Page 11234..1020..»

Category Archives: War On Drugs

Is the War on Drugs Over? Arrest Statistics Say No – The New York Times

Posted: November 7, 2019 at 10:45 pm

Drug arrests are classified into four categories: 1) heroin or cocaine and their derivatives, 2) marijuana 3) synthetic or manufactured drugs like fentanyl and 4) other dangerous non-narcotic drugs like barbiturates.

In 2018, there were 663,367 arrests involving marijuana, up from 659,700 in 2017, nearly 92 percent of them for possession. The F.B.I.s crime data includes only the top charge for each arrest, so if a suspect is found with drugs while being arrested on a more serious charge, the drug possession would not be counted in the agencys statistics.

I always caution people to read the U.C.R. data as an approximation because its imperfect, said Tess Borden, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union who worked on a report published by the A.C.L.U. and Human Rights Watch in 2016: Every 25 Seconds: The Human Toll of Criminalizing Drug Use in the United States.

According to New York States Division of Criminal Justice Services, there were 75,897 arrests for drug felonies and misdemeanors in New York in 2018, which includes any arrest where fingerprints were taken. About 35 percent of those arrests involved people who were identified as white; 37 percent as black; 25 percent as Hispanic; and 2 percent as Asian. The remainder were listed as other/unknown. (In New York State, blacks make up 18 percent of the population, and Hispanics 19 percent.)

We know from national survey data that people of all races use drugs in their adult lifetimes at approximately the same rates, Ms. Borden said. So the fact that we have great variances in who is arrested tells us about police priorities.

In 2021, the F.B.I. plans to begin using its National Incident-Based Reporting System to track crime data, which has more detail about a greater number of crimes.

This reporting system also contains information about the quantity of drugs involved in an arrest. Analyzing 700,000 drug arrests using this data for 2004, 2008 and 2012, the authors of the Sharks and Minnows paper found that about 40 percent of those arrests were for possessing or selling a quarter of a gram or less of drugs. And 20 percent were for possessing or selling drugs weighing between 0.25 grams and one gram. (A packet of Splenda sweetener weighs one gram.)

See the original post here:

Is the War on Drugs Over? Arrest Statistics Say No - The New York Times

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on Is the War on Drugs Over? Arrest Statistics Say No – The New York Times

Rodrigo Duterte hands over ‘war on drugs’ to vice-president and critic – The Guardian

Posted: at 10:45 pm

The vice-president of the Philippines, Leni Robredo, has accepted President Rodrigo Dutertes offer for her to play a lead role in his deadly crackdown against drugs, even though the former human rights lawyer is critical of the campaign and has been warned it could be a political ploy to destroy her.

Robredo said that by agreeing she may be able to save lives from a campaign that has killed thousands of mostly petty drug suspects in purported gun battles with police.

Many have expressed concerns that this is an insincere offer, that its a trap which only aims to undermine and put me to shame, said Robredo. While it can be said that this offer is just politicking and that the agencies wont really follow me and would do everything so I wont succeed, Im ready to endure all of these.

If I can save even one innocent life, my principles and my heart tell me that I should try.

Dutertes communications secretary, Martin Andanar, welcomed Robredos decision. We believe that the loudest critics should act beyond mere observers, but be active contributors for change, he said.

Nicholas Bequelin, an Amnesty official for the region, said: Vice-president Robredo must be granted power to halt the daily killings and change the deadly command structure we have documented, otherwise this move will be an empty gesture. Her appointment does not change the fact that the Duterte administrations war on drugs amounts to crimes against humanity.

After Robredos criticism of his drug campaign, Duterte formalised an offer to appoint her as one of two heads of an inter-agency committee that includes the police and the military and is tasked with overseeing and coordinating the governments efforts to combat illegal drugs.

Duterte launched the crackdown after he took office in mid-2016. More than 6,300 mostly petty drug suspects have been killed and about 1.3 million others have surrendered, officials have said. Human rights groups have cited a higher death toll and accused some police of killing unarmed suspects based on flimsy evidence and altering crime scenes to make it look like the suspects violently fought back.

At least two complaints for mass murder have been filed before the international criminal court over the large-scale deaths, but Duterte has vowed to continue with the bloody campaign up to the last day of his presidency in June 2022.

Presidents and vice-presidents are separately elected in the Philippines. Robredo, 58, is a respected former human rights lawyer and political newcomer.

More here:

Rodrigo Duterte hands over 'war on drugs' to vice-president and critic - The Guardian

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on Rodrigo Duterte hands over ‘war on drugs’ to vice-president and critic – The Guardian

War on Drugs Meets War on Vaping–This Won’t End Well – Cato Institute

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Last summer, Brian Besser, Drug Enforcement Administration District Agent in charge of Utah, told reporters that Mexican drug cartels have all of a sudden gotten involved in this vape cartridge industry, and reasonably so, because they know they are going to make money off of it.

This makes sense. Prohibition incentivizesinnovations in the production and distribution of illicit substances to make detection more difficult. It is very hard to identify illicit drugs that are processed in liquid form and combined with scented juices in vaping cartridges.

On November 1, Agent Besser informed reporters of a DEA intelligence report stating illicit fentanyl is being found in bootleg vaping cartridges in various parts of the country, although not yet in Utah.

The Utah Department of Health reports more than 100 people have been hospitalized in the state for vaping-related illness, with one death. 90 percent of the patients admitted to using bootleg THC cartridges.

There is a grim lesson in this tragic intersection of the war on drugs with the war on vaping: prohibition kills.

Prohibition of marijuana promotes bootleg and homemade concoctions of THC vaping liquids sold in cartridges in the underground market, where they are often mixed with unsafe solvents. Prohibition of opioids causes innovativeand more deadlyways of producing and distributing the drugs.

Now Axios reports the Food and Drug Administration may announce plans next week to ban all flavored vaping products except for tobacco and menthol. Menthol and tobacco flavored liquids will remain legal because those flavors are believed to be more popular with adults than children.

But as I have written, flavored vaping cartridges are the preferred method of more than 90 percent of adults who use e-cigarettes to switch off of much more harmful tobacco smoking. This deprivesadult tobacco smokersof an effective means of harm reduction. And the sale of e-cigarettes to those under age 18 has been prohibited since 2016.

Minors who wish to vape are still managing to get their e-cigarettes in the underground market. Once flavored liquids are banned, diverted legal and regulated flavored vaping cartridges will no longer be one of thesources for their preferred kind of vaping. They will have to rely on bootleg vaping cartridges sold in the black market, which are fast becoming a new industry for Mexican drug cartels.

Illicit fentanyl is already the number one cause of opioid-related overdose deaths, comprising nearly 90 percent of opioid overdose deaths in places like Massachusetts.

If the FDA goes through with a ban on flavored vaping cartridges, expect news reports of an epidemic of vaping-related deaths in minors attributed to fentanyl.

More here:

War on Drugs Meets War on Vaping--This Won't End Well - Cato Institute

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on War on Drugs Meets War on Vaping–This Won’t End Well – Cato Institute

The War On Drugs 2.0: Vaping Is Officially In The DEA’s Crosshairs – The National Interest Online

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Last summer, Brian Besser, Drug Enforcement Administration District Agent in charge of Utah, told reporters that Mexican drug cartels have all of a sudden gotten involved in this vape cartridge industry, and reasonably so, because they know they are going to make money off of it.

This makes sense. Prohibition incentivizesinnovations in the production and distribution of illicit substances to make detection more difficult. It is very hard to identify illicit drugs that are processed in liquid form and combined with scented juices in vaping cartridges.

On November 1, Agent Besserinformed reportersof a DEA intelligence report stating illicit fentanyl is being found in bootleg vaping cartridges in various parts of the country, although not yet in Utah.

The Utah Department of Health reports more than 100 people have been hospitalized in the state for vaping-related illness, with one death. 90 percent of the patients admitted to using bootleg THC cartridges.

There is a grim lesson in this tragic intersection of the war on drugs with the war on vaping: prohibition kills.

Prohibition of marijuana promotes bootleg and homemade concoctions of THC vaping liquids sold in cartridges in the underground market, where they are often mixed with unsafe solvents. Prohibition of opioids causes innovativeand more deadlyways of producing and distributing the drugs.

NowAxiosreports the Food and Drug Administration may announce plans next week to ban all flavored vaping products except for tobacco and menthol. Menthol and tobacco flavored liquids will remain legal because those flavors are believed to be more popular with adults than children.

But as I havewritten, flavored vaping cartridges are the preferred method of more than 90 percent of adults who use e-cigarettes to switch off of much more harmful tobacco smoking. This deprivesadult tobacco smokersof an effective means of harm reduction. And the sale of e-cigarettes to those under age 18 has been prohibited since 2016.

Minors who wish to vape are still managing to get their e-cigarettes in the underground market. Once flavored liquids are banned, diverted legal and regulated flavored vaping cartridges will no longer be one of thesources for their preferred kind of vaping. They will have to rely on bootleg vaping cartridges sold in the black market, which are fast becoming a new industry for Mexican drug cartels.

Illicit fentanyl is already the number one cause of opioid-related overdose deaths, comprising nearly90 percentof opioid overdose deaths in places like Massachusetts.

If the FDA goes through with a ban on flavored vaping cartridges, expect news reports of an epidemic of vaping-related deaths in minors attributed to fentanyl.

This article first appeared at the Cato Institute.

Jeffrey A. Singer is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute and works in the Department of Health Policy Studies.

Image: Reuters.

The rest is here:

The War On Drugs 2.0: Vaping Is Officially In The DEA's Crosshairs - The National Interest Online

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on The War On Drugs 2.0: Vaping Is Officially In The DEA’s Crosshairs – The National Interest Online

Philippines VP accepts Duterte’s offer of post in drugs war – Reuters

Posted: at 10:45 pm

MANILA (Reuters) - The vice president of the Philippines on Wednesday accepted President Rodrigo Dutertes offer of a lead role in his brutal war on drugs, even though she expected her political rivals administration would try to thwart her progress.

FILE PHOTO: Philippines' Vice President Leni Robredo speaks during a Reuters interview, at the Quezon City Reception House, Metro Manila, Philippines December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Ezra Acayan

The appointment follows criticism by Leni Robredo in an interview with Reuters and subsequent media appearances, which angered Duterte, whose drugs crackdown has killed thousands and prompted activists to call for international intervention.

Allies had warned Robredo, who was elected separately and has an adversarial relationship with Duterte, that the offer of drugs tsar, or a joint chair of a panel on illegal drugs, was a trap to ensure her embarrassment and failure.

She said she was skeptical about Dutertes motives, but would take a chance.

I am against the killings of the innocent, I am against abuses committed by officials. He knows my criticism. He knows what I plan to fix, Robredo told a news conference.

If the president is thinking that I will keep quiet because I accepted the offer, he is wrong.

Dutertes loyalists had urged her to take the role, saying she had plenty of criticism and should put her ideas into practice.

Ronald dela Rosa, a policeman turned senator and former drugs war commander, said Robredo had a chance to impress.

This is the time for her to shine... I will pray for her success, he said on television.

The crackdown is popular among Filipinos, with a September opinion poll showing 82% of respondents believed it effective, although critics say it has been failed to curb addiction or drugs supply or rein-in drugs kingpins.

Activists accuse police of executions and cover-ups on a massive scale being ignored by the government. Police killed only in self-defense, the administration says.

In an Oct. 23 interview, Robredo said the death toll was too high and international help should be sought if the government kept tolerating abusive police.

On Wednesday, she said she had nothing to lose.

If could save at least one innocent life, my principles and heart are telling me I should give this a try, she said.

They are asking me if I am ready for this job? My question is: Are you ready for me?

Presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo said Robredo would be welcome in Dutertes cabinet.

Her acceptance shows she is smarter than her colleagues in the opposition, he said in a text message.

Additional reporting by Neil Jerome Morales; Editing by Robert Birsel and Clarence Fernandez

See more here:

Philippines VP accepts Duterte's offer of post in drugs war - Reuters

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on Philippines VP accepts Duterte’s offer of post in drugs war – Reuters

Kayla Bailey: End the war on drugs – Lewiston Sun Journal

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Its time to make peace with the longest-running war in our society today. How can our society be aware of such a problem, have access to resources, yet still implement punishment over treatment? When comparing treatment versus punishment it is evident that treatment saves money and lives while punishment most often creates a cycle of repeated abuse andincarceration.

Substance abuse is not a war to be won. Its a reality that its time we face.

The war on drugs has been going on for 105 years, in that time we have seen drug availability, drug use, overdose rates, incarceration for drug crimes, and costs to American taxpayers increase, so what exactly have we done in this war but be defeated time and time again? The costs to provide treatment over punishment is significantly less and has a much greater effect in reducing an individuals chance of re-entering the criminal justice system and overcoming substance abuse.

There is currently a bill in the Legislature, LD 1492, that has been implemented to reform drug sentencing laws. This bill would reduce sentencing laws for individuals convicted with drug offenses and ultimately reduce the cost to taxpayers. The current sentencing for drug offenses often does not fit the crime and only creates a path to future incarceration. Its time to ask ourselves what can we as a society do differently to fight this war, and realize that incarceration has done nothing.

Kayla Bailey, New Gloucester

Previous

Next

Read more from the original source:

Kayla Bailey: End the war on drugs - Lewiston Sun Journal

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on Kayla Bailey: End the war on drugs – Lewiston Sun Journal

Drug Sniffing Dogs: How Accurate Are They? Can They Smell Your Weed And Hash? – Benzinga

Posted: at 10:45 pm

By The Fresh Toast's Rudy Sanchez, provided exclusively to Benzinga Cannabis.

Some factors, such as breed and environment, can considerably lower the performance of dogs enlisted to serve in the war on drugs.

In retelling a story about being stopped by police while trafficking narcotics in 1994, Mr. Shawn Carter, better known as Jay-Z, describes a conversation where he tells the racial-profiling officer he does not consent to a search of his vehicle. The officer then calls for a drug detecting drug, and now that dog becomes one of Mr. Carters 99 problems. But a nosey dog finding Hovas hidden drugs was far from certain.

According to research conducted on the efficacy of drug sniffing canines, some factors, such as breed and environment, can considerably lower the performance of dogs enlisted to serve in the war on drugs.

Astudyby Polish researchers from the Department of Animal Behavior at the Institute of Genetics and Animal Breeding of the Polish Academy of Science, found that on average, dogs found hidden drugs correctly only 87.7% of the time, with false indications happening about 5% of the time, and in 7% of cases, the dogs were unable to find the hidden substances.

Photo by Deonny Rantetandung via Unsplash

The group found that German Shepherds were the top narc dog, while terriers, who are often used due to their small size, were poor performers. Dogs also performed better indoors than outdoors, while familiarity with room had no significant impact. Finding drugs outdoors or inside of a car were the most difficult tasks for Mans Best Friend; these drug sniffing dogs were only 58% accurate when searching within a car.

Some drugs can also leave residual odors that dogs do not distinguish from the actual presence of substances, with cannabis buds and hashish leaving thestrongestafter-odors, all dogs signaled the presence of hashish a day after it was removed from the location, and 80% did so after 48 hours.

Police dogs and their efficacy is often perceived as highly accurate and nearly infallible. K9s are also immune from racial and other biases, and agencies all over the world rely on their keen sense of smell to find hidden narcotics. Even if Fido isnt perfect, the studys researchers point out dogs are still the best tool for the job.

2019 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

Continue reading here:

Drug Sniffing Dogs: How Accurate Are They? Can They Smell Your Weed And Hash? - Benzinga

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on Drug Sniffing Dogs: How Accurate Are They? Can They Smell Your Weed And Hash? – Benzinga

The War On Drugs Isnt Over, According To The FBI – The Fresh Toast

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Here are two facts that, when read side by side, might hurt your brain. A 2018 study found no correlation between legalizing marijuana and crime rates, with some states, like California, actually experiencing a decrease in crime. However, crime is rising as it relates to marijuana in one respect: FBI data shows that marijuana arrests increased for the third consecutive year.

The War on Drugs, despite calls to treat drug addiction as a public health issue, is not over. As the New York Times highlights, drug-related arrests are on the rise once again following a nine-year decline. Arrests tied to drug possession have also increased for the past 30 years, from about 67% in 1989 to just over 86% in 2018. Small amounts of possession account for a large portion of these arrests, too.

An important note: The FBIs data is imperfect. The federal agency compiles data submitted from 18,586 agenciesat the federal, state, and local level. For 2018, only 16,659 jurisdiction sent in data. New York City was among the groups who did not submit.

The data contains another flawthe FBI only lists the most serious criminal offense in its arrest cause report. That means someone first apprehended for marijuana possession but who was later committed for something like aggravated assault would not be included in these drug-related arrest numbers.

Photo by FatCamera/Getty Images

The FBI plans to change that, however. In 2021, the agency will unveil its National Incident-Based Reporting System, which will track crime date on a more detailed level. For example, the amount of drug someone has on their possession when arrested will be recorded. That type of information could influence policymaking.

RELATED: Where In The Country Are You Most Likely To Be Arrested For Marijuana Possession?

Authors of a paper titled Sharks and Minnows in the War on Drugs: A Study of Quantity, Race and Drug Type in Drug Arrests used the FBI data in 2004, 2008, and 2012 to analyze 700,000 drug arrests. They found that 40% of all drug possession arrests were for trace amountsa quarter of a gram or less. Drug possession between a quarter gram and one gram accounted for another 20% of all arrests. That means a majority of all drug arrests from their analysis were for a gram or less.

A big issue, as the Times reported, is that local and state agencies still use arrest numbers as a mark of achievement. By arresting more people, the thinking goes, they are doing more work. But that line of thinking has become outdated in recent years by policymakers and academics alike. You may wonder what police do when the law eliminates drug possession as a cause for arrest.

As it turns out, they do better work. Following legalization in Vermont, the Burlington Police Department decreased roadside traffics stops by 70%; The Stanford Open Police Project reported that roadside searches were cut in half in Washington and Colorado post-legalization. As these arrests falls, a different 2018 study found that police in legal marijuana states made more arrests for violent crimes, burglaries, vehicular theft, and property crime.

RELATED: How Social Reform And Cannabis Legalization Are Linked

Our models show no negative effects of legalization and, instead, indicate that crime clearance rates for at least some types of crime are increasing faster in states that legalized than in those that did not, the researchers behind the study wrote.

See the rest here:

The War On Drugs Isnt Over, According To The FBI - The Fresh Toast

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on The War On Drugs Isnt Over, According To The FBI – The Fresh Toast

Why are hundreds dying in the ‘war on drugs’? – Open Access Government

Posted: at 10:45 pm

The 25-page report Killed in Crossfire: Allegations of Extrajudicial Executions in Bangladesh in the Guise of a War on Drugs reveals extensive allegations of enforced disappearance and evidence fabrication by law-enforcement agencies, with hundreds dying.

Reports of extrajudicial executions in Bangladesh have shot up since Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina launched an anti-drugs crackdown on 3 May 2018, with 52 people killed by law-enforcement agencies within just ten days of the announcement. In total, during 2018 there were 466 suspected extrajudicial executions in the country, more than three times the number recorded in 2017.

Instead of launching proper investigations into these killings, the authorities have allegedly sought to fabricate evidence to support their gunfights or crossfire claims. In interviews with Amnesty, supposed witnesses revealed that they had not seen the killings but were asked by the police to provide false statements supporting the police version of the deaths.All the victims of the supposed gunfights appear to have been forcibly disappeared by the police and the Rapid Action Battalion sometimes for up to six weeks prior to their bodies being discovered. When relatives sought information over their whereabouts, the authorities either denied they were in their custody or refused to say where they are.

Dinushika Dissanayake, Amnesty Internationals Deputy South Asia Director, said:

The war on drugs has led to the death of at least one person per day.

Wherever there has been involvement of the Rapid Action Battalion, it appears they have acted outside of the law the victims were not arrested, let alone put on trial.

The anti-drugs operations have spread terror in some of the countrys poorest neighbourhoods, where people fear the slightest suspicion of being involved in drug abuse may lead to their loved ones being subjected to another alleged extrajudicial execution.

These killings have taken place in the wider context of a blanket prohibition of drugsunder which the government has deliberately punished and violently attacked people, particularly those from the most marginalised communities.

The Bangladeshi authorities must put an end to these killings immediately.

Bangladeshi officials have routinely claimed that the victims of apparent extrajudicial executions were caught up in crossfire, where suspects fired the first shot at the members of law-enforcement agencies, forcing them to resort to lethal force.

Amnesty spoke to supposed witnesses who said that they were involuntarily taken to the crime scene only after the killings had taken place. One witness said:

We did not see anything. They called and took me with them to the location around 5.30am and asked me to witness what they were taking from there. I only saw a motorbike and nothing else.

At least five witnesses interviewed by Amnesty said that they were involuntarily taken to the spot after the incident. They said they could not refuse police requests to act as witnesses, fearing harsh consequences. Security forces took names, signatures, phone numbers and personal details of the witnesses.

Families repeatedly told Amnesty of how their relatives were killed following a gunfight with the Rapid Action Battalion. Rahim* was forcibly disappeared from the home of his in-laws. Eight days later, Rahims corpse was discovered, and the Rapid Action Battalion claimed he had died during a gunfight.

Bablu Mia* was forcibly disappeared from the street by two Rapid Action Battalion officers dressed in plainclothes, according to his brother, who filed a police complaint detailing the disappearance. A month-and-a-half later, the Rapid Action Battalion said that Bablu Mia had been killed in a gunfight.

Suleman*, a 35-year-old-man who lived with his young daughter in a thatched hut, was killed in what police said was a gunfight though his relatives say police attempted to extort money from them for his release from detention. Before his death, Suleman phoned a relative saying that police were demanding 20,000 takas (190) for his release. One of Sulemans family confirmed to Amnesty that he paid this sum, however police then allegedly demanded another 50,000 takas or else they will kill me, Suleman told the relative. Desperate to locate him, relatives went to a police station where they were told he had been transferred to prison. Three or four days after the phone call, they were told Suleman had died in a gunfight. This is how hundreds dying in Bangladesh live out their final hours.

Amnesty is calling on the Bangladesh authorities to carry out a prompt, impartial, independent and effective investigation into the wave of apparent extrajudicial executions and other human rights violations committed by the police and Rapid Action Battalion as part of its ongoing anti-drugs operations.

Amnesty documented a total of seven cases of alleged extrajudicial executions by visiting the locations of the incidents as well as interviewing 40 people including families of the victims, witnesses whose statements were coerced by law- enforcement agencies, people in the neighbourhood where the incidents happened, and human rights activists in Bangladesh.

Names have been changed (indicated by an asterisk) to protect the families of those concerned.

Editor's Recommended Articles

Link:

Why are hundreds dying in the 'war on drugs'? - Open Access Government

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on Why are hundreds dying in the ‘war on drugs’? – Open Access Government

100 Deaths a Day’: The Guardian Weekly dedicates its cover to the drug war in Mexico – The Yucatan Times

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Can anyone end the drug war in Mexico, asks The Guardian Weekly on the cover of this weeks magazine. In it, with red paint, appears the legend: 100 deaths a day.

This Wednesday, the British media shared the cover of the magazine that will be published on November 8. It will present an investigation into the roots of the battle against drug trafficking in Mexico.

The war on drugs that has paralyzed hundreds of thousands of Mexican lives for more than a decade shows few signs of slowing. The country witnesses nearly 100 murders related to drug gangs every day and the battle to stop the carnage that has been the ruin of the presidential administrations of Felipe Caldern and Enrique Pea Nieto, the magazines description points out.

It also notes that in the last presidential elections in 2018, President Andrs Manuel Lpez Obrador pledged to end the long war against the cartels by fighting the root of crime with social policy.

However, the magazine points out, almost 30,000 murders later, little progress has been made and a wave of high-profile attacks has shaken AMLOs government.

The Guardian Weekly will circulate after two events that have marked the national security agenda: the October 17 operation in Culiacn to try to arrest Ovidio Guzmn Lpez, son of capo Joaqun El Chapo Guzmn, and the attack on the LeBarn family in Sonora on Monday.

Regarding the first fact, the federal security secretary, Alfonso Durazo, indicated in various reports after the operation that Guzman Lopez was not formally arrested.

Meanwhile, according to Julin LeBarns statement Monday night, the murder of his relatives was perpetrated in three different attacks on three vehicles in which three women and minors were traveling.

Durazo said Tuesday that the group was traveling from Galeana, Chihuahua, to Bavispe, Sonora, in a convoy of vans when it was attacked by an armed group around 1:00 p.m. local time, he added.

In addition, he indicated that the final balance for the attack of the vans was nine people killed, mostly minors, and six children injured.

The Yucatan TimesNewsroom

comments

Continue reading here:

100 Deaths a Day': The Guardian Weekly dedicates its cover to the drug war in Mexico - The Yucatan Times

Posted in War On Drugs | Comments Off on 100 Deaths a Day’: The Guardian Weekly dedicates its cover to the drug war in Mexico – The Yucatan Times

Page 11234..1020..»