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New Jersey Medical School – Official Site

New Jersey Medical School In The News News Archives

Petros Levounis, MD, Chair of Psychiatry at NJMS, featured

Boris Paskhover, MD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery at NJMS, featured

Diane P. Calello, MD, Executive Director of the New Jersey Poison Information and Education System, quoted

Bruce Ruck, PharmD, DABT, Managing Director of NJ Poison Center, quoted

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New Jersey Medical School – Official Site

USC’s dean drug scandal could take a costly toll on the school’s legal battle with the UC system – Los Angeles Times

Six months after Dr. Carmen Puliafito stepped down as dean of USCs medical school, he was called by the university to give sworn testimony as a witness in a lawsuit the institution was facing.

It was a sensitive matter with hundreds of millions of dollars potentially at stake, and two attorneys for the university sat with him as he answered questions.

Almost immediately, the opposing lawyer hit on a topic that was a closely guarded secret at USC: The circumstances of Puliafitos abrupt resignation in March 2016.

The former dean had a ready explanation, saying he had taken advantage of a unique opportunity at a biotech company. The response was succinct, matter-of-fact and, in light of recent revelations about his drug use and troubled tenure at USC, far from the whole story.

Paul Pringle, Harriet Ryan, Adam Elmahrek, Matt Hamilton and Sarah Parvini

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Of the many consequences of the Puliafito scandal for USC, few are as high-stakes as the possible effect on the court case that prompted his testimony last year.

Puliafito was expected to play a role in defending USC in the legal battle with the University of California over the defection of a star UC Alzheimer’s disease researcher.

Puliafito helped woo the scientist and dozens of other prominent academics as part of a strategy by USC President C.L. Max Nikias to vault the university into the ranks of elite research institutions.

UC is seeking $185 million in damages along with a punitive award that could be several times that amount.

With all thats out there about him, hes going to have a serious problem coming off as credible and being believed, said Los Angeles attorney Brian Panish, a civil litigator who has represented clients in suits against both schools.

A Times investigation published last month revealed that Puliafito partied and used drugs with a circle of criminals and addicts while serving as dean. Puliafito engaged in this behavior during the period in 2015 in which he was recruiting the researcher, according to interviews with his associates and text messages they exchanged with him.

A UC spokeswoman said the school would not discuss its legal strategy other than to say we are vigorously pursuing this case against USC.

An attorney for USC said no decision had been made on whether to call Puliafito as a witness, but insisted the former deans testimony was not important to the universitys defense.

Hes a bit player in this, said attorney John Quinn.

In court filings earlier this year, lawyers for USC highlighted a portion of the deans testimony in arguing that the case should be dismissed.

Puliafito testified that the university wanted UC San Diego researcher Paul Aisen to join the faculty whether or not he brought along hundreds of millions of dollars in grant funding, a rejection of UCs claim that USC was motivated by money in recruiting the scientist.

Legal experts said that even if USC decides not to use Puliafitos testimony, UCs legal team could ask for copies of his personnel record and attempt to make an issue in court of his conduct. That would set up a fight between USC and UC over whether jurors should be told about the skeletons in Puliafitos closet if the case went to trial.

The trial judge would have to decide whether the prejudicial, inflammatory value is outweighed by the probative value, said Manhattan Beach civil lawyer John Taylor, who has represented clients with legal claims against USC.

The judge, Taylor added, might say, Suppose he was out partying like a rock star? How does that make it more or less believable to a jury?

USC is anticipating that UC will try to make Puliafitos drug use a line of attack.

I believe that they would do anything they could to try to poison the well, including introducing the deans personal problems, USC lawyer Quinn said, adding that he expected a judge to reject such attempts as irrelevant.

The case is on hold while USC appeals a U.S. district judges ruling that moved the suit from federal court to San Diego County Superior Court, where it was originally filed. No trial date has been set.

By the time Puliafito was scheduled to be questioned under oath, the case was in its second year and UC had brushed off entreaties by USC to settle the matter out of court. USC deputy general counsel Stacy Bratcher and other university lawyers met with the former dean three times to prepare him for the deposition, he later testified.

On the day of his testimony, Bratcher and another lawyer sat with him at a downtown law firm as he was questioned for about six hours, according to a transcript of the testimony. Portions of the transcript were redacted at the request of USC.

Puliafito said he had been deposed 20 times in his life, including in court cases where he was a medical expert. On a video recording of part of the deposition, he appears self-assured, offering short, precise responses and brushing aside many questions as hypothetical and difficult to answer.

A few minutes into his testimony, he was asked for the circumstances of your ceasing to be dean of the medical school. An attorney for USCs outside law firm, Viola Trebicka, initially protested that the question was overbroad and vague objections a judge would rule on a later date and then directed him to go ahead and answer.

I had a unique opportunity in the ophthalmic biotechnology industry, and I was able to continue my employment at USC on sabbatical and work for this biotech company, he said.

The full story was more complicated. USC acknowledged after The Times report that the dean quit his post during a confrontation with the university provost about his behavior and job performance. That showdown capped years of complaints from faculty and staff about Puliafitos drinking, temper and public humiliation of colleagues, according to interviews with former co-workers and written complaints to the administration.

He was not offered the biotech job at Ophthotech, a firm run by two longtime friends, until more than a month after he resigned, according to a company spokesman.

Quinn said he did not know whether lawyers for USC and Puliafito discussed how he would answer questions about his resignation before the deposition. He said that attorneys for his firm would never sponsor false testimony. We would never knowingly permit a witness to lie. In a statement, a USC spokesman said the university general counsels office, where Bratcher works, would never encourage a witness to perjure himself.

Experts said UC could ask a judge to reopen the deposition in light of the new information about Puliafitos past conduct.

I would get the personnel file and also question him about what happened. Maybe there is more that is not out there yet, Panish said.

The court fight is being closely watched in academic circles. UC took the highly unusual step of suing its academic rival in 2015 after years of frustration over USCs recruitment of faculty members who were the recipients of big research grants. These grants are an important income source for the state system.

These transformative faculty, as they are known at USC, have been key to President Nikias strategy for raising the universitys national reputation. Puliafito spearheaded the effort during his eight-year tenure as dean, recruiting more than 70 academics from the UC schools, Stanford, Harvard and other prestigious rivals.

After Puliafito helped woo away two well-funded UCLA neurology researchers in 2013, UC administrators were outraged, and complained to government regulators, according to court filings. It was not unusual for professors to move to other institutions, often with the first university cooperating in the transfer of grant funding to the new school. But in UCs view, USC had acted beyond accepted norms by targeting academics based on grant funding and strategizing secretly with those researchers while they were still employed by UC about moving grants to USC. The schools reached a confidential settlement requiring USC to pay UCLA more than $2 million, according to a copy of the agreement obtained through a public records request.

Late the next year, the dean set his sights on another UC prize: Alzheimers expert Paul Aisen. The UC San Diego neurology professor was a global leader in the search for a cure for the disease, and federal agencies and drug companies were expected to send more than $340 million in research grants to the lab he ran over the next five years

Nelvin C. Cepeda

Alzheimer’s researcher Dr. Paul Aisen.

Alzheimer’s researcher Dr. Paul Aisen. (Nelvin C. Cepeda)

I am going to get more involved in this personally and quarterback the process, he wrote in an email to Provost Michael Quick in April 2015. We need this to happen.

USC offered Aisen annual compensation of $500,000 a salary bump of $110,000 along with a home loan and other perks. He moved to USC in June 2015.

The loss reverberated at the highest levels of the UC system. President Janet Napolitano unsuccessfully lobbied the head of drug company Eli Lilly, a major funder of Aisens work, to keep its grant money at UC.

In July 2015, UC sued USC, Aisen and his lab colleagues for breach of fiduciary duty, interference with contracts, computer crimes and other claims. The university said USC had conspired with the researcher while he was still working for UCSD to interfere with the public universitys contractual relationships with grant funders and to seize control of critical clinical trial data.

Subsequent filings suggested the depths of the hard feelings. In one, UC complained that the departing scientists had even made off with paper clips paid for by UCSD. In another, their lawyers described USC as a predatory private university with a law-of-the-jungle mind-set.

Astrid Riecken / Getty Images

University of California President Janet Napolitano

University of California President Janet Napolitano (Astrid Riecken / Getty Images)

USC and Aisen countersued for defamation and other charges. Their lawyers wrote in the complaint that they were ready to settle the litigation and suggested the blame rested with UC for failing to fund Aisens work adequately. When he found a school that would, they wrote, UC engaged in petty academic politics, including trying to make him sign a loyalty oath and cutting off his email and phone service, tactics that they claimed endangered patient safety.

Aisen, Puliafito and other USC administrators insisted in depositions that the university had done nothing wrong. In his sworn testimony, the former dean testified that he was prepared to offer Aisen a faculty position even if his lucrative research grants stayed behind at UCSD.

You were indifferent to whether or not the grant funding transferred with Dr. Aisen, the UC lawyer asked.

Yes, Puliafito said, adding: Thats the risk we were willing to take.

San Francisco lawyer Stephen Hirschfeld, who has defended UC and other universities in civil suits, said the involvement of other officials in Aisens recruitment could blunt the impact of Puliafitos credibility issues.

The university provost, a faculty chair, medical school administrators, and human resources officers played key roles in luring Aisen, according to court filings and deposition testimony.

You could have a situation where the dean says one thing and several other administrators confirm that it is true, Hirschfeld said. Focusing too much on Puliafito, he said, might make UC look cruel or desperate to the jury.

Youve got to think really hard if its worth it to attack this guy in this way, he said.

Taylor, the Manhattan Beach lawyer, said that jurors could see Puliafito as a reflection of the values of the university and the decision makers there.

If terrible evidence comes in about him, it is terrible evidence for the school, he said.

The deposition offers tantalizing clues about the relationship between Puliafito and USC. At one point, the former dean was asked when he had last looked at the USC ethics code.

Six months ago, he replied. The deposition was on Sept. 23, 2016 just a day short of the six-month anniversary of the meeting at which the provost confronted him with complaints from colleagues about his behavior.

harriet.ryan@latimes.com

Twitter: @latimesharriet

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USC’s dean drug scandal could take a costly toll on the school’s legal battle with the UC system – Los Angeles Times

Griffin to host new ‘Mini-Med School’ sessions – CT Post

Griffin Hospital will be offering its free 10-week Mini-Med School course that begins Thurs., Sept. 14. Image courtesy of Griffin Hospital.

Griffin Hospital will be offering its free 10-week Mini-Med School course that begins Thurs., Sept. 14. Image courtesy of Griffin Hospital.

Griffin to host new Mini-Med School sessions

DERBY Griffin Hospital is accepting registrations for its free, 10-week Mini-Med School course that begins Sept. 14.

Specifically designed for the layperson with little or no medical background, Mini-Med School provides an opportunity to gain a greater understanding of how the human body works, insight into common disorders of the various organ systems, as well as information about disease prevention.

This free course will be conducted over 10 consecutive weekly sessions. Griffin Hospital physicians serve as faculty, covering a wide range of topics, including anatomy and physiology; primary care; cardiology and others. Each weekly session will be divided into two hour-long presentations on different medical topics, with a refreshment break between presentations and ample time for questions and answers.

The program meets Thursdays from 6:30 to 9 p.m. in the hospitals Meditation and Learning Center, 130 Division Street in Derby. The Mini-Med School will culminate with a graduation ceremony for participants on November 16. The course is comprehensive and the knowledge base is cumulative, so those participants who attend all sessions will gain the most benefit.

There is no fee to enroll in the Mini-Med School, but space is limited, so early registration is encouraged. To register, visit the events calendar at griffinhealth.org or call 203-732-1511.

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Griffin to host new ‘Mini-Med School’ sessions – CT Post

Medical Schools in New Jersey – Excite Education

Frequently Asked Question(s)

Q:In my search on how many medical schools in New Jersey, I came across Associate of Applied Science in Medical Reimbursement and Coding. What is taught in this program?

A:Associate of Applied Science in Medical Reimbursement and Coding program that you came across in your search for how many medical schools in New Jersey is one of the most sought for degrees in the field. The program gives you an in depth knowledge organization and structure of the body systems, pharmacological treatment and disease processes.

Q:What are the contents of the course on Beginning English Writing in the Medical schools in New Jersey?

A:The Medical Schools in New Jersey have dedicated course on Beginning English Writing. This course usually is worth 2 credits in total. It is designed to provide students with strong understanding of the concepts of proofreading and clearer sentence structuring. Students are also provided with quite strong hands on experience in this course for a much better learning.

Q:As I was searching for Medical Schools In NJ, I came across MCAT exam. Can you explain what this is?

A:MCAT is a medical school admission test. It is accepted by many schools across every state in the country. If you’re planning to pursue higher education in a medical field, it is important that you take the MCAT test. MCAT test results are used by many colleges for the basis of student admissions. The test reflects your readiness for medical studies at a higher level.

Q:What levels of degree programs can I opt for at medical colleges in New Jersey?

A:Typically, a college will offer undergraduate and graduate level degree programs. you can opt for a bachelor degree, a master’s degree, or even a doctorate degree program. If you have just completed high school, you can look forward to enrolling in a bachelor program. On the other hand, if you have completed your bachelor degree, enrolling in a master’s degree is the next best option.

Q:Do top medical schools in NJ offer online programs?

A:Yes there are plenty of medical programs on offer that will allow you the opportunity to study online. There are several advantages of enrolling in these online schools as they allow students to study on their own time. In addition to this online programs are considered more economical as compared to traditional programs.

Q:Can you name some of the different areas of study offered by medical colleges in NJ?

A:Medical colleges in NJ offer a variety of specialization areas for you to choose from. Some of these include radiology, pathology, gynecology and oncology. You can also undertake study in the field of cardiology, pediatrics or surgery. The field that you choose to specialize in will largely determine your future professional growth and development as a doctor, researcher or health care provider.

Q:Can I easily find accredited LPN schools in NJ and also get federal loans through them?

A:There are many accredited institutes and schools in NJ that offer LPN and other nursing programs. You can even search for them online and find all the relevant admission regarding the admission criteria and the financial aid program that they offer. Accredited colleges are eligible for federal loans as they meet the standard of education set by the US department of education.

Q:What can the LPN programs in New Jersey prepare me for?

A:LPN programs in New Jersey can prepare an individual for number of nursing duties and entry level positions in the practical field. LPN programs give you an introduction of nursing fundamentals. The subjects generally studied for this program may include biology, human anatomy, nursing ethics, nursing practices, physiology and pharmacology.

Q:As I was searching for a medical college of New Jersey, I came across online medical programs. Can you tell more?

A:Now it is possible to pursue medical studies online. There are all kinds of medical specialties that one can consider enrolling online. These programs are taught via online conferences, multimedia presentations, e-notes, and more. However, in most medical degree programs, student may have to take a few courses at the campus to acquire hands on experience.

Q:Are all the top medical schools in New Jersey accredited by a medical board?

A:Yes, most of the top ranking medical schools in New Jersey are accredited either regionally, programmatically, or both. Accreditation shows that a program or institute is following educational standards set by the Higher Education Commission. You can find information about accredited medical institutes online. Degrees earned at non-accredited colleges have no market value and are not accepted by most employers.

Q:Do medical schools in New Jersey USA offer basic nursing degrees?

A:Yes, most of the medical schools in NJ offer nursing programs at undergraduate and graduate level. However, it is best to check each of the program offerings by medical schools. Some of the basic nursing programs include LPN degrees, RN degrees, MSN degrees, and BSN degrees. Nursing programs are among the leading healthcare degrees nowadays.

Q:To qualify for the best medical schools in New Jersey, will I need some background in medical studies?

A:Yes, you must a thorough understanding of subjects such as anatomy and physiology. These are the most common pre-requisites. You will also need to have acceptable scores in all general science subjects such as chemistry, biology, and physics. Apart from this, some schools also conduct admission tests to evaluate a student’s readiness for medical education.

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Medical Schools in New Jersey – Excite Education

UT regents to ink first real estate deal with Merck at Dell Medical School – Austin Business Journal


Austin Business Journal
UT regents to ink first real estate deal with Merck at Dell Medical School
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The pharmaceutical giant plans to have a big footprint in Austin for its IT hub, and this is the first real estate move to be uncovered. Subscribe to get the full story. Already a subscriber? Sign in. Subscribe to get the full story. Already a

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UT regents to ink first real estate deal with Merck at Dell Medical School – Austin Business Journal

Osmosis is bringing personalized learning to medical school, and beyond – Technical.ly Brooklyn

Baltimore is well-known for its strengths in healthcare and education technology. In one growing startup that was founded in the city and continues to be based here, both of those areas are represented.

Osmosis applies learning platform tools to education for medical and health professionals.

Our mission is to provide clinicians the best education so they can provide you the best care, saidShiv Gaglani, the companys CEO.

Gaglani and cofounder Ryan Haynes began developing the idea while they were medical students at Johns Hopkins. They found they were both interested in how they were studying, as well as the subject matter. Starting with early work on a tool to help their own classmates, Osmosis developed a personalized learning platform that helps students study for classes and boards. The tools offered allow students can organize their study plans and materials, and there is additional content such as concept cards, flashcards and videos. In addition to providing the content, the system can automatically recommend other course material based on what someone is studying.

For Osmosis, medical education extends beyond school, as well. The startup creates medical education videos that are distributed widely through Wikipedia and YouTube. The video team includes former members of theKhanAcademyMedicine team. They seek to bring an in-depth approach to explaining topics clearly in an animated format. Videos created can also help professionals who need a review, and also educate patients and their families, Gaglani said.

As it grew and developed, Osmosis participated in the Dreamit Health accelerator in Philly, and won theMilken-Penn Graduate School of Education Business Plan Competitionin 2014, our sister site Technical.ly Philly reported. The startup also got support from investors including Medscape founder Peter Frishauf andAmerican Board of Medical Specialties CEOLois Nora.

Gaglani said Osmosis now reaches 300,000 people, and is looking to continue to grow. The companys distributed team has grown to 25, and is looking to grow its Maryland team. Osmosis recently received a $100,000 from TEDCOs Seed Investment Fund to help in that effort.

Stephen Babcock is Market Editor for Technical.ly Baltimore and Technical.ly DC. A graduate of Northeastern University, he moved to Baltimore following stints in New Orleans and Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Baltimore Fishbowl, NOLA Defender, NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune and the Rio Grande Sun.

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Osmosis is bringing personalized learning to medical school, and beyond – Technical.ly Brooklyn

Essential California: How the USC med school scandal could affect … – Los Angeles Times

Good morning, and welcome to the Essential California newsletter. Its Monday, Aug. 21, and heres whats happening across California:

TOP STORIES

Long shadow of a scandal at USC

Of the many consequences of the drug scandal involving former USC medical school dean Carmen Puliafito, few are as high-stakes as the possible effect on the legal battle between the University of California and USC over the defection of a star UC Alzheimer’s disease researcher. Puliafito was a key figure in luring the researcher to USC. Hundreds of millions of dollars are potentially at stake in the legal battle. Los Angeles Times

Plus: USC moved to further distance itself from the former dean of its medical school at the center of a scandal, downplaying Puliafitos much-touted performance as a fundraiser for the university. USCs senior vice president for university advancement said in a letter to alumni and supporters that assertions that Puliafito raised more than $1 billion while leading the Keck School of Medicine were overblown and that the physician was personally responsible for collecting barely 1% of that amount over the last seven years. Los Angeles Times

Talking about the end of life

Some doctors in California felt uncomfortable last year when a new law began allowing terminally ill patients to request lethal medicines, saying their careers had been dedicated to saving lives, not ending them. But physicians across the state say the conversations that health workers are having with patients are leading to patients fears and needs around dying being addressed better than ever before. They say the law has improved medical care for sick patients, even those who dont take advantage of it. Los Angeles Times

Trash sticker shock

El Sereno resident Scott Toland is another unhappy customer of L.A.s new refuse and recycling program. Toland recently learned that because of an assortment of extra fees, all backed by Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City Council as part of RecycLA, the monthly trash bill at the 10-unit condominium complex where he lives could double at a minimum. And thats only if his homeowner association cuts back on regular trash pickup. Los Angeles Times

L.A. STORIES

Eclipse watch: L.A. residents wont see a total eclipse of the sun this morning a partial eclipse is all they can hope for but if the weather cooperates, it should still be a pretty good show. Above Southern California, the moon will start to edge into the sun just after 9 a.m. Pacific time. The maximum eclipse will happen at 10:21 a.m. Heres our guide to watching safely. Los Angeles Times

Neediest cases: Steve Lopezs columns have been something special of late. Heres his latest about a woman whose life unraveled in Los Angeles and is now living in her car. She hopes to regain her health and her job. Los Angeles Times

Saying no to hate: A popular Southern California pastor denounced white nationalists and called for a spiritual awakening as he kicked off an annual Christian retreat in Anaheim this weekend attended by more than 25,000 people. Los Angeles Times

Dont pick up the phone: Robocalls are annoying, but some Southern California area codes get more than others. Its an especially bad problem in the 310 and 949. Heres a breakdown. Orange County Register

Trojans horse: Traveler, USC’s mascot, is coming under scrutiny for having a name similar to that of Robert E. Lee’s horse. Los Angeles Times

Hindenburg Park: How La Crescenta has dealt with its own Nazi history. Salon

IMMIGRATION AND THE BORDER

Protest in Laguna Beach: Hundreds of counter-protesters showed up at Sundays America First! rally, apparently far outnumbering those participating in an event billed as a vigil for victims of crimes committed by immigrants in the U.S. illegally. The protests were largely peaceful, if tense and loud, for much of the evening. Los Angeles Times

Arrested: The brother of a leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel was indicted on drug smuggling charges Friday, a day after he was arrested at the border in Nogales, Ariz., the U.S. attorneys office in San Diego said. San Diego Union-Tribune

Innovative: In a change of tactics, smugglers are using drones to fly meth over Mexican border into San Diego, officials say. Los Angeles Times

POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

No help for residents: For five years, Los Angeles has been issuing health advisories to housing developers, warning of the dangers of building near freeways. But when the city moved to alert residents as well, officials rejected it. Planning commissioners axed a provision to require traffic pollution signs on some new, multifamily developments from an environmental ordinance on the grounds that it would burden developers and hurt market values. Los Angeles Times

Cool graphic: Now that hes left the White House and returned to Breitbart, heres how Steve Bannon became the face of a political movement with roots in Los Angeles. Los Angeles Times

For your radar: The concern over the cost of prescription drug prices has been overshadowed for the past year by the marquee healthcare battles gripping Sacramento and Washington. Thats not likely to be the case much longer. The effort to rein in pharmaceutical costs is poised for a major showdown as state lawmakers enter their final month of the legislative year. Los Angeles Times

California versus the USA: California is writing a new chapter in the centuries-old states rights conflict. Sacramento Bee

CRIME AND COURTS

Teacher arrested: A female teacher at the elite Brentwood School has been arrested on suspicion of having sex with an teenage student. Los Angeles Times

Drawing a line: City Atty. Mike Feuer said Friday that he would urge Los Angeles officials to consider imposing restrictions or even deny permits to hate groups seeking to rally here to prevent the kind of violent clashes that erupted at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Los Angeles Times

Paintball attacks on the rise: In South Los Angeles, paintball attacks have nearly tripled in the last year, with the Los Angeles Police Departments South Bureau counting 68 paintball victims, compared with 24 at this time last year. Los Angeles Times

My son deserves justice: The father of the good Samaritan who died after he tried to break up a fight in Riversides downtown area Friday asked for witnesses or others with knowledge about who might have been involved to come forward. San Bernardino Sun

THE ENVIRONMENT

Some help for beachgoers: The San Mateo County sheriffs office says visitors to Martins Beach wont be arrested if they go around gates locked by billionaire Vinod Khosla. The Mercury News

CALIFORNIA CULTURE

Comfort fare: With more than 450 original series in production this year, television is booming, yet viewers are also turning to such well-worn fare as as The Golden Girls, Full House and the political drama The West Wing, which debuted when Bill Clinton occupied the White House. Streaming services are giving these shows new life. Los Angeles Times

Sticker shock: Resale websites StubHub, SeatGeek and VividSeats report that secondhand tickets to Lin-Manuel Mirandas smash Broadway hit Hamilton are selling for $467 to $510 a ticket, on average. That bests the 2013 Pantages run of The Lion King, which had an average ticket resale value of $209. Los Angeles Times

Physically idealized roles: Body acceptance is becoming a big deal in many parts of American culture but not so much in Hollywood. New York Times

A deeply personal film: A story about the L.A. riots, seen through the perspective of Korean Americans, makes its way onto the big screen. Los Angeles Times

Ubers next leader? Former General Electric Chief Executive Jeff Immelt has emerged as the front-runner to become Ubers CEO. Recode

Third-shift magic: Disneyland Resort honored its overnight workers with a middle-of-the-night party. Orange County Register

CALIFORNIA ALMANAC

Los Angeles area: sunny and 77. San Diego: sunny and 73. San Francisco area: mostly sunny and 67. Sacramento: mostly sunny and 88. More weather is here.

AND FINALLY

This weeks birthdays for those who made a mark in California: Google co-founderSergey Brin (Aug. 21, 1973), former Gov. Pete Wilson (Aug. 23, 1933), retired Laker Kobe Bryant (Aug. 23, 1978), 12-time Olympic swimming medalist Natalie Coughlin and Rep. Raul Ruiz (Aug. 25, 1972).

If you have a memory or story about the Golden State, share it with us. Send us an email to let us know what you love or fondly remember about our state. (Please keep your story to 100 words.)

Please let us know what we can do to make this newsletter more useful to you. Send comments, complaints and ideas to Benjamin Oreskes and Shelby Grad. Also follow them on Twitter @boreskes and @shelbygrad.

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Essential California: How the USC med school scandal could affect … – Los Angeles Times

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public …

The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison is committed to improving the health of the citizens of Wisconsin and beyond through education, research and service. We are developing new approaches for preventing, diagnosing and treating illness by uniting the principles and power of traditional medicine and public health. Learn more about us

Follow this link:

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public …

Home | Yale School of Medicine

The Yale Combined Program in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences (BBS) is a doctoral program that enables you to take advantage of all of the resources found at a modern research university. Everything Yale has to offer faculty, facilities, and campuses – is here in one comprehensive, interdisciplinary graduate program. BBS is one opportunity of many at Yale that allow students and faculty to bridge all aspects of the University, including science, law, engineering, divinity, and the arts. Here, Thomas Steitz, PhD, Nobel Laureate and a participating professor in the Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology track of BBS, displays one of the many ribosomal models in his office.

Read more about the BBS Program: http://bbs.yale.edu/

Photo by Robert Lisak

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Home | Yale School of Medicine

Essential California: How the USC med school scandal could affect a major court case – Los Angeles Times

Good morning, and welcome to the Essential California newsletter. Its Monday, Aug. 21, and heres whats happening across California:

TOP STORIES

Long shadow of a scandal at USC

Of the many consequences of the drug scandal involving former USC medical school dean Carmen Puliafito, few are as high-stakes as the possible effect on the legal battle between the University of California and USC over the defection of a star UC Alzheimer’s disease researcher. Puliafito was a key figure in luring the researcher to USC. Hundreds of millions of dollars are potentially at stake in the legal battle. Los Angeles Times

Plus: USC moved to further distance itself from the former dean of its medical school at the center of a scandal, downplaying Puliafitos much-touted performance as a fundraiser for the university. USCs senior vice president for university advancement said in a letter to alumni and supporters that assertions that Puliafito raised more than $1 billion while leading the Keck School of Medicine were overblown and that the physician was personally responsible for collecting barely 1% of that amount over the last seven years. Los Angeles Times

Talking about the end of life

Some doctors in California felt uncomfortable last year when a new law began allowing terminally ill patients to request lethal medicines, saying their careers had been dedicated to saving lives, not ending them. But physicians across the state say the conversations that health workers are having with patients are leading to patients fears and needs around dying being addressed better than ever before. They say the law has improved medical care for sick patients, even those who dont take advantage of it. Los Angeles Times

Trash sticker shock

El Sereno resident Scott Toland is another unhappy customer of L.A.s new refuse and recycling program. Toland recently learned that because of an assortment of extra fees, all backed by Mayor Eric Garcetti and the City Council as part of RecycLA, the monthly trash bill at the 10-unit condominium complex where he lives could double at a minimum. And thats only if his homeowner association cuts back on regular trash pickup. Los Angeles Times

L.A. STORIES

Eclipse watch: L.A. residents wont see a total eclipse of the sun this morning a partial eclipse is all they can hope for but if the weather cooperates, it should still be a pretty good show. Above Southern California, the moon will start to edge into the sun just after 9 a.m. Pacific time. The maximum eclipse will happen at 10:21 a.m. Heres our guide to watching safely. Los Angeles Times

Neediest cases: Steve Lopezs columns have been something special of late. Heres his latest about a woman whose life unraveled in Los Angeles and is now living in her car. She hopes to regain her health and her job. Los Angeles Times

Saying no to hate: A popular Southern California pastor denounced white nationalists and called for a spiritual awakening as he kicked off an annual Christian retreat in Anaheim this weekend attended by more than 25,000 people. Los Angeles Times

Dont pick up the phone: Robocalls are annoying, but some Southern California area codes get more than others. Its an especially bad problem in the 310 and 949. Heres a breakdown. Orange County Register

Trojans horse: Traveler, USC’s mascot, is coming under scrutiny for having a name similar to that of Robert E. Lee’s horse. Los Angeles Times

Hindenburg Park: How La Crescenta has dealt with its own Nazi history. Salon

IMMIGRATION AND THE BORDER

Protest in Laguna Beach: Hundreds of counter-protesters showed up at Sundays America First! rally, apparently far outnumbering those participating in an event billed as a vigil for victims of crimes committed by immigrants in the U.S. illegally. The protests were largely peaceful, if tense and loud, for much of the evening. Los Angeles Times

Arrested: The brother of a leader of the powerful Sinaloa cartel was indicted on drug smuggling charges Friday, a day after he was arrested at the border in Nogales, Ariz., the U.S. attorneys office in San Diego said. San Diego Union-Tribune

Innovative: In a change of tactics, smugglers are using drones to fly meth over Mexican border into San Diego, officials say. Los Angeles Times

POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

No help for residents: For five years, Los Angeles has been issuing health advisories to housing developers, warning of the dangers of building near freeways. But when the city moved to alert residents as well, officials rejected it. Planning commissioners axed a provision to require traffic pollution signs on some new, multifamily developments from an environmental ordinance on the grounds that it would burden developers and hurt market values. Los Angeles Times

Cool graphic: Now that hes left the White House and returned to Breitbart, heres how Steve Bannon became the face of a political movement with roots in Los Angeles. Los Angeles Times

For your radar: The concern over the cost of prescription drug prices has been overshadowed for the past year by the marquee healthcare battles gripping Sacramento and Washington. Thats not likely to be the case much longer. The effort to rein in pharmaceutical costs is poised for a major showdown as state lawmakers enter their final month of the legislative year. Los Angeles Times

California versus the USA: California is writing a new chapter in the centuries-old states rights conflict. Sacramento Bee

CRIME AND COURTS

Teacher arrested: A female teacher at the elite Brentwood School has been arrested on suspicion of having sex with an teenage student. Los Angeles Times

Drawing a line: City Atty. Mike Feuer said Friday that he would urge Los Angeles officials to consider imposing restrictions or even deny permits to hate groups seeking to rally here to prevent the kind of violent clashes that erupted at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va. Los Angeles Times

Paintball attacks on the rise: In South Los Angeles, paintball attacks have nearly tripled in the last year, with the Los Angeles Police Departments South Bureau counting 68 paintball victims, compared with 24 at this time last year. Los Angeles Times

My son deserves justice: The father of the good Samaritan who died after he tried to break up a fight in Riversides downtown area Friday asked for witnesses or others with knowledge about who might have been involved to come forward. San Bernardino Sun

THE ENVIRONMENT

Some help for beachgoers: The San Mateo County sheriffs office says visitors to Martins Beach wont be arrested if they go around gates locked by billionaire Vinod Khosla. The Mercury News

CALIFORNIA CULTURE

Comfort fare: With more than 450 original series in production this year, television is booming, yet viewers are also turning to such well-worn fare as as The Golden Girls, Full House and the political drama The West Wing, which debuted when Bill Clinton occupied the White House. Streaming services are giving these shows new life. Los Angeles Times

Sticker shock: Resale websites StubHub, SeatGeek and VividSeats report that secondhand tickets to Lin-Manuel Mirandas smash Broadway hit Hamilton are selling for $467 to $510 a ticket, on average. That bests the 2013 Pantages run of The Lion King, which had an average ticket resale value of $209. Los Angeles Times

Physically idealized roles: Body acceptance is becoming a big deal in many parts of American culture but not so much in Hollywood. New York Times

A deeply personal film: A story about the L.A. riots, seen through the perspective of Korean Americans, makes its way onto the big screen. Los Angeles Times

Ubers next leader? Former General Electric Chief Executive Jeff Immelt has emerged as the front-runner to become Ubers CEO. Recode

Third-shift magic: Disneyland Resort honored its overnight workers with a middle-of-the-night party. Orange County Register

CALIFORNIA ALMANAC

Los Angeles area: sunny and 77. San Diego: sunny and 73. San Francisco area: mostly sunny and 67. Sacramento: mostly sunny and 88. More weather is here.

AND FINALLY

This weeks birthdays for those who made a mark in California: Google co-founderSergey Brin (Aug. 21, 1973), former Gov. Pete Wilson (Aug. 23, 1933), retired Laker Kobe Bryant (Aug. 23, 1978), 12-time Olympic swimming medalist Natalie Coughlin and Rep. Raul Ruiz (Aug. 25, 1972).

If you have a memory or story about the Golden State, share it with us. Send us an email to let us know what you love or fondly remember about our state. (Please keep your story to 100 words.)

Please let us know what we can do to make this newsletter more useful to you. Send comments, complaints and ideas to Benjamin Oreskes and Shelby Grad. Also follow them on Twitter @boreskes and @shelbygrad.

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Essential California: How the USC med school scandal could affect a major court case – Los Angeles Times

USC’s dean drug scandal could take a costly toll on the school’s legal battle with the UC system – Los Angeles Times

Six months after Dr. Carmen Puliafito stepped down as dean of USCs medical school, he was called by the university to give sworn testimony as a witness in a lawsuit the institution was facing.

It was a sensitive matter with hundreds of millions of dollars potentially at stake, and two attorneys for the university sat with him as he answered questions.

Almost immediately, the opposing lawyer hit on a topic that was a closely guarded secret at USC: The circumstances of Puliafitos abrupt resignation in March 2016.

The former dean had a ready explanation, saying he had taken advantage of a unique opportunity at a biotech company. The response was succinct, matter-of-fact and, in light of recent revelations about his drug use and troubled tenure at USC, far from the whole story.

Paul Pringle, Harriet Ryan, Adam Elmahrek, Matt Hamilton and Sarah Parvini

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Of the many consequences of the Puliafito scandal for USC, few are as high-stakes as the possible effect on the court case that prompted his testimony last year.

Puliafito was expected to play a role in defending USC in the legal battle with the University of California over the defection of a star UC Alzheimer’s disease researcher.

Puliafito helped woo the scientist and dozens of other prominent academics as part of a strategy by USC President C.L. Max Nikias to vault the university into the ranks of elite research institutions.

UC is seeking $185 million in damages along with a punitive award that could be several times that amount.

With all thats out there about him, hes going to have a serious problem coming off as credible and being believed, said Los Angeles attorney Brian Panish, a civil litigator who has represented clients in suits against both schools.

A Times investigation published last month revealed that Puliafito partied and used drugs with a circle of criminals and addicts while serving as dean. Puliafito engaged in this behavior during the period in 2015 in which he was recruiting the researcher, according to interviews with his associates and text messages they exchanged with him.

A UC spokeswoman said the school would not discuss its legal strategy other than to say we are vigorously pursuing this case against USC.

An attorney for USC said no decision had been made on whether to call Puliafito as a witness, but insisted the former deans testimony was not important to the universitys defense.

Hes a bit player in this, said attorney John Quinn.

In court filings earlier this year, lawyers for USC highlighted a portion of the deans testimony in arguing that the case should be dismissed.

Puliafito testified that the university wanted UC San Diego researcher Paul Aisen to join the faculty whether or not he brought along hundreds of millions of dollars in grant funding, a rejection of UCs claim that USC was motivated by money in recruiting the scientist.

Legal experts said that even if USC decides not to use Puliafitos testimony, UCs legal team could ask for copies of his personnel record and attempt to make an issue in court of his conduct. That would set up a fight between USC and UC over whether jurors should be told about the skeletons in Puliafitos closet if the case went to trial.

The trial judge would have to decide whether the prejudicial, inflammatory value is outweighed by the probative value, said Manhattan Beach civil lawyer John Taylor, who has represented clients with legal claims against USC.

The judge, Taylor added, might say, Suppose he was out partying like a rock star? How does that make it more or less believable to a jury?

USC is anticipating that UC will try to make Puliafitos drug use a line of attack.

I believe that they would do anything they could to try to poison the well, including introducing the deans personal problems, USC lawyer Quinn said, adding that he expected a judge to reject such attempts as irrelevant.

The case is on hold while USC appeals a U.S. district judges ruling that moved the suit from federal court to San Diego County Superior Court, where it was originally filed. No trial date has been set.

By the time Puliafito was scheduled to be questioned under oath, the case was in its second year and UC had brushed off entreaties by USC to settle the matter out of court. USC deputy general counsel Stacy Bratcher and other university lawyers met with the former dean three times to prepare him for the deposition, he later testified.

On the day of his testimony, Bratcher and another lawyer sat with him at a downtown law firm as he was questioned for about six hours, according to a transcript of the testimony. Portions of the transcript were redacted at the request of USC.

Puliafito said he had been deposed 20 times in his life, including in court cases where he was a medical expert. On a video recording of part of the deposition, he appears self-assured, offering short, precise responses and brushing aside many questions as hypothetical and difficult to answer.

A few minutes into his testimony, he was asked for the circumstances of your ceasing to be dean of the medical school. An attorney for USCs outside law firm, Viola Trebicka, initially protested that the question was overbroad and vague objections a judge would rule on a later date and then directed him to go ahead and answer.

I had a unique opportunity in the ophthalmic biotechnology industry, and I was able to continue my employment at USC on sabbatical and work for this biotech company, he said.

The full story was more complicated. USC acknowledged after The Times report that the dean quit his post during a confrontation with the university provost about his behavior and job performance. That showdown capped years of complaints from faculty and staff about Puliafitos drinking, temper and public humiliation of colleagues, according to interviews with former co-workers and written complaints to the administration.

He was not offered the biotech job at Ophthotech, a firm run by two longtime friends, until more than a month after he resigned, according to a company spokesman.

Quinn said he did not know whether lawyers for USC and Puliafito discussed how he would answer questions about his resignation before the deposition. He said that attorneys for his firm would never sponsor false testimony. We would never knowingly permit a witness to lie. In a statement, a USC spokesman said the university general counsels office, where Bratcher works, would never encourage a witness to perjure himself.

Experts said UC could ask a judge to reopen the deposition in light of the new information about Puliafitos past conduct.

I would get the personnel file and also question him about what happened. Maybe there is more that is not out there yet, Panish said.

The court fight is being closely watched in academic circles. UC took the highly unusual step of suing its academic rival in 2015 after years of frustration over USCs recruitment of faculty members who were the recipients of big research grants. These grants are an important income source for the state system.

These transformative faculty, as they are known at USC, have been key to President Nikias strategy for raising the universitys national reputation. Puliafito spearheaded the effort during his eight-year tenure as dean, recruiting more than 70 academics from the UC schools, Stanford, Harvard and other prestigious rivals.

After Puliafito helped woo away two well-funded UCLA neurology researchers in 2013, UC administrators were outraged, and complained to government regulators, according to court filings. It was not unusual for professors to move to other institutions, often with the first university cooperating in the transfer of grant funding to the new school. But in UCs view, USC had acted beyond accepted norms by targeting academics based on grant funding and strategizing secretly with those researchers while they were still employed by UC about moving grants to USC. The schools reached a confidential settlement requiring USC to pay UCLA more than $2 million, according to a copy of the agreement obtained through a public records request.

Late the next year, the dean set his sights on another UC prize: Alzheimers expert Paul Aisen. The UC San Diego neurology professor was a global leader in the search for a cure for the disease, and federal agencies and drug companies were expected to send more than $340 million in research grants to the lab he ran over the next five years

Nelvin C. Cepeda

Alzheimer’s researcher Dr. Paul Aisen.

Alzheimer’s researcher Dr. Paul Aisen. (Nelvin C. Cepeda)

I am going to get more involved in this personally and quarterback the process, he wrote in an email to Provost Michael Quick in April 2015. We need this to happen.

USC offered Aisen annual compensation of $500,000 a salary bump of $110,000 along with a home loan and other perks. He moved to USC in June 2015.

The loss reverberated at the highest levels of the UC system. President Janet Napolitano unsuccessfully lobbied the head of drug company Eli Lilly, a major funder of Aisens work, to keep its grant money at UC.

In July 2015, UC sued USC, Aisen and his lab colleagues for breach of fiduciary duty, interference with contracts, computer crimes and other claims. The university said USC had conspired with the researcher while he was still working for UCSD to interfere with the public universitys contractual relationships with grant funders and to seize control of critical clinical trial data.

Subsequent filings suggested the depths of the hard feelings. In one, UC complained that the departing scientists had even made off with paper clips paid for by UCSD. In another, their lawyers described USC as a predatory private university with a law-of-the-jungle mind-set.

Astrid Riecken / Getty Images

University of California President Janet Napolitano

University of California President Janet Napolitano (Astrid Riecken / Getty Images)

USC and Aisen countersued for defamation and other charges. Their lawyers wrote in the complaint that they were ready to settle the litigation and suggested the blame rested with UC for failing to fund Aisens work adequately. When he found a school that would, they wrote, UC engaged in petty academic politics, including trying to make him sign a loyalty oath and cutting off his email and phone service, tactics that they claimed endangered patient safety.

Aisen, Puliafito and other USC administrators insisted in depositions that the university had done nothing wrong. In his sworn testimony, the former dean testified that he was prepared to offer Aisen a faculty position even if his lucrative research grants stayed behind at UCSD.

You were indifferent to whether or not the grant funding transferred with Dr. Aisen, the UC lawyer asked.

Yes, Puliafito said, adding: Thats the risk we were willing to take.

San Francisco lawyer Stephen Hirschfeld, who has defended UC and other universities in civil suits, said the involvement of other officials in Aisens recruitment could blunt the impact of Puliafitos credibility issues.

The university provost, a faculty chair, medical school administrators, and human resources officers played key roles in luring Aisen, according to court filings and deposition testimony.

You could have a situation where the dean says one thing and several other administrators confirm that it is true, Hirschfeld said. Focusing too much on Puliafito, he said, might make UC look cruel or desperate to the jury.

Youve got to think really hard if its worth it to attack this guy in this way, he said.

Taylor, the Manhattan Beach lawyer, said that jurors could see Puliafito as a reflection of the values of the university and the decision makers there.

If terrible evidence comes in about him, it is terrible evidence for the school, he said.

The deposition offers tantalizing clues about the relationship between Puliafito and USC. At one point, the former dean was asked when he had last looked at the USC ethics code.

Six months ago, he replied. The deposition was on Sept. 23, 2016 just a day short of the six-month anniversary of the meeting at which the provost confronted him with complaints from colleagues about his behavior.

harriet.ryan@latimes.com

Twitter: @latimesharriet

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USC’s dean drug scandal could take a costly toll on the school’s legal battle with the UC system – Los Angeles Times

Program paves way for medical school – The Augusta Chronicle

Shelby Howard and Aditi Talkad might be in their first year at Medical College of Georgia but the two have been at Augusta University working toward a medical degree for three years.

The two are among 29 students who began the seven-year BS/MD program in 2014, 18 of whom are now in their first year of medical school. The combined undergraduate and health sciences programs were envisioned as one of the fruits of consolidating Augusta State and then-Georgia Health Sciences universities in 2013. Dr. Paul Wallach, vice dean for academic affairs at MCG, brought the program with him five years ago after creating similar programs at the University of South Florida.

This is my brainchild, he said, and it benefits both the students and the university.

The advantage for the student is they have a clear pathway into medical school, Wallach said. The advantage for the institution, which I thought was considerable as we were going through our consolidation, is it creates a premier program for recruitment into the undergraduate campus and permits very highly performing students to be recruited to Augusta University.

Both Howard and Talkad were considering other, larger universities in Georgia and had not heard much about Augusta prior to learning about the program. Now that has changed.

Augusta is a lot more on the map from at least when I started college, Howard said.

I think the program has put it on the map, Talkad said. There are people applying from out of state, from California, to come here to come to Augusta. She and Howard both talk to high school students about the program and its advantages.

The students along the way have had to meet the same or higher standards for others getting into medical school, including taking the Medical College Admission Test and interviewing with the Admissions Committee. The difference with these students is they had to face the committee when they were college freshmen. But they got a lot of support from the medical school faculty before they had to do it, including three mock interviews.

They groomed us for that interview, Howard said. It also let them know the level of professionalism and standards they would need to succeed in medical school, Talkad said. Some of their new classmates may just now be finding out they are surrounded by people with similar interests and passions but weve been doing that for the past three years, she said. That was a huge benefit of coming here.

It also spared them the anxiety of applications and months of waiting to find out if they would get in or not. Howard took an MCAT preparation class with students going through that process and they were so stressed out of their minds, she said. It saved us that, which I am grateful for.

And a year, Talkad added. That will be important down the road especially with how much time goes into becoming a doctor, Howard said.

The experience has also bonded them into a close-knit group that is family to each other, Talkad said.

Especially because college is such a time of personal growth and figuring out who you are so weve gone through those growing periods and growing pains with each other, Howard said.

And they expect it to stay that way.

You grow up so much with them that you dont lose track of that, Talkad said.

Reach Tom Corwin at (706) 823-3213

or tom.corwin@augustachronicle.com.

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Program paves way for medical school – The Augusta Chronicle

Albemarle native earns top medical school scholarship – Stanly News & Press

An Albemarle native has been awarded the most prestigious scholarship available at East Carolina Universitys Brody School of Medicine.

Lindsey Burleson is one of three students in the medical schools Class of 2021 chosen for the Brody Scholar award, valued at approximately $112,000.

She will receive four years of medical school tuition, living expenses and the opportunity to design her own summer enrichment program that can include travel abroad. The award will also support community service projects she may undertake while in medical school.

Burleson is a 2016 graduate of Western Carolina University Honors College, where she earned a degree in chemistry. She was a student athlete on the WCU Womens Basketball team for four years and a recipient of the Curtis and Enid Meltzer Endowed Scholarship.

Burleson was involved in multiple WCU medical research efforts and volunteered at Blue Ridge Health (formally known as Jackson County Good Samaritan Clinic) throughout her undergraduate education and subsequent gap year.

Burleson has known she wanted to work in healthcare since she was young. During her time at WCU she was given opportunities to explore the clinical and laboratory research side of medicine and credits the experience for helping her make the decision to attend medical school.

She plans to become involved in more research with clinical implications during her time at Brody.

In addition to her love for research, Burleson has another focus when it comes to healthcare.

I am particularly passionate about providing healthcare to women in underserved populations, said Burleson. I someday hope to be able to dedicate a portion of my career to providing free care for women and educating populations on healthcare disparities in rural communities.

Being named a Brody Scholar is a huge honor and I feel blessed to have the support of the Brody Family and their commitment to the students and future physicians of North Carolina, Burleson added. As someone who has attended North Carolina public schools for my entire life, I am consistently blown away and inspired by the willingness of North Carolina residents to educate and mentor their students.

In its 35th year, the Brody Scholars program honors J.S. Sammy Brody. He and his brother, Leo, were among the earliest supporters of medical education in eastern North Carolina. The legacy continues through the dedicated efforts of Hyman Brody of Greenville and David Brody of Kinston. Subsequent gifts from the Brody family have enabled the medical school to educate new physicians, conduct important research and improve health care in eastern North Carolina.

Since the program began in 1983, 137 students have received scholarships. About 70 percent of Brody Scholars remain in North Carolina to practice, and the majority of those stay in eastern North Carolina.

In her spare time, Burleson enjoys cooking and baking and stays active by running and continuing to play basketball.

She is the daughter of Jeff and Kathy Burleson and a graduate of North Stanly High School.

B. J. Drye is editor of The Stanly News & Press. Contact him at (704) 982-2121 ext. 25, bj@stanlnewspress.com or PO Box 488, Albemarle, NC 28002.

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Albemarle native earns top medical school scholarship – Stanly News & Press

Dell Medical School touts growing number of residents in new report – Austin American-Statesman

The number of medical residents and fellows providing care in Travis County clinics and hospitals is up by 30 percent since 2012, according to a report released this week by the University of Texas Dell Medical School.

In 2016, there were 287 residents working in county clinics and hospitals, up from 218 in 2012, the community benefit report says. That number is projected to grow to more than 300 by 2020.

When pressed at a Central Health meeting Wednesday night by board member Julie Oliver about why that number would only grow by about 13 in four years, the schools dean, Clay Johnston, said that was a conservative estimate.

The 300 is just reflecting commitments weve already made, Johnston said in his presentation. We actually expect the number to grow faster as we open new residency spots.

Johnston also noted that residency programs roll over every two to four years, bringing new residents into the community and producing new physicians. The programs are funded primarily by a partnership with Seton Healthcare Family.

The report also highlights other areas that Dell Medical School considers it made progress in the past year, including that 79 percent of women in the recently redesigned perinatal care system are keeping postpartum appointments, up from about 40 percent previously, and that the yearlong wait for orthopedic appointment is down to three weeks.

We think the real impact of our work is the redesign, Johnston said at Wednesdays meeting. Because if (care is) provided where the outcomes are better and the costs are lower, we all win even more than having those additional (provider) positions.

The third-annual report comes as the school and Central Health, the county health care district, face criticism from some community groups over the transparency of the schools use of $35 million of taxpayer funds annually. Travis County voters agreed in 2012 to raise property taxes to make that contribution.

Officials argue that the schools doctors and residents work in its affiliated clinics to take care of low-income patients, and in the long term the school will help attract and retain providers.

The report also shows that in the fiscal 2016-17 year, most of taxpayer funds, or a projected $46.1 million, have been used for compensation and employment-related expenses. The rest, $100,000, was used for information technology equipment and software.

Johnston told board members that compensation is the largest budget item at most medical schools, and Dell Medical Schools building costs are covered by other funding sources.

As for whats next, the school plans to open new clinics in the early winter and will continue to work on clinical model redesigns, Johnston said.

No one spoke during citizens communication on Wednesday about the benefit report. Board members on Wednesday were mainly congratulatory of Dell Medical School for the work it has accomplished.

Central Health updates

At Wednesdays regular Central Health meeting, enterprise chief administrative officer Larry Wallace updated the board on proposed efforts to expand health care in eastern Travis County.

Del Valle

Expansion of adult health care services from UT Nursing School, possibly at Creedmoor Elementary. Status: Pending approval from Del Valle school board.

Creation of Del Valle Wellness Clinic at Travis County Employee Healthcare Clinic site on FM 973 that would be open 2 to three days a week. Status: CommUnityCare, a network of public clinics affiliated with Central Health, is seeking federal approval to provide primary care at the site. The project will go before the Travis County Commissioners Court this month.

Long-term, Central Health hopes to build a permanent health canter on existing county property on FM 973. Status: Project will require approval from county commissioners.

Northeastern Travis County

The Austin school district has offered a portable classroom building at Overton Elementary to be used as a Northeast Health Resource Center. Status: School board should make decision in September.

Expansion of operation days at Turner-Roberts Recreation Center, where CommUnityCare provides clinical care through a mobile care team. Status: Central Health discussing with city.

Austins Master Plan calls for the construction of a health care facility in Colony Park. Status: Timeline unknown.

Mobile Loaves and Fishes co-founder and CEO Alan Graham has offered to provide land and assist with the construction of a health center on Hog Eye Road near the Community First Village. Status: Planning stages with Graham and other partners.

Manor

Renovations to existing CommUnityCare health center or construction of new health center. Status: Very early planning stages.

Central Health budget

Central Health is proposing to lower its tax rate to 10.74 cents per $100 taxable valuation from 11.05 cents per $100 taxable valuation. However, because the average homestead value increased from $285,152 to $305,173, the average homestead would still see an increase of about 4 percent, or $12.50, on their tax bill.

The proposed budget includes an increase of $11.7 million in health care delivery operations, which includes reserves and debt service.

The proposed budget and property tax rate will go before the Travis County Commissioners Court on Tuesday. Central Health will hold public hearings on Aug. 30 and Sept. 6, both at 6 p.m. at Central Health Administrative Offices, 1111 E. Cesar Chavez St.

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2v5HQAC.

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Dell Medical School touts growing number of residents in new report – Austin American-Statesman

Why Med Schools Are Requiring Art Classes – Artsy

Efforts to better communicate with patients also drive much of Dr. Flanagans Impressionism course. One particularly original exercise sees students partner up to paint. One student is given a postcard with a famous Impressionist painting on it, while the other student, who cannot see the card, stands at a canvas with a paintbrush in hand, and must ask their partner questions about the painting in order to reproduce it. The painter becomes like the physician whos taking a history and trying to get information from the patient, Dr. Flanagan says. They experience firsthand how much easier it is to gain information when you ask open-ended questions, when you stop and let that patient tell their story.

At many schools, programming around the arts is also happening outside of the classroom. Yale has its Medical Humanities & the Arts Council, which promotes interaction among the medical school and other schools at the university, while also supporting student-run organizations and eventslike Rocks art tour and a series of drawing sessions started by one of his classmates, Sue Xiao.

Yale med student Nientara Anderson says her involvement in an on-campus interdisciplinary group and other artists initiatives has helped widen her perspective on important issuesperspective that will ultimately make her a better doctor.

I noticed in my first year of medical school that we were talking about things like race, mental health, sexuality, and we werent really reaching outside of medicine and asking people who really study these things, Anderson says. I see art as a way, especially art in medicine, to bring in outside expertise.

Rock agrees, stressing that a sense of criticality, more than anything, is what I would hope that the arts and the humanities bring to the medical profession. He points to incidents of unconscious bias, where preconceived notions about things like how a certain disease presents or where an individual lives can negatively affect a doctors decision making. There are a lot of apparent assumptions in Western society that can be extremely problematic and very dangerous when aligned with the power that a physician has in the clinic, operating room, or emergency department, he adds.

Dr. Taylor notes that at Columbia, students are similarly receptive to taking humanities courses. The application to medicine is very obvious, we dont have to tell our medical students why theyre doing this, she says. And visual art, it seems, has a special role to play.

Dr. Schwartz suggests that visual art is somewhat unique in what it can offer to medical professionals. For me, the greatest asset with visual art in particular, when it comes to teaching medical students, is just that it gently takes us out of our comfort zone, he says. It gives us a great opportunity to have these stop and think moments. Doctor or not, we could all stand to have more moments to stop and think.

Casey Lesser

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Why Med Schools Are Requiring Art Classes – Artsy

Albemarle native earns top medical school scholarship – Stanly News & Press

An Albemarle native has been awarded the most prestigious scholarship available at East Carolina Universitys Brody School of Medicine.

Lindsey Burleson is one of three students in the medical schools Class of 2021 chosen for the Brody Scholar award, valued at approximately $112,000.

She will receive four years of medical school tuition, living expenses and the opportunity to design her own summer enrichment program that can include travel abroad. The award will also support community service projects she may undertake while in medical school.

Burleson is a 2016 graduate of Western Carolina University Honors College, where she earned a degree in chemistry. She was a student athlete on the WCU Womens Basketball team for four years and a recipient of the Curtis and Enid Meltzer Endowed Scholarship.

Burleson was involved in multiple WCU medical research efforts and volunteered at Blue Ridge Health (formally known as Jackson County Good Samaritan Clinic) throughout her undergraduate education and subsequent gap year.

Burleson has known she wanted to work in healthcare since she was young. During her time at WCU she was given opportunities to explore the clinical and laboratory research side of medicine and credits the experience for helping her make the decision to attend medical school.

She plans to become involved in more research with clinical implications during her time at Brody.

In addition to her love for research, Burleson has another focus when it comes to healthcare.

I am particularly passionate about providing healthcare to women in underserved populations, said Burleson. I someday hope to be able to dedicate a portion of my career to providing free care for women and educating populations on healthcare disparities in rural communities.

Being named a Brody Scholar is a huge honor and I feel blessed to have the support of the Brody Family and their commitment to the students and future physicians of North Carolina, Burleson added. As someone who has attended North Carolina public schools for my entire life, I am consistently blown away and inspired by the willingness of North Carolina residents to educate and mentor their students.

In its 35th year, the Brody Scholars program honors J.S. Sammy Brody. He and his brother, Leo, were among the earliest supporters of medical education in eastern North Carolina. The legacy continues through the dedicated efforts of Hyman Brody of Greenville and David Brody of Kinston. Subsequent gifts from the Brody family have enabled the medical school to educate new physicians, conduct important research and improve health care in eastern North Carolina.

Since the program began in 1983, 137 students have received scholarships. About 70 percent of Brody Scholars remain in North Carolina to practice, and the majority of those stay in eastern North Carolina.

In her spare time, Burleson enjoys cooking and baking and stays active by running and continuing to play basketball.

She is the daughter of Jeff and Kathy Burleson and a graduate of North Stanly High School.

B. J. Drye is editor of The Stanly News & Press. Contact him at (704) 982-2121 ext. 25, bj@stanlnewspress.com or PO Box 488, Albemarle, NC 28002.

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Albemarle native earns top medical school scholarship – Stanly News & Press

WSU school of medicine gave inaugural class their white coats Friday – KREM.com

KREM 2’s Alexa Block goes to the inaugural white coat presentation for the Elson Floyd School of Medicine.

Alexa Block , KREM 8:41 PM. PDT August 18, 2017

SPOKANE, Wash — WSUs Elson S. Floyd School of Medicines inaugural class took center stage when they received their white coats on Friday.

The school welcomed its first class of students on Friday in the white coat ceremony at the Fox Theater. All 60 of the medical students went up on stage and were presented with their white coats.

The 60 students are from 15 different counties in Washington, two of them have served in the military and together they speak 25 languages, according to the medical school. They all took the Hippocratic Oath at the ceremony to cement their medical aspirations.

This class was almost not possible because a 1917 law gave the University of Washington the sole authority to operate a medical school in the state. In 2015 it was finally decided WSU could have its own medical school. It was a long, drawn out battle between lawmakers, academics and citizens to get WSU the medical school.

One of the focuses of the school is to provide healthcare for rural areas. One out of five Americans live in rural areas, but only 9 percent of the nations doctors practice in rural areas. Many of the students want to work in these areas too.

The medical school is named after Elson Floyd because of all the work he put in to make this school a reality.

They will be able to learn on clinical equipment that was donated from the Paul Lauzier Foundation, check out the full story here.

2017 KREM-TV

KREM

WSU Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine welcomes its first class

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WSU school of medicine gave inaugural class their white coats Friday – KREM.com

Army Vet Who Lost Both Legs to a Roadside Bomb Is Accepted to Harvard Medical School – PEOPLE.com

A wounded Army veteran is close to achieving his dream of becoming a doctor after earning admittance to the prestigious Harvard Medical School.

GregGaleazzi, 31, lost both of his legs and part of his right arm when a roadside bomb exploded in May 2011 during his deployment to Afghanistan. Since then, he has endured dozens of surgeries and hundreds of hours of physical therapy, which he called a nightmare. But through all the trauma he experienced,Galeazzi held on to his dream of one day becoming a doctor.

Not only did I still want to practice medicine, but it strengthened my resolve to do it, he toldABC News.

Galeazzi took 18 pre-med courses over two years at the University of Maryland, before finishing in May 2016. It was in those classes that Galeazzi met his future fianc,Jazmine Romero, who he plans to marry next year.

Around that time, Galeazzi studied for six months to prepare for the hours-long Medical College Assessment Test, and after passing it, he sent applications to 19 medical schools on the East Coast. While he was accepted to many, Galeazzi announced in a blog poston August 5 that he had chosen to attend thetop-ranking medical institution in the world, Harvard Medical School, where he will study for the next four years.

It is tough to explain just how thrilled I was to simply be invited to interview at Harvard, let alone be accepted, Galeazzi wrote in his announcement. Mostly, it came as an immense relief to know that my hard work in pre-med and MCAT preparation paid off; and it reminded me just how grateful I am to have survived my injuries, and still have talents to share with the world.

Galeazzi is still deciding what type of medicine hellpractice, but hes leaning toward primary care, he told ABC News. In the end, Galeazzi said, he just wants to be a good doctor.

While Ive overcome some pretty harrowing life challenges, medical school is going to be an entirely different struggle, so please wish me luck! he wrote. Then again, I recognize that this is a wonderful challenge to have, and I am happy and eager to take it on!

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Army Vet Who Lost Both Legs to a Roadside Bomb Is Accepted to Harvard Medical School – PEOPLE.com

Dell Medical School touts growing number of residents in new report – Austin American-Statesman

The number of medical residents and fellows providing care in Travis County clinics and hospitals is up by 30 percent since 2012, according to a report released this week by the University of Texas Dell Medical School.

In 2016, there were 287 residents working in county clinics and hospitals, up from 218 in 2012, the community benefit report says. That number is projected to grow to more than 300 by 2020.

When pressed at a Central Health meeting Wednesday night by board member Julie Oliver about why that number would only grow by about 13 in four years, the schools dean, Clay Johnston, said that was a conservative estimate.

The 300 is just reflecting commitments weve already made, Johnston said in his presentation. We actually expect the number to grow faster as we open new residency spots.

Johnston also noted that residency programs roll over every two to four years, bringing new residents into the community and producing new physicians. The programs are funded primarily by a partnership with Seton Healthcare Family.

The report also highlights other areas that Dell Medical School considers it made progress in the past year, including that 79 percent of women in the recently redesigned perinatal care system are keeping postpartum appointments, up from about 40 percent previously, and that the yearlong wait for orthopedic appointment is down to three weeks.

We think the real impact of our work is the redesign, Johnston said at Wednesdays meeting. Because if (care is) provided where the outcomes are better and the costs are lower, we all win even more than having those additional (provider) positions.

The third-annual report comes as the school and Central Health, the county health care district, face criticism from some community groups over the transparency of the schools use of $35 million of taxpayer funds annually. Travis County voters agreed in 2012 to raise property taxes to make that contribution.

Officials argue that the schools doctors and residents work in its affiliated clinics to take care of low-income patients, and in the long term the school will help attract and retain providers.

The report also shows that in the fiscal 2016-17 year, most of taxpayer funds, or a projected $46.1 million, have been used for compensation and employment-related expenses. The rest, $100,000, was used for information technology equipment and software.

Johnston told board members that compensation is the largest budget item at most medical schools, and Dell Medical Schools building costs are covered by other funding sources.

As for whats next, the school plans to open new clinics in the early winter and will continue to work on clinical model redesigns, Johnston said.

No one spoke during citizens communication on Wednesday about the benefit report. Board members on Wednesday were mainly congratulatory of Dell Medical School for the work it has accomplished.

Central Health updates

At Wednesdays regular Central Health meeting, enterprise chief administrative officer Larry Wallace updated the board on proposed efforts to expand health care in eastern Travis County.

Del Valle

Expansion of adult health care services from UT Nursing School, possibly at Creedmoor Elementary. Status: Pending approval from Del Valle school board.

Creation of Del Valle Wellness Clinic at Travis County Employee Healthcare Clinic site on FM 973 that would be open 2 to three days a week. Status: CommUnityCare, a network of public clinics affiliated with Central Health, is seeking federal approval to provide primary care at the site. The project will go before the Travis County Commissioners Court this month.

Long-term, Central Health hopes to build a permanent health canter on existing county property on FM 973. Status: Project will require approval from county commissioners.

Northeastern Travis County

The Austin school district has offered a portable classroom building at Overton Elementary to be used as a Northeast Health Resource Center. Status: School board should make decision in September.

Expansion of operation days at Turner-Roberts Recreation Center, where CommUnityCare provides clinical care through a mobile care team. Status: Central Health discussing with city.

Austins Master Plan calls for the construction of a health care facility in Colony Park. Status: Timeline unknown.

Mobile Loaves and Fishes co-founder and CEO Alan Graham has offered to provide land and assist with the construction of a health center on Hog Eye Road near the Community First Village. Status: Planning stages with Graham and other partners.

Manor

Renovations to existing CommUnityCare health center or construction of new health center. Status: Very early planning stages.

Central Health budget

Central Health is proposing to lower its tax rate to 10.74 cents per $100 taxable valuation from 11.05 cents per $100 taxable valuation. However, because the average homestead value increased from $285,152 to $305,173, the average homestead would still see an increase of about 4 percent, or $12.50, on their tax bill.

The proposed budget includes an increase of $11.7 million in health care delivery operations, which includes reserves and debt service.

The proposed budget and property tax rate will go before the Travis County Commissioners Court on Tuesday. Central Health will hold public hearings on Aug. 30 and Sept. 6, both at 6 p.m. at Central Health Administrative Offices, 1111 E. Cesar Chavez St.

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2v5HQAC.

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Dell Medical School touts growing number of residents in new report – Austin American-Statesman


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