and Nanotechnology,” E. Marla Felcher suggests that the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which is charged with protecting the public against unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with consumer products, is ill-equipped to oversee the safety of complex, high-tech products made using nanotechnology.[33]

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Impact of nanotechnology – Wikipedia

Global Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials Market, 2027 – Applications, Producers, Product Developers and Products … – PR Newswire (press release)

“The Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027” is the most comprehensive assessment of the opportunities afforded by these remarkable technologies and materials.

We are facing unprecedented global challenges such as the depletion of natural resources and climate change, pollution, scarcity of clean water, providing food and energy to a growing world population and poverty. These problems are directly linked to current technologies for producing energy and manufacturing products.

The exploitation of nanotechnology and nanomaterials is the key development that can significantly address these global problems by changing both the products and the means of their production and addressing pressing market needs in security, communications and electronics.

Contents include:

Key Topics Covered:

1 Research Methodology 1.1 Nanomaterials Market Rating System 1.2 Commercial Nanotechnology Impact Rating System 1.3 Market Challenges Rating System

2 Introduction 2.1 Aims and objectives of the study 2.2 Market definition 2.3 Categorization

3 Executive Summary

4 Nanomaterials Regulations 4.1 Europe 4.2 United States 4.3 Asia

5 Global Funding And Policy 5.1 United States 5.2 Japan 5.3 China 5.4 South Korea 5.5 Taiwan 5.6 Germany 5.7 European Union

6 Patenting

7 The Global Market For Nanomaterials 7.1 Aluminium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.2 Antimony Tin Oxide Nanoparticles 7.3 Bismuth Oxide Nanoparticles 7.4 Carbon Nanotubes 7.5 Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.6 Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles 7.7 Copper Oxide Nanoparticles 7.8 Dendrimers 7.9 Fullerenes 7.10 Gold Nanoparticles 7.11 Graphene 7.12 Iron Oxide Nanoparticles 7.13 Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.14 Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles 7.15 Nanocellulose 7.16 Nanoclays 7.17 Nanodiamonds 7.18 Nanofibers 7.19 Nanosilver 7.20 Nanowires 7.21 Nickel Nanoparticles 7.22 Quantum Dots 7.23 Silicon Oxide Nanoparticles 7.24 Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles 7.25 Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles 7.26 Zirconium Oxide Nanoparticles 7.27 Other Nanomaterials 7.28 Other 2D Materials

8 Markets For Nanomaterials 8.1 Adhesives 8.2 Aerospace And Aviation 8.3 Automotive 8.4 Batteries 8.5 Biomedicine And Healthcare 8.6 Composites 8.7 Construction, Building Protection And Architectural Exterior Coatings 8.8 Cosmetics And Sunscreens 8.9 Electronics And Photonics 8.10 Filtration And Environmental Remediation 8.11 Food And Agriculture 8.12 Fuel Cells And Hydrogen Storage 8.13 Household Care And Sanitary 8.14 Lighting And UVC 8.15 Lubricants 8.16 Marine 8.17 Oil & Gas Exploration 8.18 Packaging 8.19 Security And Defence 8.20 Sensors 8.21 Solar 8.22 Supercapacitors 8.23 Textiles & Apparel 8.24 Tools & Manufacturing 8.25 3D Printing 8.26 Other Markets

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/3ztpgq/the_global_market

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Global Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials Market, 2027 – Applications, Producers, Product Developers and Products … – PR Newswire (press release)

Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027 – Research and Markets – Business Wire (press release)

DUBLIN–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Research and Markets has announced the addition of the “The Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027” report to their offering.

“The Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027” is the most comprehensive assessment of the opportunities afforded by these remarkable technologies and materials.

We are facing unprecedented global challenges such as the depletion of natural resources and climate change, pollution, scarcity of clean water, providing food and energy to a growing world population and poverty. These problems are directly linked to current technologies for producing energy and manufacturing products.

The exploitation of nanotechnology and nanomaterials is the key development that can significantly address these global problems by changing both the products and the means of their production and addressing pressing market needs in security, communications and electronics.

Contents include:

Key Topics Covered:

1 Research Methodology

2 Introduction

3 Executive Summary

4 Nanomaterials Regulations

5 Global Funding And Policy

6 Patenting

7 The Global Market For Nanomaterials

8 Markets For Nanomaterials

9 References

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/qzp3vs/the_global_market

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Global Market for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials 2010-2027 – Research and Markets – Business Wire (press release)

New blood test uses nanotechnology to predict prostate cancer – Drug Target Review

news

A new diagnostic will allow men to bypass painful biopsies to test for aggressive prostate cancer.

The test, developed by Alberta scientists, incorporates a unique nanotechnology platform to make the diagnostic using only a single drop of blood, and is significantly more accurate than current screening methods.

The Extracellular Vesicle Fingerprint Predictive Score (EV-FPS) test uses machine learning to combine information from millions of cancer cell nanoparticles in the blood to recognise the unique fingerprint of aggressive prostate cancer.

The diagnostic, developed by members of the Alberta Prostate Cancer Research Initiative (APCaRI), was evaluated in a group of 377 Albertan men who were referred to their urologist with suspected prostate cancer. It was found that EV-FPS correctly identified men with aggressive prostate cancer 40% more accurately than the most common test Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test in wide use today.

Higher sensitivity means that our test will miss fewer aggressive cancers, said John Lewis, the Alberta Cancer Foundations Frank and Carla Sojonky Chair of Prostate Cancer Research at the University of Alberta. For this kind of test you want the sensitivity to be as high as possible because you dont want to miss a single cancer that should be treated.

According to the team, current tests such as the PSA and digital rectal exam (DRE) often lead to unneeded biopsies. Lewis says more than 50 per cent of men who undergo biopsy do not have prostate cancer, yet suffer the pain and side effects of the procedure such as infection or sepsis. Less than 20% of men who receive a prostate biopsy are diagnosed with the aggressive form of prostate cancer that could most benefit from treatment.

Its estimated that successful implementation of the EV-FPS test could eventually eliminate up to 600-thousand unnecessary biopsies, 24-thousand hospitalisations and up to 50% of unnecessary treatments for prostate cancer each year in North America alone. Beyond cost savings to the health care system, the researchers say the diagnostic test will have a dramatic impact on the health care experience and quality of life for men and their families.

Compared to elevated total PSA alone, the EV-FPS test can more accurately predict the result of prostate biopsy in previously unscreened men, said Adrian Fairey, urologist at the Northern Alberta Urology Centre and member of APCaRI. This information can be used by clinicians to determine which men should be advised to undergo immediate prostate biopsy and which men should be advised to defer biopsy and continue prostate cancer screening.

The team plans to bring the test to market through university spin-off company Nanostics Inc, which was founded by John Lewis, Catalina Vasquez, Desmond Pink and Robert Paproski.

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New blood test uses nanotechnology to predict prostate cancer – Drug Target Review

Nanotechnology | Definition of Nanotechnology by Merriam …

Nanotechnology, or nanotech for short, deals with matter at a level that most of us find hard to imagine, since it involves objects with dimensions of 100 billionths of a meter (1/800th of the thickness of a human hair) or less. The chemical and physical properties of materials often change greatly at this scale. Nanotechnology is already being used in automobile tires, land-mine detectors, and computer disk drives. Nanomedicine is a particularly exciting field: Imagine particles the size of a blood cell that could be released into the bloodstream to form into tiny robots and attack cancer cells, or “machines” the size of a molecule that could actually repair the damaged interiors of individual cells.

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Nanotechnology | Definition of Nanotechnology by Merriam …

New Nanotechnology-Based Blood Test for Predicting Prostate … – AZoNano

Written by AZoNanoJun 12 2017

Alberta Scientists have developed a new diagnostic that will allow men to avoid painful biopsies to check for aggressive prostate cancer. The test includes a unique nanotechnology system to make the diagnostic using just a single drop of blood, and is considerably more accurate than existing screening techniques.

University of Alberta prostate cancer researcher Dr. John Lewis, left, works with graduate student Srijan Raha. (CREDIT – University of Alberta)

The Extracellular Vesicle Fingerprint Predictive Score (EV-FPS) test applies machine learning to incorporate information from millions of cancer cell nanoparticles in the blood to identify the unique fingerprint of aggressive prostate cancer. The diagnostic, developed by members of the Alberta Prostate Cancer Research Initiative (APCaRI), was tested on a group of 377 Albertan men who were referred to their urologist with suspected prostate cancer. It was discovered that EV-FPS precisely identified men with aggressive prostate cancer 40% more accurately than the most common test used today – Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test.

Higher sensitivity means that our test will miss fewer aggressive cancers. For this kind of test you want the sensitivity to be as high as possible because you don’t want to miss a single cancer that should be treated.

John Lewis, the Alberta Cancer Foundation’s Frank and Carla Sojonky Chair of Prostate Cancer Research, The University of Alberta

According to the team, existing tests such as the PSA and digital rectal exam (DRE) frequently lead to unnecessary biopsies. Lewis says over 50% of men who undergo a biopsy do not have prostate cancer, yet have to go through the pain and side effects of the procedure such as sepsis or infection. Below 20% of men who undergo a prostate biopsy are diagnosed with the aggressive form of prostate cancer that could highly benefit from treatment.

It is projected that effective implementation of the EV-FPS test could ultimately eliminate up to 600 thousand needless biopsies, 24 thousand hospitalizations and up to 50 % of avoidable treatments for prostate cancer annually in North America alone. Besides cost savings to the health care system, the Researchers say the diagnostic test will have a great impact on the health care experience and quality of life for men and their families.

Compared to elevated total PSA alone, the EV-FPS test can more accurately predict the result of prostate biopsy in previously unscreened men. This information can be used by clinicians to determine which men should be advised to undergo immediate prostate biopsy and which men should be advised to defer biopsy and continue prostate cancer screening.

Adrian Fairey, Urologist, The Northern Alberta Urology Centre and Member of APCaRI

The team will be launching the test into market through university spin-off company Nanostics Inc, which was founded by John Lewis, Desmond Pink, Catalina Vasquez and Robert Paproski.

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New Nanotechnology-Based Blood Test for Predicting Prostate … – AZoNano

Driven by the environment – Nature.com

Nature Nanotechnology | Research Highlights

Nature Nanotechnology | Research Highlights

Nature Nanotechnology | Research Highlights

Nitrogenvacancy centres

Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 167204 (2017)

The coherent control of a spin qubit state and its time evolution between two quantum levels is usually achieved by the application of an external a.c. magnetic field whose frequency matches the separation between the energy levels resonantly. Simultaneously, local fluctuations induced by the

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Driven by the environment – Nature.com

Russian nanotechnology official arrested for fraud – ABC News – ABC News

A top official for the Russian government’s nanotechnology promotion arm has been detained on fraud charges.

The state Investigative Committee announced the arrest of Andrei Gorkov on Saturday. He is the managing director for investment of Rusnano, a state company that invests in nanotechnology projects. Rusnano has been touted by the government as important to making Russian industry more innovative.

The investigative committee said Gorkov placed Rusnano funds in a bank whose license was revoked in 2014 .The deposits were claimed to be used for settlements, but financed the bank’s activities.

The committee estimated the loss to Rusnano at more than 700 million rubles ($12 million).

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Russian nanotechnology official arrested for fraud – ABC News – ABC News

Nanotechnology Reveals Hidden Depths of Bacterial ‘Machines’ – Controlled Environments Magazine

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Nanoscale, has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis.

Cyanobacteria are a phylum of bacteria that produce oxygen and energy during photosynthesis, similar to green plants. They are among the most abundant organisms in oceans and fresh water. Unique internal ‘machines’ in cyanobacteria, called carboxysomes, allow the organisms to convert carbon dioxide to sugar and provide impacts on global biomass production and our environment.

Carboxysomes are nanoscale polyhedral structures that are made of several types of proteins and enzymes. So far, little is known about how these ‘machines’ are constructed and maintain their organisation to perform carbon fixation activity.

Researchers from the University’s Institute of Integrative Biology, led by Royal Society University Research Fellow Dr. Luning Liu, examined in depth the native structure and mechanical stiffness of carboxysomes using advanced microscopes and biochemical approaches.

For the first time, the researchers were able to biochemically purify active carboxysomes from cyanobacteria and characterize their carbon fixation activity and protein composition. They then used electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to visualise the morphology and internal protein organization of these bacterial machines.

Furthermore, the intrinsic mechanical properties of the three-dimensional structures were determined for the first time. Though structurally resembling polyhedral viruses, carboxysomes were revealed to be much softer and structurally flexible, which is correlated to their formation dynamics and regulation in bacteria.

Liu, said: “It’s exciting that we can make the first ‘contact’ with these nano-structures and understand how they are self-organised and shaped using state-of-the-art techniques available at the University. Our findings provide new clues about the relationship between the structure and functionality of native carboxysomes.”

The self-assembly and modularity features of carboxysomes make them interesting systems for nanoscientists, synthetic biologists and bioengineers, who hope to find ways to design new nanomaterials and nano-bioreactors.

“We’re now just starting to understand how these bacterial machines are built and work in nature. Our long-term vision is to harness the knowledge to make further steps towards better design and engineering of bio-inspired machines,” added Liu, “The knowledge and techniques can be extended to other biological machines.”

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Nanotechnology Reveals Hidden Depths of Bacterial ‘Machines’ – Controlled Environments Magazine

Here is what you need to know about nanotechnology – Born2Invest

The size of a nanometer is approximately one one-millionth of a millimeter, and thats the scale at which nanotechnology is slowly starting a revolution.

Nanotechnology represents the manipulation of matter on an atomic molecular and supermolecular scale. The size of a nanometer is approximately one one-millionth of a millimeter, and thats the scale at which nanotechnology is slowly starting a revolution.

Have you ever wanted to know more about this extraordinary and emerging technology? Here are some of the revolutionary facts about nanotechnology that might interest you:

First the good news: nanomaterials have already been proven to be very effective at cleaning soil, water, and to some extent the air, and theres still more work to be done particularly in the field of green energy. The bad news: like all new ventures we dont know the long-term health impact of nanotechnologies. Nanoparticles are just so tiny that there is a potential for them to accumulate in plants and microorganisms, so nobody is sure yet what breathing in a lung full of nanoscopic particles would do to our health.

We are all familiar with 3D printers, but personal nano factories will be far more advanced. Theoretically, as soon as we can build one fabricatora nanomachine that assembles individual molecules into useful shapesthat fabricator could build more of itself and they could assemble themselves into larger and larger machines. Nanotech theorists think that these machines could build computer processors so small and efficient that laptops could house literally billions of CPUs, making them exponentially more powerful than todays computers.

This nanotech revolution is starting to sound like a paradise, but if we can build all the non-edible consumer goods we need, and nano factories enable massive gains and efficiency in every sector of society, then just what will we do for work? Granted, economies have restructured with the advent of new technologies before. But couple that level of unrest with nano factories ability to manufacture extremely powerful and complex robotic weapons, and the nanotech revolution suddenly becomes a nightmare.

According to some experts, nanotechnology will completely disrupt the economy. (Source)

Its hard to argue against technologies that will prolong human life, and this is probably the most exciting area of nanotechnology. The holy grail of nanomedicine is nanobots that swim through your bloodstream patrolling for tumors, arterial clogs, or other dangerous abnormalities. Those things are still a long way away, but in the meantime, scientists are using nanoparticles in multiple ways like targeted delivery vehicles for cancer medications. Scientists from MIT recently proved that its possible to insert nano factories into the body to manufacture drugs on demand at specific sites. Who knows, in the future, curing cancer could be as simple as getting a shot.

SEE ALSO From Underwear Nightmare to Promising Enterprise

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Here is what you need to know about nanotechnology – Born2Invest

Nanotechnology Helps Expose Workings of Bacterial ‘Machines’ – AZoNano

Written by AZoNanoJun 9 2017

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have probed the structure and material properties of protein mechanisms in bacteria, which have the ability to change carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis. Details of this research have been published in the journal Nanoscale.

This is an illustration of a carboxysome. (Credit: Dr Luning Liu, University of Liverpool)

Cyanobacteria are a phylum of bacteria that yield energy and oxygen during photosynthesis, akin to green plants. They are among the most plentiful organisms in fresh water and oceans. Unique internal machines in cyanobacteria, known as carboxysomes allow the organisms to transform carbon dioxide to sugar and provide impacts on universal biomass production and the environment.

Carboxysomes are nanoscale polyhedral structures that are made up of different types of enzymes and proteins. So far, little is known about these ‘machines’ that are constructed and maintain their organization to perform carbon fixation activity.

Structure in nature

A team of Researchers from the Universitys Institute of Integrative Biology, led by Royal Society University Research Fellow Dr Luning Liu, examined in depth the native structure and mechanical stiffness of carboxysomes using advanced microscopes and biochemical techniques.

For the first time, the Researchers were successful in biochemically purifying active carboxysomes from cyanobacteria and characterizing their carbon fixation activity and protein composition. They then used atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy to visualize the morphology and internal protein organization of these bacterial machines.

Moreover, the complex mechanical properties of the 3D structures were established for the first time. Though structurally close to polyhedral viruses, carboxysomes were discovered to be a lot softer and structurally flexible, which is associated to their formation dynamics and regulation in bacteria.

Its exciting that we can make the first contact with these nano-structures and understand how they are self-organised and shaped using state-of-the-art techniques available at the University. Our findings provide new clues about the relationship between the structure and functionality of native carboxysomes.

Dr Luning Liu, Research Fellow, Royal Society University

Nanomaterial engineering

The self-assembly and modularity characteristics of carboxysomes make them fascinating systems for Nanoscientists, Bioengineers, and Synthetic Biologists, who aim to discover ways to design new nano-bioreactors and nanomaterials.

Were now just starting to understand how these bacterial machines are built and work in nature. Our long-term vision is to harness the knowledge to make further steps towards better design and engineering of bio-inspired machines. The knowledge and techniques can be extended to other biological machines.

Dr Luning Liu, Research Fellow, Royal Society University

The project was conducted in partnership with Professor Rob Beynon at the Centre for Proteome Research and the Centre for Cell Imaging and funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and a Royal Society University Research Fellowship.

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Nanotechnology Helps Expose Workings of Bacterial ‘Machines’ – AZoNano


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