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Amelia Earhart Captured and Killed? New Evidence Debunks History Channel’s Crazy Theory – Daily Beast

A new theory about the fate of Amelia Earhart is seriously undermined by evidence obtained by The Daily Beast. The theory, to be aired Sunday in a History Channel documentary, claims that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, were rescued by the Japanese after crash landing in the Marshall Islands and then taken to a Japanese prison where they died in captivity.

The pivot of the documentarys case is a photograph, undated, of a wharf at Jaluit Island, one of the scores of atolls that make up the Marshall Islands. A forensic expert who specializes in facial recognition appears in the program to support the claim that Earhart and Noonan are among a group of people on the wharf.

Just beyond the wharf, in the harbor, is a Japanese military vessel identified as the Koshu Maru. The documentary suggests that after this picture was taken Earhart and Noonan were arrested and taken aboard the Koshu Maru and that a barge alongside contained the remains of their Lockheed Electra airplane.

According to the documentary, it is likely that the Koshu Maru then sailed for the island of Saipan where the two Americans were imprisoned and then killed.

The role of the Koshu Maru (maru means ship in Japanese) is therefore crucial to the theory that Earhart and Noonan are, indeed, the people in the photograph.

However, in 1982 a Japanese author and journalist, Fukiko Aoki, published a book in Japanese, Looking for Amelia. She found a surviving crewmember of the Koshu Maru, a telegraphist named Lieutenant Sachinao Kouzu. He told her that, like other Japanese ships in the western Pacific, they were told that Earhart had disappeared while over the ocean and were alerted to look out for any sign of the airplane and, if they did, seek to rescue Earhart and Noonan.

After a few days, said Kouzo, the alert was dropped. At no time did anyone on Koshu Maru set eyes on the Americans, alive or dead.

Aoki told The Daily Beast that her interest in the Earhart story was sparked when she read a story about four Japanese meteorologists who were assigned to a weather station on Greenwich Island in the South Pacific. As soon as they arrived at the station early in July 1937, they received a government message to look out for the aviators and, if they saw them, to organize a rescue operation. They saw nothing.

The disappearance of Amelia Earhart looks so different from the Japanese and American sides, Aoki told The Daily Beast. One of the weathermen, an old guy called Yoneji Inoue, protested against the theory that Amelia was captured and executed by the Japanese. I wanted to find out what really happened. I found and checked the log of the Koshu Maru, but of course I couldnt find any description of the capture of Amelia Earhart.

Aoki later moved to New York where she became bureau chief for the Japanese edition of Newsweek. She has written 12 books. Looking for Amelia was republished as a paperback in 1995 but only in Japanese.

The four meteorologists were taken to Greenwich Island on the Koshu Maru, arriving on July 3, the day after Earhart disappeared. Greenwich Island is now named Kapingamaranji,and is 1,500 miles from the Marshall Island where the photo supposedly of Earhart was taken, which means that the vessel was nowhere near the Marshall Islands at the crucial time.

As Aokis research indicates, the assumption that the Japanese military was under orders to arrest and quietly kill Earhart and Noonan them shows little understanding of what was happening in the Pacific at the time.

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The war in the Pacific didnt begin with Pearl Harbor. It began on July 7, 1937, five days after Earhart disappeared, when a minor clash between Japanese and Chinese troops near Beijing suddenly turned into all-out war between the two nations.

The last thing the Japanese needed was to inflame American opinion by murdering the worlds most-famous woman. Although they had a formidable air force and navy the Japanese were distracted by Soviet Russias claims to Japanese islands and at that time they also feared American naval power in the Pacific. America, in turn, wanted no part of the war in China.

Just how anxious both the U.S. and Japan were to avoid conflict was revealed by an incident in December 1937. An American gunboat, the USS Panay, that was allowed to patrol the Yangtze River by international agreement, was called in to evacuate staff from the U.S. embassy in Nanking, as well as some international journalists as the Japanese carpet-bombed the city.

The Panay sailed upriver to what the captain thought would be a safe refuge and anchored alongside other boats laden with Chinese refugees.

But a swarm of Japanese bombers attacked all the boats, including the Panay. Two U.S. crewmen and an Italian journalist were killed. The Japanese claimed that the attack was an accident. President Roosevelt was so anxious that the bombing should not lead to calls for retaliation that he censored newsreel footage. The Japanese, alarmed that they might have awakened a sleeping tiger, paid $2.2 million in compensation.

Then there is how the Japanese treated Charles Lindbergh.

In August 1931, he flew from Alaska across the Bering Sea to Japan in a seaplane with his wife Anne. Thick fog forced Lindbergh to make a blind landing using only his instruments. After touchdown, with the engine shut down, the airplane drifted dangerously close to rocks and was rescued by a Japanese boat that towed them to a safe harbor.

When they reached Tokyo the Japanese gave the Lindberghs a welcome that one newspaper said was one of the greatest demonstrations ever seen in the ancient capital.

As for Earhart, there was no military intelligence value to the Japanese in getting their hands on her Lockheed Electra. The Electra was widely used by airlines across the world and held no technological secrets. By 1937 the Japanese were mass-producing a Mitsubishi bomber so far superior to the similarly-sized Electra that when it was converted to an airliner it flew a record-breaking round-the-world flight.

The theory that Earthart crash landed in the Marshall Islands is not supported by the basic rules of geography and navigation. It rests on the idea that, once Earhart realized she had missed a scheduled rendezvous with a U.S. Coast Guard cutter on tiny Howland Island, she reversed direction.

The Marshall Islands are 800 miles northwest of Howland Island, way beyond the range of the Electra as it was running low on gas at the end of a long leg from Papua New Guinea, over the Pacific.

Her only option was to look for a landing place that was much closer and, ideally, ahead of her rather than far behind.

Her last message to the cutter was at 8:43 a.m. on July 2. It was that she was flying on a line of 157 337 that is, the southeasterly course from her starting point that intersected Howland Island. Because of an unexplained problem with the Electras radio, the cutter could receive her messages but she couldnt receive the replies.

As a result, in the 80-year search for Earhart there is nothing to go on to point to her final position beyond what was in that radio transmission. Yet on the basis of that one transmission we arrive at the next most prominent theory about Earharts fate.

This takes us to an atoll named Nikumaroro Island, 350 miles southeast of Howland Island, and to Ric Gillespie, chief executive of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, TIGHAR.

Gillespie is the best funded and most persistent of all Earhart hunters. Since 1989 he has directed 12 expeditions to Nikumaroro, partly funded by National Geographic, and each expedition follows the same pattern: advance publicity that garners a gullible audience and funds, followed by negligible results, some bordering on the ludicrous.

Gillespie gave scientific credence to his theory by analyzing 120 reports of radio traffic in the area of Nikumaroro at the time and deciding that 57 messages were possibly transmitted from the Electra, beginning three hours after the final transmission picked up by the Coast Guard cutter.

To believe this demands two leaps of faith or, more likely, of the imagination. The first is that Earhart managed to land on the atoll and the second is that she did so with such skill that her radio remained able to operate.

Such a landing would have required a near miraculous feat of airmanship. Nikumaroro is a typical coral atoll sitting atop a volcano with a rocky reef looping around a lagoon with only a tiny appendage of flat surface. And although she did not lack courage, Earhart was not a pilot of natural intuitive skills, like Lindbergh, and the Electra was an unforgiving machine in a marginal situation like this.

Earhart, under the stress of knowing that her fuel was running out, would have had to align her approach over water at a shallow angle and make a finely-judged touchdown with no margin of error. Landing on an aircraft carrier would be much easier.

For the radio signal theory to have any credence the airplane then had to remain undamaged by water for days.

For a fraction of the money that TIGHAR has invested and is still investing in its expeditions they could have commissioned a computer program to simulate the landing. All the necessary data about the handling characteristics of the Electra and the probable weather and sea conditions at the time are available. The trouble is, of course, that this would prove the impossibility of the idea.

Gillespie was, not surprisingly, dissed when told of the History Channel revelation about the Marshall Islands.

This is just a picture of a wharf at Jaluit with a bunch of people, its just silly, he said.

This happened when Gillespie had just sent another expedition to Nikumaroro, this time including four sniffer dogs trained by the Institute for Canine Forensics. The dogs arrived wearing life vests when the temperature was more than 100 degrees. They were looking for human remains the latest spin of the theory being that Earhart and Noonan had perished there.

The Earhart saga will go on providing endless fuel for lovers of the classic vanishing airplane narratives. People in the grip of a pet theory will go to great lengths to believe in that theory on the thinnest evidence. Gillespie, for example, seized on the discovery of a jar of 1930s ointment for the treatment of freckles found in the waters near Nikumaroro as evidence that Earhart, famously freckled, had made it to the island.

Freckles would not have been of much concern as Earhart planned her flight. Nothing that was not essential was carried in the Electra. She was piloting what was virtually a flying gas station. In place of passenger seats the airplane was stuffed with six large extra gas tanks and had another six in the wings, as well as having to carry 80 gallons of oil for its hot-running supercharged engines.

There is, to be sure, no reason to stop looking for Earhart, Noonan and the Electra. The odds are that after a desperate search for land they ended up, out of fuel, ditching into the ocean, and then plunged as far as 17,000 feet down to the bottom of the ocean. They most certainly didnt die in a Japanese prison.

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Amelia Earhart Captured and Killed? New Evidence Debunks History Channel’s Crazy Theory – Daily Beast

Walter Williams: Colleges: Islands of Intolerance – LubbockOnline.com

Is there no limit to the level of disgusting behavior on college campuses that parents, taxpayers, donors and legislators will accept? Colleges have become islands of intolerance, and as with fish, the rot begins at the head. Lets examine some recent episodes representative of a general trend and ask ourselves why we should tolerate it plus pay for it.

Students at Evergreen State College harassed biology professor Bret Weinstein because he refused to leave campus, challenging the schools decision to ask white people to leave campus for a day of diversity programming. The profanity-laced threats against the faculty and president can be seen on a YouTube video titled Student takeover of Evergreen State College

What about administrators permitting students to conduct racially segregated graduation ceremonies, which many colleges have done, including Ivy League ones such as Columbia and Harvard universities? Permitting racially segregated graduation ceremonies makes a mockery of the idols of diversity, multiculturalism and inclusion, which so many college administrators worship. Or is tribalism part and parcel of diversity?

Trinity College sociology professor Johnny Eric Williams recently called white people inhuman and he added another word that is unprintable. In the wake of the Alexandria, Virginia, shooting at a congressional baseball practice, Williams tweeted, It is past time for the racially oppressed to do what people who believe themselves to be white will not do, put (an) end to the vectors of their destructive mythology of whiteness and their white supremacy system. #LetThem-Die

June Chu, dean of Pierson College at Yale University, recently resigned after having been placed on leave because of offensive Yelp reviews she had posted. One of her reviews described customers at a local restaurant as white trash and low class folk; another review praised a movie theater for its lack of sketchy crowds. In another review of a movie theater, she complained about the barely educated morons trying to manage snack orders for the obese.

Harvey Mansfield, a distinguished Harvard University professor who has taught at the school for 55 years, is not hopeful about the future of American universities. In a College Fix interview, Mansfield said, No, Im not very optimistic about the future of higher education, at least in the form it is now with universities under the control of politically correct faculties and administrators.

Once Americas pride, universities, he says, are no longer a marketplace of ideas or bastions of free speech. Universities have become bubbles of decadent liberalism that teach students to look for offense when first examining an idea.

Who is to blame for the decline of American universities? Mansfield argues that it is a combination of administrators, students and faculties. He puts most of the blame on faculty members, some of whom are cowed by deans and presidents who dont want their professors to make trouble.

I agree with Mansfields assessment in part. Many university faculty members are hostile to free speech and open questioning of ideas. A large portion of todays faculty and administrators were once the hippies of the 1960s, and many have contempt for the U.S. Constitution and the values of personal liberty.

The primary blame for the incivility and downright stupidity we see on university campuses lies with the universities trustees. Every board of trustees has fiduciary responsibility for the governance of a university, shaping its broad policies. Unfortunately, most trustees are wealthy businessmen who are busy and arent interested in spending time on university matters. They become trustees for the prestige it brings, and as such, they are little more than yes men for the university president and provost. If trustees want better knowledge about university goings-on, they should hire a campus ombudsman who is independent of the administration and accountable only to the board of trustees.

The university malaise reflects a larger societal problem. Mansfield says culture used to mean refinement. Today, he says, it just means the way a society happens to think, and theres no value judgment in it any longer.

For many of todays Americans, one cultural value is just as good as another.

^

Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. His column is distributed by Creators Syndicate, 5777 W. Century Blvd., Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

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Walter Williams: Colleges: Islands of Intolerance – LubbockOnline.com

Love Island’s Jessica Shears and Dominic Lever reveal they are in love and planning to move in together as they make … – The Sun

The couple are already plotting their future

LOVE Island stars Jessica Shears and Dominic Lever have revealed they are in love and planning to move in together after making their relationship official.

The couple have been spending a lot of time together since they reunited outside of the villa and they have now told fans they are planning a future together.

ITV

The stars opened up about their romance on spin-off show Aftersun tonight and they made a big admission as they told host Caroline Flack they are in love.

Dom also revealed they are planning to move in together.

When asked about their relationship status, he said: Its official we are girlfriend and boyfriend.

When Caroline pressed him about the L word and whether it means they are in love, he added: It does.

I completed love island.

Dom is currently based in Manchester and Jess is in Devon, but they are now planning to buy a house and rent a flat together.

ITV

He added: Were going to buy in Manchester and rent in London

We need bases.

It was an emotional episode for the stars as it also showed them having a confrontation over Jess romp withMike Thalassitis.

Jess insisted all she did in the hotel room with Mike was talk and slather on face masks but fans dont believe her.

Some demanded the pair go on Jeremy Kyle for a lie detector test.

ITV

The Sun Online exclusively revealed that Jess and Mike had a night of passion at a hotel after they were given the boot from the show.

Dom was left outraged by the news, and he finally confronted her about the romp on spin-off show Aftersun tonight.

Jess denied she had sex with Mike, insisting they just put face masks on and sat on the hotel room bed talking about life in the villa.

She said: “Literally, we just sat there with face masks on, chatted about the villa and went to bed.”

Mike also insisted they didn’t have sex during their night of passion, saying: “He’s lucky that I didn’t try to stick it on her.”

Dom decided to believe their story, but many viewers were convinced the pair were not telling the truth about the saucy night.

ITV

One viewer wrote: “Take mess in Jeremy Kyle for a lie detector test #LoveIsland.”

Another tweeted: “Still don’t believe Jess and Mike.”

The Sun Online exclusively revealed that Jess beddedDom’s rival Mike Thalassitis just hours after being dumped from the show.

They had sex at a hotel, and devastated Dom even stormed out of the villa when he heard about the betrayal.

He was overwhelmed with emotion when he asked her about her romp with Mike, saying: “How did you do that?”

Dom breaks down as he says: “There’s so much going on in me head.

Mike insisted Dom should be glad he ‘didn’t stick it on Jess’

“I just want to hear from you, what’s the deal with the pictures of you coming out of a hotel with Mike?

“I knew something was up.”

Jess then says: “Honestly, don’t,” before Dom continues: “First it was anger, then it was just betrayal I suppose.

“How did you do that?…

“Do you know what I don’t get is how you were mates with him when you didn’t like him in the villa.”

After their romp,Jess and Mike were reunitedas they appeared on This Morning together – and they looked closer than ever.

The Sun Online went on to reveal they were “all over each” other backstage at the show shortly before Jess reunited with Dom.

They were spotted spending the night together at a London hotel and they have been inseparable ever since.

Originally posted here:

Love Island’s Jessica Shears and Dominic Lever reveal they are in love and planning to move in together as they make … – The Sun

People’s Republic of China continues to support the Pacific Islands Forum – Loop PNG

The money was handed over to Forums Secretary General, Dame Meg Taylor last week.

During the handover, the SG thanked China for their ongoing support through the fund and strong relationship between China and Pacific.

Id particularly like to thank you for the ongoing support to the Pacific Trade and Invest (PTI China) office in Beijing. The trade relationships we have with China are very important and the work of this office continues to help in their development, she said.

Chinas Ambassador, Zhang Ping said China attached great importance to the relationship with Pacific Islands and cooperation and looks at extending this in future.

China always attaches great importance to the relationship with Pacific Island Countries, and looks forward to further enhancing the bilateral dialogue, exchanges and cooperation in various fields and persists to provide assistance and aid within its capacity, said Ambassador Ping.

We sincerely welcome the Pacific Island Countries participation in the cooperation of Belt and Road Initiative to realise common development through win-win cooperation, he added.

The China-PIF Cooperative Fund was established in 2000 to support trade, investment, tourism and personal exchange between China and Forum countries.

One of the key initiatives under the fund is PTI China which works closely with Forum Country Embassies in Beijing to develop and strengthen networks between Pacific businesses and Chinese markets.

Trade statistics released by PTI China last year showed that the fourteen Forum Island Countries exported US$2.5 billion worth of goods to China in 2015, up from US$2 billion in 2014.

Chinas exports to the Forum Island Countries in the same year doubled from US$2.5 billion in 2014 to US$5 billion.

The Fund also enabled the China-PIFS Regional Scholarship Scheme which doubled its intake last year and has seen more than 80 students study a wide range of subjects recently.

The subjects include engineering, international law, medicine, information & communications technology, agriculture, and commerce in Chinese institutions.

The handover follows the trip to China earlier this year by the Secretary General during which she met with Chinese Minister for Foreign Affairs, Wang Yi.

Minister Wang Yi reaffirmed that China stood ready to support Pacific Island Countries and encouraged them to take up the opportunities offered by its Belt and Road strategy for economic and people to people cooperation.

China has been a Dialogue Partner of the Forum since 1990.

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People’s Republic of China continues to support the Pacific Islands Forum – Loop PNG

Sport: Fiji netballers impress as illness bugs Cook Islands – Radio New Zealand

Fiji are a step closer to the knockout rounds after their second straight win at the Netball World Youth Cup in Botswana.

The Baby Pearls thrashed Trinidad and Tobago 55-28 in their tournament opener and backed it up with a comprehensive 48-35 victory over Wales on Monday at the UB Indoor Sports Arena.

Meanwhile the Cook Islands lost their second match against hosts Botswana as they continue to be hampered by a gastro bug that swept through the squad on their arrival in Gaborone.

The Baby Black Pearls had let a five goal advantage slip in a 43-41 defeat by Jamaica at the weekend and led briefly this morning before the home side ran out 51-41 winners in front of a vocal home crowd.

The Cook Islands squad pushed Jamaica close despite suffering from a gastro bug. Photo: Facebook / Netball Cook Islands

Head coach John Glassie said nine of their 12 players have been hit with the bug, which has been lingering for more than a week.

He said the team have moved accommodation in recent days, which has helped, and are monitoring closely what food the players are eating.

“It’s still a bit there, a few of the players are still suffering from it but we’ve been trying to deal with it,” he said.

“We ran out of medication after like four days so we’ve been going to the event doctors getting more medication every couple of days.

“So the girls are getting better but obviously not being able to hold your food down and that sort of thing does play a part in preparation so that’s why these physical games are taking such a toll out of the players.”

Photo: Netball World Youth Cup

While his team was far from 100 percent, John Glassie acknowledged the role played by the raucous home fans, who helped inspire their team to victory.

“With Botswana the major factor there would have been crowd and after seeing briefly the live footage it’s hard to comprehend how loud the crowd actually is.

“Just being able to talk to the players and that sort of thing – we’re trying to yell out during the breaks – and even talking to my assistant coach next to me we had to yell at each other because it was deafening.”

“They had a great support from their home-based crowd and it really did make a difference. The girls said it was very hard to concentrate it was so loud, it was deafening at some stages.”

“Botswana, they’re actually used to that sort of cheering and that loud vocal support whereas our crowd wouldn’t have played in anything quite as hostile or even half as loud as that – something we tried to plan for but it’s very hard to adjust to that sort of thing.”

Meanwhile Samoa were thrashed 85-33 by defending champions New Zealand in their first match and Australia produced the most lopsided result to date, thumping Singapore 119-12.

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Sport: Fiji netballers impress as illness bugs Cook Islands – Radio New Zealand

Toronto harbor islands hurt by Lake Ontario flooding – WRVO Public Media

Flooding along Lake Ontario is still causing problems in Toronto, the biggest city in Canada, particularly for the picturesque harbor islands.

Julian Ganton owns Toronto Islands SUP, which stands for stand up paddleboard. He looks like a typical water sports guy in flip flops, board shorts, and sunglasses.

Normally, this time of year, Ganton would be giving tours or lessons, but instead, he is filling his time by paddling with his friends.

Were gonna go check out some of the flooded areas of the island, and just take a tour through some of the lagoons, he said.

The Toronto Islands are a huge pull for tourists. They are just a short ferry from downtown Toronto, with beachy cottages, boardwalks and bicycles there are virtually no cars on the islands.

But right now, theres almost no one there. Restaurants and other businesses are suffering.

Undeterred, Ganton sees the opportunity for a new marketing strategy.

“It’s been slower, of course,” he said. “But we do feature in showing people the natural phenomenon and what it means to the natural landscapes: showing them flooded areas, touring the lagoons Theres definitely more to paddle.

The islands were hit hard by the heavy spring rains that raised the level of Lake Ontario by two-and-a-half feet. This spring they lost a lot of their beaches, water is pooling in people’s yards, and their sewer systems are overwhelmed.

Currently, the islands are technically closed. Theres even a white piece of paper taped to the window of the ticket counter in the ferry terminal which says: Toronto Islands Closed until July 31. But, if you say youre headed over for a day trip, you can get a ticket anyway.

Thats how Aviva Wade says she got over. She says she told the guy selling tickets she was visiting the islands for lunch with a friend.

And to check out whats been going on after this unbelievable springtime weve had.

As a visitor, she says shes not particularly bothered by the lack of people on what would usually be a busy summer day.

Its kind of nice, Wade said. Youre going to have the place to yourself.

Besides restaurants and beaches, the islands have another draw, their main attraction the Centre Island Amusement Park.

Its part theme park, part petting zoo, part event space for parties and weddings. The theme park has a log flume, a little Ferris wheel and roller coaster a lot geared for smaller children.

This year the park turns 50. Usually, it would be full of people in the swan boats, eating funnel cakes or taking pony rides. Some would be putting their heads in those plywood cutouts painted like pirates and mermaids and making faces.

But now it’s empty. It is here that the islands’ closure feels the most dramatic, maybe because abandoned amusement parks are already kind of eerie.

The islands are scheduled to re-open in late July, assuming they dont have any unforeseen problems or lingering health concerns. Workers are worried about standing water breeding mosquitos, or E. coli in the water from sewage problems.

But so far so good. The water continues to go down, and more of the beach is visible every day.

Right now crews are cleaning up the park, getting ready for summer visitors hoping they come back.

Originally posted here:

Toronto harbor islands hurt by Lake Ontario flooding – WRVO Public Media

Visit of Japan’s delegation to Kuril Islands favors treaty with Russia – Japanese minister – TASS

TOKYO, July 8. /TASS/. Japan’s government says the trip of the country’s delegation of officials and businesses to South Kuril Islands on June 27 – July 1 would favor greatly signing of a peace treaty with Russia, Japan’s Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Hiroshige Seko said in an interview with TASS on Saturday.

“Between June 27 and July 1, a Japanese delegation for the first time made research related to the cooperation on the four islands,” the minister said. “This trip complied with agreements on the top level; from the point of details for the cooperation, this trip was very fruitful in terms of its objectives, scales and contents.”

“A direct impact on improvement of trust and understanding (between Japan and Russia – TASS) has the fact that we continue discussions about joint cooperation, without affecting each other’s positions, and the Japanese and Russians are working together on future of the four islands,” he said. “I am confident, this favors signing of the peace treaty, and leaders of our countries confirm this.”

“During this research, we received information, including opinions of our experts, our partners,” he continued. “Based on this data, we shall analyze thoroughly what projects could be implemented without conflicting legal positions of the countries, and still picking the projects which we shall promote first of all.”

Besides, the minister said, “on July 7, leaders of our countries touched upon this topic.”

“As for the Japanese side, we shall study results of that trip at the upcoming meeting of the Council on cooperation, which will feature Foreign Minister [Fumio] Kushida,” he said. “We shall analyze the received information and shall continue working on the projects.”

Japanese delegations visit

The delegation featured members of the Japanese government office, officials from the Foreign Ministry, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, as well as from the Hokkaido Prefecture. They visited 64 facilities, including hospitals, electric power plants, sports centers, as well as a hotel complex under construction.

On December 15-16, 2016, the Russian president visited Japan for the first in eleven years. The peace treaty issue and the South Kuril Islands issue topped the agenda, while bilateral cooperation was also discussed. Vladimir Putin and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe adopted a joint statement saying that consultations on joint economic activities on the South Kuril Islands could become an important step on the way to a peace treaty.

Russia and Japan have been holding consultations since the mid-20th century in order to clinch a peace treaty as a follow-up to World War II. The Kuril Islands issue remains the sticking point since after WWII the islands were handed over to the Soviet Union while Japan has laid claims to the four southern islands.

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Visit of Japan’s delegation to Kuril Islands favors treaty with Russia – Japanese minister – TASS

Love Island’s Craig Lawson spends some quality time with his cousin Amy Childs in Essex – The Sun

Tattooed hunk who tried to woo Camilla shares a joke with famous cousin Amy from Towie as they meet up in Brentwood

LOVE Island hunk Craig Lawson enjoys a stroll and a chat with his Towie cousin Amy Childs after returning to the UK.

The tattooed Essex lad, who bagged himself a snog with Camilla Thurlow on the ITV2 show, grinned as he joked about with new mum Amy.

Flynet Pictures Tel : +44 (0)20 3551 5049 Email :

Flynet Pictures Tel : +44 (0)20 3551 5049 Email :

Tanned glamourpuss Amy and walking work of art Craig hardly looked like birds of a feather during their walk on the streets of their native Brentwood in Essex.

But dad-of-three Craig,who angered his ex-girlfriend by going on Love Island, seemed delighted to be in the stars company, four days after being kicked off the programme with Nathan and Danielle who are now dating each other.

Red-haired Amy only revealed herself to be the cousin of Craig after hed gone into the Love Island villa, a few weeks into the 2017 series.

She wished him all the best on Twitter, writing:Good luck to my cousin Craig that has just entered the Love Island villa.

At the moment it sounds like Amy might need a spell on the island of love herself, though.

The reality TV favourite recently split from ex-convict boyfriend Bradley Wright, the father of her baby daughter, six weeks after giving birth.

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Flynet Pictures Tel : +44 (0)20 3551 5049 Email :

But Amy, who seems to have lost a lot of weight since the birth, has ruled out moving on from Bradley as she says hes being a great dad to their daughter Polly.

Amy left Towie in 2011 and went on to major career success in other TV shows and in retail career success which Craig may now be aspiring to.

He certainly made his mark in the Love Island villa, doing some serious grafting to impress Camilla Thurlow after her heart was broken by Jonny Mitchell.

ITV

In the end Camilla who had a fling with Prince Harry didnt think their romance had a future and all they shared together was a snog before Craig was driven to the airport.

Viewers werent all conviced that Craigs feelings for Cam were genuine, but after leaving the show he hit back, saying: For me I had a very strong connection with her before I went in there because I felt I could understand her.

ITV Picture Desk

Im 100 per cent in or nothing. I werent going to go in there and play hard to get and mess around with her emotions, he added.

However, it seems Craig was anticipating a big TV future for himself and Camilla as hed signed up to an agency to get them both their own TV show BEFORE going into Love Island.

He also raised suspicions among viewers by saying he and Camilla could be the next Pro Green and Millie Mackintosh, something that had been mentioned on social media as soon as he arrived on the programme.

Got a story? email digishowbiz@the-sun.co.uk or call us direct on 02077824220

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Love Island’s Craig Lawson spends some quality time with his cousin Amy Childs in Essex – The Sun

SURFER 30 Days of Giveaways, Day 24: Channel Islands / Freewaters – Surfer Magazine

30 days. 30 brands. 30 chances to win

Time for a summer sled, this one a Biscuit Bonzer model from Channel Islands. Youll also win two pairs of Freewaters shoes and some CI x Freewaters colab sandals, perfect for cruising on the shore when youre not in the middle of head-high, offshore field testing. You only have 24 hours, so enter to win now.

The SURFER 30 Days of Giveaways Presented by Surfboards.com will be going on right here at SURFER.com until July 14th. Check back at 12:00 PM EST tomorrow for your chance at the next batch of free gear!

About Surfboards.com:

For over a decade Surfboards.com has been the obvious choice when shopping for surf equipment and apparel. We stock a curated selection, offer free shipping on everything, and have surfers on staff to answer your most pressing questions. E komo mai.

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SURFER 30 Days of Giveaways, Day 24: Channel Islands / Freewaters – Surfer Magazine

Penobscot Bay islands rally for their plane service, send donations and big love – PenBayPilot.com

Jeannie Conway, of Vinalhaven, handed a surprise over to Kevin Waters, owner of Penobscot Island Air, at the Knox County Regional Airport. It was July 5, and Owls Head was humming, but her gift stopped him in his tracks. It wasnt just from Conway. The modest package represented the gratitude and good will of residents on Vinalhaven, North Haven and Matinicus. It was a book full of heartfelt comments written by islanders. And stuffed in the back, $3,600 in cash.

But its not about the money, Conway was quick to point out.It was about showing him how much he means to us, and how the islands are behind him 100 percent.

Two days later, and Waters was still overwhelmed by the kindness.

I got to tell you, its old school, he said, over the phone, and in between talking on the radio with pilots who were delivering cargo to islands before weather moved in.Its unbelievable the support of those guys over there. It totally amazes me. When youre down, the islanders really rally. Ididnt expect it, and I didnt know it. They are very special folks.

After one of PIAs planes went down on Vinalhaven June 26, during a routine morning mail run to the island, first responders rushed to the scene to help the pilot, Ted Westlake. While the plane was demolished in a stand of trees, Westlake miraculously walked away from the crash, uninjured.

As the Federal Aviation Administration and insurance companies continue to investigate the crash,Penobscot Island Air, familiar to all islanders and citizens of the Midcoast, continues to do what it does best get people and cargo to and from the islands every day, responding to all kinds of personal situations at all hours of the day.

He flies my donuts in every weekend, said Conway, who according to Vinalhaven resident Carol Thompson, is a fundraiser extraordinaire. Conway owns the Islands Closet. She works for the ferry service, and is a firefighter with the Vinalhaven Fire Department. And she doesnt hesitate to help others through rough patches.

Hes a real good friend, she said.He has flown me out of here when my dog was sick, and took me to the vet. He gave me his van [on the mainland] when a family member was in the hospital. If I dont call him to bum something, hell call me and saywhat do you need?

This time, Conway intuitively sensed itwas Waters and Penobscot Island Air that needed something. Support, encouragement, appreciation, a pat on the back. She saw Waters the day after the crash, and noted he was feeling down.

She decided, as community-minded organizers like her often do, that the situation required action.

Were going to have a bake sale, she said.

That snowballed fairly quickly into a raffle, and various Facebook pages, including the North Haven community page, picked up on the effort.

Pretty soon, all manner of raffle items appeared. Conways son works for the Sea Dogs, so the team contributed season tickets, a signed ball, even the last ball pitched in the 2004 World Series. Artist Eric Hopkins donated a print. Nebo Lodge, on North Haven, kicked in, as did approximately 60 other residents and business owners.

At the July Fourth parade on Vinalhaven, a table was set up to sell tickets. A guest book was created, and everyone jotted down individual messages to Waters, and the crew at PIA. Just to express their appreciation,for everything they do, which is not just flying, said Conway.

The money followed, and still does.

Someone just handed me a $20 as I was walking by, she said, two days after she visited Waters at the Owls Head Airport.

So many people depend on him for so many different things, said Conway.At Christmas, I told him about a family that could use help. He loaded his plane with presents for them. Hes a giver, but hes a silent giver. Hes a teddy bear.

The feeling is likewise.

Its a year-round deal, said Waters, choking up just a little.We care very much about them.

Related story

Pilot transported to Rockport hospital following Vinalhaven plane crash

Reach Editorial Director Lynda Clancy at lyndaclancy@penbaypilot.com; 207-706-6657

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Penobscot Bay islands rally for their plane service, send donations and big love – PenBayPilot.com

For Restaurants in the San Juan Islands, a Beautiful Setting Brings Serious Challenges – Eater

This is a business for crazy people, says Jay Blackinton, a three-time James Beard Award semifinalist for Rising Star Chef of the Year and one of Food & Wines best new chefs of 2017. This isnt a place to make money. Up here its even worse. The business is running a restaurant, but up here refers to Orcas Island, a picturesque member of the San Juan Islands off the northwest coast of Washington.

Blackinton is describing the unique challenges, including seasonality, of operating a restaurant accessible from Seattle only after a few hours ride by car and ferry. Starting right now, we will be slammed until mid-September when the weather starts to turn. Then it just turns off and gets really slow, he says. You want full-time employees all the time, but you cant have that, so we try to make work for people.

Blackinton owns Hogstones Wood Oven, which started as a rustic pizzeria in 2013 but quickly added more creative and ambitious tasting menu options as the chef was inspired by his ingredients. The islands are amazingly fertile, and almost all of Hogstones food comes from local farms, like Maple Rock, where Blackinton also works. These tasting menu experiences thrilled the intrepid restaurant elite, wholl happily go off-grid for unique experiences and a taste of true terroir, but stymied many unsuspecting tourists. What a lot of people do on the islands is they make places that are Im gonna get mobbed for saying this pretty mediocre. Because thats what most people expect, want, and are willing to pay for. Were mostly not the pizza place people are looking for, he deadpans.

This is a business for crazy people. Up here its even worse.

Now, Blackinton is trying to ease confusion by moving the casual Hogstones to the lovely backyard, currently being revamped, and opening Aelder in the dining room, offering four-, seven-, and 12-course experimental menus almost exclusively by prepaid reservation through the online ticketing system Tock. When Aelder opens on July 7, walk-ins will be allowed to order the four-course menu, or be directed to Hogstones out back.

Seattle, generally, has been slow to embrace this kind of strict reservation policy. But most restaurateurs, certainly ones who work with limited ingredients, dream of having diners locked in, eliminating one major variable affecting service and the bottom line. We get a lot of people who come up here just to eat here, he says. So why wouldnt people be willing to do that? I think its going to work well.

Aelder is part of a growing trend of hyper-local high-concept restaurants separated from Washingtons coast by a stretch of water. It joins the ranks of the revered Willows Inn on Lummi Island and Ursa Minor on neighboring Lopez Island. Chef Nick Coffey, who previously pushed boundaries in the tiny kitchen of Seattles Barjot then helped award-winning chef Matt Dillon open Ciudad last year, opened Ursa Minor in April after years of visiting the island and feeling awed at the natural beauty and bountiful harvest.

Coffey, recognizing the importance of balancing local and tourist business, ran a successful Kickstarter campaign, raising more than $30,000 based on his desire to fully support Lopez Islands many artisan producers and growers with menus that will rotate frequently. Like many businesses on the island, we need the visitors to help sustain us through the slower times, he says. But we want to build a restaurant here that the residents are proud of and dine in as often as theyd like. And, as many entrepreneurs have discovered since crowdfunding exploded, the support can be as valuable as the influx of cash. Kickstarter does create a network around you of people that are vested in the business and interested in it succeeding, Coffey says. Theyre telling their friends; its a great networking tool as well as fundraising.

Youre trying to fill the restaurant during those two busy months then scaling back the rest of the year.

As a first-time restaurateur, Coffeys doing his best to prepare for the highs and lows of island living. Theres about two months of really busy season so youre trying to fill the restaurant during those two months then scaling back on the rest of the year until youre a little more established, he says. Ursa Minor is only open Thursday to Sunday right now, and might drop Thursdays after September. Coffey also plans to close in January and February, typically the slowest months of the year.

Even the Willows Inn, despite its reputation as a fine-dining astonishment with two-time James Beard Award-winner Blaine Wetzel at the helm, still has an off-season. Were fully booked most of the year, but we still definitely feel the effect of a seasonal fluctuation in business levels, says Wetzel, who apprenticed at Denmarks two-Michelin-starred Noma and seems to have brought a bit of that restaurants magic with him when he took over the inns kitchen on Lummi Island. Thats why were open just four days of the week in the winter and early spring.

Wetzel, who helps run the companys farm yes, another restaurant with a farm and forages regularly with his staff, admits that the pickings get slimmer in the winter, since its so windy that no locals are fishing or diving for shellfish. But he says its not sourcing food thats challenging The ingredients here are amazing, way more than enough its the mundane things.

Lummi is just five to 10 minutes from the mainland by ferry, but the ferry is too small for deliveries, which means the inn cant operate the way most restaurants do, relying on regular deliveries of fresh linens and cleaning chemicals. Theres not even a dumpster out back what garbage truck would empty it? To underscore the isolation, Wetzels phone keeps cutting out during an interview. Another challenge you have to deal with: Half the time you have no signal, he says. The internets so bad we have to have like four satellites to have decent speed for guests.

Naturally, staffing is a challenge, but not for lack of interest. Ive had many people reach out over the years who wanted to work here, and Id love to have them in the kitchen, Blackinton says. But its impossible to find places for people to live. It is and isnt my responsibility to make sure people have a place, but I have to keep looking for those resources if I want to continue to have staff in the future. Im short a cook right now, but I have no idea where they would go, because everythings pretty filled up here. One of his long-term goals is to add rooms to his operation.

Coffey agrees finding housing for employees is difficult. On my staff, theres one guy still looking for a place, basically couch-surfing right now, he says. But for the most motivated people, it eventually works out. More accommodations would certainly make peoples transition to the island easier. People want to come from further away to work in the restaurant, he says, and even some kind of hostel or shared bedding situation would be much appreciated. Its a constant concern in the community.

Its impossible to find places for people to live.

In its favor, the Willows Inn does have rooms, and plenty of people are willing to come from all over the world and intern for little to nothing to gain experience at such a highly regarded restaurant. The Willows Inn recently shut down its stage program, though, and has been ordered by the Department of Labor to pay $149,000 in unpaid wages and damages to 19 former stages. As soon as I learned that this, something that was common practice in the industry, is technically not legal, then we discontinued it, says Wetzel, who himself staged in his career. He also says ending the stage program wouldnt affect payroll or quality. Its not like we were relying on free labor for the restaurant to operate, he says. These were young, aspiring chefs and cooks from around the country who wanted exposure to what we were doing and an opportunity to learn. Wed often just have one extra hand in the kitchen to show whats going on.

Wetzel says his staff which can include 15 cooks for 30 diners on a given night are compensated competitively, and consider the limited schedule and significant off-season bonuses. This type of restaurant is usually combined with a strenuous schedule, he says. I think us having the time off every year is a real benefit in that it offers some balance in a field [where] thats rarely the case.

When asked why they stick it out on the islands, all of these chefs agree: Its worth the challenge. Its hard to answer this question because it sounds so dumb, Oh, its just a beautiful place. But its home, Blackinton says. If you have the opportunity to do something like this in a place that feels like home, then its a no-brainer, as far as fulfillment of your spirit goes.

As for visitors, they can stop in and reap the reward as they please. You figure it out and you get access to some of the best products in one of the most beautiful and wild areas in the country, Wetzel says. These islands are so abundant, with small farms, old farms, native tribes that fish, kind of eccentric or artisanal people and producers. And its not just a new thing, its been that way a long time.

Adam H. Callaghan is the editor of Eater Seattle. Suzi Pratt is a Seattle-based photographer. Editor: Hillary Dixler

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For Restaurants in the San Juan Islands, a Beautiful Setting Brings Serious Challenges – Eater

Future Islands at the Iveagh Gardens: unbridled passion, unbelievable dancing – Irish Times

Thank you for being part of our history, being part of our lives, Samuel T Herring tells the rapt Dublin crowd

Artist: Future Islands

Venue: Iveagh Gardens

Date Reviewed: July 6th, 2017

Samuel T Herring marvels at sight in front of him. This is gorgeous, he says, before the music starts. Its always good to be in Dublin . . . But Imma shut the f*ck up and make some music.

A Future Islands gig is a lesson in how to live life to the full. While the rest of the band keep it low key, frontman Herring is the living embodiment of dance like nobodys watching, except everyone is and theyre taking notes. On record, their music is all well and good but when they take to the stage, it becomes an unruly beast thats coaxed on by Herring, a man who has relentless energy.

Opening with Ran, their recent single from latest album The Far Field, this is their fourth gig this week. From Limerick to Cork, and from Galway to this evening, their biggest headline show ever, theres a mutual adoration borderline infatuation between Future Islands and Ireland, and it only gets stronger with every thump Herring directs to his chest, loud enough for everyone to hear.

Each song is introduced with a short anecdote that takes us on a brief but bittersweet journey. This is a song about a long walk home alone . . . one of those nights where you thought you had a place to stay but you got turned away at the door, he says wistfully as Before the Bridge bursts into life, growling the verses from the pit of his stomach.

Their music works its way up from the base of your spine until every limb finds its own unique rhythm but, truly, nothing can compare to the art form that is Herrings dancing. You could spend years studying in an elite dance school and it wouldnt be a patch on what he has to offer.

He has a strong repertoire of shapes to pull, and pull them he does. And often. A Dream of You and Me sees him kicking his legs out like a Russian dancer; Inch of Dust has him winding his entire body up like a jacked-up sean ns singer; for Sun in the Morning, hes slinking his body like a desert snake; and during Doves, he drops down, rotates his hips and bites his lip, putting pop tween queens to shame.

The human body is a marvellous thing and for every primal ape run, shimmy and shake, he throws his entire soul into his performance, making him one of the most committed frontmen out there.

Theres a reluctance in the crowd to head to the bar or nip to the loo, in case we miss a glimmering moment that can never be experienced again. When Seasons (Waiting On You) starts,the security have to scold guests to walk and not run, like strict primary school teachers, down the steps from the portaloos.

Its 10pm and still bright out and as two lads crowd surf, like two little tug boats, during Spirit it feels like one of those summer nights that will never end. Except it does, but not before they get kitted the f*ck out in Irish football jerseys.

Thank you for being part of our history . . . being part of our lives, Herring says.

Dedicating Beach Foam to Samus Coleman and finishing on a slower note with Little Dreamer (One more to send you starry-eyed off into the night), theyre pandering hard to the crowd, and do we mind? Were used to being pandered to when international acts claim to be one-quarter Irish or praise the Guinness, but Future Islands play this one particularly well.

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Future Islands at the Iveagh Gardens: unbridled passion, unbelievable dancing – Irish Times

Christian roots are deep in these islands – WND.com

Hawaiian missionaries

In 1778, British Captain James Cook discovered Hawaii, which he named the Sandwich Islands in honor of John Montagu, the fourth Earl of Sandwich the acting First Lord of the Admiralty.

Captain Cook was killed in Hawaii in 1779. When Captain Cooks voyages were read in England they raised awareness of new lands and inspired a missionary movement, led by William Carey, who took the Gospel to India in 1793.

The Hawaiian Islands were united by King Kamehameha I in 1810. In 1819, King Kamehameha I died. His wife, Kaahumanu, and his son, Liholiho (King Kamehameha II), abolished the pagan religion with its kapu rules and human sacrifice. The next year the first missionaries, led by Hiram Bingham and Yale graduate Asa Thurston, with his wife, Lucy, arrived from New England on the brig Thaddeus. Hiram Binghams grandson, of the same name, discovered the Inca city of Machu Pichu in 1908, was governor of Connecticut and a U.S. Senator.

A 12-letter Hawaiian alphabet was created by missionaries Hiram Bingham and Asa Thurston, who then translated the Bible into the Hawaiian Language. In 1823, Queen Kaahumanu and six high chiefs requested to be baptized as Christians. The Queen Kaahumanus government then banned prostitution and drunkenness, resulting in sailors resenting the missionaries influence.

In 1824, Chiefess Kapiolani, the cousin of Kamehameha I, defied the volcano goddess Pele by saying a Christian prayer, climbing down into the lava crater and returning unharmed, then eating the forbidden helo berries.

In 1825, Queen Keopuolani first spoke Hawaiis Motto, The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness (Ua Mau Ke Ea O Ka Aina I Ka Pono) as she was baptized into the Christian faith. When Liholiho (King Kamehameha II) died, his brother, King Kamehameha III, ascended to the throne, having the longest reign in Hawaiis history, 1825-1854.

The various island kingdoms of the Pacific had no navies capable of repelling the global maritime powers of the day, namely, Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, French, British and Japanese. King Kamehameha III was instrumental in using diplomacy to keep the Kingdom of Hawaii from being taken over by the British and French.

King Kamehameha III introduced the first Hawaiian Constitution in 1840: Kingdom of Hawai`i Constitution of 1840, Declaration of Rights of People and Chiefs: God hath made of one blood all nations of men to dwell on the earth, in unity and blessedness. God has also bestowed certain rights alike on all men and all chiefs, and all people of all lands. God has also established government, and rule for the purpose of peace. We are aware that we cannot ourselves alone accomplish such an object God must be our aid, for it is His province alone to give perfect protection and prosperity. Wherefore we first present our supplication to Him, that he will guide us to right measures and sustain us in our work.

Hawaiis 1840 Constitution continued: It is therefore our fixed decree,

I. That no law shall be enacted which is at variance with the word of the Lord Jehovah, or at variance with the general spirit of His word. All laws of the Islands shall be in consistency with the general spirit of Gods law.

II. All men of every religion shall be protected in worshiping Jehovah, and serving Him, according to their own understanding, but no man shall ever be punished for neglect of God unless he injures his neighbor, of bring evil on the kingdom.

The above constitution has been agreed to by the Nobles, and we have hereunto subscribed our names, this eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord 1840, at Honolulu, Oahu. (Signed) Kamehameha III. Kekauluohi

Discover more of Bill Federers eye-opening books and videos in the WND Superstore!

King Kamehameha III granted the Ka Wai freshwater springs where High Chiefess Hao frequented to be the location for building of the historic Kawaiahao Church. Located on the Island of Oahu, the Kawaiahao Church is listed on the state and national registers of historic sites, as it is one of the first Christian churches in Hawaii. Built between 1836-1842 in New England style architecture, Kawaiahao Church was called the Westminster Abbey of Hawaii. Constructed with 14,000 coral slabs, quarried by hand from reefs 10 to 20 feet under water each slab weighed more than 1,000 pounds. Within its walls the kingdoms royalty prayed, sang hymns, were married, christened their children, and finally laid in state. On the grounds surrounding the church are buried some of the original missionaries.

In 1852, Hawaiian James Kekela went as a missionary to the Marquesas Islands of French Polynesia. He wrote that Hawaii was fortunate to have come under the protection of the United States rather than France: The French government is celebrating the 14th of July in Papeete, as America does on the 4th of July. What Americans do to celebrate is to give speeches, worship God, do things to strengthen the body, and so on. The French are pleasure lovers, acting as in the old days the dances of Tahiti, Tuamotu, Rurutu, Tubuai, and Atiu. What is done is like what the (filthy arioi?) did. It is a very painful thing for our eyes to behold, because all kinds of liquor are allowed on the tables on this day-beer, soda, wine, whiskey.

Hawaii became a U.S. Territory July 7, 1898, when President McKinley signed the Treaty of Annexation. In 1959, Hawaii became the 50th U.S. state. The occasion was marked by ceremonies within the sanctuary walls of the Kawaiahao Church.

On April 19, 1970, President Richard Nixon spoke at the historic Kawaiahao Church, saying: Reverend Akaka I wanted to attend this great church, with all of its history that is here having in mind the fact that today you will be commemorating the 150th anniversary of Christianity in these islands.

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Christian roots are deep in these islands – WND.com

Price war breaks out on Scottish islands flights – BBC News


BBC News
Price war breaks out on Scottish islands flights
BBC News
As Flybe prepares to go head to head with Loganair from the beginning of September, some flights from Stornoway to Glasgow are on sale for just 50. The airlines have jointly operated routes across the Highlands and islands under a franchise agreement …

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Price war breaks out on Scottish islands flights – BBC News

OPINION: Islands of intolerance – Arkansas Democrat-Gazette – Arkansas Online

Is there no limit to the level of disgusting behavior on college campuses that parents, taxpayers, donors and legislators will accept? Colleges have become islands of intolerance, and as with fish, the rot begins at the head. Let’s examine some recent episodes representative of a general trend and ask ourselves why we should tolerate it–plus pay for it.

Students at Evergreen State College harassed biology professor Bret Weinstein because he refused to leave campus, challenging the school’s decision to ask white people to leave campus for a day of diversity programming. The profanity-laced threats against the faculty and president can be seen on a YouTube video titled “Student takeover of Evergreen State College.”

What about administrators permitting students to conduct racially segregated graduation ceremonies, which many colleges have done, including Ivy League ones such as Columbia and Harvard universities? Permitting racially segregated graduation ceremonies makes a mockery of the idols of diversity, multiculturalism and inclusion, which so many college administrators worship. Or is tribalism part and parcel of diversity?

Trinity College sociology professor Johnny Eric Williams recently called white people “inhuman a**holes.” In the wake of the Alexandria, Va., shooting at a congressional baseball practice, Williams tweeted, “It is past time for the racially oppressed to do what people who believe themselves to be ‘white’ will not do, put [an] end to the vectors of their destructive mythology of whiteness and their white supremacy system.”

June Chu, dean of Pierson College at Yale University, recently resigned after having been placed on leave because of offensive Yelp reviews she had posted. One of her reviews described customers at a local restaurant as “white trash” and “low class folk”; another review praised a movie theater for its lack of “sketchy crowds.” In another review of a movie theater, she complained about the “barely educated morons trying to manage snack orders for the obese.”

Harvey Mansfield, a distinguished Harvard University professor who has taught at the school for 55 years, is not hopeful about the future of American universities. In a College Fix interview, Mansfield said, “No, I’m not very optimistic about the future of higher education, at least in the form it is now with universities under the control of politically correct faculties and administrators.” Once America’s pride, universities, he says, are no longer a marketplace of ideas or bastions of free speech. Universities have become “bubbles of decadent liberalism” that teach students to look for offense when first examining an idea.

Who is to blame for the decline of American universities? Mansfield argues that it is a combination of administrators, students and faculties. He puts most of the blame on faculty members, some of whom are cowed by deans and presidents who don’t want their professors to make trouble.

I agree with Mansfield’s assessment in part. Many university faculty members are hostile to free speech and open questioning of ideas. A large portion of today’s faculty and administrators were once the hippies of the 1960s, and many have contempt for the U.S. Constitution and the values of personal liberty. The primary blame for the incivility and downright stupidity we see on university campuses lies with the universities’ trustees. Every board of trustees has fiduciary responsibility for the governance of a university, shaping its broad policies.

Unfortunately, most trustees are wealthy businessmen who are busy and aren’t interested in spending time on university matters. They become trustees for the prestige it brings, and as such, they are little more than yes men for the university president and provost. If trustees want better knowledge about university goings-on, they should hire a campus ombudsman who is independent of the administration and accountable only to the board of trustees.

The university malaise reflects a larger societal problem. Mansfield says culture used to mean refinement. Today, he says, it “just means the way a society happens to think, and there’s no value judgment in it any longer.” For many of today’s Americans, one cultural value is just as good as another.

————v————

Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University.

Editorial on 07/06/2017

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OPINION: Islands of intolerance – Arkansas Democrat-Gazette – Arkansas Online

As Seas Rise, Tropical Pacific Islands Face a Perfect Storm – Yale Environment 360

Interview

Although they have done little to contribute to global warming, Pacific islanders may face some of the most dire consequences of rising seas and worsening storms. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, geologist Chip Fletcher describes the threats confronting Hawaii and other tropical islands, and discusses potential adaptation strategies.

By RichardSchiffman July6,2017

Among the places expected to be most hard-hit by sea level rise in the coming century or two are the islands of the tropical Pacific Ocean, ranging from sparsely developed archipelagos in Micronesia to heavily populated coastal areas on the Hawaiian Islands, such as Honolulu.

Tracking the past, present, and future impacts of sea level rise on the Pacific region is University of Hawaii geologist Chip Fletcher. In an interview withYale Environment 360, Fletcher discusses how rising seas are already causing flooding and other disruptions on various Pacific islands, how saltwater intrusion will pose a major threat to freshwater supplies, and how countless coastal residents may inevitably have to be relocated from disappearing shorelines.

Fletcher notes that while the tropical Pacific is on the front line of climate changes destruction, it has done little to cause it. The majorindustrialnations responsible for global warming have a debt to the Pacific islands to assistwith theadaptation that is necessary to survive this challenge, says Fletcher.

Yale Environment 360:Given current and projected rates of sea level rise, what can we anticipate in the coming decades?

Chip Fletcher:What used to be considered an absolute worst-case scenario of probably about one meter of global sea level rise by the end of the century has now been characterized in a recent report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as an intermediate scenario. For the first time, the possibility of a two-meter rise in sea level by the end of the century is being taken seriously. There is even one model result published recently showing that we may see a near-three-meter rise by the end of the century.

e360:Which Pacific islands will be most severely impacted by sea level rise?

Fletcher:Well every island, actually, because in the Pacific, islandpopulations tend to cluster around the coastal zone and around ports. Most populations are highly dependent on shipping and goods made in faraway places. As sea level continues to rise, we are going to see coastal erosion. Port facilities will experience new currents and extreme water levels, making navigation challenging. Extreme high tides, which are already occurring, will lead to flooding inunexpectedways, such aswater coming up through storm drains onto streets and waves flowing across beaches into buildings and roads. Coastal wetlands, where important staples such as taro aregrown,are experiencing saltwater intrusion. Saltwater is contaminatingshallowaquifers and threatening freshwateravailability.

e360: As a geologist, you have studied the history of the Pacific during recent millennia. How long has sea level been rising?

Fletcher: We cored the coastal plain in Western Samoa on the island of Upoluand found that at the same time that Polynesians were undergoing their journeys of exploration and discovery, 1,000 to 3,000 years ago, sea level was falling and exposing coastal plains that then became habitable, where previously the sea was up against clay banks or cliffs.

After the last ice age about 20,000 years ago, sea level initially rose due to the melting of the glaciers. That peaked around 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. In the Pacific region, sea levelstarted to fall until a few centuriesago. And now global warming is causing sea levels to rise again.

e360:The impact of sea level rise on islands and coastal areas in the Pacific has been exacerbated by changes in the climate. Could you talk about one critical factor the periodic El Nio phenomenon?

Fletcher:El Nio occurs when the trade winds are substituted by winds that blow from the west to the east. As we move into a warmer future, climate models are projecting that the Pacificwillexperience morefrequentstrong ElNio events.El Nio years bring with them enormous changes for all Pacific islands changes inrainfall, inwinds, in drought, in waves and erosion processes, in water temperature.

Globally, data show ashift to increased rain intensity.Withmore extreme precipitation, there is the possibility thatless water will soak into the ground to recharge aquifers and more of it willremain on the surface as runoff. This can depletefreshwater reserves and increaseflooding. In some areas this trend is compounded by extended periods of drought. And El Nio puts an exclamation point on all of this. The typical variability of storminess and drought rises in magnitude when you superimpose an El Nio on top of it.

e360:There have indeed been some punishing droughts recently in the Pacific.

Fletcher:Yes, for instance in Yap and Palau, during the 2015-16 El Nio, the drought was so severe that they were down to two-hour water days one hour in the morning and one hour in the evening when people could take water. All the reservoirs were nearly at zero, the rivers were drying up, they were in desperate shape for freshwater.

e360: Another threat to critical island fresh water supplies comes directly from sea level rise itself, isnt that right?

Fletcher: In the atoll communities, which rely on a thin aquifer of fresh water, you get saltwater intrusion into that aquifer both by wave overwash and saltwater bubbling up from below. In fact, in 2007 and 2008 there was a state of emergency in the Federated States of Micronesia where a king tide [an unusually high tide] and a high wave event superimposed on it caused something like 80 communities to lose their food and freshwater because of saltwater intrusions.

e360:Saltwater intrusion can be a threat in some cases before actual flooding of the islands?

Fletcher:Thats correct. People worry that these islands will drown with sea level rise, but their freshwater capacity will be challenged and is already being challenged much sooner than the islands would be drowned.Freshwater is the fundamental element that allows life on an island. It is already being affected in many places. It is possible in atoll communities that rely on thin freshwater aquifers if it breaks out onto the land surface, that water flows out into the ocean and you lose it. The freshwater lens becomes thinner and thinner.

The water table in all our coastal locations goes up and down with the tides. That means the water table is connected to the ocean. So as the ocean rises, the water table rises. This has a couple of effects. If you have a thin freshwater aquifer, it will break out through the land surface and create a new wetland. At first it will only occur at the highest tides of the year, then monthly, and eventually during every high tide. This trend of flooding will beworsened when it rains.

Imagine the consequences when this occursin downtown Honolulu and in Waikiki [as sea levels continue to rise].

We have one location [on Oahu] in particular that is over a mile from the coastline, an industrial area called Mapunapuna. And sea water flows up through the storm drain system, as well as comes under a small bridge out of a stream, and weve seen high tides over the past couple of months where theres a foot or two of standing water in the streets. This nuisance flooding is an example of what were going to be experiencing more and more as sea level continues to rise.

e360:When you look to the future in Honolulu, what are the big concerns?

Fletcher:Erosion of the beaches the tourists come here to go to the beaches. Storm drains flooding with saltwater up onto roads. Ground becoming saturated with groundwater and turning into wetlands. And then greatly increased vulnerability to tsunamis and hurricanes, because there is a non-linear aspect to storm surges and tsunami flooding. That is, if you raise sea level one foot, its more than just the equivalent of a one-foot-higher tsunami. If you raise sea level on the very flat topography of the coastal plain that stretches back landward of you, what a small tsunami might have caused with one foot of sea level rise could be ten times greater in terms of damage not just doubling.

e360: Are there any mitigation strategies being considered now in Hawaii to minimize the impact on Honolulu?

Fletcher: Yes, there is a committee that was formed by legislative mandate three years ago to study how we are going to adapt to climate change. And the first topic they took up was sea level rise, and theres a report thatll be coming out at the end of this year that discusses options. They will also report on the billions of dollars [in projected damages] and the numbers of people and the miles of roadway that are vulnerable to various aspects of sea level rise.

e360:What are some of those adaptation strategies?

Fletcher:So sea level rise is going to cause, and is already causing, accelerated beach erosion. How are we going to respond to that? Maybe in a few locations where the cost-benefit analysis permits it, we will spend millions of dollars on finding sand and putting it on the beach doing beach nourishment. And thats been done already and will continue to be done on Waikiki. Thats being contemplated and will occur in the next year or two for a tourism place on Maui called Kaanapali. Its lined with hotels, and looks a lot like Waikiki. The cost-benefit ratio suggests that spending millions of dollars putting new sand on the beach is certainly worth it.

But many beaches are not lined with hotels, and its problematic as to whether placing sand on those beaches will be a good long-term solution or if that sand will immediately erode away. Also where is the money supposed to come from? And so [we need] to simultaneously develop an exit strategy for coastal homes if erosion starts to threaten those homes and they put sea walls up in front of them the beaches can just disappear. That will no doubt happen on many beaches, but what about beaches that we dont want to disappear? Like Sunset Beach on the north shore of Oahu a famous beach. Were not just going to sea-wall that thing to death we need to figure out an exit strategy for the homes, for the homeowners. So do we buy them out, or do we trade state-owned land with them away from the shoreline. All sorts of economic tools might be considered.

e360:Could you briefly give an idea of how many homes in the Hawaiian islands will be threatened in the future by sea level rise. How many homes are that close to the ocean?

Fletcher:Thousands, thousands. Our modeling has looked at just a certain stretch of Sunset Beach and we see that at under one foot of sea level rise, over a hundred homes are threatened. Today there are 18 homes threatened, and with one foot of sea level rise it jumps up to over 100 homes. And one foot of sea level rise could happen within a few decades. And so if even half of those homes are allowed to put up sea walls, were going to see the end of Sunset beach.

e360:So thousands of homes on the Hawaiian islands are threatened in the next few decades?

Fletcher:I would say before the middle part of the century well see thousands of homes threatened with erosion and were going to be faced with a choice: Do we build sea walls, which will end up killing the beaches and hurt the monk seals and the turtles and all the stuff that goes along with beaches, or do we develop an exit strategy for these homeowners somehow?

e360: Coral reefs are another key factor in the geology of many Pacific islands.

Fletcher: This is point number one related to the Pacific Ocean and climate change that our reefs are taking a hammering much faster than we thought would occur. An important paper came out a year or two ago that said that by 2050, 98 percent of the reefs in the world will be sustaining annual bleaching. Thats extinction, basically. The only reefs that wont go extinct are reefs that can migrate to cooler waters, toward the poles.

The Great Barrier Reef appears to be on its last legs. It got hammered in 1998 and again in 2010, 2014, 2015, and 2016. Reefs cannot sustain year after year bleaching. The Great Barrier Reef has moved beyond our ability to help. It is collapsing before our very eyes. The reefs throughout Micronesia, in the coral triangle, in Indonesia, even in Hawaii which sits in slightly cooler water these reefs have sustained, year after year, serious coral bleaching and they are highly endangered.

e360: Reading about these threats, one might be under the impression that the smaller islands in the Pacific are doomed.

Fletcher: The Micronesians and Polynesians are place-based cultures. The bones of their ancestors are buried in these places. The land isconsidereda family member. This means moving is not arealisticoption for many. Moving would mean leaving behind ones culture, ones family, and the very basis of ones identity. However, rising sea levels, and changes in freshwater resources pose existential threats.

Pacific island communities did not bring this upon ourselves. Our contributions to greenhouse gas emissions arenegligible, yet we are among the earliest communities toexperiencethe worst consequences. The majorindustrialnations responsible for global warming have a debt to the Pacific islands to assistwith theadaptation that is necessary to survive this challenge. There is no time to spare. There are many steps that can be taken to bolsterfoodresources, improve rainwater catchment, increase the elevation of the land, and envision new community designs that are resilient to storms, drought, and flooding.

Richard Schiffman reports on the environment and health for a variety of publications that include The New York Times, Scientific American, the Atlantic and Yale Environment 360. His latest book published in February is a collection of nature-inspired poems entitled “What the Dust Doesn’t Know.” More about Richard Schiffman

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As Seas Rise, Tropical Pacific Islands Face a Perfect Storm – Yale Environment 360

Tropical Depression 4 may strengthen before approaching Leeward Islands – AccuWeather.com

Tropical Depression Four, which formed over the south-central Atlantic Wednesday evening, may become Tropical Storm Don prior to swinging north of the Leeward Islands.

The tropical system will take a west-northwestward path over tropical waters through this weekend. The system is being guided by a clockwise flow associated with a large area of high pressure over the central Atlantic to the north.

This animation shows Tropical Depression Four over the south-central Atlantic Ocean on Thursday midday, July 6, 2017. (NOAA/Satellite)

Fluctuation in strength of the system is likely. The system may slip below tropical depression status and could also become a tropical storm over the next several days.

Into Friday, there is a chance the system becomes a tropical storm.

“Beyond Friday, some weakening of the system is likely,” according to AccuWeather Meteorologist Brett Rossio.

“The system will move into a zone of dry air and strong southwesterly winds at mid-levels of the atmosphere.”

The core of thunderstorms associated with torrential rain and strong winds will steer north of the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico this weekend. However, it is possible for squalls to push westward across the islands well south of the center.

The system could still become strong enough to raise seas and surf around the islands. As a result, bathers and boaters should exercise caution.

In the long term, the strength of the system is questionable.

If the system survives the zone of dry air and disruptive winds as a tropical depression or storm, it could be drawn northward between Bermuda and the United States Atlantic coast next week.

In this farther north scenario, “the environment northeast of the Bahamas may allow strengthening,” Rossio said.

RELATED: AccuWeather Hurricane Center How do hurricanes get their names? How to ensure the safety of family pets during a hurricane

Should the system remain weak, a more westward path is likely during next week.

If the system becomes shredded by the dry air and strong winds north of the Leeward Island, a poorly organized feature may drift westward across the Bahamas, Cuba and the Florida Peninsula with spotty showers and thunderstorms next week.

All interests from the northern Islands of the Caribbean to the Bahamas, Bermuda and the southeastern U.S. should monitor the progress of Tropical Depression Four.

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Tropical Depression 4 may strengthen before approaching Leeward Islands – AccuWeather.com

Israel issues severe travel warning to Philippine islands – The Times of Israel

The Counter-Terrorism Bureau on Thursday issued a travel warning to Israelis against visiting the southern Philippine area of the Mindanao and Sulu islands due to an immediate threat of terrorism.

Following a situation assessment by the Counter-Terrorism Bureau, a decision made to further raise the severity of the travel warning to the island of Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago group of islands, the Prime Ministers Office said in a statement.

It said the travel warning was at Level 1, the highest on a scale of 4 and indicating a concrete threat.

There is a real and tangible risk to Israelis staying in the area, the statement said and noted the warning was issued due to increased activities by terrorists, and in particular global jihad groups.

In light of the severity of the threat, the recommendation of the CTB to Israelis is to avoid visiting the area of the travel warning, and those who are there to leave immediately.

The CTB also advised Israelis in other areas of the Philippines to stay alert to the possible spillover of terror incidents and to follow the instructions of local security authorities.

In May Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte imposed martial law across the southern region of Mindanao to crush what he said was a rising threat from the Islamic State group there.

He made the move shortly after militants went on a rampage through the southern city of Marawi, which is about 800 kilometers (500 miles) south of Manila.

Security forces are still battling the militants in Marawi, and the clashes there have left at least 171 people dead.

Duterte has said he may need to declare martial law across the rest of the country if the terrorism threat spreads.

The violence has left at least 459 people dead, including 336 militants, 84 soldiers and policemen, and 39 civilians. At least eight foreign fighters are believed to be among the dead in the fierce fighting, which has forced more than 300,000 residents of Marawi and nearby towns to flee to safety and turned much of the lakeside city into ghost towns.

After more than a month of offensives, troops have regained 15 of 19 villages besieged by the militants, with fewer than 100 gunmen holding an unspecified number of hostages still putting up a fight, military officials said.

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Israel issues severe travel warning to Philippine islands – The Times of Israel

Investigators say photo shows Amelia Earhart on Marshall Islands – Las Vegas Review-Journal

A newly unearthed photo shows Amelia Earhart survived her final flight, investigators say.

What happened to Amelia Earhart?

That question has captivated the public ever since her plane vanished over the Pacific Ocean in 1937 as she attempted to become the first female pilot to fly around the world.

Now, investigators believe they have discovered the smoking gun that would support a decades-old theory that Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, were captured by the Japanese: a newly unearthed photograph from the National Archives that purportedly shows Earhart and Noonan and their plane on an atoll in the Marshall Islands.

I was originally skeptical until we could get the photograph authenticated, Shawn Henry, a former FBI assistant executive director who is now helping privately investigate the Earhart disappearance, told The Washington Post. The fact that it came out of the National Archives as opposed to somebodys basement or garage somewhere that to me gave it a lot more credibility.

The photograph was rediscovered a few years ago in a mislabeled file at the National Archives by a former U.S. Treasury agent named Les Kinney, who began looking into Earharts disappearance after he retired, according to previews for a new History channel documentary, Amelia Earhart: The Lost Evidence, that airs July 9.

The 8-by-10-inch black-and-white photograph went ignored in a stack of 20 or 30 other pictures until Kinney took a closer look a few months later, Henry said.

In the photo, a figure with Earharts haircut and approximate body type sits on the dock, facing away from the camera, Henry points out. Toward the left of the dock is a man they believe is Noonan. On the far right of the photo is a barge with an airplane on it, supposedly Earharts.

Henry, who was asked to join the investigation about a year ago, said two photo experts analyzed the picture to ensure it had not been manipulated. It had not been, they found. The experts also compared the facial features and body proportions of the two figures in the photograph with known pictures of Earhart and Noonan.

For the man on the left, the hairline is the most distinctive characteristic, Ken Gibson, a facial recognition expert who studied the image, told the Today show. Its a very sharp receding hairline. The nose is very prominent . Its my feeling that this is very convincing evidence that this is probably Noonan.

The figure seated on the dock is wearing pants, much like Earhart often did, Henry noted.

Im looking at her sitting on the dock and thinking, This is her, he said.

Though they cant be sure of when the photo was taken, there is no record of Earhart being in the Marshall Islands, he added.

Henry said he traveled to the Marshall Islands and interviewed the son of a man whose father repeatedly told others he had witnessed Earharts plane land at Mili Atoll in 1937. He also spoke with the last living person who claimed to have seen the pair after their emergency landing.

But again, for me, those things are all somewhat suspect until you have that photograph, which corroborates that she was there, Henry said. To me, thats just proof beyond a reasonable doubt.

Gary Tarpinian, executive producer of the History documentary, told the Today show that they believe the Koshu, the Japanese merchant ship in the photo, took Earhart to Saipan, where she died in Japanese custody.

What happened to her then?

The team thinks the photo might have been taken by someone spying on the Japanese, he added. Other questions, like when and how Earhart died, remain a mystery.

What happened to her then? Was there a coverup or not? Did the U.S. government know? What did the Japanese government know? Henry said. I think this actually opens up a whole new line of questioning.

Over the past 80 years, three prevailing theories about Earharts disappearance have emerged.

Some speculate that Earharts Lockheed Model 10 Electra crashed and sank to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, killing her and Noonan.

Last year, a Pennsylvania-based group called International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR) repositioned the spotlight on an alternate theory: With their fuel rapidly depleting, Earhart and Noonan used celestial navigation to land on a remote coral atoll named Gardner Island, about 400 miles south of Howland Island, their original destination. It was there, TIGHAR says, that the two tried to send out frantic radio calls for help but eventually died as castaways.

Just last month, the group launched an ambitious expedition to try to prove its theory, sending researchers and a pack of forensically trained border collies to Gardner Island, now called Nikumaroro. The mission: For the dogs to sniff out human bones that, through DNA matching, would confirm Earhart and Noonan landed and then perished on that island.

Henry said he isnt bothered by other explanations for of Earharts disappearance.

Ive listened to some competing theories, he said. When you look at the totality of what we put together and then hold that photograph I think that photograph is as close to a smoking gun as youre going to have in a cold case thats 80 years old.

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Investigators say photo shows Amelia Earhart on Marshall Islands – Las Vegas Review-Journal

Philippines earthquake: Magnitude 6.9 seismic tremor hits the Pacific islands chain, reports USGS – The Independent

Donald Trump arrives to deliver a speech at Krasinski Square in Warsaw, Poland.

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A firefighter conducts rescue operations in an area damaged by heavy rain in Asakura, Japan.

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Anti-capitalism activists protest in Hamburg, where leaders of the worlds top economies will gather for a G20 summit.

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Crowds gather for the start of the San Fermin festival in Pamplona, Spain.

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A member of the Iraqi security forces runs with his weapon during a fight between Iraqi forces and Islamic State militants in the Old City of Mosul, Iraq.

A U.S. MGM-140 Army Tactical Missile is fired during the combined military exercise between the U.S. and South Korea against North Korea at an undisclosed location in South Korea

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North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un looks on during the test-fire of inter-continental ballistic missile Hwasong-14

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (R) shakes hands with his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping during a signing ceremony following the talks at the Kremlin

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Belarussian servicemen march during a military parade as part of celebrations marking the Independence Day in Minsk, Belarus

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Ambulance cars and fire engines are seen near the site where a coach burst into flames after colliding with a lorry on a motorway near Muenchberg, Germany

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Protesters demonstrating against the upcoming G20 economic summit ride boats on Inner Alster lake during a protest march in Hamburg, Germany. Hamburg will host the upcoming G20 summit and is expecting heavy protests throughout.

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Protesters carry a large image of jailed Chinese Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo as they march during the annual pro-democracy protest in Hong Kong. Thousands joined an annual protest march in Hong Kong, hours after Chinese President Xi Jinping wrapped up his visit to the city by warning against challenges to Beijing’s sovereignty.

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Jockey Andrea Coghe of “Selva” (Forest) parish rides his horse during the first practice for the Palio Horse Race in Siena, Italy June 30, 2017

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A man takes pictures with a phone with a Union Flag casing after Chinese President Xi Jinping (not pictured) inspected troops at the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Hong Kong Garrison as part of events marking the 20th anniversary of the city’s handover from British to Chinese rule, in Hong Kong, China June 30, 2017

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A protester against U.S. President Donald Trump’s limited travel ban, approved by the U.S. Supreme Court, holds a sign next to protesters supporting the ban, in New York City, U.S., June 29, 2017

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Israeli Air Force Efroni T-6 Texan II planes perform at an air show during the graduation of new cadet pilots at Hatzerim base in the Negev desert, near the southern Israeli city of Beer Sheva

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A woman gestures next to people spraying insecticide on a vehicle during a mosquito-control operation led by Ivory Coast’s National Public and Health Institute in Bingerville, near Abidjan where several cases of dengue fever were reported

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An aerial view shows women swimming in the Yenisei River on a hot summer day, with the air temperature at about 32 degrees Celsius (89.6 degrees Fahrenheit), outside Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, Russia, June 28, 2017

Reuters

A Libyan coast guardsman watches over as illegal immigrants arrive to land in a dinghy during the rescue of 147 people who attempted to reach Europe off the coastal town of Zawiyah, 45 kilometres west of the capital Tripoli, on June 27, 2017. More than 8,000 migrants have been rescued in waters off Libya during the past 48 hours in difficult weather conditions, Italy’s coastguard said on June 27, 2017

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Investigators work at the scene of a car bomb explosion which killed Maxim Shapoval, a high-ranking official involved in military intelligence, in Kiev, Ukraine, June 27, 2017

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A man leaves after voting in the Mongolian presidential election at the Erdene Sum Ger (Yurt) polling station in Tuul Valley. Mongolians cast ballots on June 26 to choose between a horse breeder, a judoka and a feng shui master in a presidential election rife with corruption scandals and nationalist rhetoric

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People attend Eid al-Fitr prayers to mark the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan at a play ground in the suburb of Sale, Morocco

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A plain-clothes police officer kicks a member of a group of LGBT rights activist as Turkish police prevent them from going ahead with a Gay Pride annual parade on 25 June 2017 in Istanbul, a day after it was banned by the city governor’s office.

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Pakistan army soldiers stands guard while rescue workers examine the site of an oil tanker explosion at a highway near Bahawalpur, Pakistan. An overturned oil tanker burst into flames in Pakistan on Sunday, killing more than one hundred people who had rushed to the scene of the highway accident to gather leaking fuel, an official said.

AP

Rescue workers search for survivors at the site of a landslide that occurred in Xinmo Village, Mao County, Sichuan province, China

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Student activists shout anti martial law slogans during a protest in Manila on June 23, 2017

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A diver performs from the Pont Alexandre III bridge into the River Seine in Paris, France, June 23, 2017 as Paris transforms into a giant Olympic park to celebrate International Olympic Days with a variety of sporting events for the public across the city during two days as the city bids to host the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Reuters

Debris and smoke are seen after an OV-10 Bronco aircraft released a bomb, during an airstrike, as government troops continue their assault against insurgents from the Maute group, who have taken over parts of Marawi city, Philippines June 23, 2017

Reuters

Russian President Vladimir Putin (C) stands under pouring rain during a wreath-laying ceremony marking the 76th anniversary of the Nazi German invasion, by the Kremlin walls in Moscow, on June 22, 2017

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Smoke rises following a reported air strike on a rebel-held area in the southern Syrian city of Daraa, on June 22, 2017

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Iraqis flee from the Old City of Mosul on June 22, 2017, during the ongoing offensive by Iraqi forces to retake the last district still held by the Islamic State (IS) group

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Girls stand in monsoon rains beside an open laundry in New Delhi, India

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People take part in the 15th annual Times Square yoga event celebrating the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, during classes in the middle of Times Square in New York. The event marked the international day of yoga.

Reuters

Faroe Islanders turn the sea red after slaughtering hundreds of whales as part of annual tradition

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A firefighting plane tackles a blaze in Cadafaz, near Goes, Portugal

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A person participates in a journalists’ protest asking for justice in recent attacks on journalists in Mexico City, Mexico, 15 June 2017

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Poland’s Piotr Lobodzinski starts in front of the Messeturm, Fairground Tower, in Frankfurt Germany. More than 1,000 runners climbed the 1202 stairs, and 222 meters of height in the Frankfurt Messeturm skyscraper run

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A runner lies on the ground after arriving at the finish line in Frankfurt Germany. More than 1,000 runners climbed the 1202 stairs, and 222 meters of height in the Frankfurt Messeturm skyscraper run

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A troupe of Ukrainian dancers perform at Boryspil airport in Kiev, on the first day of visa-free travel for Ukrainian nationals to the European Union

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A troupe of Ukrainian dancers perform on the tarmac at Boryspil airport in Kiev, on the first day of visa-free travel for Ukrainian nationals to the European Union

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French President Emmanuel Macron with his wife Brigitte Trogneux cast their ballot at their polling station in the first round of the French legislatives elections in Le Touquet, northern France

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A Thai worker paints on a large statue of the Goddess of Mercy, known as Guan Yin at a Chinese temple in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. Guan Yin is one of the most popular and well known Chinese Goddess in Asia and in the world. Guan Yin is the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion in Mahayana Buddhism and also worshiped by Taoist

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A Thai worker paints on a large statue of the Goddess of Mercy, known as Guan Yin at a Chinese temple in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. Guan Yin is one of the most popular and well known Chinese Goddess in Asia and in the world. Guan Yin is the Bodhisattva of Great Compassion in Mahayana Buddhism and also worshiped by Taoists

EPA

Volunteers spread mozzarella cheese toppings on the Guinness World Record attempt for the Longest Pizza in Fontana, California, USA. The pizza was planned to be 7000 feet (2.13 km) to break the previous record of 6082 feet (1.8 km) set in Naples, Italy in 2016

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Jamaica’s Olympic champion Usain Bolt gestures after winning his final 100 metres sprint at the 2nd Racers Grand Prix at the National Stadium in Kingston, Jamaica

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Usain Bolt of Jamaica salutes the crowd after winning 100m ‘Salute to a Legend’ race during the Racers Grand Prix at the national stadium in Kingston, Jamaica. Bolt partied with his devoted fans in an emotional farewell at the National Stadium on June 10 as he ran his final race on Jamaican soil. Bolt is retiring in August following the London World Championships

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Usain Bolt of Jamaica salutes the crowd after winning 100m ‘Salute to a Legend’ race during the Racers Grand Prix at the national stadium in Kingston, Jamaica. Bolt partied with his devoted fans in an emotional farewell at the National Stadium on June 10 as he ran his final race on Jamaican soil. Bolt is retiring in August following the London World Championships

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Police officers investigate at the Amsterdam Centraal station in Amsterdam, Netherlands. A car ploughed into pedestrians and injured at least five people outside the station. The background of the incident was not immediately known, though police state they have ‘no indication whatsoever’ the incident was an attack

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Police officers investigate at the Amsterdam Centraal station in Amsterdam, Netherlands. A car ploughed into pedestrians and injured at least five people outside the station. The background of the incident was not immediately known, though police state they have ‘no indication whatsoever’ the incident was an attack

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Protesters stand off before police during a demonstration against corruption, repression and unemployment in Al Hoseima, Morocco. The neglected Rif region has been rocked by social unrest since the death in October of a fishmonger. Mouhcine Fikri, 31, was crushed in a rubbish truck as he protested against the seizure of swordfish caught out of season and his death has sparked fury and triggered nationwide protests

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A man looks on at a migrant and refugee makeshift camp set up under the highway near Porte de la Chapelle, northern Paris

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Philippines earthquake: Magnitude 6.9 seismic tremor hits the Pacific islands chain, reports USGS – The Independent


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