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What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

See the article here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Hybrid Cloud & Digital Transformation | Dell EMC US

1 Based on Dell EMC aggregate of Public & Private Cloud IT Infrastructure data, Q3 2017, January 2018, Vendor Revenue.

2 IDC white paper commissioned by Dell EMC, The Power of Hybrid Cloud, April 2017.

3 ESG whitepaper commissioned by Dell EMC, How IT Transformation Maturity Drives IT Agility, Innovation, and Improved Business Outcomes, April 2017.

4 IDG Research Services, Hybrid Cloud Computing, the Great Enabler of Digital Business, commissioned by Dell EMC, January 2017. Results based on IDG survey of 905 global IT executives. Forrester, The Total Economic ImpactTM of Pivotal Cloud Foundry, October 2017.

5 The Forrester Wave: Hosted Private Cloud Services, North America, Q2 2017 & Europe, Q3 2017

6 Based on a November 2017 IDC Whitepaper sponsored by Dell EMC and Intel, “The Technology Impact of IT Transformation,” where IDC interviewed 16 organizations in NA, EMEA, APAC, from a cross-section of industry verticals regarding their IT modernization steps. Actual results will vary.

7 Forrester study commissioned by Pivotal, The Total Economic ImpactTM of Pivotal Cloud Foundry, October 2017, where Forrester interviewed (4) U.S.-based, existing Pivotal customers, created a composite organization and performed a subsequent financial analysis for the composite org. Actual ROI will vary. Full report: https://content.pivotal.io/analyst-reports/the-total-economic-impact-of-pivotal-cloud-foundry

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Hybrid Cloud & Digital Transformation | Dell EMC US

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

In Computer science, cloud computing describes a type of outsourcing of computer services, similar to the way in which electricity supply is outsourced. Users can simply use it. They do not need to worry where the electricity is from, how it is made, or transported. Every month, they pay for what they consumed.

The idea behind cloud computing is similar: The user can simply use storage, computing power, or specially crafted development environments, without having to worry how these work internally. Cloud computing is usually Internet-based computing. The cloud is a metaphor for the Internet based on how the internet is described in computer network diagrams; which means it is an abstraction hiding the complex infrastructure of the internet.[1] It is a style of computing in which IT-related capabilities are provided as a service,[2] allowing users to access technology-enabled services from the Internet (“in the cloud”)[3] without knowledge of, or control over the technologies behind these servers.[4]

According to a paper published by IEEE Internet Computing in 2008 “Cloud Computing is a paradigm in which information is permanently stored in servers on the Internet and cached temporarily on clients that include computers, laptops, handhelds, sensors, etc.”[5]

Cloud computing is a general concept that utilizes software as a service (SaaS), such as Web 2.0 and other technology trends, all of which depend on the Internet for satisfying users’ needs. For example, Google Apps provides common business applications online that are accessed from a web browser, while the software and data are stored on the Internet servers.

Cloud computing is often confused with other ideas:

Cloud computing often uses grid computing, has autonomic characteristics and is billed like utilities, but cloud computing can be seen as a natural next step from the grid-utility model.[8] Some successful cloud architectures have little or no centralised infrastructure or billing systems including peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent and Skype.[9]

The majority of cloud computing infrastructure currently consists of reliable services delivered through data centers that are built on computer and storage virtualization technologies. The services are accessible anywhere in the world, with The Cloud appearing as a single point of access for all the computing needs of consumers. Commercial offerings need to meet the quality of service requirements of customers and typically offer service level agreements.[10] Open standards and open source software are also critical to the growth of cloud computing.[11]

As customers generally do not own the infrastructure or know all details about it, mainly they are accessing or renting, so they can consume resources as a service, and may be paying for what they do not need, instead of what they actually do need to use. Many cloud computing providers use the utility computing model which is analogous to how traditional public utilities like electricity are consumed, while others are billed on a subscription basis. By sharing consumable and “intangible” computing power between multiple “tenants”, utilization rates can be improved (as servers are not left idle) which can reduce costs significantly while increasing the speed of application development.

A side effect of this approach is that “computer capacity rises dramatically” as customers do not have to engineer for peak loads.[12] Adoption has been enabled by “increased high-speed bandwidth” which makes it possible to receive the same response times from centralized infrastructure at other sites.

Cloud computing is being driven by providers including Google, Amazon.com, and Yahoo! as well as traditional vendors including IBM, Intel,[13] Microsoft[14] and SAP.[15] It can adopted by all kinds of users, be they individuals or large enterprises. Most internet users are currently using cloud services, even if they do not realize it. Webmail for example is a cloud service, as are Facebook and Wikipedia and contact list synchronization and online data backups.

The Cloud[16] is a metaphor for the Internet,[17] or more generally components and services which are managed by others.[1]

The underlying concept dates back to 1960 when John McCarthy expressed his opinion that “computation may someday be organized as a public utility” and the term Cloud was already in commercial use in the early 1990s to refer to large ATM networks.[18] By the turn of the 21st century, cloud computing solutions had started to appear on the market,[19] though most of the focus at this time was on Software as a service.

Amazon.com played a key role in the development of cloud computing when upgrading their data centers after the dot-com bubble and providing access to their systems by way of Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis. They found the new cloud architecture resulted in significant internal efficiency improvements.[20]

2007 observed increased activity, including Google, IBM and a number of universities starting large scale cloud computing research project,[21] around the time the term started gaining popularity in the mainstream press. It was a hot topic by mid-2008 and numerous cloud computing events had been scheduled.[22]

In August 2008 Gartner observed that “organizations are switching from company-owned hardware and software assets to per-use service-based models” and that the “projected shift to cloud computing will result in dramatic growth in IT products in some areas and in significant reductions in other areas”.[23]

Clouds cross many country borders and “may be the ultimate form of globalisation”.[24] As such it is the subject of complex geopolitical issues, whereby providers must satisfy many legal restrictions in order to deliver service to a global market. This dates back to the early days of the Internet, where libertarian thinkers felt that “cyberspace was a distinct place calling for laws and legal institutions of its own”; author Neal Stephenson envisaged this as a tiny island data haven in his science-fiction classic novel Cryptonomicon.[24]

Although there have been efforts to match the legal environment (such as US-EU Safe Harbor), providers like Amazon Web Services usually deal with international markets (typically the United States and European Union) by deploying local infrastructure and allowing customers to select their countries.[25] However, there are still concerns about security and privacy for individual through various governmental levels, (for example the USA PATRIOT Act and use of national security letters and title II of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act).

In March 2007, Dell applied to trademark the term ‘”cloud computing” in the United States. It received a “Notice of Allowance” in July 2008 which was subsequently canceled on August 6, resulting in a formal rejection of the trademark application in less than a week later.

In November 2007, the Free Software Foundation released the Affero General Public License (abbreviated as Affero GPL and AGPL), a version of GPLv3 designed to close a perceived legal loophole associated with Free software designed to be run over a network, particularly software as a service. According to the AGPL license application service providers are required to release any changes they make to an AGPL open source code.

Cloud architecture[26] is the systems architecture of the software systems involved in the delivery of cloud computing (e.g. hardware, software) as designed by a cloud architect who typically works for a cloud integrator. It typically involves multiple cloud components communicating with each other over application programming interfaces (usually web services).[27]

This is very similar to the Unix philosophy of having multiple programs doing one thing well and working together over universal interfaces. Complexity is controlled and the resulting systems are more manageable than their monolithic counterparts.

Cloud architecture extends to the client where web browsers and/or software applications are used to access cloud applications.

Cloud storage architecture is loosely coupled where metadata operations are centralized enabling the data nodes to scale into the hundreds, each independently delivering data to applications or users.

A cloud application influences The Cloud model of software architecture, often eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, thus reducing software maintenance, ongoing operations, and support. For example:

A cloud client is computer hardware and/or computer software which relies on The Cloud for application delivery, or which is specifically designed for delivery of cloud services, and which is in either case essentially useless without a Cloud.[33] For example:

Cloud infrastructure (e.g. Infrastructure as a service) is the delivery of computer infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service.[41] For example:

A cloud platform (e.g. Platform as a service) (the delivery of a computing platform and/or solution stack as a service) [42] facilitates deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software layers.[43] For example:

A cloud service (e.g. Web Service) is “software system[s] designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network”[44] which may be accessed by other cloud computing components, software (e.g. Software plus services) or end users directly.[45] For example:

Cloud storage is the delivery of data storage as a service (including database-like services), often billed on a utility computing basis (e.g. per gigabyte per month).[46] For example:

Traditional storage vendors have recently begun to offer their own flavor of cloud storage, sometimes in conjunction with their existing software products (e.g. Symantec’s Online Storage for Backup Exec). Others focus on providing a new kind of back-end storage optimally designed for delivering cloud storage (EMC’s Atmos), categorically known as Cloud Optimized Storage.

A cloud computing provider or cloud computing service provider owns and operates cloud computing systems serve someone else. Usually this needs building and managing new data centers. Some organisations get some of the benefits of cloud computing by becoming “internal” cloud providers and servicing themselves, though they do not benefit from the same economies of scale and still have to engineer for peak loads. The barrier to entry is also significantly higher with capital expenditure required and billing and management creates some overhead. However, significant operational efficiency and quickness advantages can be achieved even by small organizations, and server consolidation and virtualization rollouts are already in progress.[47] Amazon.com was the first such provider, modernising its data centers which, like most computer networks were using as little as 10% of its capacity at any one time just to leave room for occasional spikes. This allowed small, fast-moving groups to add new features faster and easier, and they went on to open it up to outsiders as Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis.[20]

The companies listed in the Components section are providers.

A user is a consumer of cloud computing.[33] The privacy of users in cloud computing has become of increasing concern.[48][49] The rights of users is also an issue, which is being addressed via a community effort to create a bill of rights (currently in draft).[50][51]

A vendor sells products and services that facilitate the delivery, adoption and use of cloud computing.[52] For example:

A cloud standard is one of a number of existing (typically lightweight) open standards that have facilitated the growth of cloud computing, including:[57]

Follow this link:

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

In Computer science, cloud computing describes a type of outsourcing of computer services, similar to the way in which electricity supply is outsourced. Users can simply use it. They do not need to worry where the electricity is from, how it is made, or transported. Every month, they pay for what they consumed.

The idea behind cloud computing is similar: The user can simply use storage, computing power, or specially crafted development environments, without having to worry how these work internally. Cloud computing is usually Internet-based computing. The cloud is a metaphor for the Internet based on how the internet is described in computer network diagrams; which means it is an abstraction hiding the complex infrastructure of the internet.[1] It is a style of computing in which IT-related capabilities are provided as a service,[2] allowing users to access technology-enabled services from the Internet (“in the cloud”)[3] without knowledge of, or control over the technologies behind these servers.[4]

According to a paper published by IEEE Internet Computing in 2008 “Cloud Computing is a paradigm in which information is permanently stored in servers on the Internet and cached temporarily on clients that include computers, laptops, handhelds, sensors, etc.”[5]

Cloud computing is a general concept that utilizes software as a service (SaaS), such as Web 2.0 and other technology trends, all of which depend on the Internet for satisfying users’ needs. For example, Google Apps provides common business applications online that are accessed from a web browser, while the software and data are stored on the Internet servers.

Cloud computing is often confused with other ideas:

Cloud computing often uses grid computing, has autonomic characteristics and is billed like utilities, but cloud computing can be seen as a natural next step from the grid-utility model.[8] Some successful cloud architectures have little or no centralised infrastructure or billing systems including peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent and Skype.[9]

The majority of cloud computing infrastructure currently consists of reliable services delivered through data centers that are built on computer and storage virtualization technologies. The services are accessible anywhere in the world, with The Cloud appearing as a single point of access for all the computing needs of consumers. Commercial offerings need to meet the quality of service requirements of customers and typically offer service level agreements.[10] Open standards and open source software are also critical to the growth of cloud computing.[11]

As customers generally do not own the infrastructure or know all details about it, mainly they are accessing or renting, so they can consume resources as a service, and may be paying for what they do not need, instead of what they actually do need to use. Many cloud computing providers use the utility computing model which is analogous to how traditional public utilities like electricity are consumed, while others are billed on a subscription basis. By sharing consumable and “intangible” computing power between multiple “tenants”, utilization rates can be improved (as servers are not left idle) which can reduce costs significantly while increasing the speed of application development.

A side effect of this approach is that “computer capacity rises dramatically” as customers do not have to engineer for peak loads.[12] Adoption has been enabled by “increased high-speed bandwidth” which makes it possible to receive the same response times from centralized infrastructure at other sites.

Cloud computing is being driven by providers including Google, Amazon.com, and Yahoo! as well as traditional vendors including IBM, Intel,[13] Microsoft[14] and SAP.[15] It can adopted by all kinds of users, be they individuals or large enterprises. Most internet users are currently using cloud services, even if they do not realize it. Webmail for example is a cloud service, as are Facebook and Wikipedia and contact list synchronization and online data backups.

The Cloud[16] is a metaphor for the Internet,[17] or more generally components and services which are managed by others.[1]

The underlying concept dates back to 1960 when John McCarthy expressed his opinion that “computation may someday be organized as a public utility” and the term Cloud was already in commercial use in the early 1990s to refer to large ATM networks.[18] By the turn of the 21st century, cloud computing solutions had started to appear on the market,[19] though most of the focus at this time was on Software as a service.

Amazon.com played a key role in the development of cloud computing when upgrading their data centers after the dot-com bubble and providing access to their systems by way of Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis. They found the new cloud architecture resulted in significant internal efficiency improvements.[20]

2007 observed increased activity, including Google, IBM and a number of universities starting large scale cloud computing research project,[21] around the time the term started gaining popularity in the mainstream press. It was a hot topic by mid-2008 and numerous cloud computing events had been scheduled.[22]

In August 2008 Gartner observed that “organizations are switching from company-owned hardware and software assets to per-use service-based models” and that the “projected shift to cloud computing will result in dramatic growth in IT products in some areas and in significant reductions in other areas”.[23]

Clouds cross many country borders and “may be the ultimate form of globalisation”.[24] As such it is the subject of complex geopolitical issues, whereby providers must satisfy many legal restrictions in order to deliver service to a global market. This dates back to the early days of the Internet, where libertarian thinkers felt that “cyberspace was a distinct place calling for laws and legal institutions of its own”; author Neal Stephenson envisaged this as a tiny island data haven in his science-fiction classic novel Cryptonomicon.[24]

Although there have been efforts to match the legal environment (such as US-EU Safe Harbor), providers like Amazon Web Services usually deal with international markets (typically the United States and European Union) by deploying local infrastructure and allowing customers to select their countries.[25] However, there are still concerns about security and privacy for individual through various governmental levels, (for example the USA PATRIOT Act and use of national security letters and title II of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act).

In March 2007, Dell applied to trademark the term ‘”cloud computing” in the United States. It received a “Notice of Allowance” in July 2008 which was subsequently canceled on August 6, resulting in a formal rejection of the trademark application in less than a week later.

In November 2007, the Free Software Foundation released the Affero General Public License (abbreviated as Affero GPL and AGPL), a version of GPLv3 designed to close a perceived legal loophole associated with Free software designed to be run over a network, particularly software as a service. According to the AGPL license application service providers are required to release any changes they make to an AGPL open source code.

Cloud architecture[26] is the systems architecture of the software systems involved in the delivery of cloud computing (e.g. hardware, software) as designed by a cloud architect who typically works for a cloud integrator. It typically involves multiple cloud components communicating with each other over application programming interfaces (usually web services).[27]

This is very similar to the Unix philosophy of having multiple programs doing one thing well and working together over universal interfaces. Complexity is controlled and the resulting systems are more manageable than their monolithic counterparts.

Cloud architecture extends to the client where web browsers and/or software applications are used to access cloud applications.

Cloud storage architecture is loosely coupled where metadata operations are centralized enabling the data nodes to scale into the hundreds, each independently delivering data to applications or users.

A cloud application influences The Cloud model of software architecture, often eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, thus reducing software maintenance, ongoing operations, and support. For example:

A cloud client is computer hardware and/or computer software which relies on The Cloud for application delivery, or which is specifically designed for delivery of cloud services, and which is in either case essentially useless without a Cloud.[33] For example:

Cloud infrastructure (e.g. Infrastructure as a service) is the delivery of computer infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service.[41] For example:

A cloud platform (e.g. Platform as a service) (the delivery of a computing platform and/or solution stack as a service) [42] facilitates deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software layers.[43] For example:

A cloud service (e.g. Web Service) is “software system[s] designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network”[44] which may be accessed by other cloud computing components, software (e.g. Software plus services) or end users directly.[45] For example:

Cloud storage is the delivery of data storage as a service (including database-like services), often billed on a utility computing basis (e.g. per gigabyte per month).[46] For example:

Traditional storage vendors have recently begun to offer their own flavor of cloud storage, sometimes in conjunction with their existing software products (e.g. Symantec’s Online Storage for Backup Exec). Others focus on providing a new kind of back-end storage optimally designed for delivering cloud storage (EMC’s Atmos), categorically known as Cloud Optimized Storage.

A cloud computing provider or cloud computing service provider owns and operates cloud computing systems serve someone else. Usually this needs building and managing new data centers. Some organisations get some of the benefits of cloud computing by becoming “internal” cloud providers and servicing themselves, though they do not benefit from the same economies of scale and still have to engineer for peak loads. The barrier to entry is also significantly higher with capital expenditure required and billing and management creates some overhead. However, significant operational efficiency and quickness advantages can be achieved even by small organizations, and server consolidation and virtualization rollouts are already in progress.[47] Amazon.com was the first such provider, modernising its data centers which, like most computer networks were using as little as 10% of its capacity at any one time just to leave room for occasional spikes. This allowed small, fast-moving groups to add new features faster and easier, and they went on to open it up to outsiders as Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis.[20]

The companies listed in the Components section are providers.

A user is a consumer of cloud computing.[33] The privacy of users in cloud computing has become of increasing concern.[48][49] The rights of users is also an issue, which is being addressed via a community effort to create a bill of rights (currently in draft).[50][51]

A vendor sells products and services that facilitate the delivery, adoption and use of cloud computing.[52] For example:

A cloud standard is one of a number of existing (typically lightweight) open standards that have facilitated the growth of cloud computing, including:[57]

See original here:

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

Cloud computing | CGI.com

The need for greater business agility and the move to DevOps are contributing to increased adoption of cloud services. But moving to the cloud has its challenges. As a veteran cloud service provider with 40 years of IT infrastructure and managed services experience, CGI has the know-how to get you to the cloud with confidence.

Whether your requirements lead to public, community or private clouds, or most likely a hybrid mix of all of the above, we can help you successfully navigate the planning, transition, integration and ongoing management of your hybrid cloud solution. This includes integrating both cloud and traditional IT environments with comprehensive governance to ensure alignment with business strategy

Our cloud approach includes:

Excerpt from:

Cloud computing | CGI.com

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

Continue reading here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

In Computer science, cloud computing describes a type of outsourcing of computer services, similar to the way in which electricity supply is outsourced. Users can simply use it. They do not need to worry where the electricity is from, how it is made, or transported. Every month, they pay for what they consumed.

The idea behind cloud computing is similar: The user can simply use storage, computing power, or specially crafted development environments, without having to worry how these work internally. Cloud computing is usually Internet-based computing. The cloud is a metaphor for the Internet based on how the internet is described in computer network diagrams; which means it is an abstraction hiding the complex infrastructure of the internet.[1] It is a style of computing in which IT-related capabilities are provided as a service,[2] allowing users to access technology-enabled services from the Internet (“in the cloud”)[3] without knowledge of, or control over the technologies behind these servers.[4]

According to a paper published by IEEE Internet Computing in 2008 “Cloud Computing is a paradigm in which information is permanently stored in servers on the Internet and cached temporarily on clients that include computers, laptops, handhelds, sensors, etc.”[5]

Cloud computing is a general concept that utilizes software as a service (SaaS), such as Web 2.0 and other technology trends, all of which depend on the Internet for satisfying users’ needs. For example, Google Apps provides common business applications online that are accessed from a web browser, while the software and data are stored on the Internet servers.

Cloud computing is often confused with other ideas:

Cloud computing often uses grid computing, has autonomic characteristics and is billed like utilities, but cloud computing can be seen as a natural next step from the grid-utility model.[8] Some successful cloud architectures have little or no centralised infrastructure or billing systems including peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent and Skype.[9]

The majority of cloud computing infrastructure currently consists of reliable services delivered through data centers that are built on computer and storage virtualization technologies. The services are accessible anywhere in the world, with The Cloud appearing as a single point of access for all the computing needs of consumers. Commercial offerings need to meet the quality of service requirements of customers and typically offer service level agreements.[10] Open standards and open source software are also critical to the growth of cloud computing.[11]

As customers generally do not own the infrastructure or know all details about it, mainly they are accessing or renting, so they can consume resources as a service, and may be paying for what they do not need, instead of what they actually do need to use. Many cloud computing providers use the utility computing model which is analogous to how traditional public utilities like electricity are consumed, while others are billed on a subscription basis. By sharing consumable and “intangible” computing power between multiple “tenants”, utilization rates can be improved (as servers are not left idle) which can reduce costs significantly while increasing the speed of application development.

A side effect of this approach is that “computer capacity rises dramatically” as customers do not have to engineer for peak loads.[12] Adoption has been enabled by “increased high-speed bandwidth” which makes it possible to receive the same response times from centralized infrastructure at other sites.

Cloud computing is being driven by providers including Google, Amazon.com, and Yahoo! as well as traditional vendors including IBM, Intel,[13] Microsoft[14] and SAP.[15] It can adopted by all kinds of users, be they individuals or large enterprises. Most internet users are currently using cloud services, even if they do not realize it. Webmail for example is a cloud service, as are Facebook and Wikipedia and contact list synchronization and online data backups.

The Cloud[16] is a metaphor for the Internet,[17] or more generally components and services which are managed by others.[1]

The underlying concept dates back to 1960 when John McCarthy expressed his opinion that “computation may someday be organized as a public utility” and the term Cloud was already in commercial use in the early 1990s to refer to large ATM networks.[18] By the turn of the 21st century, cloud computing solutions had started to appear on the market,[19] though most of the focus at this time was on Software as a service.

Amazon.com played a key role in the development of cloud computing when upgrading their data centers after the dot-com bubble and providing access to their systems by way of Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis. They found the new cloud architecture resulted in significant internal efficiency improvements.[20]

2007 observed increased activity, including Google, IBM and a number of universities starting large scale cloud computing research project,[21] around the time the term started gaining popularity in the mainstream press. It was a hot topic by mid-2008 and numerous cloud computing events had been scheduled.[22]

In August 2008 Gartner observed that “organizations are switching from company-owned hardware and software assets to per-use service-based models” and that the “projected shift to cloud computing will result in dramatic growth in IT products in some areas and in significant reductions in other areas”.[23]

Clouds cross many country borders and “may be the ultimate form of globalisation”.[24] As such it is the subject of complex geopolitical issues, whereby providers must satisfy many legal restrictions in order to deliver service to a global market. This dates back to the early days of the Internet, where libertarian thinkers felt that “cyberspace was a distinct place calling for laws and legal institutions of its own”; author Neal Stephenson envisaged this as a tiny island data haven in his science-fiction classic novel Cryptonomicon.[24]

Although there have been efforts to match the legal environment (such as US-EU Safe Harbor), providers like Amazon Web Services usually deal with international markets (typically the United States and European Union) by deploying local infrastructure and allowing customers to select their countries.[25] However, there are still concerns about security and privacy for individual through various governmental levels, (for example the USA PATRIOT Act and use of national security letters and title II of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act).

In March 2007, Dell applied to trademark the term ‘”cloud computing” in the United States. It received a “Notice of Allowance” in July 2008 which was subsequently canceled on August 6, resulting in a formal rejection of the trademark application in less than a week later.

In November 2007, the Free Software Foundation released the Affero General Public License (abbreviated as Affero GPL and AGPL), a version of GPLv3 designed to close a perceived legal loophole associated with Free software designed to be run over a network, particularly software as a service. According to the AGPL license application service providers are required to release any changes they make to an AGPL open source code.

Cloud architecture[26] is the systems architecture of the software systems involved in the delivery of cloud computing (e.g. hardware, software) as designed by a cloud architect who typically works for a cloud integrator. It typically involves multiple cloud components communicating with each other over application programming interfaces (usually web services).[27]

This is very similar to the Unix philosophy of having multiple programs doing one thing well and working together over universal interfaces. Complexity is controlled and the resulting systems are more manageable than their monolithic counterparts.

Cloud architecture extends to the client where web browsers and/or software applications are used to access cloud applications.

Cloud storage architecture is loosely coupled where metadata operations are centralized enabling the data nodes to scale into the hundreds, each independently delivering data to applications or users.

A cloud application influences The Cloud model of software architecture, often eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, thus reducing software maintenance, ongoing operations, and support. For example:

A cloud client is computer hardware and/or computer software which relies on The Cloud for application delivery, or which is specifically designed for delivery of cloud services, and which is in either case essentially useless without a Cloud.[33] For example:

Cloud infrastructure (e.g. Infrastructure as a service) is the delivery of computer infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service.[41] For example:

A cloud platform (e.g. Platform as a service) (the delivery of a computing platform and/or solution stack as a service) [42] facilitates deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software layers.[43] For example:

A cloud service (e.g. Web Service) is “software system[s] designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network”[44] which may be accessed by other cloud computing components, software (e.g. Software plus services) or end users directly.[45] For example:

Cloud storage is the delivery of data storage as a service (including database-like services), often billed on a utility computing basis (e.g. per gigabyte per month).[46] For example:

Traditional storage vendors have recently begun to offer their own flavor of cloud storage, sometimes in conjunction with their existing software products (e.g. Symantec’s Online Storage for Backup Exec). Others focus on providing a new kind of back-end storage optimally designed for delivering cloud storage (EMC’s Atmos), categorically known as Cloud Optimized Storage.

A cloud computing provider or cloud computing service provider owns and operates cloud computing systems serve someone else. Usually this needs building and managing new data centers. Some organisations get some of the benefits of cloud computing by becoming “internal” cloud providers and servicing themselves, though they do not benefit from the same economies of scale and still have to engineer for peak loads. The barrier to entry is also significantly higher with capital expenditure required and billing and management creates some overhead. However, significant operational efficiency and quickness advantages can be achieved even by small organizations, and server consolidation and virtualization rollouts are already in progress.[47] Amazon.com was the first such provider, modernising its data centers which, like most computer networks were using as little as 10% of its capacity at any one time just to leave room for occasional spikes. This allowed small, fast-moving groups to add new features faster and easier, and they went on to open it up to outsiders as Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis.[20]

The companies listed in the Components section are providers.

A user is a consumer of cloud computing.[33] The privacy of users in cloud computing has become of increasing concern.[48][49] The rights of users is also an issue, which is being addressed via a community effort to create a bill of rights (currently in draft).[50][51]

A vendor sells products and services that facilitate the delivery, adoption and use of cloud computing.[52] For example:

A cloud standard is one of a number of existing (typically lightweight) open standards that have facilitated the growth of cloud computing, including:[57]

Read more:

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

In Computer science, cloud computing describes a type of outsourcing of computer services, similar to the way in which electricity supply is outsourced. Users can simply use it. They do not need to worry where the electricity is from, how it is made, or transported. Every month, they pay for what they consumed.

The idea behind cloud computing is similar: The user can simply use storage, computing power, or specially crafted development environments, without having to worry how these work internally. Cloud computing is usually Internet-based computing. The cloud is a metaphor for the Internet based on how the internet is described in computer network diagrams; which means it is an abstraction hiding the complex infrastructure of the internet.[1] It is a style of computing in which IT-related capabilities are provided as a service,[2] allowing users to access technology-enabled services from the Internet (“in the cloud”)[3] without knowledge of, or control over the technologies behind these servers.[4]

According to a paper published by IEEE Internet Computing in 2008 “Cloud Computing is a paradigm in which information is permanently stored in servers on the Internet and cached temporarily on clients that include computers, laptops, handhelds, sensors, etc.”[5]

Cloud computing is a general concept that utilizes software as a service (SaaS), such as Web 2.0 and other technology trends, all of which depend on the Internet for satisfying users’ needs. For example, Google Apps provides common business applications online that are accessed from a web browser, while the software and data are stored on the Internet servers.

Cloud computing is often confused with other ideas:

Cloud computing often uses grid computing, has autonomic characteristics and is billed like utilities, but cloud computing can be seen as a natural next step from the grid-utility model.[8] Some successful cloud architectures have little or no centralised infrastructure or billing systems including peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent and Skype.[9]

The majority of cloud computing infrastructure currently consists of reliable services delivered through data centers that are built on computer and storage virtualization technologies. The services are accessible anywhere in the world, with The Cloud appearing as a single point of access for all the computing needs of consumers. Commercial offerings need to meet the quality of service requirements of customers and typically offer service level agreements.[10] Open standards and open source software are also critical to the growth of cloud computing.[11]

As customers generally do not own the infrastructure or know all details about it, mainly they are accessing or renting, so they can consume resources as a service, and may be paying for what they do not need, instead of what they actually do need to use. Many cloud computing providers use the utility computing model which is analogous to how traditional public utilities like electricity are consumed, while others are billed on a subscription basis. By sharing consumable and “intangible” computing power between multiple “tenants”, utilization rates can be improved (as servers are not left idle) which can reduce costs significantly while increasing the speed of application development.

A side effect of this approach is that “computer capacity rises dramatically” as customers do not have to engineer for peak loads.[12] Adoption has been enabled by “increased high-speed bandwidth” which makes it possible to receive the same response times from centralized infrastructure at other sites.

Cloud computing is being driven by providers including Google, Amazon.com, and Yahoo! as well as traditional vendors including IBM, Intel,[13] Microsoft[14] and SAP.[15] It can adopted by all kinds of users, be they individuals or large enterprises. Most internet users are currently using cloud services, even if they do not realize it. Webmail for example is a cloud service, as are Facebook and Wikipedia and contact list synchronization and online data backups.

The Cloud[16] is a metaphor for the Internet,[17] or more generally components and services which are managed by others.[1]

The underlying concept dates back to 1960 when John McCarthy expressed his opinion that “computation may someday be organized as a public utility” and the term Cloud was already in commercial use in the early 1990s to refer to large ATM networks.[18] By the turn of the 21st century, cloud computing solutions had started to appear on the market,[19] though most of the focus at this time was on Software as a service.

Amazon.com played a key role in the development of cloud computing when upgrading their data centers after the dot-com bubble and providing access to their systems by way of Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis. They found the new cloud architecture resulted in significant internal efficiency improvements.[20]

2007 observed increased activity, including Google, IBM and a number of universities starting large scale cloud computing research project,[21] around the time the term started gaining popularity in the mainstream press. It was a hot topic by mid-2008 and numerous cloud computing events had been scheduled.[22]

In August 2008 Gartner observed that “organizations are switching from company-owned hardware and software assets to per-use service-based models” and that the “projected shift to cloud computing will result in dramatic growth in IT products in some areas and in significant reductions in other areas”.[23]

Clouds cross many country borders and “may be the ultimate form of globalisation”.[24] As such it is the subject of complex geopolitical issues, whereby providers must satisfy many legal restrictions in order to deliver service to a global market. This dates back to the early days of the Internet, where libertarian thinkers felt that “cyberspace was a distinct place calling for laws and legal institutions of its own”; author Neal Stephenson envisaged this as a tiny island data haven in his science-fiction classic novel Cryptonomicon.[24]

Although there have been efforts to match the legal environment (such as US-EU Safe Harbor), providers like Amazon Web Services usually deal with international markets (typically the United States and European Union) by deploying local infrastructure and allowing customers to select their countries.[25] However, there are still concerns about security and privacy for individual through various governmental levels, (for example the USA PATRIOT Act and use of national security letters and title II of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act).

In March 2007, Dell applied to trademark the term ‘”cloud computing” in the United States. It received a “Notice of Allowance” in July 2008 which was subsequently canceled on August 6, resulting in a formal rejection of the trademark application in less than a week later.

In November 2007, the Free Software Foundation released the Affero General Public License (abbreviated as Affero GPL and AGPL), a version of GPLv3 designed to close a perceived legal loophole associated with Free software designed to be run over a network, particularly software as a service. According to the AGPL license application service providers are required to release any changes they make to an AGPL open source code.

Cloud architecture[26] is the systems architecture of the software systems involved in the delivery of cloud computing (e.g. hardware, software) as designed by a cloud architect who typically works for a cloud integrator. It typically involves multiple cloud components communicating with each other over application programming interfaces (usually web services).[27]

This is very similar to the Unix philosophy of having multiple programs doing one thing well and working together over universal interfaces. Complexity is controlled and the resulting systems are more manageable than their monolithic counterparts.

Cloud architecture extends to the client where web browsers and/or software applications are used to access cloud applications.

Cloud storage architecture is loosely coupled where metadata operations are centralized enabling the data nodes to scale into the hundreds, each independently delivering data to applications or users.

A cloud application influences The Cloud model of software architecture, often eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, thus reducing software maintenance, ongoing operations, and support. For example:

A cloud client is computer hardware and/or computer software which relies on The Cloud for application delivery, or which is specifically designed for delivery of cloud services, and which is in either case essentially useless without a Cloud.[33] For example:

Cloud infrastructure (e.g. Infrastructure as a service) is the delivery of computer infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service.[41] For example:

A cloud platform (e.g. Platform as a service) (the delivery of a computing platform and/or solution stack as a service) [42] facilitates deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software layers.[43] For example:

A cloud service (e.g. Web Service) is “software system[s] designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network”[44] which may be accessed by other cloud computing components, software (e.g. Software plus services) or end users directly.[45] For example:

Cloud storage is the delivery of data storage as a service (including database-like services), often billed on a utility computing basis (e.g. per gigabyte per month).[46] For example:

Traditional storage vendors have recently begun to offer their own flavor of cloud storage, sometimes in conjunction with their existing software products (e.g. Symantec’s Online Storage for Backup Exec). Others focus on providing a new kind of back-end storage optimally designed for delivering cloud storage (EMC’s Atmos), categorically known as Cloud Optimized Storage.

A cloud computing provider or cloud computing service provider owns and operates cloud computing systems serve someone else. Usually this needs building and managing new data centers. Some organisations get some of the benefits of cloud computing by becoming “internal” cloud providers and servicing themselves, though they do not benefit from the same economies of scale and still have to engineer for peak loads. The barrier to entry is also significantly higher with capital expenditure required and billing and management creates some overhead. However, significant operational efficiency and quickness advantages can be achieved even by small organizations, and server consolidation and virtualization rollouts are already in progress.[47] Amazon.com was the first such provider, modernising its data centers which, like most computer networks were using as little as 10% of its capacity at any one time just to leave room for occasional spikes. This allowed small, fast-moving groups to add new features faster and easier, and they went on to open it up to outsiders as Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis.[20]

The companies listed in the Components section are providers.

A user is a consumer of cloud computing.[33] The privacy of users in cloud computing has become of increasing concern.[48][49] The rights of users is also an issue, which is being addressed via a community effort to create a bill of rights (currently in draft).[50][51]

A vendor sells products and services that facilitate the delivery, adoption and use of cloud computing.[52] For example:

A cloud standard is one of a number of existing (typically lightweight) open standards that have facilitated the growth of cloud computing, including:[57]

Original post:

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

What is Cloud Computing? – Amazon Web Services

Whether you are running applications that share photos to millions of mobile users or youre supporting the critical operations of your business, a cloud services platform provides rapid access to flexible and low cost IT resources. With cloud computing, you dont need to make large upfront investments in hardware and spend a lot of time on the heavy lifting of managing that hardware. Instead, you can provision exactly the right type and size of computing resources you need to power your newest bright idea or operate your IT department. You can access as many resources as you need, almost instantly, and only pay for what you use.

Cloud computing provides a simple way to access servers, storage, databases and a broad set of application services over the Internet. A Cloud services platform such as Amazon Web Services owns and maintains the network-connected hardware required for these application services, while you provision and use what you need via a web application.

More here:

What is Cloud Computing? – Amazon Web Services

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

Read more here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

See the original post:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

In Computer science, cloud computing describes a type of outsourcing of computer services, similar to the way in which electricity supply is outsourced. Users can simply use it. They do not need to worry where the electricity is from, how it is made, or transported. Every month, they pay for what they consumed.

The idea behind cloud computing is similar: The user can simply use storage, computing power, or specially crafted development environments, without having to worry how these work internally. Cloud computing is usually Internet-based computing. The cloud is a metaphor for the Internet based on how the internet is described in computer network diagrams; which means it is an abstraction hiding the complex infrastructure of the internet.[1] It is a style of computing in which IT-related capabilities are provided as a service,[2] allowing users to access technology-enabled services from the Internet (“in the cloud”)[3] without knowledge of, or control over the technologies behind these servers.[4]

According to a paper published by IEEE Internet Computing in 2008 “Cloud Computing is a paradigm in which information is permanently stored in servers on the Internet and cached temporarily on clients that include computers, laptops, handhelds, sensors, etc.”[5]

Cloud computing is a general concept that utilizes software as a service (SaaS), such as Web 2.0 and other technology trends, all of which depend on the Internet for satisfying users’ needs. For example, Google Apps provides common business applications online that are accessed from a web browser, while the software and data are stored on the Internet servers.

Cloud computing is often confused with other ideas:

Cloud computing often uses grid computing, has autonomic characteristics and is billed like utilities, but cloud computing can be seen as a natural next step from the grid-utility model.[8] Some successful cloud architectures have little or no centralised infrastructure or billing systems including peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent and Skype.[9]

The majority of cloud computing infrastructure currently consists of reliable services delivered through data centers that are built on computer and storage virtualization technologies. The services are accessible anywhere in the world, with The Cloud appearing as a single point of access for all the computing needs of consumers. Commercial offerings need to meet the quality of service requirements of customers and typically offer service level agreements.[10] Open standards and open source software are also critical to the growth of cloud computing.[11]

As customers generally do not own the infrastructure or know all details about it, mainly they are accessing or renting, so they can consume resources as a service, and may be paying for what they do not need, instead of what they actually do need to use. Many cloud computing providers use the utility computing model which is analogous to how traditional public utilities like electricity are consumed, while others are billed on a subscription basis. By sharing consumable and “intangible” computing power between multiple “tenants”, utilization rates can be improved (as servers are not left idle) which can reduce costs significantly while increasing the speed of application development.

A side effect of this approach is that “computer capacity rises dramatically” as customers do not have to engineer for peak loads.[12] Adoption has been enabled by “increased high-speed bandwidth” which makes it possible to receive the same response times from centralized infrastructure at other sites.

Cloud computing is being driven by providers including Google, Amazon.com, and Yahoo! as well as traditional vendors including IBM, Intel,[13] Microsoft[14] and SAP.[15] It can adopted by all kinds of users, be they individuals or large enterprises. Most internet users are currently using cloud services, even if they do not realize it. Webmail for example is a cloud service, as are Facebook and Wikipedia and contact list synchronization and online data backups.

The Cloud[16] is a metaphor for the Internet,[17] or more generally components and services which are managed by others.[1]

The underlying concept dates back to 1960 when John McCarthy expressed his opinion that “computation may someday be organized as a public utility” and the term Cloud was already in commercial use in the early 1990s to refer to large ATM networks.[18] By the turn of the 21st century, cloud computing solutions had started to appear on the market,[19] though most of the focus at this time was on Software as a service.

Amazon.com played a key role in the development of cloud computing when upgrading their data centers after the dot-com bubble and providing access to their systems by way of Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis. They found the new cloud architecture resulted in significant internal efficiency improvements.[20]

2007 observed increased activity, including Google, IBM and a number of universities starting large scale cloud computing research project,[21] around the time the term started gaining popularity in the mainstream press. It was a hot topic by mid-2008 and numerous cloud computing events had been scheduled.[22]

In August 2008 Gartner observed that “organizations are switching from company-owned hardware and software assets to per-use service-based models” and that the “projected shift to cloud computing will result in dramatic growth in IT products in some areas and in significant reductions in other areas”.[23]

Clouds cross many country borders and “may be the ultimate form of globalisation”.[24] As such it is the subject of complex geopolitical issues, whereby providers must satisfy many legal restrictions in order to deliver service to a global market. This dates back to the early days of the Internet, where libertarian thinkers felt that “cyberspace was a distinct place calling for laws and legal institutions of its own”; author Neal Stephenson envisaged this as a tiny island data haven in his science-fiction classic novel Cryptonomicon.[24]

Although there have been efforts to match the legal environment (such as US-EU Safe Harbor), providers like Amazon Web Services usually deal with international markets (typically the United States and European Union) by deploying local infrastructure and allowing customers to select their countries.[25] However, there are still concerns about security and privacy for individual through various governmental levels, (for example the USA PATRIOT Act and use of national security letters and title II of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act).

In March 2007, Dell applied to trademark the term ‘”cloud computing” in the United States. It received a “Notice of Allowance” in July 2008 which was subsequently canceled on August 6, resulting in a formal rejection of the trademark application in less than a week later.

In November 2007, the Free Software Foundation released the Affero General Public License (abbreviated as Affero GPL and AGPL), a version of GPLv3 designed to close a perceived legal loophole associated with Free software designed to be run over a network, particularly software as a service. According to the AGPL license application service providers are required to release any changes they make to an AGPL open source code.

Cloud architecture[26] is the systems architecture of the software systems involved in the delivery of cloud computing (e.g. hardware, software) as designed by a cloud architect who typically works for a cloud integrator. It typically involves multiple cloud components communicating with each other over application programming interfaces (usually web services).[27]

This is very similar to the Unix philosophy of having multiple programs doing one thing well and working together over universal interfaces. Complexity is controlled and the resulting systems are more manageable than their monolithic counterparts.

Cloud architecture extends to the client where web browsers and/or software applications are used to access cloud applications.

Cloud storage architecture is loosely coupled where metadata operations are centralized enabling the data nodes to scale into the hundreds, each independently delivering data to applications or users.

A cloud application influences The Cloud model of software architecture, often eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, thus reducing software maintenance, ongoing operations, and support. For example:

A cloud client is computer hardware and/or computer software which relies on The Cloud for application delivery, or which is specifically designed for delivery of cloud services, and which is in either case essentially useless without a Cloud.[33] For example:

Cloud infrastructure (e.g. Infrastructure as a service) is the delivery of computer infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service.[41] For example:

A cloud platform (e.g. Platform as a service) (the delivery of a computing platform and/or solution stack as a service) [42] facilitates deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software layers.[43] For example:

A cloud service (e.g. Web Service) is “software system[s] designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network”[44] which may be accessed by other cloud computing components, software (e.g. Software plus services) or end users directly.[45] For example:

Cloud storage is the delivery of data storage as a service (including database-like services), often billed on a utility computing basis (e.g. per gigabyte per month).[46] For example:

Traditional storage vendors have recently begun to offer their own flavor of cloud storage, sometimes in conjunction with their existing software products (e.g. Symantec’s Online Storage for Backup Exec). Others focus on providing a new kind of back-end storage optimally designed for delivering cloud storage (EMC’s Atmos), categorically known as Cloud Optimized Storage.

A cloud computing provider or cloud computing service provider owns and operates cloud computing systems serve someone else. Usually this needs building and managing new data centers. Some organisations get some of the benefits of cloud computing by becoming “internal” cloud providers and servicing themselves, though they do not benefit from the same economies of scale and still have to engineer for peak loads. The barrier to entry is also significantly higher with capital expenditure required and billing and management creates some overhead. However, significant operational efficiency and quickness advantages can be achieved even by small organizations, and server consolidation and virtualization rollouts are already in progress.[47] Amazon.com was the first such provider, modernising its data centers which, like most computer networks were using as little as 10% of its capacity at any one time just to leave room for occasional spikes. This allowed small, fast-moving groups to add new features faster and easier, and they went on to open it up to outsiders as Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis.[20]

The companies listed in the Components section are providers.

A user is a consumer of cloud computing.[33] The privacy of users in cloud computing has become of increasing concern.[48][49] The rights of users is also an issue, which is being addressed via a community effort to create a bill of rights (currently in draft).[50][51]

A vendor sells products and services that facilitate the delivery, adoption and use of cloud computing.[52] For example:

A cloud standard is one of a number of existing (typically lightweight) open standards that have facilitated the growth of cloud computing, including:[57]

Read the original:

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free …

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

More here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

Link:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

Originally posted here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

See the original post:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

View original post here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

What is Cloud Computing Technology?: Cloud Definition …

More and more, we are seeing technology moving to the cloud. Its not just a fadthe shift from traditional software models to the Internet has steadily gained momentum over the last 10 years. Looking ahead, the next decade of cloud computing promises new ways to collaborate everywhere, through mobile devices.

So what is cloud computing? Essentially, cloud computing is a kind of outsourcing of computer programs. Using cloud computing, users are able to access software and applications from wherever they need, while it is being hosted by an outside party in the cloud. This means that they do not have to worry about things such as storage and power, they can simply enjoy the end result.

There are three types of cloud computing:

– Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

A third party hosts elements of infrastructure, such as hardware, software, servers, and storage, also providing backup, security, and maintenance.

– Software as a Service (SaaS)

Using the cloud, software such as an internet browser or application is able to become a usable tool.

– Platform as a Service (PaaS)

The branch of cloud computing that allows users to develop, run, and manage applications, without having to get caught up in code, storage, infrastructure and so on.

There are several types of PaaS. Every PaaS option is either public, private, or a hybrid mix of the two. Public PaaS is hosted in the cloud and its infrastructure is managed by the provider. Private PaaS, on the other hand, is housed in on-site servers or private networks, and is maintained by the user. Hybrid PaaS uses elements from both public and private, and is capable of executing applications from multiple cloud infrastructures.

PaaS can be further categorized depending on whether it is open or closed source, whether it is mobile compatible (mPaaS), and what business types it caters to.

When choosing a PaaS solution, the most important considerations beyond how it is hosted are how well it integrates with existing information systems, which programing languages it supports, what application-building tools it offers, how customizable or configurable it is, and how effectively it is supported by the provider.

As digital technologies grow ever more powerful and available, apps and cloud-based platforms are becoming almost universally widespread. Businesses are taking advantage of new PaaS capabilities to further outsource tasks that would have otherwise relied on local solutions. This is all made possible through advances in cloud computing.

Traditional business applications have always been very complicated and expensive. The amount and variety of hardware and software required to run them are daunting. You need a whole team of experts to install, configure, test, run, secure, and update them.

When you multiply this effort across dozens or hundreds of apps, its easy to see why the biggest companies with the best IT departments arent getting the apps they need. Small and mid-sized businesses dont stand a chance. The affordability of cloud-hosted data makes it an essential tool for these types of situations. Here are some other benefits of cloud computing.

– Adaptable

Cloud computing allows for adaptable programs and applications, that are customizable, while allowing the owners control over the core code.

– Multi-tenancy

Cloud software provides the opportunity to provide personalized applications and portals to a number of customers or tenants.

– Reliable

Because it is hosted by a third party, businesses and other users have greater assurance of reliability, and when there are problems, easy access to customer support.

– Scalability

With the Internet of Things, it is essential that software functions across every device and integrates with other applications. Cloud applications can provide this.

– Secure

Cloud computing can also guarantee a more secure environment, thanks to increased resources for security and centralization of data.

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With cloud computing, you eliminate those headaches that come with storing your own data, because youre not managing hardware and software that becomes the responsibility of an experienced vendor like salesforce.com. The shared infrastructure means it works like a utility: you only pay for what you need, upgrades are automatic, and scaling up or down is easy.

Cloud-based apps can be up and running in days or weeks, and they cost less. With a cloud app, you just open a browser, log in, customize the app, and start using it.

Businesses are running all kinds of apps in the cloud, like customer relationship management (CRM), HR, accounting, and much more. Some of the worlds largest companies moved their applications to the cloud with salesforce.com after rigorously testing the security and reliability of our infrastructure.

As cloud computing grows in popularity, thousands of companies are simply rebranding their non-cloud products and services as cloud computing. Always dig deeper when evaluating cloud offerings and keep in mind that if you have to buy and manage hardware and software, what youre looking at isnt really cloud computing but a false cloud.

Salesforce can provide a comprehensive solution to all of your cloud computing needs. Using a wide array of tools and services, Salesforce can be a one stop shop for businesses looking to manage customer relationships, sales, marketing, and application development. Using artificial intelligence, Salesforce applications can also provide predictive analytics that allow for all around better decision making.

The best way to get to know Sales Cloud is to get your hands on the actual product. The free trial also comes with unlimited access to our Sales Community, a group of sales thought leaders sharing ideas about sales for salespeople.

QUESTIONS? OUR REPS HAVE ANSWERS. 1-800-667-6389

Excerpt from:

What is Cloud Computing Technology?: Cloud Definition …

The Cloud Computing Era Could Be Nearing Its End | WIRED – WIRED

Fasten your harnesses , because the era of cloud computings giant data centers is about to be rear-ended by the age of self-driving cars. Heres the problem: When a self-driving car has to make snap decisions, it needs answers fast. Even slight delays in updating road and weather conditions could mean longer travel times or dangerous errors. But those smart vehicles of the near-future dont quite have the huge computing power to process the data necessary to avoid collisions, chat with nearby vehicles about optimizing traffic flow, and find the best routes that avoid gridlocked or washed-out roads. The logical source of that power lies in the massive server farms where hundreds of thousands of processors can churn out solutions. But that wont work if the vehicles have to wait the 100 milliseconds or so it usually takes for information to travel each way to and from distant data centers. Cars, after all, move fast.

Jeremy Hsu is a science and tech journalist based in New York.

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That problem from the frontier of technology is why many tech leaders foresee the need for a new edge computing networkone that turns the logic of todays cloud inside out. Today the $247 billion cloud computing industry funnels everything through massive centralized data centers operated by giants like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. Thats been a smart model for scaling up web search and social networks, as well as streaming media to billions of users. But its not so smart for latency-intolerant applications like autonomous cars or mobile mixed reality.

Its a foregone conclusion that giant, centralized server farms that take up 19 city blocks of power are just not going to work everywhere, says Zachary Smith, a double-bass player and Juilliard School graduate who is the CEO and cofounder of a New York City startup called Packet. Smith is among those who believe that the solution lies in seeding the landscape with smaller server outpoststhose edge networksthat would widely distribute processing power in order to speed its results to client devices, like those cars, that cant tolerate delay.

Packets scattered micro datacenters are nothing like the sprawling facilities operated by Amazon and Google, which can contain tens of thousands of servers and squat outside major cities in suburbs, small towns, or rural areas, thanks to their huge physical footprints and energy appetites. Packets centers often contain just a few server racksbut the company promises customers in major cities speedy access to raw computing power, with average delays of just 10 to 15 milliseconds (an improvement of roughly a factor of ten). That kind of speed is on the must have lists of companies and developers hoping to stream virtual reality and augmented reality experiences to smartphones, for example. Such experiences rely upon a neurological processthe vestibulo-ocular reflexthat coordinates eye and head movements. It occurs within seven milliseconds, and if your device takes 10 times that long to hear back from a server, forget about suspension of disbelief.

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Immersive experiences are just the start of this new kind of need for speed. Everywhere you look, our autonomously driving, drone-clogged, robot-operated future needs to shave more milliseconds off its network-roundtrip clock. For smart vehicles alone, Toyota noted that the amount of data flowing between vehicles and cloud computing services is estimated to reach 10 exabytes per month by 2025 .

Cloud computing giants havent ignored the lag problem. In May, Microsoft announced the testing of its new Azure IoT Edge service, intended to push some cloud computing functions onto developers own devices. Barely a month later, Amazon Web Services opened up general access to AWS Greengrass software that similarly extends some cloud-style services to devices running on local networks. Still, these services require customers to operate hardware on their own. Customers who are used to handing that whole business off to a cloud provider may view that as a backwards step.

US telecom companies are also seeing their build-out of new 5G networks which should eventually support faster mobile data speedsas a chance to cut down on lag time. As the service providers expand their networks of cell towers and base stations, they could seize the opportunity to add server power to the new locations. In July, AT&T announced plans to build a mobile edge computing network based on 5G, with the goal of reaching single-digit millisecond latency . Theoretically, data would only need to travel a few miles between customers and the nearest cell tower or central office, instead of hundreds of miles to reach a cloud data center.

Our network consists of over 5,000 central offices, over 65,000 cell towers, and even several hundred thousand distribution points beyond that, reaching into all the neighborhoods we serve, says Andre Fuetsch, CTO at AT&T. All of a sudden, all those physical locations become candidates for compute.

AT&T claims it has a head start on rival telecoms because of its network virtualization initiative, which includes the software capability to automatically juggle workloads and make good use of idle resources in the mobile network, according to Fuetsch. Its similar to how big data centers use virtualization to spread out a customers data processing workload across multiple computer servers.

Meanwhile, companies such as Packet might be able to piggyback their own machines onto the new facilities, too. I think were at this time where a huge amount of investment is going into mobile networks over the next two to three years, Packets Smith says. So its a good time to say Why not tack on some compute? (Packets own funding comes in part from the giant Japanese telecom and internet conglomerate Softbank, which invested $9.4 million in 2016.) In July 2017, Packet announced its expansion to Ashburn, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Seattle, along with new international locations in Frankfurt, Toronto, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Sydney.

Packet is far from the only startup making claims on the edge. Austin-based Vapor IO has already begun building its own micro data centers alongside existing cell towers. In June, the startup announced its Project Volutus initiative, which includes a partnership with Crown Castle, the largest US provider of shared wireless infrastructure (and a Vapor IO investor). That enables Vapor IO to take advantage of Crown Castles existing network of 40,000 cell towers and 60,000 miles of fiber optic lines in metropolitan areas. The startup has been developing automated software to remotely operate and monitor micro data centers to ensure that customers dont experience interruptions in service if some computer servers go down, says Cole Crawford, Vapor IOs founder and CEO.

Dont look for the edge to shut down all those data centers in Oregon, North Carolina, and other rural outposts: Our eras digital cathedrals are not vanishing anytime soon. Edge computings vision of having thousands of small, regional and micro-regional data centers that are integrated into the last mile networks is actually a natural extension of todays centralized cloud, Crawford says. In fact, the cloud computing industry has extended its tentacles toward the edge with content delivery networks such as Akamai, Cloudflare, and Amazon CloudFront that already use edge locations to speed up delivery of music and video streaming.

Nonetheless, the remote computing industry stands on the cusp of a back to the future moment, according to Peter Levine, general partner at the venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. In a 2016 video presentation , Levine highlighted how the pre-2000 internet once relied upon a decentralized network of PCs and client servers. Next, the centralized network of the modern cloud computing industry really took off, starting around 2005. Now, demand for edge computing is pushing development of decentralized networks once again (even as the public cloud computing industrys growth is expected to peak at 18 percent this year, before starting to taper off).

That kind of abstract shift is already showing up, unlocking experiences that could only exist with help from the edge. Hatch, a spinoff company from Angry Birds developer Rovio, has begun rolling out a subscription game streaming service that allows smartphone customers to instantly begin playing without waiting on downloads. The service offers low-latency multiplayer and social gaming features such as sharing gameplay via Twitch-style live-streaming. Hatch has been cagey about the technology it developed to slash the number of data-processing steps in streaming games, other than saying it eliminates the need for video compression and can do mobile game streaming at 60 frames per second. But when it came to figuring out how to transmit and receive all that data without latency wrecking the experience, Hatch teamed up withguess whoPacket.

We are one of the first consumer-facing use cases for edge computing, says Juhani Honkala, founder and CEO of Hatch. But I believe there will be other use cases that can benefit from low latency, such as AR/VR, self-driving cars, and robotics.

Of course, most Hatch customers will not know or care about how those micro datacenters allow them to instantly play games with friends. The same blissful ignorance will likely surround most people who stream augmented-reality experiences on their smartphones while riding in self-driving cars 10 years from now. All of us will gradually come to expect new computer-driven experiences to be made available anywhere instantlyas if by magic. But in this case, magic is just another name for putting the right computer in the right place at the right time.

There is so much more that people can do, says Packets Smith, than stare at their smartphones and wait for downloads to happen. We want our computation now . And the edge is the way well get it.

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The Cloud Computing Era Could Be Nearing Its End | WIRED – WIRED

Marketo decides to go all-in on cloud computing, and picks Google as its home – GeekWire

Diane Greene, senior vice president for Google Cloud, speaks at Google Cloud Next this morning. (Google Photo)

One of the bigger marketing software companies, Marketo, has decided its ready to ditch its servers and move into the cloud, and Google is getting the business.

The two companies announced a multiyear collaboration strategy Thursday that will see Marketo move its business onto Google Cloud Platform over the next couple of years, and Google will do some work to integrate Marketos products into G Suite. Forbes noted that Google provided migration incentives in order to sweeten the deal, which will further the notion that a lot of Googles major customer wins have come at the cost of steep discounts for its services.

Still, the multiyear agreement provides Google with another long-term customer that could help it woo others, especially other marketing companies. Marketo told Forbes that one of the main reasons it choose Google was because of its in-house marketing savvy as one of the biggest advertising brokers in the world, and that might be an interesting niche for Google to pursue as other software-as-a-service marketing companies plot out cloud strategies.

Marketos software is used by a lot of companies to manage their marketing operations, from lead generation to campaign measurement. It might have decided that it needed some IT assistance earlier this year when it somehow forgot to renew its domain name registration and went down for several hours until it could fix the problem.

Google has been making slow but steady process in its cloud efforts, as it tries to shed a reputation for lacking the enterprise sales touch that Amazon Web Services and Microsoft enjoy. It has stepped up its support of hybrid cloud strategies through deals with Nutanix and just this week lowered prices on networking costs for customers that dont require all the performance that Googles fiber network provides.

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Marketo decides to go all-in on cloud computing, and picks Google as its home – GeekWire


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