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Biden awarded presidential Medal of Freedom – cnn.com

“For your faith in your fellow Americans, for your love of country and for your lifetime of service that will endure through the generations, I’d like to ask the military aide to join us on stage,” Obama said in the ceremony. “For my final time as President, I am pleased to award our nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.”

Biden, who appeared extremely emotional during the tribute and was seen tearing up, accepted the award but said he did not deserve it.

“This honor is not only well beyond what I deserve, but it’s a reflection of the extent and generosity of your spirit,” Biden said. “I don’t deserve this but I know it came from the President’s heart.”

Before surprising Biden with the award, Obama gave lengthy and colorful remarks praising Biden, his wife Dr. Jill Biden and his children and grandchildren.

“This is the kind of family that built this country,” Obama said. “That’s why my family is honored to call ourselves honorary Bidens.”

Obama noted that while their term is almost over the two will be “forever binded as a family,”

“If you can’t admire Joe Biden as a person you’ve got a problem,” Obama said quoting a Republican senator. “He’s as good a man as God ever created.”

Biden, who was shocked by the entire gathering, said he had no “inkling” it was going to happen. The Vice President said he thought he was coming to toast senior staff with the first lady and his wife Jill Biden.

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Freedom – ou.edu

Here at the Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage, we believe an educated citizenry is the foundation of a healthy democracy. Out of that conviction came freedom.ou.edu, a site intended to house our entire IACH lecture library. We’ve sorted hundreds of videos for your convenience, all available through the navigation bar or the icons below. You can search by event by clicking on Teach-In or Constitution Day, or browse specific constitutional themes through Quick Courses. Think of our final tab, Constitutional Resources, as a hub of links and tools to assist in your civic learning. We invite you students, alumni, faculty and friends to use this site as a sort of extended campus, no matter where you’re at in life.

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Freedom – ou.edu

Freedom Xpress inc In Brewer, Me

At Freedom Xpress Inc. we are committed to providing on-time delivery with a level of customer service that exceeds our customers expectations.

All customers must receive a consistently reliable and professionally delivered level of service while incorporating both their individual needs and sound business principles.

We recognize that we represent our clients during a delivery, and as such, we must treat all contacts with the highest level of dignity and respect.

We strive for excellence and recognize the importance of treating our employees fairly and operating our company with strong ethical and trustworthy values.

The flexibility our service provides gives you the capability of shipping packages on a regular scheduled basis or on demand as needed. Freedom Xpress also offers line hauling from NH, VT and Maine as well as the Boston area. So whether you have one envelope or a truck load of packages, let us take care of your delivery needs.

FreedomXpress runs more than 100 daily routes throughout the Eastern Seaboard delivering over 800,000 packages per month.

We utilize vehicles ranging from mini vans to tractor trailers so package sizes from envelops to truck loads are not a problem.

– Same Day Delivery

– On Demand, Scheduled, Routed

– Overnight Service

– Line Hauls

– Home Delivery

– Distribution Services

– Bulk Break Down & Delivery

– Warehousing & Fullfilment Services

Our experienced management team and professional drivers work hard to ensure best in class service and on time delivery services.

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Political freedom – Wikipedia

Political freedom (also known as a political autonomy or political agency) is a central concept in history and political thought and one of the most important features of democratic societies.[1] It was described as freedom from oppression[2] or coercion,[3] the absence of disabling conditions for an individual and the fulfillment of enabling conditions,[4] or the absence of life conditions of compulsion, e.g. economic compulsion, in a society.[5] Although political freedom is often interpreted negatively as the freedom from unreasonable external constraints on action,[6] it can also refer to the positive exercise of rights, capacities and possibilities for action, and the exercise of social or group rights.[7] The concept can also include freedom from “internal” constraints on political action or speech (e.g. social conformity, consistency, or “inauthentic” behaviour).[8] The concept of political freedom is closely connected with the concepts of civil liberties and human rights, which in democratic societies are usually afforded legal protection from the state.

Various groups along the political spectrum naturally differ on what they believe constitutes “true” political freedom.

Left wing political philosophy generally couples the notion of freedom with that of positive liberty, or the enabling of a group or individual to determine their own life or realize their own potential. Freedom, in this sense, may include freedom from poverty, starvation, treatable disease, and oppression, as well as freedom from force and coercion, from whomever they may issue.

Friedrich Hayek, a classical liberal, criticized this as a misconception of freedom:

[T]he use of “liberty” to describe the physical “ability to do what I want”, the power to satisfy our wishes, or the extent of the choice of alternatives open to us… has been deliberately fostered as part of the socialist argument… the notion of collective power over circumstances has been substituted for that of individual liberty.[9]

Anarcho-socialists see negative and positive liberty as complementary concepts of freedom. Such a view of rights may require utilitarian trade-offs, such as sacrificing the right to the product of one’s labor or freedom of association for less racial discrimination or more subsidies for housing. Social anarchists describe the negative liberty-centric view endorsed by capitalism as “selfish freedom”.[10]

Anarcho-capitalists see negative rights as a consistent system. Ayn Rand described it as “a moral principle defining and sanctioning a mans freedom of action in a social context. To such libertarians, positive liberty is contradictory, since so-called rights must be traded off against each other, debasing legitimate rights which, by definition, trump other moral considerations. Any alleged “right” which calls for an end result (e.g. housing, education, medical services) produced by people is, in effect, a purported “right” to enslave others.[citation needed]

Some notable philosophers, such as Alasdair MacIntyre, have theorized freedom in terms of our social interdependence with other people.[11]

According to political philosopher Nikolas Kompridis, the pursuit of freedom in the modern era can be broadly divided into two motivating ideals: freedom as autonomy or independence; and freedom as the ability to cooperatively initiate a new beginning.[12]

Political freedom has also been theorized in its opposition to (and a condition of) “power relations”, or the power of “action upon actions,” by Michel Foucault.[13] It has also been closely identified with certain kinds of artistic and cultural practice by Cornelius Castoriadis, Antonio Gramsci, Herbert Marcuse, Jacques Ranciere, and Theodor Adorno.

Environmentalists often argue that political freedoms should include some constraint on use of ecosystems. They maintain there is no such thing, for instance, as “freedom to pollute” or “freedom to deforest” given that such activities create negative externalities. The popularity of SUVs, golf, and urban sprawl has been used as evidence that some ideas of freedom and ecological conservation can clash. This leads at times to serious confrontations and clashes of values reflected in advertising campaigns, e.g. that of PETA regarding fur.

John Dalberg-Acton stated that “The most certain test by which we judge whether a country is really free is the amount of security enjoyed by minorities.”[14]

Gerald MacCallum spoke of a compromise between positive and negative freedoms. An agent must have full autonomy over themselves. It is triadic in relation to each other, because it is about three things: the agent, the constraints they need to be free from, and the goal they’re aspiring to.[15]

Hannah Arendt traces the origins of the concept of freedom to the practice of politics in ancient Greece.[1] According to her study, the concept of freedom was historically inseparable from political action. Politics could only be practiced by those who had freed themselves from the necessities of life, so that they could participate in the realm of political affairs. According to Arendt, the concept of freedom became associated with the Christian notion of freedom of the will, or inner freedom, around the 5th century C.E. and since then, freedom as a form of political action has been neglected, even though, as she says, freedom is “the raison d’tre of politics.”[16]

Arendt says that political freedom is historically opposed to sovereignty or will-power, since in ancient Greece and Rome, the concept of freedom was inseparable from performance, and did not arise as a conflict between the “will” and the “self.” Similarly, the idea of freedom as freedom from politics is a notion that developed in modern times. This is opposed to the idea of freedom as the capacity to “begin anew,” which Arendt sees as a corollary to the innate human condition of natality, or our nature as “new beginnings and hence beginners.”[citation needed]

In Arendt’s view, political action is an interruption of automatic process, either natural or historical. The freedom to begin anew is thus an extension of “the freedom to call something into being which did not exist before, which was not given, not even as an object of cognition or imagination, and which therefore, strictly speaking, could not be known.”[citation needed]

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Political freedom – Wikipedia

Freedom House – Freedom House

Long term Residential Treatment Solutions

The real challenge for those afflicted with alcoholism and/or drug addiction is realizing that there is a problem, and accepting that in order to get better, the right alcoholism treatment or drug addiction treatment center must be found.

Then they must have Faith that they can be helped, maintain the Hope that a better tomorrow awaits them, and Trust in the recovery process to sustain the results of their treatment. Then, and only then, will they be able to find the internal strengthday after dayto remain alcohol and drug free and be able to say, I found my freedom.

Contact Us

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The CNN Freedom Project: Ending Modern-Day Slavery

Professor Bernard Freamon teaches courses on modern-day slavery and human trafficking at Seton Hall University School of Law in New Jersey and also specializes in Islamic Legal History. He is currently writing a book, Islam, Slavery and Empire in the Indian Ocean World. The views in this article are his alone.

By Professor Bernard Freamon

In the past few months, the world has witnessed horrific accounts of the enslavement of thousands of innocent Yazidis and other religious minorities by ISIS partisans in Iraq and Syria.

In a recent article in its online English-language magazine, ISIS ideologues offered legal justifications for the enslavement of these non-Muslim non-combatants, stating that enslaving the families of the kuffar [infidels] and taking their women as concubines is a firmly established aspect of the Shariah or Islamic law.

The article argues, based on a variety of Shariah sources, that ISIS partisans have a religious duty to kill or enslave members of the Yazidi community as part of their struggle [jihad] against their enemies.

This argument is plainly wrong, hypocritical and astonishingly ahistorical, relying on male fantasies inspired by stories from the days of imperial Islam.

It is also an affront to right-thinking Muslims everywhere and a criminal perversion of Islamic law, particularly its primary source, the Glorious Quran.

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Liberty – Wikipedia

Liberty, in philosophy, involves free will as contrasted with determinism.[1] In politics, liberty consists of the social and political freedoms to which all community members are entitled.[2] In theology, liberty is freedom from the effects of “sin, spiritual servitude, [or] worldly ties.”[3]

Generally, liberty is distinctly differentiated from freedom in that freedom is primarily, if not exclusively, the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty concerns the absence of arbitrary restraints and takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, the exercise of liberty is subject to capability and limited by the rights of others.[4]

Philosophers from earliest times have considered the question of liberty. Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius (121180 AD) wrote of “a polity in which there is the same law for all, a polity administered with regard to equal rights and equal freedom of speech, and the idea of a kingly government which respects most of all the freedom of the governed.”[5] According to Thomas Hobbes (15881679), “a free man is he that in those things which by his strength and wit he is able to do is not hindered to do what he hath the will to do” (Leviathan, Part 2, Ch. XXI).

John Locke (16321704) rejected that definition of liberty. While not specifically mentioning Hobbes, he attacks Sir Robert Filmer who had the same definition. According to Locke:

John Stuart Mill (18061873), in his work, On Liberty, was the first to recognize the difference between liberty as the freedom to act and liberty as the absence of coercion.[7] In his book Two Concepts of Liberty, Isaiah Berlin formally framed the differences between these two perspectives as the distinction between two opposite concepts of liberty: positive liberty and negative liberty. The latter designates a negative condition in which an individual is protected from tyranny and the arbitrary exercise of authority, while the former refers to the liberty that comes from self-mastery, the freedom from inner compulsions such as weakness and fear.

The modern concept of political liberty has its origins in the Greek concepts of freedom and slavery.[8] To be free, to the Greeks, was to not have a master, to be independent from a master (to live like one likes).[9] That was the original Greek concept of freedom. It is closely linked with the concept of democracy, as Aristotle put it:

“This, then, is one note of liberty which all democrats affirm to be the principle of their state. Another is that a man should live as he likes. This, they say, is the privilege of a freeman, since, on the other hand, not to live as a man likes is the mark of a slave. This is the second characteristic of democracy, whence has arisen the claim of men to be ruled by none, if possible, or, if this is impossible, to rule and be ruled in turns; and so it contributes to the freedom based upon equality.”[10]

This applied only to free men. In Athens, for instance, women could not vote or hold office and were legally and socially dependent on a male relative.[11]

The populations of the Persian Empire enjoyed some degree of freedom. Citizens of all religions and ethnic groups were given the same rights and had the same freedom of religion, women had the same rights as men, and slavery was abolished (550 BC). All the palaces of the kings of Persia were built by paid workers in an era when slaves typically did such work.[12]

In the Buddhist Maurya Empire of ancient India, citizens of all religions and ethnic groups had some rights to freedom, tolerance, and equality. The need for tolerance on an egalitarian basis can be found in the Edicts of Ashoka the Great, which emphasize the importance of tolerance in public policy by the government. The slaughter or capture of prisoners of war also appears to have been condemned by Ashoka.[13] Slavery also appears to have been non-existent in the Maurya Empire.[14] However, according to Hermann Kulke and Dietmar Rothermund, “Ashoka’s orders seem to have been resisted right from the beginning.”[15]

Roman law also embraced certain limited forms of liberty, even under the rule of the Roman Emperors. However, these liberties were accorded only to Roman citizens. Many of the liberties enjoyed under Roman law endured through the Middle Ages, but were enjoyed solely by the nobility, rarely by the common man.[citation needed] The idea of inalienable and universal liberties had to wait until the Age of Enlightenment.

The social contract theory, most influentially formulated by Hobbes, John Locke and Rousseau (though first suggested by Plato in The Republic), was among the first to provide a political classification of rights, in particular through the notion of sovereignty and of natural rights. The thinkers of the Enlightenment reasoned that law governed both heavenly and human affairs, and that law gave the king his power, rather than the king’s power giving force to law. This conception of law would find its culmination in the ideas of Montesquieu. The conception of law as a relationship between individuals, rather than families, came to the fore, and with it the increasing focus on individual liberty as a fundamental reality, given by “Nature and Nature’s God,” which, in the ideal state, would be as universal as possible.

In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill sought to define the “…nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual,” and as such, he describes an inherent and continuous antagonism between liberty and authority and thus, the prevailing question becomes “how to make the fitting adjustment between individual independence and social control”.[4]

England and following the Act of Union 1707 Great Britain, laid down the cornerstones to the concept of individual liberty.

In 1166 Henry II of England transformed English law by passing the Assize of Clarendon act. The act, a forerunner to trial by jury, started the abolition of trial by combat and trial by ordeal.[16]

In 1215 the Magna Carta was drawn up, it became the cornerstone of liberty in first England, Great Britain and later, the world.

In 1689 the Bill of Rights grants ‘freedom of speech in Parliament’, which lays out some of the earliest civil rights.[19]

In 1859 an essay by the philosopher John Stuart Mill, entitled On Liberty argues for toleration and individuality. If any opinion is compelled to silence, that opinion may, for aught we can certainly know, be true. To deny this is to assume our own infallibility.[20][21]

In 1958 Two Concepts of Liberty, by Isaiah Berlin, determines ‘negative liberty’ as an obstacle, as evident from ‘positive liberty’ which promotes self-mastery and the concepts of freedom.[22]

In 1948 British representatives attempt to and are prevented from adding a legal framework to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (It was not until 1976 that the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights came into force, giving a legal status to most of the Declaration.) [23]

The United States of America was one of the first nations to be founded on principles of freedom and equality, with no king and no hereditary nobility[citation needed]. According to the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence, all men have a natural right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”. But this declaration of liberty was troubled from the outset by the presence of slavery. Slave owners argued that their liberty was paramount, since it involved property, their slaves, and that the slaves themselves had no rights that any White man was obliged to recognize. The Supreme Court, in the Dred Scott decision, upheld this principle. It was not until 1866, following the Civil War, that the US constitution was amended to extend these rights to persons of color, and not until 1920 that these rights were extended to women.[24]

By the later half of the 20th century, liberty was expanded further to prohibit government interference with personal choices. In the United States Supreme Court decision Griswold v. Connecticut, Justice William O. Douglas argued that liberties relating to personal relationships, such as marriage, have a unique primacy of place in the hierarchy of freedoms.[25] Jacob M. Appel has summarized this principle:

I am grateful that I have rights in the proverbial public square but, as a practical matter, my most cherished rights are those that I possess in my bedroom and hospital room and death chamber. Most people are far more concerned that they can control their own bodies than they are about petitioning Congress.[26]

In modern America, various competing ideologies have divergent views about how best to promote liberty. Liberals in the original sense of the word see equality as a necessary component of freedom. Progressives stress freedom from business monopoly as essential. Libertarians disagree, and see economic freedom as best. The Tea Party movement sees big government as the enemy of freedom.[27][28]

France supported the Americans in their revolt against English rule and, in 1789, overthrew their own monarchy, with the cry of “Libert, galit, fraternit”. The bloodbath that followed, known as the reign of terror, soured many people on the idea of liberty. Edmund Burke, considered one of the fathers of conservatism, wrote “The French had shewn themselves the ablest architects of ruin that had hitherto existed in the world.”[29]

According to the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Politics, liberalism is “the belief that it is the aim of politics to preserve individual rights and to maximize freedom of choice”. But they point out that there is considerable discussion about how to achieve those goals. Every discussion of freedom depends of three key components: who is free, what are they free to do, and what forces restrict their freedom.[30] John Gray argues that the core belief of liberalism is toleration. Liberals allow others freedom to do what they want, in exchange for having the same freedom in return. This idea of freedom is personal rather than political.[31] William Safire points out that liberalism is attacked by both the Right and the Left: by the Right for defending such practices as abortion, homosexuality, and atheism, by the Left for defending free enterprise and the rights of the individual over the collective.[32]

According to the Encyclopdia Britannica, Libertarians hold liberty as their primary political value.[33] Libertarian philosophers hold that there is no tenable distinction between personal and economic liberty that they are, indeed, one and the same, to be protected (or opposed) together. In the context of U.S. constitutional law, for example, they point out that the constitution twice lists “life, liberty, and property” without making any distinctions within that phrase.[34] Their approach to implementing liberty involves opposing any governmental coercion, aside from that which is necessary to prevent individuals from coercing each other.[35] This is known as the non-aggression principle.[36]

According to republican theorists of freedom, like the historian Quentin Skinner[37][38] or the philosopher Philip Pettit,[39] one’s liberty should not be viewed as the absence of interference in one’s actions, but as non-domination. According to this view, which originates in the Roman Digest, to be a liber homo, a free man, means not being subject to another’s arbitrary will, that is to say, dominated by another. They also cite Machiavelli who asserted that you must be a member of a free self-governing civil association, a republic, if you are to enjoy individual liberty.[40]

The predominance of this view of liberty among parliamentarians during the English Civil War resulted in the creation of the liberal concept of freedom as non-interference in Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan.[citation needed]

Socialists view freedom as a concrete situation as opposed to a purely abstract ideal. Freedom involves agency to pursue one’s creative interests unhindered by coercive social relationships that one is forced to engage in in order to survive under a given social system. From this perspective, freedom requires both the material economic conditions that make freedom possible alongside the social relationships and institutions conducive to freedom. As such, the socialist concept of freedom is held in contrast to the liberal concept of freedom.[41]

The socialist conception of freedom is closely related to the socialist view of creativity and individuality. Influenced by Karl Marx’s concept of alienated labor, socialists understand freedom to be the ability for an individual to engage in creative work in the absence of alienation, where alienated labor refers to work people are forced to perform and un-alienated work refers to individuals pursuing their own creative interests.[42]

For Karl Marx, meaningful freedom is only attainable in a communist society characterized by superabundance and free access, would eliminate the need for alienated labor and enable individuals to pursue their own creative interests, leaving them to develop their full potentialities. This goes alongside Marx’s emphasis on the reduction of the average length of the workday to expand the “realm of freedom” for each person.[43][44] Marx’s notion of communist society and human freedom is thus radically individualistic.[45]

“This also is remarkable in India, that all Indians are free, and no Indian at all is a slave. In this the Indians agree with the Lacedaemonians. Yet the Lacedaemonians have Helots for slaves, who perform the duties of slaves; but the Indians have no slaves at all, much less is any Indian a slave.”

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Freedom Synonyms, Freedom Antonyms – Merriam-Webster

1 the state of being free from the control or power of another Synonyms autonomy, independence, independency, liberty, self-determination, self-governance, self-government, sovereignty (also sovranty) Related Words emancipation, enfranchisement, liberation, manumission, release Near Antonyms captivity, enchainment, enslavement, immurement, imprisonment, incarceration, internment, subjugation Antonyms dependence (also dependance), heteronomy, subjection, unfreedom

2 the right to act or move freely Synonyms authorization, free hand, latitude, license (or licence), run Related Words authority, clutch, command, control, dominion, grip, hold, mandate, mastery, power, sway; range, room, space; blank check, carte blanche

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Freedom Sports Association

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Illinois Freedom of Information Act – University of Illinois

As of November 2011, all Freedom of Information requests to the University of Illinois administration or any of the three University campuses are processed by the Office for University Relations.

TheIllinois Freedom of Information Act(FOIA) provides public access to government documents and records. The Illinois FOIA notes that it is “the public policy of the State of Illinois that all persons are entitled to full and complete information regarding the affairs of government and the official acts and policies of those who represent them as public officials and public employees consistent with the terms of this Act. Such access is necessary to enable the people to fulfill their duties of discussing public issues fully and freely, making informed political judgments and monitoring government to ensure that it is being conducted in the public interest.”

The IllinoisAttorney General office websiteprovides details about the act. The site includes an FAQ (frequently asked questions) document written by staff in the AG’s office for individuals employed by “public bodies” such as the University of Illinois.

As a state institution, the University of Illinois issubject to the Illinois FOIA. Alog of all FOIA requests is maintained by the Office for University Relations, which manages the FOIA process for the U of I. Requests filed under the Freedom of Information Act, response letters, and responsive documents are themselves public records and subject to FOIA requests.

The University of Illinois provides countless documents and information without the requirement of filing a FOIA request. The FOIA process can be complicated and information can be provided without that step. However, some requestors — or the University — may determine that a formal request for records under FOIA is appropriate. In those instances, a thorough reading of the pages listed below will provide helpful information about the process, contact names, and how a request is handled.

For more detailed information, read:

If you have questions, please contact theOffice for University Relationsat 217-333-6400.

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Freedom Boat Club Chicago Illinois Freedom Boat Club

Welcome to Freedom Boat Club Chicago. We are the perfect alternative to boat ownership, or renting a boat on Lake Michigan. In fact, your monthly membership fee can be less than renting a boat for just one day in Chicago. The best part of being a member in Freedom Boat Club Chicago is that you dont have any of the hassles that come with owning a boat. You dont pay for insurance, docking fees, depreciation, maintenance, or storage. If you are looking to buy a boat to store in San Diego, or you like to rent boats multiple times per year, this is a new alternative without all the hassles that come with owning a boat. And, were adding new boats to our fleets all the time!

Your membership gives you access to our entire fleet in your membership class. New members also receive free basic training.

Membership in Freedom Boat Club Chicago is easy. You pay a one-time initiation fee, and then low monthly dues.

Whether you want to spend more time with your friends and family, want to dive Lake Michigan wrecks, love to fish, or just want to hang out in the Playpen, Freedom Boat Club Chicago has the boat in our fleet thats right for every occasion. The boat is waiting. Why are you? Join Freedom Boat Club Chicago and experience the smart alternative to boat ownership or renting! Start the process by emailing Michael Johnston today.

We are conveniently located on L Dock at Montrose Harbor, minutes from River North and many suburbs. Stop by the dock for a tour, or schedule an appointment to learn more by clicking here.

Get Pre-Approved for membership by clicking here.

Check us out on social media, too!

*we hate SPAM too, so we don’t do it, period.

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Freedom Boat Club Chicago Illinois Freedom Boat Club

Freedom Heating and Cooling

Thank you for visiting Freedom Heating & Cooling. We are here to serve you – Whether it’s heating or cooling, we’ve got you covered. Our licensed & insured technicians are on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We take great pride in our prompt service and rapid response. With 30 years of experience, our technicians offer reliable service that you can count on and at prices you can afford. See our Heating Coupons and Air Conditioning coupons.

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City of Montgomery Texas

The City of Montgomery has historical buildings in Fernland Park open to the public! Fernland Park is full of educational opportunities for the family so bring everyone along and enjoy a day in Historical Fernland Park and the City of Montgomery.

Please click the link below for hours of operation: Hours of Operation

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City of Montgomery Texas

Freedom Arms Inc.

.500 Wyoming Express Intro. (pdf) | .500 Wyoming Express (pdf) | .500 Wyoming Express Data (pdf) 224-32FA Data (pdf) | | .454 Loading Data | .454 Loading Data (pdf) | Preferred Dealer List Distributors & Exporter Information | Collector’s Association | Revolver Specifications Chart.(pdf)

Our Current Stock Gun List & Misc. Items & Discontinued Items.(pdf) 1998-2015 Freedom Arms Inc. All rights reserved. Click here for terms.

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Welcome to Freedom Newspaper Online

Categories Select Category Advertisements(4) Africa News(3) Bombshell(7) Breaking News(197) Business(2) Celebrities(6) Diaspora(20) Economy(16) Editorial(14) Entertainment(4) Gambia Affairs(56) Government(26) Health(9) Interviews(4) Investment(17) Legal Affairs(19) Letters To The Editor(149) Life and Style(1) Music(1) Orbituary Announcements(4) Politics(26) Press Release(31) Property(1) SeneGambia News(26) Sports(2) The Assasins(12) The Soldier(23) Tourism(10) Videos(10) Whistle Blower(2) World News(4)

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Quotes About Freedom (4209 quotes)

Its probably not just by chance that Im alone. It would be very hard for a man to live with me, unless hes terribly strong. And if hes stronger than I, Im the one who cant live with him. Im neither smart nor stupid, but I dont think Im a run-of-the-mill person. Ive been in business without being a businesswoman, Ive loved without being a woman made only for love. The two men Ive loved, I think, will remember me, on earth or in heaven, because men always remember a woman who caused them concern and uneasiness. Ive done my best, in regard to people and to life, without precepts, but with a taste for justice. Coco Chanel

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Quotes About Freedom (4209 quotes)

Freedom (2015) – Rotten Tomatoes

The Tomatometer rating based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Fresh

The Tomatometer is 60% or higher.

Rotten

The Tomatometer is 59% or lower.

Certified Fresh

Movies and TV shows are Certified Fresh with a steady Tomatometer of 75% or higher after a set amount of reviews (80 for wide-release movies, 40 for limited-release movies, 20 for TV shows), including 5 reviews from Top Critics.

Audience Score

Percentage of users who rate a movie or TV show positively.

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