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Palo Alto: Hazmat on scene at Stanford Medical School following 3-alarm fire – The Mercury News

STANFORD A three-alarm fire erupted at Stanford Medical School early Saturday and burned a laboratory containingbio-hazardous waste, prompting fire crews to activate hazmat and decontamination teams.

Hazmat crews made entry into the hot zone at about 10 a.m. to evaluate any hazards inside the lab, said Catherine Capriles, deputy fire chief of thePalo Alto Fire Department.

The incident was reported on the departments Twitter account at about 8 a.m. Though initial reports said the fire was inside Stanford Hospital on Pasteur Drive, crews later said it was in the medical school building, located in the same compound.

Anofficial cause for the fire was not immediately determined, but Capriles said it may have been sparked by an experiment inside the third-floor lab.

It appears at this point in time that there was some sort of experiment on a hot plate or heating mechanism, she said. That was on fire when our team came in.

Capriles said the fume hoods in the laboratory helped contain the blaze.

Crews temporarily closed the main entrance to the hospital and redirected people to other entrances, but there were no threats to patients, fire officials said.

No damage estimate was immediately available.

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Palo Alto: Hazmat on scene at Stanford Medical School following 3-alarm fire – The Mercury News

Lawsuit against Martinsville medical school goes to trial | News … – Martinsville Bulletin

MARTINSVILLEA trial date has been set for a lawsuit against the Integrative Centers for Science and Medicine. At the same time, at least a portion of the claim appears to have been resolved.

Late last year, a former employee at ICSM filed suit against the organization and its president, Dr. Noel T. Boaz. ICSM is the nonprofit arm of the proposed College of Henricopolis School of Medicine.

At a hearing Friday in Martinsville Circuit Court, lawyers for both sides said that ICSM concedes that it owes Dr. Bozenna M. Liszka Howland a total of $26,983.59 for wages and continuing medical education expenses. However, ICSM contests that it owes Dr. Liszka a $5,000 bonus.

Judge G. Carter Greer denied a motion by Liszkas lawyer, Elizabeth Loflen, to go ahead and rule on whether ICSM owes Liszka the $5,000 bonus without holding a jury trial.

Judge Greer scheduled a jury trial for June 5 on the remaining claims against ICSM and all the claims against Boaz. All the hearing Friday dealt with claims against ICSM only, not the claims against Boaz.

After court, Gregory declined to comment. Loflen said remaining issues include the $5,000 bonus Liszka maintains she is owed, breach of contract, and any wages Liszka claims she is owed for alleged violation of the Virginia Minimum Wage Act. Loflen couldnt immediately estimate how much that might be.

As for the $26,983.59 that ICSM concedes it owes Liszka for wages and continuing medical education expenses, Loflen argues that if ICSM is unable to pay any of that, Boaz should be held responsible for paying it.

The original lawsuit sought a total of up to $36,475.59 as well as payment for Liszkas court costs, lawyers fees and any such other relief as the Court may allow.

Liszka was hired as a consulting physician of ICSM on a yearly basis.

Loflen argued during the hearing Friday that there was an implied renewal of Liszkas employment contract from 2015 to 2016 because she continued to perform her duties and ICSM continued to pay her medical malpractice insurance. The 2015 contract also included wages of $100 an hour, reimbursement for certain continuing medical education expenses, payment of a $5,000 bonus by a March 31 due date, and other provisions, Loflen argued. Loflen said ICSM paid the $5,000 bonus for 2015 by the March 31 due date.

John Gregory, ICSMs lawyer, argued that on Jan. 2, 2016, ICSM submitted a proposed contract to Liszka, including provision of a $5,000 bonus as soon as ICSM can pay but with no deadline date. He said Liszka declined the proposed contract, and she proposed hand-written changes, including payment of a $5,000 bonus no later than March 31, 2016. Gregory said no renewal contract was ever in place. He added that ICSM never intended to pay the $5,000 bonus in 2016 unless funds were available.

The lawsuit alleged that Liszka continued to work for Boaz and ICSM until the defendants refusal to compensate her for her services forced her to resign on June 30, 2016.

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Lawsuit against Martinsville medical school goes to trial | News … – Martinsville Bulletin

Alumnus endows medical school scholarship program with estate gift – UChicago News

A physician who graduated from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and his spouse are bequeathing their estate to the medical school, creating a new scholarship they hope will encourage future alumni to pay it forward.

The anonymous gift, valued at $12.3 million, will become the largest endowed scholarship fund at Pritzker. The gift comes as a result of the schools Legacy Challenge, a campaign to increase student scholarships.

This generous gift will ensurein perpetuitythat bright, deserving students who want to pursue degrees in medicine will be able to do so regardless of their financial ability, said Kenneth Polonsky, dean of the Biological Sciences Division and the Pritzker School of Medicine. Its a testament to the donors deep connection to Pritzker and their desire that future generations of physicians are able to come here and thrive.

The physician attended Pritzker thanks to financial aid provided by the school and arranged by the late Joseph Ceithaml, Pritzkers dean of students from 1951 to 1986. Without the scholarship, he said he would have been unable to attend the renowned medical school.

The donors feel privileged to be able to pay it forward to a school that gave them so much, said Holly Humphrey, Pritzkers dean of medical education. They hope this gift inspires current and future alumni to give back to Pritzker and ensure its legacy of medical education.

Known as one of the countrys best training grounds for future physicians, Pritzker is among the nations top medical schools for both research and primary care. Its the highest-ranking medical school for research in Illinois. A school with about 350 students, Pritzker places a strong emphasis on research and discovery while translating the most recent advances in biomedical science to the bedside.

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Alumnus endows medical school scholarship program with estate gift – UChicago News

Lawsuit against Martinsville medical school moves forward – Martinsville Bulletin

MARTINSVILLEA trial date has been set for a lawsuit against the Integrative Centers for Science and Medicine. At the same time, at least a portion of the claim appears to have been resolved.

Late last year, a former employee at ICSM filed suit against the organization and its president, Dr. Noel T. Boaz. ICSM is the nonprofit arm of the proposed College of Henricopolis School of Medicine.

At a hearing Friday in Martinsville Circuit Court, lawyers for both sides said that ICSM concedes that it owes Dr. Bozenna M. Liszka Howland a total of $26,983.59 for wages and continuing medical education expenses. However, ICSM contests that it owes Dr. Liszka a $5,000 bonus.

Judge G. Carter Greer denied a motion by Liszkas lawyer, Elizabeth Loflen, to go ahead and rule on whether ICSM owes Liszka the $5,000 bonus without holding a jury trial.

Judge Greer scheduled a jury trial for June 5 on the remaining claims against ICSM and all the claims against Boaz. All the hearing Friday dealt with claims against ICSM only, not the claims against Boaz.

After court, Gregory declined to comment. Loflen said remaining issues include the $5,000 bonus Liszka maintains she is owed, breach of contract, and any wages Liszka claims she is owed for alleged violation of the Virginia Minimum Wage Act. Loflen couldnt immediately estimate how much that might be.

As for the $26,983.59 that ICSM concedes it owes Liszka for wages and continuing medical education expenses, Loflen argues that if ICSM is unable to pay any of that, Boaz should be held responsible for paying it.

The original lawsuit sought a total of up to $36,475.59 as well as payment for Liszkas court costs, lawyers fees and any such other relief as the Court may allow.

Liszka was hired as a consulting physician of ICSM on a yearly basis.

Loflen argued during the hearing Friday that there was an implied renewal of Liszkas employment contract from 2015 to 2016 because she continued to perform her duties and ICSM continued to pay her medical malpractice insurance. The 2015 contract also included wages of $100 an hour, reimbursement for certain continuing medical education expenses, payment of a $5,000 bonus by a March 31 due date, and other provisions, Loflen argued. Loflen said ICSM paid the $5,000 bonus for 2015 by the March 31 due date.

John Gregory, ICSMs lawyer, argued that on Jan. 2, 2016, ICSM submitted a proposed contract to Liszka, including provision of a $5,000 bonus as soon as ICSM can pay but with no deadline date. He said Liszka declined the proposed contract, and she proposed hand-written changes, including payment of a $5,000 bonus no later than March 31, 2016. Gregory said no renewal contract was ever in place. He added that ICSM never intended to pay the $5,000 bonus in 2016 unless funds were available.

The lawsuit alleged that Liszka continued to work for Boaz and ICSM until the defendants refusal to compensate her for her services forced her to resign on June 30, 2016.

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Lawsuit against Martinsville medical school moves forward – Martinsville Bulletin

Mini medical school lecture series starts Wednesday at IU School of Medicine – South Bend Tribune

SOUTH BEND Diabetes, the importance of sleep and health treatment advances will be among topics discussed during a series of public health lectures starting Wednesday at Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend.

All the lectures, which are free and open to the public, will be in the auditorium of the medical school, 1234 N. Notre Dame Ave.

The Mini Medical School lectures will start at 6 p.m. on consecutive Wednesdays. Here are the topics and dates:

Wednesday: “Everything You Wanted to Know about Sleep (But Were too Tired to Ask),” Gary Fromm, M.D., medical director of Memorial Sleep Disorder Center.

March 22: “Living Well: Quality of Life Considerations at Life’s End,” Mark Murray, president and CEO, Center for Hospice Care, and Mark Sandock, M.D., of St. Joseph Regional Medical Center and Michiana Life Wishes Coalition.

March 29: “Indianas Precision Health Initiative,” Anantha Shekhar, M.D., dean for translational research and director of Indiana Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute, IU School of Medicine.

April 5: “The Evolving Landscape of Joint Replacement,” Mark Klaassen, M.D., Elkhart orthopedic surgeon.

April 12: “The Future Is Here: Emerging Trends in Cancer Therapy,” Rafat Ansari, M.D., and Jose Bufill, M.D., of Michiana Hematology Oncology.

April 19: “Thriving with Diabetes,” Ebonee Davis, M.D., internal medicine physician, South Bend Clinic.

The lecture series is sponsored by the Medical Education Foundation, the citizens advisory group of IU School of Medicine-South Bend.

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Mini medical school lecture series starts Wednesday at IU School of Medicine – South Bend Tribune

New medical school to offer new ways to learn – Buffalo Business First

New medical school to offer new ways to learn
Buffalo Business First
As vice chair for education and senior associate dean for medical curriculum, Dr. Alan Lesse plays a major role in the University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. He works with everyone from first-year medical students to

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New medical school to offer new ways to learn – Buffalo Business First

Beloved Harvard Medical School Library Therapy Dog Missing – CBS Boston / WBZ

March 9, 2017 11:40 AM

BOSTON (CBS) Abeloved dog at Harvard Medical School is missing.

Cooper is a 9-year-old Shih Tzu who has worked as a therapy dog at the schoolslibrary in the Longwood medical area.

He disappeared from an enclosed back yard in Belmont last week.

I hope and pray that they find him and all these efforts do not go in vain, Dr. Venkatesan Renugopalakrishnan, a professor at the medical school, told WBZ NewsRadio 1030s Ben Parker.

Along with putting up posters and handing out flyers, family and friends have been using social media to alert people about Cooper.

Cooper works two days a week at the Countway Library, spending time with doctors, students and workers.

He was part of our family. People would come by and they would play with Cooper. I would take him out for a walk. Just last Tuesday, we went out for a walk. Hes part of our community, Countway Library employee Erica Nosike said.

Cooper is black and white and weighs about 15 pounds.

He brought a lot of pleasure to us. We really miss him, Dr. Renugopalakrishnan said.

He cheers you up, hes definitely got a personality, said Amber LaFountain. Its just sad when hes not here.

A reward is being offered for his return.

WBZ NewsRadio 1030s Ben Parker reports

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Beloved Harvard Medical School Library Therapy Dog Missing – CBS Boston / WBZ

Ga.-PCOM students credit Eagle Scouting with medical school … – Gwinnettdailypost.com

Several students studying osteopathic medicine in Suwanee may have come from around the country, but their school is not the only thing they have in common. At least eight of them are Eagle Scouts.

The students, all enrolled at the Georgia campus of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, recently gathered to attend the Northeast Georgia Council of the Boy Scouts of Americas American Values Dinner along with Chief Campus Officer Bryan Ginn. The dinner featured a local scouting report and address by Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle.

Several of the students said scouting gave them a glimpse into the hard work, life-saving practices and being prepared for emergencies for the profession theyre preparing to enter. Not to mention how to prioritize tasks.

Medical school is certainly the most demanding task Ive ever agreed to, but scouting and my Eagle Scout project in particular taught me that some of the best rewards and achievements come through working hard and persevering through difficult tasks, said second-year student Coston Rowe of Gadsden, Ala. The schoolwork is hard and seemingly endless sometimes, but I know that because of scouting, I will be equipped to help my future patients on a daily basis and provide for my family in an exciting and fulfilling way.

Rowe said his Eagle Scout project was to renovate a local neighborhood tennis and basketball court, including repairing or replacing the surface.

Along with other requirements, in order to advance from Life Scout to Eagle Scout, you must initiate, plan, manage and carry out a service project directed to benefit the local community it is up to you to plan, recruit help for, and execute this project, Rowe said. There were many times within that year that I just wanted to call it quits and not worry about the logistics anymore. But with the encouragement and help of my dad, my scout masters, and my other family and friends, I persevered and finished the project one year and one week after the first day of labor.

First-year student Brant Barron of Thomaston said he learned how to stick to something in scouting, and hes applied it in medical school.

Scouting introduced me to the practice of applying constant effort to reach increasingly more difficult goals. Many challenges presented in Boy Scouts let me experience situations where my personal strengths, mental preparedness and adaptability that I normally depended on would be exhausted, Barron said. I learned that only the faith to persevere could guide me to the tasks completion.

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Ga.-PCOM students credit Eagle Scouting with medical school … – Gwinnettdailypost.com

Investigation continues into illness linked to coffee machine at medical school – Yale News

Yale School of Medicine Dean Dr. Robert Alpern sent the following message to the schools community members on March 7:

As you may be aware, on Tuesday, Feb. 28, four members of the Yale School of Medicine community became ill after drinking from a single-service, pod style coffee machine located at an office area at 333 Cedar St. and were monitored at Yale New Haven Hospital. All have returned to work. Yale Police, the New Haven Fire Department, the State Department of Energy & Environmental Protection, and the Yale Environmental Health and Safety team responded and initiated an investigation.

I am writing to update you on their progress and our continued efforts. Today we learned that an independent laboratory test on items removed from the area indicated the presence of sodium azide, a substance commonly found in laboratories and used as a preservative. The single-serve coffee machine was not connected to a water source and the area was evaluated and declared to be safe by Yale Environmental Health and Safety. The Yale Police Department is continuing its investigation, in collaboration with local, state, and federal law enforcement.

At the same time, we are reviewing security and safety procedures with our public safety team. Out of an abundance of caution, you should be aware that the symptoms of exposure to sodium azide are dizziness, headache, nausea and vomiting, rapid breathing, and rapid heart rate.

In the event you experience these symptoms, please contact Yale Health Acute Care at (203) 432-0123.

Anyone with any information regarding this incident, should contact the Yale Police Department at (203) 432-4400. We will keep you updated but caution that gathering complete information will take some time. As always, the safety and security of the Yale community is our utmost priority.

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Investigation continues into illness linked to coffee machine at medical school – Yale News

Med School Professors Worried About Federal Budget | News | The … – Harvard Crimson

As Congress begins formulating a new budget, some professors and researchers at Harvard Medical School are concerned about potential cuts in federal funding.

While Harvard as a whole received almost $600 million from the federal government in 2016, 69.9 percent of that came from the National Institutes of Health, and Medical School professors say that federal research funding is particularly important for their work. Federal funding for research at Harvard has steadily declined since 2009, leading University President Drew G. Faust to cite the NIH as a major focus of concern during a visit to Washington D.C. in February.

NIHs funds in research grants allow investigators to pursue interesting and novel ideas with a lot of academic freedom and intellectual freedom, said Medical School and pediatrics professor Kenneth D. Mandl. Its a very well-designed system to promote high quality medical research.

Mandl said while he doesnt expect any tectonic shifts in research funding, he thinks there are certain research agencies such as the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute whose very existence may be in question with the new budget.

If we see those agencies diminished, we would see less research thats evaluative of the healthcare system itself, Mandl said.

Aaron S. Kesselheim 96, a Medical School professor who studies drug approval and drug development laws, said that the potential decreases in funding, combined with inflation, is worrying.

Unfortunately, it may drive some smart people out of the field and out of academia because there just isnt as much funding available to go around, Kesselheim said.

Kesselheim said that most transformative drugs that have been approved by the United States in the last 25 years have had direct origins in publicly funded research.

The kind of therapeutic innovation that is most likely to move the needle clinically comes from these publicly funded origins, Kesselheim said.

Mandl also noted that in the past two years, requirements for receiving NIH funding have also increased, resulting in a more competitive process for grant-seekers and a push for diversification of funding sources. He said he expects that trend to continue in the future.

John N. Campbell, a researcher at the Medical School, said that potential budget cuts made him nervous. Last year, Campbell catalogued 50 distinct brain cell types associated with appetite using a relatively expensive technique called gene expression profiling.

Funding is a worthwhile investment because we learn things we cant find out in any other way, Campbell said. The progress being made now in terms of understanding how the brain works will lead to breakthrough after breakthrough for medicine.

I think we are all a bit nervous about [potential budget cuts], but were staying optimistic and investment in science is always a priority, Campbell said.

Campbell said that in the event of budget cuts, researchers would most likely seek alternative sources of funding through non-profit organizations. Otherwise, Campbell said, the scope of research projects could be reduced.

Beyond the Medical School, professors across Harvard are worried about cuts in research funding despite a record fiscal year. In February, humanities professors expressed concern about the potential cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Environmental studies professors also expect to be affected by potential budget cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Staff writer Alexis J. Ross can be reached at alexis.ross@thecrimson.com. Follow her on Twitter @aross125.

Staff writer William L. Wang can be reached at william.wang@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter @wlwang20.

Despite Record Year, Research Funding Remains ‘Huge Challenge’

Despite Record Year, Research Funding Remains ‘Huge Challenge’

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Med School Professors Worried About Federal Budget | News | The … – Harvard Crimson

Med School Professors Worried About Federal Budget – Harvard Crimson

As Congress begins formulating a new budget, some professors and researchers at Harvard Medical School are concerned about potential cuts in federal funding.

While Harvard as a whole received almost $600 million from the federal government in 2016, 69.9 percent of that came from the National Institutes of Health, and Medical School professors say that federal research funding is particularly important for their work. Federal funding for research at Harvard has steadily declined since 2009, leading University President Drew G. Faust to cite the NIH as a major focus of concern during a visit to Washington D.C. in February.

NIHs funds in research grants allow investigators to pursue interesting and novel ideas with a lot of academic freedom and intellectual freedom, said Medical School and pediatrics professor Kenneth D. Mandl. Its a very well-designed system to promote high quality medical research.

Mandl said while he doesnt expect any tectonic shifts in research funding, he thinks there are certain research agencies such as the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute whose very existence may be in question with the new budget.

If we see those agencies diminished, we would see less research thats evaluative of the healthcare system itself, Mandl said.

Aaron S. Kesselheim 96, a Medical School professor who studies drug approval and drug development laws, said that the potential decreases in funding, combined with inflation, is worrying.

Unfortunately, it may drive some smart people out of the field and out of academia because there just isnt as much funding available to go around, Kesselheim said.

Kesselheim said that most transformative drugs that have been approved by the United States in the last 25 years have had direct origins in publicly funded research.

The kind of therapeutic innovation that is most likely to move the needle clinically comes from these publicly funded origins, Kesselheim said.

Mandl also noted that in the past two years, requirements for receiving NIH funding have also increased, resulting in a more competitive process for grant-seekers and a push for diversification of funding sources. He said he expects that trend to continue in the future.

John N. Campbell, a researcher at the Medical School, said that potential budget cuts made him nervous. Last year, Campbell catalogued 50 distinct brain cell types associated with appetite using a relatively expensive technique called gene expression profiling.

Funding is a worthwhile investment because we learn things we cant find out in any other way, Campbell said. The progress being made now in terms of understanding how the brain works will lead to breakthrough after breakthrough for medicine.

I think we are all a bit nervous about [potential budget cuts], but were staying optimistic and investment in science is always a priority, Campbell said.

Campbell said that in the event of budget cuts, researchers would most likely seek alternative sources of funding through non-profit organizations. Otherwise, Campbell said, the scope of research projects could be reduced.

Beyond the Medical School, professors across Harvard are worried about cuts in research funding despite a record fiscal year. In February, humanities professors expressed concern about the potential cuts to the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Environmental studies professors also expect to be affected by potential budget cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Staff writer Alexis J. Ross can be reached at alexis.ross@thecrimson.com. Follow her on Twitter @aross125.

Staff writer William L. Wang can be reached at william.wang@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter @wlwang20.

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Med School Professors Worried About Federal Budget – Harvard Crimson

WSU, UW look to strengthen their Spokane medical schools | The … – The Seattle Times

Washingtons two major universities are once again asking lawmakers for more money for medical education, but the fighting over who is best equipped to teach doctors seems to be a thing of the past.

Washingtons two research universities are once again asking lawmakers for extra money for both of their medical-school programs in Spokane.

But the frosty relationship between the University of Washington and Washington State University over medical-school funding seems to be a thing of the past.

Finally, we see this as behind us, said WSU President Kirk Schulz, speaking during a joint interview on the Seattle Channel show Civic Cocktail on Wednesday with UW President Ana Mari Cauce.

Two years ago, the two schools fought publicly over which one was more qualified and capable of quickly expanding doctor training in the state. WSU proposed and ultimately won the right to open its own medical school on its Spokane campus.

That school the Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine is on track to admit its first group of students this fall. Its reviewing 340 applications for 60 slots for its program.

The UW, which had partnered with WSU to teach medical students in Spokane, went its own way last year, starting a partnership with Spokanes private Gonzaga University to host its medical-school program. (The UWs cooperative, five-state medical education program is known as WWAMI an acronym formed by the names of the five states that participate: Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho.)

Schulz was not WSU president during the medical-school fight; he joined WSU in June 2016. Cauce became president of the UW in the fall of 2015, after the debate was largely over.

I hate to say it, but I actually like this guy, Cauce joked about Schulz on Wednesday, noting that the two became presidents of their respective universities at similar times, and most of the issues were dealing with are incredibly similar.

Cauce said all of the states four-year public universities and two-year colleges are approaching Olympia this year with a common agenda, in hopes of accomplishing more.

The truth is, a stronger WSU makes the UW stronger, and a strong UW makes a stronger WSU, she said. This state has plenty of room for two top universities.

In the Legislature this year, WSU is requesting $10.8 million to fund 60 first-year and 60 second-year medical school students over the biennium.

The WSU school received preliminary accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education in October. It is named after the universitys late president, Elson Floyd, who died in 2015.

Meanwhile, the UW which is teaching 60 first-year and 40 second-year medical students at Gonzaga this academic year is hoping to add 20 additional students, eventually bringing the total to 80 first-year and 80 second-year students. Its requesting $9.2 million in state funding.

For now, theres enough physical space in Spokane for both programs to continue to share an anatomy lab thats located on the WSU campus, which is located directly across the Spokane River from Gonzaga. The rest of the UWs classes are taught at Gonzagas Schoenberg Center building.

But if the UW gets the OK to increase the size of its program, it will require a new building, said Suzanne Allen, vice dean for academic, rural and regional affairs for the UW School of Medicine.

The lab, where first-year students take anatomy lessons using cadavers in the ground-floor lab on the Riverpointe campus, will be used by medical students from both programs for the next three years, while the WSU ramps up the size of its classes.

The plan is for Gonzaga to raise private funding for a building on its campus, for both anatomy and other classes. The building would be leased to the UW. Its likely to take three or four years to raise the money and construct the building, Allen said.

In 2015, when WSU and UW were battling over funding, it became clear that one of the bottlenecks was a lack of residency positions the finishing years for medical-school graduates that allow them to work with patients and complete their educations.

The Legislature that year put $16 million toward increasing family residency slots, said Ian Goodhew, director of government relations for UW Medicine.

Residencies are funded by federal dollars, but the state money helped make sure there were enough faculty for the programs to be fully accredited, Allen said. As well, it allowed residents to do rotations in clinics; federal dollars only pay for residency rotations that are done in hospitals.

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WSU, UW look to strengthen their Spokane medical schools | The … – The Seattle Times

San Bernardino County awards new Colton medical school a $10 million contract – San Bernardino County Sun

SAN BERNARDINO >> San Bernardino County Supervisors on Tuesday approved, without discussion, a $10 million, five-year agreement to support the effort for a new medical school in Colton.

The California University of Science and Medicines School of Medicine is expected to open in summer 2018 inside temporary headquarters in San Bernardino and then move to its permanent home just north of Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, the county hospital in Colton, said Dr. Dev GnanaDev, founder, president and CEO of CalMed.

Remodeling for the temporary site is ongoing at the former Everest College site at 217 E. Club Center Drive, just west of Waterman Avenue and south of the 10 Freeway.

GnanaDev is also chief of surgery at ARMC and president of the Medical Board of California. Previously, he was a longtime ARMC medical director and is a past president of the California Medical Association.

Originally, CalMed had hoped to open the new medical school in Colton this fall, but GnanaDev said Tuesday, during an interview following the supervisors vote, that it is easier to get necessary accreditations from an existing structure than from a new building.

The initial class will grow from 60 students to 90 the second year and 120 the third year. From then on, each graduating class will start with 120 students, he said.

The new medical school will work to develop additional residency slots at several hospital locations to place its graduates, GnanaDev said.

At another location, also adjacent to ARMC, the California University of Science and Medicine will ultimately include a school to train biomedical engineers, physician assistants and physical therapists, as well as provide nurses with graduate-level education opportunities.

The memorandum of understanding calls for a collaboration in clinical research studies, education and in the delivery and improvement of health care services at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center.

The memorandum will result in the use of the countys discretionary general funding in the amount of $1 million annually for five years, while ARMC will provide an additional $5 million from its Enterprise Fund, according to county documents.

The agreement will terminate if CalMed fails to obtain appropriate accreditations on or before July 1, 2018.

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The agreement is a cause of concern for Pomona-based Western Universitys College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific.

Dr. Paula Crone, medical school dean, said, Western U has a 40-year track record of service and success in the Inland Empire and Southern California, and is an essential source of the badly-needed primary care providers in this region.

We have a long-standing relationship with San Bernardino County and ARMC, where our graduates have filled literally thousands of rotation and residency slots over the years, without public funding coming to the university or the college to support that. So anything that might diminish training opportunities for our students and graduates is a blow.

Robert Lovingood, chairman of the county Board of Supervisors, explained in a statement why the board approved the memorandum of understanding.

ARMC has a number of agreements with universities, colleges, junior colleges, and technical and trade schools through which it provides on-site clinical training for students. The training provided at ARMC prepares medical students to obtain their degree, license and/or certification, Lovingood said in the statement.

Riverside and San Bernardino counties have one of the lowest ratios of active patient care physicians. The agreement supports the creation, maintenance and growth of jobs and economic value in the county by offering medical education locally with preference to county residents, which will result in an increased pool of locally-trained health care workers remaining in the area, Lovingood said.

The contribution announced today (Tuesday) from the County of San Bernardino is a wonderful testament to the faith in the mission of California University of Science and Medicine and the value it will provide to the county, community and Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, said Elizabeth Nikels, spokeswoman for the Prime Healthcare Foundation.

California University School of Medicine and the Prime Healthcare Foundation are grateful to San Bernardino County and Arrowhead Regional for their partnership and support as we build a world-class medical school dedicated to training future leaders that will give back to underserved areas like San Bernardino County, she said in a statement.

The CalMed medical school is being financed primarily through a $40 million donation from the Prime Healthcare Foundation, which was founded by Dr. Prem Reddy, a cardiologist who is founder, chairman and president of Ontario-based Prime Healthcare Services.

GnanaDev said he is working to secure additional funding from the state of California.

Prime Healthcare owns and operates 44 acute-care hospitals in California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Alabama and Missouri.

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San Bernardino County awards new Colton medical school a $10 million contract – San Bernardino County Sun

UK announces regional medical school partnership with NKU … – Kentucky Kernel

UK announced plans last week to develop a regional medical school campus in Northern Kentucky, in partnership with Northern Kentucky University and St. Elizabeth Healthcare.

Working with outstanding regional partners universities and hospitals we can educate and train more potential doctors and help address the physician shortage in the commonwealth, UK College of Medicine Dean Dr. Robert DiPaola said.

The Lexington campus reached capacity in the number of students its facilities and infrastructure can support.

Currently, the UK College of Medicine enrolls 547 students, with 139 in the most recently admitted class, the class of 2020.

The curriculum and education will be the same as what is provided at the Lexington campus.

UK HealthCare saw NKU and St. Elizabeth as outstanding and qualified institutions in higher education and as regional providers of healthcare.

We will be able to educate more outstanding students. This will be a new opportunity to offer to NKU students and others in the region to continue their education at the highest levels closer to home, DiPaola said. The region, potentially, will have more outstanding clinicians, serving the state and, in particular, Northern Kentucky. It is a win-win-win for the university, the region and our partners.

Four-year regional campuses in Bowling Green and Morehead were also proposed in 2016 by UK.

UK plans to open the regional campus with NKU and St. Elizabeth as early as 2019.

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UK announces regional medical school partnership with NKU … – Kentucky Kernel

Culinary Medicine: Teaching the importance of nutrition in medical school – Penn State News

HERSHEY, Pa. During future physicians four years in medical school, they expect to be exposed to many different environments. They become acquainted with the emergency room, operating room, delivery room and every other room in between. Instructors at Penn State College of Medicine hope to help their students become familiar with one more room the kitchen.

Fourth-year medical students at the college now have an opportunity to participate in a culinary medicine course to learn cooking and nutrition basics, which they can then pass on to patients. Culinary medicine is a new evidence-based field in medicine that blends the art of food and cooking with the science of medicine.

In the United States, the traditional medical approach has been to focus on treatment rather than prevention of disease and illness, said Tomi Dreibelbis, Culinary Medicine course co-director, senior director of educational affairs, and instructor of public health sciences. For the past 100 years, the standard medical school curriculum has required spending only a few days in four years discussing how nutrition affects wellness and the risk of progression of disease. Diet and nutrition will take us either on the path to wellness or on the path to disease.

Dreibelbis has a background as a public health nutritionist and holds a graduate degree in health education. She was inspired by the culinary medicine program at Tulane University School of Medicine and its teaching kitchen where students are required to take nutrition courses throughout their four years of medical school. She visited Tulane in July 2016 and worked with her counterparts there to bring the program to Penn State. The first class launched in September 2016.

Dietary intervention can positively impact health outcomes across the lifespan. Optimal nutrition throughout all phases of life, especially for the population groups that are at high risk for health disparities, must be the primary focus of health promotion and disease prevention, she said.

Nine students have completed the course this semester, which is currently offered as an elective.

The course is held at the Mohler Senior Center, which is located on the edge of the College of Medicine and Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center campus. Use of its kitchen adds an additional dynamic to the course, as members of the senior center participate in the course alongside the students.

Learn more about the course in this Penn State Medicine article.

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Culinary Medicine: Teaching the importance of nutrition in medical school – Penn State News

Professors at Dell Medical School bring new way of patient-to-physician communication – UT The Daily Texan

Patients are not as comfortable disclosing health disparities to their physicians as they are with other patients experiencing similar disparities, an issue two Dell Medical School professors hope to address.

The professors, Scott Wallace and Elizabeth Teisberg, are the managing director and executive director of the schools Institute for Value in Health and Care. They developed the idea of Experience Groups, which allow patients with similar health issues to sit together and discuss health challenges, about a decade ago. The group size ranges from six to 10 participants with two facilitators who oversee the group, take notes and pose questions to guide the group toward discussion.

Often time, (health care) services are designed from a physicians point of view, not designed from a patients point of view, Wallace said. We use these Experience Group sessions to bring groups of patients who share a set of circumstances together to talk about what is it like to live with their condition.

Wallace said Experience Groups have been conducted at other hospitals, and they hope to bring the idea to the Dell Medical School soon.

Most hospitals have patient advisory groups (with a mixed group of patients), and what they talk about is parking, food and whether the televisions worked and whether the nurses have been nice to them, because thats the only thing they have in common, Wallace said.

Deborah Kennedy, who has facilitated about seven Experience Groups, said the groups provide clinicians with valuable information about their patients they might not have known before.

As clinicians, we automatically think we have the answer, Kennedy said. If we dont, we like to at least postulate what might be a solution.

The Experience Groups Kennedy oversaw involved people struggling with their weight. Kennedy said she learned to be a part of the background of the discussion and to let the participants speak for themselves, which showed her that having people with similar issues come together can enlighten physicians on issues that might not have come up in a clinical setting.

One of the things (the patients) actually said to me several times is, We dont want a skinny person telling us what to do, Kennedy said. They felt like (the physicians) had no understanding.

Wallace said he and Teisberg decided to share their idea with the Dell Medical School in order to directly help the community, one of the schools core missions.

It was a really appealing idea to come down here and actually be a part of creating a health care system that was committed to improving the health of the people in the community, Wallace said. We described it as (taking) on responsibilities of improving the health of our neighbors, and thats a phenomenal opportunity for someone who is interested in dramatically changing health care.

School Dean Clay Johnston said the Experience Groups provide an innovative outlook on how medicine should be provided for the patients at the school.

Experience Groups are about people at an individual level what theyre experiencing, where they want to go and what they want to do with their lives, Johnston said. They demonstrate the kind of innovation that the school is already catalyzing in a variety of communities and settings throughout Austin and Travis County.

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Professors at Dell Medical School bring new way of patient-to-physician communication – UT The Daily Texan

San Bernardino County awards new Colton medical school a $10 … – San Bernardino County Sun

SAN BERNARDINO >> San Bernardino County Supervisors on Tuesday approved, without discussion, a $10 million, five-year agreement to support the effort for a new medical school in Colton.

The California University of Science and Medicines School of Medicine is expected to open in summer 2018 inside temporary headquarters in San Bernardino and then move to its permanent home just north of Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, the county hospital in Colton, said Dr. Dev GnanaDev, founder, president and CEO of CalMed.

Remodeling for the temporary site is ongoing at the former Everest College site at 217 E. Club Center Drive, just west of Waterman Avenue and south of the 10 Freeway.

GnanaDev is also chief of surgery at ARMC and president of the Medical Board of California. Previously, he was a longtime ARMC medical director and is a past president of the California Medical Association.

Originally, CalMed had hoped to open the new medical school in Colton this fall, but GnanaDev said Tuesday, during an interview following the supervisors vote, that it is easier to get necessary accreditations from an existing structure than from a new building.

The initial class will grow from 60 students to 90 the second year and 120 the third year. From then on, each graduating class will start with 120 students, he said.

The new medical school will work to develop additional residency slots at several hospital locations to place its graduates, GnanaDev said.

At another location, also adjacent to ARMC, the California University of Science and Medicine will ultimately include a school to train biomedical engineers, physician assistants and physical therapists, as well as provide nurses with graduate-level education opportunities.

The memorandum of understanding calls for a collaboration in clinical research studies, education and in the delivery and improvement of health care services at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center.

The memorandum will result in the use of the countys discretionary general funding in the amount of $1 million annually for five years, while ARMC will provide an additional $5 million from its Enterprise Fund, according to county documents.

The agreement will terminate if CalMed fails to obtain appropriate accreditations on or before July 1, 2018.

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The agreement is a cause of concern for Pomona-based Western Universitys College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific.

Dr. Paula Crone, medical school dean, said, Western U has a 40-year track record of service and success in the Inland Empire and Southern California, and is an essential source of the badly-needed primary care providers in this region.

We have a long-standing relationship with San Bernardino County and ARMC, where our graduates have filled literally thousands of rotation and residency slots over the years, without public funding coming to the university or the college to support that. So anything that might diminish training opportunities for our students and graduates is a blow.

Robert Lovingood, chairman of the county Board of Supervisors, explained in a statement why the board approved the memorandum of understanding.

ARMC has a number of agreements with universities, colleges, junior colleges, and technical and trade schools through which it provides on-site clinical training for students. The training provided at ARMC prepares medical students to obtain their degree, license and/or certification, Lovingood said in the statement.

Riverside and San Bernardino counties have one of the lowest ratios of active patient care physicians. The agreement supports the creation, maintenance and growth of jobs and economic value in the county by offering medical education locally with preference to county residents, which will result in an increased pool of locally-trained health care workers remaining in the area, Lovingood said.

The contribution announced today (Tuesday) from the County of San Bernardino is a wonderful testament to the faith in the mission of California University of Science and Medicine and the value it will provide to the county, community and Arrowhead Regional Medical Center, said Elizabeth Nikels, spokeswoman for the Prime Healthcare Foundation.

California University School of Medicine and the Prime Healthcare Foundation are grateful to San Bernardino County and Arrowhead Regional for their partnership and support as we build a world-class medical school dedicated to training future leaders that will give back to underserved areas like San Bernardino County, she said in a statement.

The CalMed medical school is being financed primarily through a $40 million donation from the Prime Healthcare Foundation, which was founded by Dr. Prem Reddy, a cardiologist who is founder, chairman and president of Ontario-based Prime Healthcare Services.

GnanaDev said he is working to secure additional funding from the state of California.

Prime Healthcare owns and operates 44 acute-care hospitals in California, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Alabama and Missouri.

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San Bernardino County awards new Colton medical school a $10 … – San Bernardino County Sun

New information released on hazmat situation at Yale Medical School – WTNH Connecticut News (press release)


WTNH Connecticut News (press release)
New information released on hazmat situation at Yale Medical School
WTNH Connecticut News (press release)
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (WTNH) Officials have released information on what caused several people to fall ill at the Yale School of Medicine last week. Yale officials say independent laboratory tests on items removed from the area showed the presence of …
Chemical Found In Yale Med School Coffee MachineCBS Connecticut

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New information released on hazmat situation at Yale Medical School – WTNH Connecticut News (press release)

UB prepares to debut its $375 million showpiece of a medical school … – Buffalo News

Inside a new University at Buffalo building on Main Street is a mammoth glass atrium capped by seven skylights and filled with temporary scaffolding holding tradesmen working from dawn to dusk five days a week, and sometimes Saturdays.

The workers are adding the interior details of the $375 million Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at Main and Allen streets.

The eight-floor building, now 75 percent complete, will open later this year to house an expanding UB medical school.

The school has been steadily adding faculty since it began construction of the downtown building and plans to add 80 new faculty members by 2020 as it gears up to meet the needs of more students.

Workers put the finishing touches on the ceiling of the atrium of the new UB Medical School. (Mark Mulville/Buffalo News)

The building will have more educational space than the school’s current home on UB’s South Campus, as well asadvance simulation centers for patient care and updatedlaboratories.

But its design and location with its terra cotta exterior, glass atrium and Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus address is part of a wider university strategy for attracting new doctors to the medical school.

“The atrium was always to be the showcase,” said Jennifer A. Kuhn, UB project manager. “The architect always called it the piano nobile.”

An average of 380 workers on the site each day are tasked with transforming the 628,000-square-foot building from the ground level to the top of the eighth floor.

“We’re in the process of putting the lipstick on, and the finishing touches,” said William J. Mahoney, vice president of LPCiminelli, which is overseeing construction.

Atrium features glass panels

Mahoney and UB officials led a walk-through of the building last week to give a peek of progress that has been made and what work remains.

The building which in terms of square footage is the equivalent of 14.6 acres has about $30 million worth of work to go, Mahoney said.

It is the largest construction project in UB’s history. It is also, UB says, the largest building dedicated to medical education presently under construction in the United States. More than 3,000 trades workers have left their touch on the complex in the three years it has been under construction.

Outside, workers have been placing terra cotta panels on the building like pieces of a puzzle fitting into place. By late summer, 27,646 of the panels will form a high-performance “skin” of the new building.

Some of the exterior terra cotta as construction starts to take shape at the new UB medical school downtown. (Mark Mulville/Buffalo News)

Inside, walls are up and the shells of offices are in place. Mechanical and electrical systems are being turned on. Work on medical labs, counters, file drawers, built-in cabinets, flooring, ceiling tiles and light fixtures is under way on many floors, as well as student classrooms and lecture halls.

The building’s seven-story atrium is also underway. It will feature 650 ribbon-glass panels made up of 19,000 square feet of glass along the perimeter, as well as a glass rainscreen faade.

Five floors of temporary scaffolding provide work crews access to the perimeter of the atrium to complete finishing work of the building. An interior band of terra cotta panels mirroring the ones on the outside of the building will rim the inside of each floor.

Gradually, the top scaffolding level will be removed as each level is completed. “It’s kind of like a train, one car after another, until the final product is complete,” Mahoney said.

Workers on scaffolding put the finishing touches on the ceiling of the atrium inside UB’s new Medical School in downtown Buffalo. (Mark Mulville/Buffalo News)

Glass is a big deal, particularly with an atrium that will shed natural light into the center of the building and a small bistro planned for students and faculty on the second floor.

The atrium area, along with lounges, is intended to be a collaborative space for students to meet students and their professors.

“The idea is to create opportunities for people to get together and share ideas,” said Gail E. Ettaro, LPCiminelli’s senior marketing director.

Building aimed at evolving mission

The building, UB officials hope, will not just provide a new downtown home for a bigger medical school, but will meet new needs as its mission evolves and the school grows.

The new school offers a 178 percent increase in educational space for our medical students and most of those increases occur in the small classroom area, Michael E. Cain, vice president for health sciences and medical school dean, told faculty during a recent address, according to a UB summary. This is by design as we reshape the vision of our medical curriculum.

The medical school had 688 faculty members during the 2011-12 school year, when the new building was still in the planning stages. That number grew to 778 last school year and is expected to be 860 by 2020.

By fall, the first staff members are slated to move into the new building. Classes will start there in January.

A view of the west side from the seventh floor at the new UB medical school. (Mark Mulville/Buffalo News)

Lab spaces will occupy much of the third, fourth and fifth floors. The sixth floor will contain administrative offices and a clinical competency center for simulated patient work. Administrative offices, along with gross anatomy teaching space, will make up the seventh floor. The eighth floor consists of mechanical systems. The second level will mostly contain classrooms, two large lecture halls, a small bistro and student and faculty lounges.

While most of the medical school will not be accessible to the general public, the building houses the Metro Rail Allen Medical Station and will be part of a sky-bridge connector system to adjacent hospitals and research facilities.

“It’s a state-of-the-art medical facility that provides hands-on experiences,” Mahoney said.

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UB prepares to debut its $375 million showpiece of a medical school … – Buffalo News


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