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NTU and Northwestern University to set up $70 million nanomedicine research institute

Published on Feb 20, 2014 6:11 PM

By Amelia Teng

The Nanyang Technological University (NTU) is partnering the International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN) to set up a $70 million research institute to develop healthcare innovations in the field of nanotechnology.

The IIN, which was established in 2000 and is part of the Northwestern University in the United States, focuses on research in the field of nanotechnology including medicine.

The new NTU-Northwestern Institute for Nanomedicine will support scientists from around the world working on joint research projects in the areas of disease diagnostics and targeted drug delivery methods, which aim to increase the efficacy of existing drugs. Researchers will also design new methods, like gene silencing, to treat diseases.

NTU President Bertil Andersson announced the collaboration on Monday at the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting held in Chicago.

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NTU and Northwestern University to set up $70 million nanomedicine research institute

Using Mathematical Models to Understand Nanoscale Roughness Published by Dove Medical Press

(PRWEB) February 17, 2014

International Journal of Nanomedicine has published the original research Using mathematical models to understand the effect of nanoscale roughness on protein adsorption for improving medical devices.

As main author Dr Ercan says Protein adsorption is critical for the longevity of an implant. Among others, surface nanophase topography and wettability are important parameters that affect the type, amount and bioactivity of the adsorbed proteins, which, in turn controls select cellular adhesion onto biomaterial surfaces. In order to model the effect of surface nanophase topography and wettability on protein adsorption, highly ordered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) surfaces with identical chemistry but altered nanoscale roughness and energy were synthesized.

Dr. Ercan continues Fibronectin and collagen IV adsorption was assessed and observed trends were line fitted to currently used mathematical models. The results from this study provided an important step in developing future mathematical models that can correlate surface properties (such as nanoscale roughness and surface energy) to initial protein adsorption events important to promote select cellular adhesion.

As Professor Webster, Editor-in-Chief, explains Researchers from Northeastern University recently developed a mathematical model that can help to understand biological interactions with nanomaterials. Such results can be used to improve implant performance for a variety of tissues and reduce the number of experiments (and consequently the use of animals) in the development of improved medical devices.

International Journal of Nanomedicine is an international, peer-reviewed journal focusing on the application of nanotechnology in diagnostics, therapeutics, and drug delivery systems throughout the biomedical field. Reflecting the growing activity in this emerging specialty, the aim of this journal is to highlight research and development leading to potential clinical applications in the prevention and treatment of disease.

Dove Medical Press Ltd is a privately held company specializing in the publication of Open Access peer-reviewed journals across the broad spectrum of science, technology and especially medicine.

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Using Mathematical Models to Understand Nanoscale Roughness Published by Dove Medical Press

New Live-Cell Printing Technology Works Like Ancient Chinese Woodblocking

Released: 2/6/2014 12:20 PM EST Embargo expired: 2/10/2014 3:00 PM EST Source Newsroom: Houston Methodist Contact Information

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Newswise HOUSTON -- ( Feb. 6, 2014 ) -- With a nod to 3rd century Chinese woodblock printing and children's rubber stamp toys, researchers in Houston have developed a way to print living cells onto any surface, in virtually any shape. Unlike recent, similar work using inkjet printing approaches, almost all cells survive the process, scientists report in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The researchers, led by Houston Methodist Research Institute nanomedicine faculty member Lidong Qin, Ph.D., say their approach produces 2-D cell arrays in as little as half an hour, prints the cells as close together as 5 micrometers (most animal cells are 10 to 30 micrometers wide), and allows the use of many different cell types. They've named the technology Block-Cell-Printing, or BloC-Printing.

"We feel the current technologies are inadequate," Qin said. "Inkjet-based cell printing leaves many of the cells damaged or dead. We wanted to see if we could invent a tool that helps researchers obtain arrays of cells that are alive and still have full activity."

Recent work to print cells in two and three dimensions using electricity-gated inkjet technology have been largely successful, but sometimes only half of the printed cells survive the printing process -- a source of frustration for many laboratory scientists.

"Cell printing is used in so many different ways now -- for drug development and in studies of tissue regeneration, cell function, and cell-cell communication," Qin said. "Such things can only be done when cells are alive and active. A survival rate of 50 to 80 percent is typical as cells exit the inkjet nozzles. By comparison, we are seeing close to 100 percent of cells in BloC-Printing survive the printing process."

BloC-Printing manipulates microfluidic physics to guide living cells into hook-like traps in the silicone mold. Cells flow down a column in the mold, past trapped cells to the next available slot, eventually creating a line of cells (in a grid of such lines). The position and spacing of the traps and the shape of the channel navigated by the cells is fully configurable during the mold's creation. When the mold is lifted away, the living cells remain behind, adhering to the growth medium or other substrate, in prescribed formation.

Qin's group tested BloC-Printing for its utility in studying cancerous cells and primary neurons. By arranging metastatic cancer cells in a grid and examining their growth in comparison with a non-metastatic control, the researchers found they could easily characterize the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

"We looked at cancer cells for their protrusion generation capability, which correlates to their malignancy level," Qin said. "Longer protrusion means more aggressive cancer cells. The measurement may help to diagnose a cancer's stage."

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New Live-Cell Printing Technology Works Like Ancient Chinese Woodblocking

Nanomedicine Market is Expected to Reach USD 177.60 …

Transparency Market Research added new report "Nanomedicine Market (Neurology, Cardiovascular, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-infective, and Oncology Applications) - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share,Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 - 2019" to its database. Browse full report: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/nanomedicine-market.html

Albany, NY (PRWEB) February 07, 2014

According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Nanomedicine Market (Neurology, Cardiovascular, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-infective, and Oncology Applications) - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share,Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the market for nanomedicine was valued at USD 78.54 billion in 2012 and is expected to reach a value of USD 177.60 billion in 2019, growing at a CAGR of 12.3% from 2013 to 2019.

Browse the full report with complete TOC at http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/nanomedicine-market.html

The advent of new applications and technology in the field of nanomedicine will be one of the major growth factors for the global nanomedicine market. In addition, increase of funding aimed at boosting the research activities pertaining to nanomedicine by the government as well as private institutions will expedite the process of commercialization of new products and hence will drive the market. Other driving factors include rising base of geriatric population, presence of high unmet medical needs and rising worldwide incidences of chronic diseases.

The global nanomedicine market by applications was dominated by the oncology market with a market share of approximately 38.0% in 2012 on account of the presence of high number of commercialized products in this segment. Development of nanomedicine products enabling drugs crossing blood brain barrier and targeting the tumor in brain and at other sites in the body will prove to be a significant future growth driver for this market.

Related Report: Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Devices Market http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/gastrointestinal-endoscopic-devices.html

However, the global cardiovascular market for nanomedicine is the fastest growing application segment. Factors such as the presence of large patient prevalence coupled with rising demand for nanotechnology enabled drugs and devices catering to this segment, attribute to its high growth rate.

North America dominated the market in 2012 and is expected to maintain its market position till 2019. However, theAsia-Pacific market is estimated to grow at a faster pace (CAGR of 14.6% from 2013 to 2019).Europe is expected to grow at a relatively higher rate compared to North America owing to constantly improving regulatory framework and the presence of an extensive product pipeline portfolio.

Some of the key players in the global nanomedicine market include GE Healthcare, Merck & Co Inc., Abbott Laboratories, Pfizer Inc., Nanosphere Inc., Mallinckrodt plc, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc., Celgene Corporation, Novavax, Inc.; Life Technologies, MagArray, Inc., Gilead Sciences Inc. and others.

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Nanomedicine Market is Expected to Reach USD 177.60 ...

Nanomedicine Market is Expected to Reach USD 177.60 Billion in 2019

Albany, NY (PRWEB) February 07, 2014

According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research "Nanomedicine Market (Neurology, Cardiovascular, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-infective, and Oncology Applications) - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share,Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 - 2019," the market for nanomedicine was valued at USD 78.54 billion in 2012 and is expected to reach a value of USD 177.60 billion in 2019, growing at a CAGR of 12.3% from 2013 to 2019.

Browse the full report with complete TOC at http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/nanomedicine-market.html

The advent of new applications and technology in the field of nanomedicine will be one of the major growth factors for the global nanomedicine market. In addition, increase of funding aimed at boosting the research activities pertaining to nanomedicine by the government as well as private institutions will expedite the process of commercialization of new products and hence will drive the market. Other driving factors include rising base of geriatric population, presence of high unmet medical needs and rising worldwide incidences of chronic diseases.

The global nanomedicine market by applications was dominated by the oncology market with a market share of approximately 38.0% in 2012 on account of the presence of high number of commercialized products in this segment. Development of nanomedicine products enabling drugs crossing blood brain barrier and targeting the tumor in brain and at other sites in the body will prove to be a significant future growth driver for this market.

Related Report: Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Devices Market http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/gastrointestinal-endoscopic-devices.html

However, the global cardiovascular market for nanomedicine is the fastest growing application segment. Factors such as the presence of large patient prevalence coupled with rising demand for nanotechnology enabled drugs and devices catering to this segment, attribute to its high growth rate.

North America dominated the market in 2012 and is expected to maintain its market position till 2019. However, theAsia-Pacific market is estimated to grow at a faster pace (CAGR of 14.6% from 2013 to 2019).Europe is expected to grow at a relatively higher rate compared to North America owing to constantly improving regulatory framework and the presence of an extensive product pipeline portfolio.

Some of the key players in the global nanomedicine market include GE Healthcare, Merck & Co Inc., Abbott Laboratories, Pfizer Inc., Nanosphere Inc., Mallinckrodt plc, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc., Celgene Corporation, Novavax, Inc.; Life Technologies, MagArray, Inc., Gilead Sciences Inc. and others.

Blog: http://www.tmrblog.com/ Blog: http://www.culrav.org/pr/author/tmrrelease

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Nanomedicine Market is Expected to Reach USD 177.60 Billion in 2019

In Vitro Innovation: Testing Nanomedicine With Blood Cells On A Microchip

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Newswise Designing nanomedicine to combat diseases is a hot area of scientific research, primarily for treating cancer, but very little is known in the context of atherosclerotic disease. Scientists have engineered a microchip coated with blood vessel cells to learn more about the conditions under which nanoparticles accumulate in the plaque-filled arteries of patients with atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke.

In the research, microchips were coated with a thin layer of endothelial cells, which make up the interior surface of blood vessels. In healthy blood vessels, endothelial cells act as a barrier to keep foreign objects out of the bloodstream. But at sites prone to atherosclerosis, the endothelial barrier breaks down, allowing things to move in and out of arteries that shouldnt.

In a new study, nanoparticles were able to cross the endothelial cell layer on the microchip under conditions that mimic the permeable layer in atherosclerosis. The results on the microfluidic device correlated well with nanoparticle accumulation in the arteries of an animal model with atherosclerosis, demonstrating the devices capability to help screen nanoparticles and optimize their design.

Its a simple model a microchip, not cell culture dish which means that a simple endothelialized microchip with microelectrodes can show some yet important prediction of whats happening in a large animal model, said YongTae (Tony) Kim, an assistant professor in bioengineering in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

The research was published in January online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This work represents a multidisciplinary effort of researchers that are collaborating within the Program of Excellence in Nanotechnology funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The team includes researchers at the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, Kyushu Institute of Technology in Japan, and the Boston University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School.

Kim began the work as his post-doctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the lab of Robert Langer.

This is a wonderful example of developing a novel nanotechnology approach to address an important medical problem, said Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who is renowned for his work in tissue engineering and drug delivery.

Kim and Langer teamed up with researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. Mark Lobatto, co-lead author works in the laboratories of Willem Mulder, an expert in cardiovascular nanomedicine and Zahi Fayad, the director of Mount Sinais Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute.

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In Vitro Innovation: Testing Nanomedicine With Blood Cells On A Microchip

High Unmet Needs in Therapeutics to Spur Growth in the Market for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, According to New …

San Jose, California (PRWEB) January 20, 2014

Follow us on LinkedIn Pharmaceutical industry represents one of the early beneficiaries of advancements in nanotechnology. Nanotechnology holds the potential to dramatically alter the fields of drug delivery, drug discovery, in vivo imaging, in vitro diagnostics, tissue engineering and implants. Of all the areas of nanomedicine, drug delivery remains the most researched and commercialized areas for nanotechnology in medicine. Nanoscale delivery systems hold potential to reduce undesirable effects of medication while improving therapeutic efficacy. Advancements in this area is expected to result in re-investigation of molecules whose development was earlier shelved due to lower pharmaceutical activity but were known to be biologically active. Also, nanoscale delivery systems can help improve efficacy of certain drugs that are already on the market.

Business interests in the application of nanotechnology is fast rising, driven by rising intensity in research work in this area and growing competition within the general drug delivery technologies. The pharmaceutical industry is witnessing increasing demand for novel drug delivery technologies, as companies seek to minimize drug side effects, reduce quantity of costly active therapeutic agents, and endeavor to differentiate their products from competition as well as from commoditization. In this regard, nano-milled/nano-sized/nano-crystallized products and nanocarriers, such as liposomes, among other approaches are providing a new set of tools to address these issues. Nanomaterials provide novel functions and features that are not delivered by other drug delivery technologies. In addition to enhancing therapeutic efficacy and improving safety profile of existing drugs, nanotechnology has the potential to deliver an all important means of developing next generation drugs. The ability of dendrimers and micelles to act as imaging agents as well as therapeutic agents is a significant progress in this direction, assisting clinicians in imaging as well as treating tumors.

Nanotechnology-based drug delivery is being seen as a revolution in protein and gene therapy, for delivering biomolecules such as DNA and siRNA, enabling researchers to overcome several hurdles that are found in these therapies using conventional delivery systems. Given the harm caused by chemotherapeutic agents to healthy tissues alongside diseased cells, there is growing interest and efforts to deliver anti-cancer agents directly to tumors, using nanotechnology based delivery systems. In addition, efforts are underway to develop oral formulations of various therapeutic agents. While several drugs delivered orally breakdown in the stomach, nanotechnology-based drug delivery is being explored to ensure smooth passage of a medication through the stomach such that they enter the intestines and are absorbed by the intestinal walls and passed on to the blood stream.

As stated by the new market research report on Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, the United States represents the largest market worldwide. Growth in the country is driven by various factors such as a strong pharmaceutical industry with robust expertise in related sciences, high focus on R&D, and narrowing drug pipelines of major pharmaceutical companies, among others. Asia-Pacific led by China is forecast to grow at the fastest CAGR of 70% over the analysis period. China is making rapid strides in the area of healthcare and pharmaceuticals. In recent years, the country has made healthcare improvement a domestic priority, with a special focus on introducing advanced medical technology. Nanocrystals dominate the market worldwide, supported by shorter development time and lower cost of production. Nanocarriers, such as liposomes, dendrimers and micelles are expected to witness strong growth in the coming years.

Major players covered in the report include Access Pharmaceuticals Inc., Alkermes PLC, Aquanova AG, Camurus AB, Capsulution Pharma AG, Celgene Inc., Flamel Technologies SA, Lena Nanoceutics Ltd., NanoBio Corporation, and NanoCarrier Co. Ltd., among others.

The research report titled Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery: A Global Strategic Business Report announced by Global Industry Analysts Inc., provides a comprehensive review of market trends, drivers, challenges and strategic industry activities of major companies worldwide. The report provides market estimates and projections in US dollars for all major geographic markets including the United States, Canada, Japan, Europe (France, Germany, Italy, UK, Spain, Russia and Rest of Europe), Asia-Pacific, Latin America and Rest of World. Product segments analyzed for the global market include Nanocrystals and Nanocarriers.

For more details about this comprehensive market research report, please visit http://www.strategyr.com/Nanotechnology_in_Drug_Delivery_Market_Report.asp

About Global Industry Analysts, Inc. Global Industry Analysts, Inc., (GIA) is a leading publisher of off-the-shelf market research. Founded in 1987, the company currently employs over 800 people worldwide. Annually, GIA publishes more than 1300 full-scale research reports and analyzes 40,000+ market and technology trends while monitoring more than 126,000 Companies worldwide. Serving over 9500 clients in 27 countries, GIA is recognized today, as one of the world's largest and reputed market research firms.

Global Industry Analysts, Inc. Telephone: 408-528-9966 Fax: 408-528-9977 Email: press(at)StrategyR(dot)com Web Site: http://www.StrategyR.com/

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High Unmet Needs in Therapeutics to Spur Growth in the Market for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, According to New ...

Researchers measure minuscule particles with ‘tiny diving boards’

Suspended nanochannel resonator (SNR), a high precision instrument, can now measure masses of particles as small as one millionth of a trillionth of a gram, say MIT researchers.

Researchers from MIT can now measure masses of particles as small as one millionth of a trillionth of a gram.

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The suspended nanochannel resonator (SNR), a high precision instrument devised by researchers, can determine the mass of particles with a resolution better than an attogram one millionth of a trillionth of a gram, according to a press release by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

With the help of the SNR, researchers can now determine the mass of minuscule-sized viruses, protein aggregates, and other naturally occurring and engineered nanoparticles (a nanometer is one-billionth of a meter), which were earlier difficult to measure due to their small size, according to the findings that were published in a paper for the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Now we can weigh small viruses, extracellular vesicles, and most of the engineered nanoparticles that are being used for nanomedicine, said Selim Olcum, one of the paper's lead authors.

The SNR builds upon the suspended microchannel resonator (SMR), an earlier technology developed by Scott Manalis, an MIT professor of biological and mechanical engineering.

The SMR was used to track cell growth and measure density of cells, according to the MIT press release.

The SMR consists of a fluid-filled microchannel in a tiny silicon cantilever, a beam secured at one end. The particles are made to flow through the channel, one by one, and the mass of the particles changes the vibration frequency of the cantilever.

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Researchers measure minuscule particles with 'tiny diving boards'


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