Researchers produce iPSC model to better understand genetic lung/liver disease

(Boston)–Using patient-derived stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to study the genetic lung/liver disease called alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, researchers have for the first time created a disease signature that may help explain how abnormal protein leads to liver disease. The study, which appears in Stem Cell Reports, also found that liver cells derived from AAT deficient iPSCs are more sensitive to drugs that cause liver toxicity than liver cells derived from normal iPSCs Continue reading



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Researchers produce iPSC model to better understand genetic lung/liver disease

Cancer's relentless evolution

All living things–from dandelions to reindeer–evolve over time. Cancer cells are no exception, and are subject to the two overarching mechanisms described by Charles Darwin: chance mutation and natural selection. In new research, Carlo Maley, PhD., and his colleagues describe compulsive evolution and dramatic genetic diversity in cells belonging to one of the most treatment-resistant and lethal forms of blood cancer: acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Continue reading



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Cancer's relentless evolution

iPSC model helps to better understand genetic lung/liver disease

Using patient-derived stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to study the genetic lung/liver disease called alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, researchers have for the first time created a disease signature that may help explain how abnormal protein leads to liver disease. Continue reading



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iPSC model helps to better understand genetic lung/liver disease

Some false postive prenatal genetic screens due to mother's extra DNA segments

People differ in the size and composition of their chromosomes, which can affect the test results IMAGE:This is conceptual art of maternal blood screening of fetal DNA. view more Credit: Alice C Gray Prenatal blood screening for extra or missing chromosomes in the fetus might give false-positive results if the mother’s genome contains more than the usual number of certain DNA segments. This finding is reported April 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine Continue reading



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Some false postive prenatal genetic screens due to mother's extra DNA segments

Marcus Miller, Ph.D., receives ACMG Foundation/David L. Rimoin Inspiring Excellence Award

The ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine announces the first recipient of the ACMG Foundation/David L. Continue reading



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Marcus Miller, Ph.D., receives ACMG Foundation/David L. Rimoin Inspiring Excellence Award

South-east England ahead on genetic tests for inherited eye conditions

New research from The University of Manchester published in the Journal of Community Genetics reveals a stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye disease in England. Continue reading



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South-east England ahead on genetic tests for inherited eye conditions

Short and Sweet: Why Modern Molecular Biology Needs Oligos

DNA sequencing and synthesis are two sides of the same coin, the read and write functions of genetic material. The field and its requisite technology took off in the 1990s with the Human Genome Projects effort to sequence billions of bases and unlock a new era of genetically informed medicine. The resulting science is still a work in progress it turns out the genetic code is more complicated than anticipated but the technologies and companies it helped spawn are an impressive legacy. Continue reading



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Short and Sweet: Why Modern Molecular Biology Needs Oligos

Genetic Variability in the Platelet Linked to Increased Risk for Clotting

Contact Information Available for logged-in reporters only Newswise Boston (March 31, 2015) Coronary heart disease and stroke, two of the leading causes of death in the United States, are diseases associated with heightened platelet reactivity. A new study in humans suggests an underlying reason for the variability in the risk of clotting is due to a genetic variation in a receptor on the surface of the platelet Continue reading



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Genetic Variability in the Platelet Linked to Increased Risk for Clotting

Recombine Announces Launch of Its CarrierMap Carrier Screening Test Through Sequenom

Home Mail Search News Sports Finance Weather Games Answers Screen Flickr Mobile More Politics Celebrity Movies Music TV Groups Health Style Beauty Food Parenting Makers Tech Shopping Travel Autos Homes Install the new Firefox Skip to Navigation Skip to Main content Skip to Right rail Sign In Mail Help Account Info Help Suggestions Continue reading



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Recombine Announces Launch of Its CarrierMap Carrier Screening Test Through Sequenom

Interleukin Genetics and Employee Benefit Consulting Group LLC Partner to Expand Awareness and Adoption of PerioPredict

Home Mail Search News Sports Finance Weather Games Answers Screen Flickr Mobile More Politics Celebrity Movies Music TV Groups Health Style Beauty Food Parenting Makers Tech Shopping Travel Autos Homes Install the new Firefox Skip to Navigation Skip to Main content Skip to Right rail Sign In Mail Help Account Info Help Suggestions Continue reading



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Interleukin Genetics and Employee Benefit Consulting Group LLC Partner to Expand Awareness and Adoption of PerioPredict

ACMG Foundation announces inaugural recipient of Lovell Award

The ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine announces the first recipient of the ACMG Foundation Carolyn Mills Lovell Award at the 2015 ACMG Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah: First award specifically for genetic counselors Stephanie Harris, CGC was honored as the first recipient of the ACMG Foundation Carolyn Mills Lovell Award at the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) 2015 Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah. Continue reading



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ACMG Foundation announces inaugural recipient of Lovell Award

PACK360@USC Institute for Genetic Medicine Art Gallery – Video




PACK360@USC Institute for Genetic Medicine Art Gallery PACK360 has taken an architectural approach to building art. Each site specific piece is layered in construction in a similar process to building a wall. Continue reading

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PACK360@USC Institute for Genetic Medicine Art Gallery - Video

Personalised meds on way for prostate cancer patients?

Kolkata, March 28 (IANS) Paving the way for personalised medicine, Indian scientists have identified for the first time various genetic alterations found in prostate cancer patients in the country, a development that could aid clinicians diagnose, decide and select the most effective and precise therapy for the person. Recently, renowned Indian film producer D. Ramanaidu, 79, lost a 13-year-old … Continue reading



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Personalised meds on way for prostate cancer patients?

How Unipathic Medicine Is Using a "Genetic Medical Blueprint" to Better Enhance Cancer Treatments

Home Mail Search News Sports Finance Weather Games Answers Screen Flickr Mobile More Politics Celebrity Movies Music TV Groups Health Style Beauty Food Parenting Makers Tech Shopping Travel Autos Homes Install the new Firefox Skip to Navigation Skip to Main content Skip to Right rail Sign In Mail Help Account Info Help Suggestions Continue reading



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How Unipathic Medicine Is Using a "Genetic Medical Blueprint" to Better Enhance Cancer Treatments

Scientists Spot Gene Tied to Severe Autism in Girls

By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) — Researchers say they’ve discovered a new genetic cause of autism, singling out a rare gene mutation that appears to hamper normal brain development early on in powerful ways. The gene, CTNND2, provides instructions for making a protein called delta-catenin, which plays crucial roles in the nervous system, said senior author Aravinda Chakravarti, a professor in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s Institute of Genetic Medicine. His research team found that a group of girls with severe autism carried CTNND2 mutations that appeared to reduce the effectiveness of delta-catenin, potentially affecting their neurological development. Continue reading



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Scientists Spot Gene Tied to Severe Autism in Girls

In A Genetic Portrait Of A Nation, A Map Of The Future

Its the most complete genetic map of an entire country yet completed and it could show clues of what medicine could look like in the coming age of big data. Researchers working at DeCode Genetics, a unit of the drug company Amgen, have sequenced the genomes of 2,636 Icelanders and used genealogical records and more spotty genetic data to calculate the likely genetics of 101,584 more. Because DeCode has anonymized access to patient medical records, the company could then look for relationships between the genetic variants and disease and they found a new genetic variant that increases the risk of Alzheimers, as well as confiming suspected variants that raise the risk of diabetes and one that causes atrial fibrillation, a heart condition Continue reading



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In A Genetic Portrait Of A Nation, A Map Of The Future

New autism-causing genetic variant identified

Using a novel approach that homes in on rare families severely affected by autism, a Johns Hopkins-led team of researchers has identified a new genetic cause of the disease. The rare genetic variant offers important insights into the root causes of autism, the researchers say. And, they suggest, their unconventional method can be used to identify other genetic causes of autism and other complex genetic conditions. Continue reading



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New autism-causing genetic variant identified

Patricia Hall, Ph.D., earns 2015 King Trainee Award for best publication, Genetics in Medicine

Patricia L. Hall, Ph.D., FACMG of Emory University is the recipient of the 2015 Richard King Trainee Award for the best publication in ACMG’s academic journal, Genetics in Medicine Patricia L. Hall, PhD, FACMG of Emory University is the recipient of the 2015 Richard King Trainee Award Continue reading



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Patricia Hall, Ph.D., earns 2015 King Trainee Award for best publication, Genetics in Medicine

Iceland's Giant Genome Project Points to Future of Medicine

Photo: Chris Lund The blood of a thousand Icelanders. When the first Viking explorers began settling Iceland, none could have imagined that theirdescendants would pioneer thefuture of modern medicine by surveying the human genome. Fast forward 1000 years to today, whenanIcelandic company has revealedits success insequencing the largest-ever set of human genomes from a single population Continue reading



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Iceland's Giant Genome Project Points to Future of Medicine