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Medical Research | IU School of Medicine

IU School of Medicine investigators work collaboratively on the worlds most critical areas of medicine and are recognized as the nations leading experts in their fields.

With more than $300 million in external grants and awards for medical research federal, state and private sources, Indiana University School of Medicine oversees a comprehensive research enterprise thats nationally recognized for its successes in many specialty areas, including cancer, transplantation, alcoholism, bone and stem cell biology, and health outcomes research. In the most recent fiscal year, the school received more than $111 million in awards from the National Institutes of Health. IU School of Medicine ranks 36th among accredited schools of medicine in NIH research dollars receivedup from 41st in 2013.

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Medical Research | IU School of Medicine

Department of Medicine | Department of Medicine

The Department of Medicine of the NYU Langone Medical Center is among the longest established in the U.S. and is the largest academic department in the NYU School of Medicine. It supports and oversees 10 subspecialty divisions and numerous programs and centers in its three-pronged mission of education, research and clinical care. We train medical students, residents and fellows in Internal Medicine and its subspecialties, with emphasis on the care of patients and on clinical investigation. The Department is recognized for its high standards of education, pioneering research, and superior clinical care, as well as its grounding in the humanities. We welcome your exploration of our web site, which represents who we are, what we do, and what we hold dear.

Each week the Department of Medicine presents a distinguished speakerrepresenting one of the sub-specialty divisions of the department. Please see the Medicine Grand Rounds Calendar for additional details.

Lecture may be viewable live online with speaker’s permission.

When:Wednesdays, from 7:45am to 8:45am Where: Schwartz Lecture Hall E

For more information contact: Jennifer Mulliken, MD

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Department of Medicine | Department of Medicine

medicine – Wiktionary

English[edit] Alternative forms[edit] Etymology[edit]

From Middle English medicin, from Old French, from Latin medicna (the healing art, medicine, a physician’s shop, a remedy, medicine), feminine of medicinus (of or belonging to physic or surgery, or to a physician or surgeon), from medicus (a physician, surgeon), from medeor (I heal).

medicine (countable and uncountable, plural medicines)

Terms derived from medicine (noun)

Terms etymologically related to medicine (noun)

ritual Native American magic

Translations to be checked

medicine (third-person singular simple present medicines, present participle medicining, simple past and past participle medicined)

medicinef

From Old French medecine, with the i added back to reflect the original Latin medicna.

medicinef (plural medicines)

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medicine – Wiktionary

The University of Chicago Department of Medicine

Robert Grossman,PhD, Professor of Medicine and Co-Chief Section of Computational Biomedicine and Biomedical Data Science has been named the Frederick H. Rawson Professor effective January 1, 2017. Dr. Grossman is an expert in data intensive computing and its applications to biology, medicine and healthcare. His research focuses on bioinformatics, data science, and data intensive computing. Dr. Grossman currently serves as Co- PI of the NCI Genomics Data Commons.

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After nearly two decades of unsuccessful attempts, researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine and the Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center have created the first mouse model for the most common form of infant leukemia. Their discovery, published in the Nov. 14, 2016, issue of Cancer Cell, could hasten development and testing of new drug therapies.

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This year Kovler Diabetes Center celebrates its 10th anniversary, capping a decade of cutting edge treatment and research that has made the University of Chicago Medicine a world leader in diabetes care.

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Although many cancer patients respond favorably to immunotherapies such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, most patients do not. Blame for treatment failures is usually attributed to so-called cold tumors, those that do not attract T-cell infiltration and may lack key T-cell targetsthe mutated proteins known as neoantigens.

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I know that we can save many more women from dying from breast cancer, oncologist Olufunmilayo Olopade says, leaning forward in her chair. Olopade, who goes by Funmi, is sitting in her office at the end of a long day, surrounded by stacks of paper on her desk and shopping bags on the floor, but she sounds like she could be addressing the World Health Organization. The drugs are there, the women are out there, she says. Whats missing, in her view, is a will to diagnose and treat people, wherever they live.

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The number of deaths from breast cancer have declined significantly over the last several decades. However, many populations within the U.S. and across the globe have not benefited from these improvements in mortality as much as other groups have. This unequal burden of cancer felt by specific population groups, also known as disparities, is a major healthcare challenge and one that hits home. In Chicago, the most recent figures show the breast cancer death rate among black women is 40 percent higher than that of white women.

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The role of the gut microbiome in human health keeps expanding, but some microbes are slow to reveal their secrets.

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The University of Chicago Medicines Successful Aging and Frailty Evaluation (SAFE) Clinic, located in the nearby South Shore community on the South Side, cares for some of the most vulnerable patients throughout the city..

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Dr. Everett Vokes recently announced the creation of the new Section of Computational Biomedicine and Biomedical Data Science , making it the 15th subspecialty section within the Department of Medicine. The new Section will provide an intellectual home for faculty whose research interests encompass computational biomedicine; biomedical data science (data science and its applications to biology, medicine and healthcare), and biomedical informatics (bioinformatics, translational informatics, and clinical/medical informatics) and will be co-led by Robert L. Grossman, PhD and Andrey Rzhetsky, PhD.

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Matthew Sorrentino, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Section of Cardiology, has been appointed as Vice Chair for Clinical Operations effective immediately. In this new role, Dr. Sorrentino will assist in leading the Department of Medicines clinical programs and serve as the key departmental representative with the UCM and BSD on issues relating to the Departments outpatient, inpatient and offsite practices.

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Type 2 diabetes is an insidious disease because its most damaging effects dont show up for years. A patient may have her ups and downs from day to day, but the risk of heart disease, kidney disease, damage to the retinas and other circulatory problems builds over years with the accumulated stress of high blood sugar levels.

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Obstructive sleep apnea a disorder that affects nearly one out of four people between the ages of 30 and 70 is a common cause of high blood pressure. In the Aug. 17, 2016, issue of the journal Science Signaling, researchers based primarily at the University of Chicago describe the signaling cascade that leads to this form of hypertension and suggest ways to disrupt those signals and prevent elevated blood pressures.

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By probing the differences between two farming communitiesthe Amish of Indiana and the Hutterites of South Dakotaan interdisciplinary team of researchers found that specific aspects of the Amish environment are associated with changes to immune cells that appear to protect children from developing asthma.

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The University of Chicago Department of Medicine

UConn School of Medicine

The Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. Clinical Research Center (CRC) Seminar Series On Methods in Clinical Research

Provided by University of Connecticut School of Medicine Office of Community and Continuing Medical Education and the Clinical Research Center

Intergenerational Effects of Maternal Trauma Exposure: Implications for Prevention

Damion Grasso, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics Department of Psychiatry University of Connecticut School of Medicine UConn Health

Date: Tuesday, January 10, 2017 Time: 12:00 Noon 1:00 P.M. Location: Low Learning Center UConn Health, Farmington, CT

WEB CAST: http://mediasite.uchc.edu/mediasite41/Play/9e64736be23c4f8baf50e2c8afe7fdbb1d (Note: No CMEs given for Web Cast viewing)

Light lunch and beverage provided from 11:30 AM-12:00 noon

Target Audience: Faculty, staff, residents, and students interested in clinical research

Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: a) Identify developmental and psychosocial risk associated with maternal exposure to trauma and violence in offspring; b) Describe possible psychosocial and biological mechanisms through which trauma-related risk may be conferred from trauma exposed mothers to their offspring; c) Identify potential strategies for identifying risk and implementing preventive interventions in vulnerable populations

Accreditation: The University of Connecticut School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Connecticut School of Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Conflict of Interest Policy: All faculty members participating in CME activities provided by the University of Connecticut School of Medicine are required to disclose to the program audience any actual or apparent conflict of interest related to the content of their presentations. Program planners have an obligation to resolve any actual conflicts of interest and share with the audience any safeguards put in place to prevent commercial bias from influencing the content.

The activity director, planning committee members, nor the speaker, Dr. Damion Grasso, has a financial interest/arrangement or affiliation with any organizations that could be perceived as a real or apparent conflict of interest in the context of the subject of this presentation. Dr. Grasso will not be discussing the off-label use of any product.

This CME activity has no commercial support associated with it. Food and refreshments provided by the CRC.

Evaluations: Participants are required to complete an electronic evaluation in order to obtain CME Credits. An email from http://MyEvaluation.com with instructions will be sent to participants. Please complete the

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UConn School of Medicine

My Medicine – WebMD

WebMD My Medicine Help

Q: What is an interaction?

A: Mixing certain medicines together may cause a bad reaction. This is called an interaction. For example, one medicine may cause side effects that create problems with other medicines. Or one medicine may make another medicine stronger or weaker.

Q: How do you classify the seriousness of an interaction?

A: The following classification is used:

Contraindicated: Never use this combination of drugs because of high risk for dangerous interaction

Serious: Potential for serious interaction; regular monitoring by your doctor required or alternate medication may be needed

Significant: Potential for significant interaction (monitoring by your doctor is likely required)

Mild: Interaction is unlikely, minor, or nonsignificant

Q: What should I do if my medications show interactions?

A: Call your doctor or pharmacist if you are concerned about an interaction. Do not stop taking any prescribed medication without your doctor’s approval. Sometimes the risk of not taking the medication outweighs the risk or the interaction.

Q: Why can’t I enter my medication?

A: There may be medications, especially otc or supplements, that have not been adequately studied for interactions. If we do not have interaction information for a certain medication it can’t be saved in My Medicine.

Q: Do you cover all FDA warnings?

A: WebMD will alert users to the most important FDA warnings and alerts affecting consumers such as recalls, label changes and investigations. Not all FDA actions are included. Go to the FDA for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Q: Can I be alerted by email if there is an FDA warning or alert?

A: Yes. If you are signed in to WebMD.com and using My Medicine you can sign up to receive email alerts when you add a medicine. To unsubscribe click here.

Q: Can I add medicines for family members?

A: Yes. Click the arrow next to your picture to add drug profiles for family or loved ones.

Q: Can I access My Medicine from my mobile phone?

A: Yes. Sign in to the WebMD Mobile App. Your saved medicine can be found under “Saved.”

Q: Why are there already medicines saved when this my first time using this tool?

A: If you have previously saved a medication on WebMD, for example, in the WebMD Mobile App, these may display in My Medicine.

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My Medicine – WebMD

Drugs.com | Prescription Drug Information, Interactions …

Posted today in Medical

Choosing the perfect Christmas tree is a fun tradition for many families, but it’s important to consider fire safety when decorating for the holidays, a pediatricians’ group advises. People who opt for an artificial tree should make sure it’s fire-resistant. This should be noted on its label, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. If you’re…

Posted 3 days ago in Clinical Trials

Arena Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ARNA) today announced that it has completed enrollment in the ralinepag phase 2 trial. Ralinepag is an oral, selective IP receptor agonist targeting the prostacyclin pathway for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The study enrolled approximately 60 patients at sites globally. “This marks…

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

Yoga may help reduce blood pressure in people who are at risk for developing hypertension, a new study finds. “Patients with pre-hypertension [slightly elevated blood pressure] are likely to develop hypertension [high blood pressure] unless they improve their lifestyle,” said study author Dr. Ashutosh Angrish. He is a cardiologist at Sir Gangaram Hospital…

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Trump Appoints Fossil Fuel Industry Ally to Lead EPA A fossil fuel industry ally and opponent of policies to fight climate change has been appointed to run the Environmental Protection Agency in Donald Trump’s administration. Republican Scott Pruitt…

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Public support for full repeal of Obamacare is softening, with most Americans saying they’d rather leave the law as is or have it improved by changing some parts of it, according to the latest HealthDay/Harris Poll. In the wake of November’s presidential election, about three out of five Americans now say they want the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to…

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E-cigarettes are now the most popular tobacco product among American teens, according to a new U.S. Surgeon General’s report that calls for a crackdown on the devices. E-cigarette use among high school students grew an astounding 900 percent between 2011 and 2015, and the devices surpassed traditional cigarettes as teens’ preferred tobacco product…

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

— Your fridge may be overflowing with leftovers from holiday meals. Here are some tips to safely preserve all that food, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Set the fridge temperature between 33 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and your freezer at 0 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Make sure you store any meat, eggs, veggies…

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

Long-term use of powerful opioid painkillers may be common among Alzheimer’s disease patients and could be a cause for concern, researchers report. Researchers analyzed data from more than 67,000 Alzheimer’s disease patients in Finland. They found that 7 percent had used opioids for more than six months for non-cancer pain relief. One-third of patients…

Posted yesterday in Medical

Cats, dogs, birds and other pets can help people manage their mental disorders, a new study says. Researchers from the United Kingdom asked more than 50 adults with long-term mental conditions about the role pets play in their social networks. Sixty percent placed pets in the central and most important circle — above family, friends and hobbies….

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

A mummy of a child who lived in the 1600s in Lithuania could offer new insight into how smallpox developed over the millennia. Researchers say they’ve found the oldest known sample of the virus that causes smallpox in the child. The child’s remains were discovered in a crypt under a church, the authors report in the Dec. 8 issue of Current Biology. “There…

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Posted in Blog

REMS Overview Fact: Prescription drugs are complicated, and they are getting more complicated every day. Issues with complex drugs and side effects is not just a concern for the healthcare provider, it directly impacts the patient and caregiver, too. Weve all heard the long list of adverse effects and warnings that unfold during a primetime []

Posted in Blog

Drugs.com is pleased to announce the introduction offull HTTPS encryption for all web site visitors. With this significant and important change, nearly 70 million monthly visitors will have access to critical health and medicine information in a safe, secure and private environment. Why HTTPS Encryption? Almost everything you do on the Internet leaves a digital []

Posted in Blog

Off-Label Drug Use: What Is It? You may be surprised to learn that you have probably been prescribed a medication off-label at one point or another by your doctor. Maybe youve heard of off-label drug use in the news, but what does this really mean? Off-label use of a drug refers to prescribing a medication []

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Drugs.com | Prescription Drug Information, Interactions …

Dallas Family Medicine

Paul S. Worrell, D.O.

Dr. Worrell graduated with honors from The University of Texas in Austin, prior to receiving his Doctorate in Osteopathic Medicine from the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center in Ft. Worth in 1980. As Associate Professor of Family Medicine, he has taught numerous medical students, nurse practitioner and PA students, interns and residents throughout his career.

When asked about his practice, Dr. Worrell repliedIve founded a clinic where I can treat the entire family. I cant tell you how rewarding it is to see three and sometimes even four generations of the same family. Knowing the entire family helps me to have a much more comprehensive understanding of the needs of each individual patient.

When asked about his treatment style, Dr. Worrell repliedI believe in taking a conservative approach to treating my patients. Surgery, and even certain drugs, should be the last alternative.

Dr Worrell has hospital affiliations with the following hospitals:

Aleshia is passionate about practicing preventive medicine. When asked why Family Medicine, she replied, It is an opportunity to augment lives from pediatrics to geriatrics. She graduated from Baylor University in 2009 with a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and a minor in Chemistry. She then went to Arizona to further her education by earning a Master of Arts in Biomedical Sciences from Midwestern University in 2010. Most recently, she graduated from the University of North Texas Health Science Center where she received a Masters in Physician Assistant Studies as of August 2015. In her past time she enjoys traveling, watching movies, fellow-shipping with others, girl talk and mission work.

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Dallas Family Medicine

Medicine Mound, Texas – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Medicine Mound is a ghost town in southeastern Hardeman County in West Texas. It consists of two buildings, the former Hicks-Cobb general store and the W.W. Cole Building, a combination bank, drugstore, gasoline station (with rusty pumps still standing), and post office. The Hicks-Cobb building has been turned into a regional history and cultural museum by its former owner, Myna Potts (born 1927), of nearby Chillicothe, the daughter of store co-owner Ira Lee Hicks (1886-1966). The museum is a personal testimony of Potts’ life. It contains a large collection of photographs of area pioneers. Potts considers the preservation a way to honor the contributions of rural Americans.[1]

A sign proclaims: Medicine Mound: Population Zero, but the Texas road map claims fifty individuals live in the general area. Medicine Mound can be accessed southward from Chillicothe via Farm to Market Road 91, which connects with F-M Road 1167 at the ghost town and proceeds northward to U.S. Highway 287 several miles west of Chillicothe. The ghost town is southeast of the county seat of Quanah. southeast of Lake Pauline, and north of the Pease River.

Medicine Mound has received non-profit status and has been placed in the domain of the newly established Downtown Medicine Mound Preservation Group, a 501(c)(3) public charity.[2] Potts operates the museum on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and by appointment through her Chillicothe telephone. There are four historical markers in Medicine Mound to commemorate the community itself, the Hicks-Cobb store, a Works Progress Administration sanitation project in the 1930s, and a small 19th century cemetery.[3]

Medicine Mound also features in several scenes of the Children’s DVD ‘Adventures of Bailey – Christmas Hero’.

Medicine Mound (singular) is named for four nearby cone-shaped dolomite hills called “Medicine Mounds” (plural), which rise some 350 feet above the surrounding plains. They were named by the Comanche Indians, who maintained that the mounds are the dwelling place of powerful, benevolent spirits, which can cure ills, assure successful hunts, and protect in battle. In an annual ritual the Comanche came to Medicine Mound with cedar incense taken from nearby Cedar Mound. The mounds are on private property but can be observed some five miles in the distance by vehicle.[4]

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Medicine Mound, Texas – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Executive Medicine of Texas | Heath Consultants Dallas …

Executive Medicine of Texas is a leader in preventative and proactive health. Their executive physical program is one of the most comprehensive in the country.Dr. Mark AndersonandDr. WalterGamanare co-authors ofmultiple publications, including their latest bookAge to Perfection: How to Thrive to 100 Happy, Healthy, and Wise. They are often called upon as experts and have appeared in hundreds of media spots, including CNN, TIME, Good Morning Texas, Good Morning Arizona, and many more. Drs.Gamanand Anderson, along withJudyGamanhost a nationally syndicated health and wellness radio show entitledThe Staying Young Show.

People travel from all around the globe to visit the physicians at Executive Medicine of Texas. From executives and professional athletes, to high profile individuals, its the level of service at and comprehensive approach at Executive Medicine of Texas that brings people back, year after year. The physicians dedication to corporate wellness and executive health also attracts Fortune 500 companies as well as small business owners.Their executive physicals, bio-identical hormone replacement program, age management services, and concierge programs are what has earned them numerous accolades including Best Docs in Texas by Newsweek Magazine and Healthcare Heroes by the Fort Worth Business Press. The physicians andstaffat Executive Medicine of Texas will make you feel right at home. No matter who you are, if you are ready to learn more about your individual health status and make steps towards a longer and healthier life, there is no better place to start than Executive Medicine of Texas

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Executive Medicine of Texas | Heath Consultants Dallas …

American College of Sports Medicine

The American College of Sports Medicine, the Medical Fitness Association and the American Council on Exercise announce a new collaboration called the Exercise is Medicine Solution.

The announcement was made at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. and included a keynote by 18th U.S. Surgeon general Regina Benjamin, M.D. (pictured, right)

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American College of Sports Medicine

Old Crow Medicine Show

New Co-headlining shows with Brandi Carlile announced:

7/12 – Cleveland, OH at Jacobs Pavilion 7/15 – Interlochen, MI at Kresge Auditorium 7/16 – Detroit, MI at Fox Theatre 7/19 – Huber Heights, OH at Music Center @ The Heights 7/22 – Canandaigua, NY at Marvin Sands PAC 7/23 – Columbia, MD at Merriweather Post Pavilion 8/14 – Morrison, CO at Red… Read More

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Old Crow Medicine Show

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in …

Whether youre looking to become a physician, find a clinical fellowship or residency program, hoping to pursue a life of basic science research or aspiring to join one of the best medical art programs in the world, Johns Hopkins has what you are looking for. Our medical and graduate programs are ranked among the top in the nation and our teachers, scientists, and physicians are some of the worlds foremost experts in their fields. That’s what gets people interested in coming to Johns Hopkins… but it’s the culture here that gets people to stay. It’s a culture of excellence and an aspiration to be the best in the world at what you do, mixed with friendliness, and a spirit of collaboration that make it all possible… and wonderful to be part of.

While we are steeped in history, having been the first institution of its kind to bring together patient care, research and education, youll find that we also have some of the most cutting-edge research happening here. We have biomedical engineers working side-by-side with surgeons developing mind-controlled prosthetic limbs; we have geneticists working with oncologists decoding cancer genomes and looking for drug targets; and we have students designing synthetic genomes to better understand the fundamentals of life. And you can be a part of this.

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The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in …

Medicine Merit Badge – U.S. Scouting Service Project

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Medicine Merit Badge – U.S. Scouting Service Project

NYS Medicine – New York State Education Department

A physician is a licensed health care professional who diagnoses, treats, operates, or prescribes for any human disease, pain, injury, deformity, or physical condition.

A physician assistant (“PA”) is a licensed health care professional who provides medical care under the supervision of a physician. PAs provide a wide range of care within the area of practice of the supervising physician.

A specialist assistant provides medical care under the supervision of a physician in one of the four following specialty areas: orthopedics, acupuncture, radiology, or urology.

A New York licensed physician has completed a program of medical education and received the doctor of medicine (M.D.), doctor of osteopathic medicine (D.O.), or equivalent degree. While New York State requires a minimum of two years of postsecondary education prior to medical school, most applicants admitted to medical school have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Medical programs include studies in basic and medical sciences.

New York licensed physicians have also completed a minimum of one year of postgraduate training in an approved residency program; graduates of unaccredited/unregistered medical schools must complete three years of residency training and pass a proficiency exam. In addition, licensed physicians pass a State-approved licensing examination.

Licensed New York physician assistants have graduated from a two-to-four year State-approved PA program; these programs often require two years of college-level course work prior to admission, although some programs allow entry directly from high school. In addition, PAs have passed a comprehensive licensing examination.

Read more about this profession.

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NYS Medicine – New York State Education Department

Hatboro Medical Associates – Hatboro, PA

Hatboro Medical Associates has served Eastern Montgomery and Bucks counties as a family practice since the 1950s. As primary care physicians, our goal is to provide excellent, caring, and high quality healthcare to our patients and their families. Our doctors are on staff at Abington Hospital, Holy Redeemer Hospital, and Doylestown Hospital. We also serve as the physicians for the Masonic Village at Warminster.

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Hatboro Medical Associates – Hatboro, PA

Welcome – Penn State College of Medicine

In 1963, The M.S. Hershey Foundation offered $50 million to The Pennsylvania State University to establish a medical school in Hershey. With this grant and $21.3 million from the U.S. Public Health Service, the University built a medical school, research center, and teaching hospitalPenn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. The University broke ground in 1966, and Penn State College of Medicine opened its doors to students in 1967. Penn State Hershey Medical Center accepted its first patients in 1970. More…

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Welcome – Penn State College of Medicine

Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania – PennMedicine.org

The Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian are ranked among the top hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.

The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) is world-renowned for its clinical and research excellence, forging the way for newer and better ways to diagnose and treat illnesses and disorders.

Learn more about HUP

Penn Tower Garage has permanently closed.

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Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania – PennMedicine.org


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