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Category Archives: Eczema

Evidence Growing That Eczema Itch More Than Skin Deep – Medscape

Posted: November 4, 2019 at 6:47 pm

"My patients understand itch is transferred like nerve pain," said Gil Yosipovitch, MD, director of the Miami Itch Center and chair of the National Eczema Association scientific advisory committee.

But clinicians have argued whether atopic dermatitis is a "rash that itches" or an "itch that rashes," he acknowledged.

New evidence supports the patient-reported sensation that "eczema is the itch that rashes," Yosipovitch told Medscape Medical News.

The research, published in Nature and presented during the President's Symposium at the 28th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Congress in Madrid, shows that neurons serving the skin directly interact with mast cells to trigger the massive histamine release associated with atopic dermatitis inflammation.

These new findings confirm a direct role for the nervous system, which is responsible for the itchiness and was already implicated in the inflammation.

"We, as a profession, have this thinking that eczema is an immune condition, and we forget that the immune system works with nerves," Yosipovitch explained. "Ten years ago, you wouldn't accept it because there weren't any data."

Atopic dermatitis, a form of eczema, is far more than just itching skin. The condition cycles through flares and remissions and can take over the entire body, leading to discomfort and inflammation. In fact, the root of "eczema" is a Greek word for boiling, which is an apt description of the burning inflammation and itching people experience.

Eczema affects about one in five children, some of whom show signs of it shortly after birth. Genetic variants can increase susceptibility.

For newborns at high risk for eczema, the pre-emptive application of petroleum jelly might delay onset or limit escalation, one study suggests. However, studies on the use of cream emollients and oil baths have yielded disappointing results, as reported by Medscape Medical News.

The investigators used dust mite antigens from the skin of reactive patients to induce a reaction in mice.

The condition is so similar in mice and humans that it is difficult to distinguish samples from one another at the microscopic level, presenter Nicolas Gaudenzio, PhD, an immunologist at INSERM in Toulouse, France, told Medscape Medical News.

For their study, Gaudenzio and his colleagues used several mouse models to show that sensory neurons and immune cells work together to detect allergens related to the common dust mite.

The team pursued this research question because levels of neuropeptides signaling molecules produced by sensory neurons called nociceptors are elevated in people with atopic dermatitis, as are markers for mast cells.

To examine the association between neurons and mast cells, the researchers exposed mice to dust mite allergens and monitored their skin. They found that nociceptors, which transmit pain and itch messages, and mast cells do not chat with each other from a distance. Instead, they cluster together and make physical contact, with the mast cells gathering around the nociceptors like bees around a hive.

We don't really know why some people are reacting and others are not.

We don't really know why some people are reacting and others are not.

Although these neuronmast cell units seem to be part of normal immune defense, not everyone reacts to ubiquitous dust mite allergens. In some people, "they can literally fire up the nerve fibers," he pointed out, "but we don't really know why some people are reacting and others are not. That's a black box."

Nociceptors and mast cells occur in other tissues that show an allergic response, the researchers explain, including the lungs, upper airways, and gut.

After his presentation, audience questions to Gaudenzio homed in on the same subject: Does this discovery mean new therapeutic possibilities for this sometimes-intractable condition?

That is not clear, Gaudenzio said, but the next steps will be to block the interaction between the sensory neuron and the mast cells to see if doing so forestalls the cascade of events that leads to the inflammation.

28th European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Congress. Presented October12, 2019.

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Itchy Skin Conditions And Mental Health Are Linked, And We Need to Talk About It – ScienceAlert

Posted: at 6:46 pm

Why do we itch? The reasons are many and varied. But what's becoming ever clearer is many who experience chronic itching due to skin conditions also shoulder a profound psychological burden no scratching can relieve.

While the nature of this link around conditions like eczema and psoriasis has been investigated before, scientists say we're still only beginning to understand how skin disorders, mental health problems, and quality of life all intersect.

"There are already studies showing evidence of a correlation between itch and mental health problems in general, and in specific skin disorders, but there is a lack of a cross-sectional study across chronic skin diseases," says dermatologist Florence J. Dalgard from Lund University in Sweden.

To help fill that gap, Dalgard and her team analysed data collected from thousands of dermatology patients with skin issues in 13 European countries, including the UK, France, Germany, Russia, and elsewhere.

In total, over 3,500 patients with varying skin diseases took part in the study, undergoing physical examinations and filling out a questionnaire which asked questions about their socio-economic background and experiences with itching, while also measuring symptoms of depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation.

More than 1,300 people without skin conditions acted as a control group, self-reporting the same information.

When the research team analysed the responses, they found a number of associations between skin conditions, itching, mood disorders, and quality of life impairments.

In patients with skin conditions who reported itching, the prevalence of depression was 14.1 percent. This lowered to 5.7 percent in patients who didn't itch.

Controls without skin disorders who reported itching also had around a 6 percent prevalent of depression - while only 3.2 percent in the control group members who didn't have itching reported depression.

Anxiety bore a similar pattern, showing up in 21.4 percent of the patients with skin conditions and itching, and dropping to 12.3 percent in patients without itching, while approximately 8 percent of the controls reported anxiety.

The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher in patients with itch (15.7 percent) than in patients without itch (9.1 percent); similarly, it was higher in controls with itch (18.6 percent) than controls without (8.6 percent).

Patients with itch further reported experiencing more negative life events than the patients without itch did (38.2 percent compared to 32.4 percent respectively), and the patients who experienced itching were also likely to experience more economic problems.

While the team acknowledge their data can prove nothing about causation one way or the other (and submit that mental health suffering could potentially induce itch to some degree), they suggest it is much more likely that skin diseases are the cause of itching, which then leads to mental health effects.

"Speculative reasons for this correlation is that itch correlates with skin inflammation and skin inflammation induces serotonin network in the brain leading to depression and anxiety," the authors write in their paper.

While more research is needed to explore the hypothesis, for now at least, the link between itching and depression looks more firmly established than ever.

And that, the researchers say, should be reflected in how we treat patients with skin conditions with a multidisciplinary team of physicians to help support these people, and everything they may be dealing with.

At the same time, preventative programs might be able to play a role in helping to ease itching and maybe reducing the development of the serious psychological symptoms that appear to stem from it.

"Our findings demonstrate that the presence of itch in dermatological patients is significantly associated with clinical depression, suicidal ideation and stress," the researchers conclude.

"The study reveals that itch contributes substantially to the psychological burden of dermatological patients and confirms the multi-dimensional suffering of dermatological patients with itch."

The findings are reported in Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

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Eczema drug raises hopes of effective and long-lasting treatment – inews

Posted: October 27, 2019 at 3:14 pm

NewsScienceTests found it significantly reduced the severity of the disease in a matter of weeks

Wednesday, 23rd October 2019, 7:00 pm

Scientists have raised hopes of an effective new treatment for the most common form of eczema after tests found it significantly reduced the severity of the disease in a matter of weeks.

All 12 of the atopic dermatitis patients injected with the new drug saw a reduction in symptoms of 50 per cent of more - and in 83 per cent of cases the improvement took just 29 days.

But while the results show promise, the researchers cautioned that a much bigger study was needed to confirm the findings - and they are now working on a clinical trial involving 300 patients to do this.

"Patients with atopic dermatitis experienced significant improvement in their symptoms after a single dose," said Professor Graham Ogg, of the University of Oxford, who led the research.

About 1.5 million people in the UK are thought to have atopic dermatitis - a long-term condition where skin inflammation results in dry, cracked, red, itchy and painful skin.

More effective, less frequent

A range of treatments for atopic dermatitis are already available which can be of help to many patients. However, the researchers are hopeful that their new treatment will be more effective and longer-lasting, so it won't need to be administered as often.

Damaged skin cells release a substance called IL-33 which activates the body's immune cells to come and fight a possible infection. But sometimes the immune cells are over-activated - for example in people with atopic dermatatis - causing inflammation.

The new drug is based on an artificially created antibody called etokimab and is classed as a targeted therapy because it targets and effectively smothers the IL-33 molecules behind the condition.

This calms down the body's immune response and curbs the eczema.

Healthcare industry reaction

Emma Wedgeworth, consultant dermatologist at the British Skin Foundation, said: "There is no doubt in my mind that targeted therapies like this are the future of treatment for severe eczema.

For so long, we have relied on strong general immunosuppressants to treat severe cases.....The emergence of new therapies is hugely exciting for patients and clinicians alike."

Professor Patrick Chinnery, clinical director at the Medical Research Council, which part funded the trial, said the results were "exciting".

He hopes the new drug may potentially be adapted to treat other diseases relating to the immune system such as the skin diseases psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa - and maybe some immune diseases affecting other organs as well.

"The trial suggests that [the same mechanism] may have an important role in a number of immune-related disorders which will also lead to new avenues of research for other conditions," he said.

The study is published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The trial was funded by the antibody development company AnaptysBio.

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Which emollients are effective and acceptable for eczema in children? – The BMJ

Posted: at 3:14 pm

Although emollients alone can help reduce the symptoms of eczema and prevent flares, most people will need to use anti-inflammatory treatments such as topical corticosteroids of an appropriate strength and duration as well

Effectiveness and acceptability of emollients varies according to disease severity, body site, climate, container, and patient or carer preferences and beliefs

Based on current evidence, the best emollient is the one that the individual prefers after a period of testing

Atopic eczema or dermatitis, commonly referred to as eczema, is characterised by dry, itchy skin. Although mainly a childhood condition, this disease commonly persists into or develops in adulthood.1 Patients are advised to use leave-on emollients or moisturisers, applied directly to the skin which add or help retain moisture.23 While evidence of their clinical effectiveness is limited, their use is ingrained in clinical practice and guidelines.2

Many different emollients can be prescribed or bought over the counter. Most are formulated as lotions, creams, gels, or ointments (see infographic). There is little evidence to recommend one type of emollient over another. Healthcare professional recommendation is the main source of advice when choosing a prescribed emollient.4 Preferences of the patient or carer are critical and may be influenced by the characteristics of the emollient, patient, and environment.5 The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends patients try different emollients in the clinic before choosing.2 This approach is not practical in most primary care settings, and even in specialist clinics the range of emollients available to try can be arbitrary and influenced by pharmaceutical companies and local formularies.

Older, cheaper emollients may be as effective as newer, more expensive ones,6 and the advantages of products that claim dermatologically tested, fragrance-free, and hypoallergenic are dubious.7 Through a process of trial

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Eczema On The Face: How To Care For Your Skin Naturally – mindbodygreen.com

Posted: at 3:14 pm

Emollients are ingredients in moisturizers that soothe and soften the skin, making them ideal for inflammatory skin conditions. Finding one that works for you might take a little guess-and-test, says Dattner. "You never know what your trigger is going to be, so you might have to experiment," he says. "I usually recommend oils. Creams are obviously sensorily appealing, but you just want to make sure that you're not allergic to the preservatives in those. Again, most people aren't, but you needto know your own skin."

There are quite a few at-home, natural remedies that have received anecdotal praise, from honey face masks to oatmeal baths. These ingredients are emollients and have skin-soothing propertiesand even some smaller clinical studies pointing to their positive effects but no sweeping conclusions from the research community. But overall, the advice remains the same from Dattner: Spot-test first, and remember that everyone is different. Just because it was effective for someone you follow on Instagram doesn't mean it will work for you.

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New drug developed in S’pore could provide full relief to eczema symptoms like redness & itching of skin – Mothership.sg

Posted: at 3:14 pm

Biopharmaceutical company, Aslan Pharmaceuticals, has made progress in their study on a novel therapeutic antibody that could potentially provide complete relief from eczema symptoms in the future.

The drug known as Aslan004 can inhibit proteins that are key to triggering eczema symptoms such as redness and itchiness.

Currently, available treatments for eczema mostly involve steroid creams or taking antihistamines. Which involves a lot of side effects.

Aslan004 however, according to The Straits Times, is a biologic.

Earlier in June 2019, Aslan completed the first part of the study where the dosage of drug increases for every new cohort.

The results showed that the drug was well tolerated at all doses.

There were no adverse events or discontinuations of the drug during the period.

Analysis of results also showed there was potential for the drug to be administered once every month.

Aslan announced on Oct. 22 that they will be doing the second part of the drug test on eczema patients in a randomised manner.

The drug test will also withhold any information that may influence the patients until the end of the test.

The test will also be placebo-controlled that means some people may receive sham placebo that poses no real effect on the skin conditions.

The test will be conducted at Singapores National Skin Centre and Changi General Hospital, led by Prof Steven Thng.

Each participant will receive multiple doses of the drug, this is known as a multiple ascending dose (MAD) study.

The MAD study will evaluate three doses of the drug, delivered subcutaneously, followed by an expansion of the cohort at the most effective dose.

The study will recruit up to 50 moderate to severe eczema patients.

According to ST, Thng noted that it was highly unlikely for a cure to eczema anytime soon, Aslan004 would make treatment for patients more convenient, especially since there are limited treatments for those with severe eczema.

Results are expected in the second half of 2020.

Top photo from Singhealth website

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Norovirus to shigella and eczema the ultimate guide to protect your kids from winter bugs – The Sun

Posted: at 3:14 pm

WITH Britain set to be hit with its coldest winter in 30 years - kids will be susceptible to picking up bugs such as norovirus, shigella and the dreaded flu.

And nobody wants their kids coughing and spluttering or off school poorly, especially with Christmas only 62 days way.

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However, there are some simple steps parents can take to protect their kids from some of the main winter bugs.

Here, Dr Sarah Jarvis, Clinical Director of Patient.info, and some other top experts, take The Sun Online through the best ways to ensure your child remains fit and well this winter.

Norovirus is one of the most common stomach bugs in the UK and is also referred to as "the winter vomiting bug".

In particular, the first wave of norovirus outbreaks have already closed schools and hospital wards across the country.

Dr Jarvis emphasises the need to make sure kids wash their hands thoroughly to stop them from catching this contagious and extremely unpleasant bug.

She tells The Sun Online: "Wash, wash and wash again!

"Norovirus is spread via the 'faecal oral route', which is just as disgusting as it sounds.

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"Germs passed out in an infected persons poo can be picked up on someone elses hands, and transferred into their mouths when they touch their mouths or via food.

"So wash your hands thoroughly after going to the loo, before you handle or eat food and after you empty a potty.

"Clean surfaces including toilet handles, taps and door handles regularly with disinfectant.

"And make sure you wash your hands if youve been in a public place like a bus or train, where lots of other people have touched surfaces.

"If children in your kids circle are affected, steer clear of them until they have been clear of diarrhoea or vomiting for at least 48 hours."

Shigella is a highly infectious vomiting bug known to spread quickly around schools and workplaces in the UK when there's an outbreak.

Shigellosis causes chronic diarrhoea and sickness and can leave people feeling very unwell.

Good hand hygiene is vital to stop the bacteria from spreading and Dr Jarvis also recommends the "boil it, peel it, cook it or forget it" principle for food and drink.

Follow the boil it, peel it, cook it or forget it principle for food and drink

She says: "This form of dystentery is not a big issue in the UK its far more likely to be a problem if youre travelling overseas.

"If youre travelling outside Western Europe, the USA, Australia or New Zealand, follow the boil it, peel it, cook it or forget it principle for food and drink."

Influenza, often abbreviated to flu, strikes millions of kids each year and it is almost impossible to avoid completely.

Dr Jarvis advises parents take their kids to get the free NHS flu vaccine.

She says: "Encouraging everyone around you who sneezes to use paper tissues, which they dispose of immediately in a bin (and then wash their hands) will help.

"All children from two years old to the end of primary school are now eligible for a free NHS flu vaccine.

"Kids are super spreaders of flu they pass it on far more efficiently than adults.

"And theyre far more prone to serious complications than healthy adults.

"The vaccine is given as a nasal spray rather than an injection in children via your GP surgery or through their school if theyre at primary school.

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"It really is the most effective way to protect them against flu."

Dr Daniel Atkinson, GP Clinical Lead atTreated.com, also advises making sure your child is having a healthy diet.

He adds: "So with more dangers around in the air we breathe, its best to keep yours and your kids immune systems fighting fit.

"This means eating a healthy and balanced diet, with plenty of fruit and veg, and making sure youre getting enough sleep."

Sore throats are common in kids in the winter winter and are almost always caused by viral infections.

Normally they're nothing to worry about but they can sometimes be a sign of tonsillitis, which is very common in children.

Dr Jarvis recommends keeping kids away from others who are poorly and, yep, more hand washing.

Keeping your child away from others with bad sore throats, and getting them to wash their hands regularly, will help

She says: "You cant prevent them but keeping your child away from others with bad sore throats, and getting them to wash their hands regularly, will help.

"Tonsillitis symptoms include fever, sore throat without a cough, swollen tender glands on the front of the neck and white spots on the tonsils at the back of the throat if you shine a torch into their mouths.

"If they have at least three of these symptoms, see your doctor."

For kids and adults, asthma is normally a lot harder to control during the winter months.

This is because the cold, dry air can irritate airwaves and cause the muscles inside to spasm.

Emma Rubach, Head of Health Advice at Asthma UK, advises parents to make sure their child carries their reliever inhaler and wears a simple scarf during the cold weather.

She says: "Winter can bea dangerous time for the 1.1 million children with asthma in the UK as chilly weather, colds and flu, chest infections and mould are more common and can trigger life-threatening asthma attacks.

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"They cause children's airways to become inflamed, causing symptoms such ascoughing, wheezing and struggling to breathe.

"Make sure your child carries their reliever inhaler (usually blue) with them at all times and keep taking their regular preventer inhaler (usually brown) as prescribed.

"The simple scarf could also save your child's life.

"Do a 'scarfie - wrapping a scarf loosely over your childs nose and mouth to help warm up the air before they breathe it in, as cold air is another asthma attack trigger.

"It could also be helpful to stick to indoor activities when the weather is particularly cold."

The cold chill and central heating systems often cause eczema to flare up during the winter season.

Dermatologist Dr Daniel Glass at The Dermatology Clinic London recommends dressing kids in cotton rather than woollies and keeping their skin moisturised.

He says: "Eczema in the winter is incredibly common, with many people finding that their skin will flare up more frequently or get worse during the colder months, as the cold biting winds and central heating systems continuously dry out their skin.

"Their eczema may be further irritated by taking hot baths or showers, which will in turn strip the skin of its natural oils.

Top tips for parents for protecting kids from winter bugs

1. Make sure kids wash their hands properly

This prevents the spread of bugs like Norovirus and Shigella, as well as the common cold.

2. Keep kids away from other poorly children

Colds and coughs are almost unavoidable so this is one solution to protect them.

3. Get kids the free NHS flu vaccine

All children from two years old to the end of primary school are now eligible for a free NHS flu vaccine

4. Wrap asthma sufferers up in a scarf

By wrapping a scarf loosely over your childs now and mouth this helps prevent airways from becoming inflamed

5. Keep kids' skin moisturised

This prevents eczema flare ups

6. Avoid woollen clothes

Opt for cotton clothes in the winter as wool can trigger eczema

"Bundling up in woollies to ward off the cold may also irritate the skin and exacerbate symptoms, so try to layer your children up in cotton clothing which is often kinder and softer on the skin.

"Keeping the skin well moisturised is one of the most important things you can do to prevent the eczema flaring up.

"This is because eczema is often caused by a problem with your skin barrier function, which can be helped by using a paraffin based moisturiser regularly.

"Try applying a fragrance-free moisturiser at least twice a day, especially after washing, such as Epaderm ointment which can also be used as a soap substitute, or Oilatum cream which is lighter and more easily absorbed."

Hand, food and mouth disease is a common infection that causes spots on the hands and feet.

Though children aged 10 and under are more likely to catch it, it can affect older children and adults as well.

Dr Jarvis said: "This virus infection can occur at any time of year and often starts with a fever, followed by a sore throat and then spots in the mouth which develop into ulcers.

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"Many children also get spots on their hands and feet (and occasionally buttocks and genitals) a day or two later.

"Hand foot and mouth usually settles within a few days with no complications. Once theyve had it once, they should be immune for life.

"Hand, foot and mouth is very infectious usually passed on by coughing or sneezing, as well as by touching someone who has been infected.

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"Its hard to avoid as you can pass it on before you develop any spots."

Dr Jarvis' advice comes after it was revealed snow could hit areas of the UK today as sub-zero polar air blasts Britain.

The Met Office said there could be snow on the hills in the northwest later today and other areas will see cold weather and a touch of frost.

Temperatures could dip as low as 2C overnight in Scotland as the UK is plunged into a cold snap.

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Baby Wipe Ingredient Linked To Eczema – Nonwovens Industry Magazine – News, Markets – Nonwovens Industry Magazine

Posted: at 3:14 pm

Fragrances and preservatives commonly found in baby wipes, cosmetics, skincare products and toy "slime" are among the most common causes of eczema in Australian children, according to a new study, published in the Australasian Journal of Dermatology. Children suffering from suspected skin allergies should be patch-tested for 30 of the most common allergens and potential allergens identified in their research.

Allergic contact dermatitis is a red, itchy rash that develops as an immune response in the days after exposure to an allergen. The condition is diagnosed by patch-testing the skin on the back.

Historically it was thought it rarely affected children due to their immature immune systems and limited exposure. In fact, the researchers, from the Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Centre at Melbourne's Skin Health Institute, found it was not uncommon for children to suffer from allergic contact dermatitis and rates appeared to be increasing.

Allergic contact dermatitis is a red, itchy rash that develops as an immune response in the days after exposure to an allergen. The condition is diagnosed by patch-testing the skin on the back.

Historically it was thought it rarely affected children due to their immature immune systems and limited exposure. In fact, the researchers, from the Occupational Dermatology Research and Education Centre at Melbourne's Skin Health Institute, found it was not uncommon for children to suffer from allergic contact dermatitis and rates appeared to be increasing.

While the study found very few children under five had been patch-tested, among the six-10 age group, fragrance and colophonium were the most common allergens. Fragrance and nickel sulphate were the most common allergens in the 1117 age group.

Nickel sulphate allergies were more common among girls, which the authors said was consistent with existing literature and most likely due to the "increased use of jewellery in females", particularly ear piercings.

Armed with evidence of the most common allergens affecting children, the researchers have proposed the first Australian Paediatric Baseline Series comprising 30 common allergens and potential allergens for patch-testing.

While patch-testing is "the gold standard" for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), it "appears to be performed infrequently in children, and consequently, ACD is likely underdiagnosed", the authors said. "This is unfortunate because ACD can have a significant impact on a child's quality of life, and early, correct, identification of allergens and subsequent avoidance can lead to substantial improvement in symptoms, preventing progression to a chronic disease state."

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Aldi brings back ‘miracle’ cream which parents swear cures children’s eczema – and it costs 3.99 – Birmingham Live

Posted: at 3:14 pm

The Aldi cream that shoppers claim cures ezcema is back on shelves - and sending customers wild once again.

The must-have product, sold at branches of the budget supermarket, costs just 3.99.

Aldi opened its first store in Britain right here in Birmingham some 20-plus years ago.

The store was a huge success, opening back in the 1990s, and the German supermarket has gone from strength to strength since.

Obviously, a large part of Aldi's success is its fantastic prices, with families on budgets routinely flocking to stores to pick up low-priced items.

Aldi's special items - known as its SpecialBuys - are also massively popular with customers.

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The product is now available once again on Aldis website , alongside more than 100 reviews from happy customers, reports the Liverpool Echo .

Many shoppers have pointed out that the product soothes eczema.

One review on Aldis website said she has suffered with eczema for 30 years, but after using the Lacura Miracle Cream it has completely gone, while others have taken to Twitter to praise the cream.

One woman said: I had bad eczema on my ankle which Ive had for a long time. I bought Lacura Miracle Cream from Aldi [and] it has completely cleared up, Im amazed, thank you Aldi. Please stock it forever.

The Lacura Miracle Cream is currently available online and in store.

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Here’s How 20 Years of Office Work Will Disfigure the Human Body – Futurism

Posted: at 3:14 pm

Emma doesnt look so great.

Her legs are puffy and covered in varicose veins. Her eyes are flat and dead, and her backlooks like she spends her days ringing the bell at Notre-Dame Cathedral.

Its harsh but true. Emma is a life-sized doll depicting what the average office worker in the United Kingdom could look like in 20 years if changes arent made to the workplace environment.

For a new report titled The Work Colleague of The Future, a team of health experts led by behavioral futurist William Higham looked at survey data submitted by more than 3,000 office workers in France, Germany, and the U.K.

The percentages of U.K. office workers who said they already suffered from sore eyes (50 percent), sore backs (48 percent), and headaches (48 percent) as a direct result of their work environment informed the design of the sickly Emma, who also suffers from stress-related eczema, excess weight, and swollen limbs.

If we dont majorly shake-up the standard office environment, according to Higham, were headed toward a future rife with Emmas.

Unless we make radical changes to our working lives, such as moving more, addressing our posture at our desks, taking regular walking breaks, or considering improving our workstation setup, our offices are going to make us very sick, he said, according to The Independent.

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