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Category Archives: Germ Warfare

Whats next after coronavirus? (letter to the editor) – SILive.com

Posted: July 21, 2020 at 11:45 am

It bothers me and lots of Americans, what happened to our great country. I do not know why the current administration is not clearly telling the American people who is responsible for this pandemic.

We only hear that China did all of this.

I was wondering, when all this happened, where was our intelligence community?

The whole world is suffering and people are dying right and left, why isnt there an investigation to find who is responsible for destroying the human race?

People had no experience with this kind of suffering. It is the responsibility of all those countries who have germ warfare labs to completely destroy these machines who are killing people. All these nukes are obsolete.

Now we are entering into a new era. It is in the best interest of all the countries who are making nuclear weapons and these warfare germs to destroy them completely and spend money for the humanity of the world so people can have a better life and clean water to drink.

I am wondering if this coronavirus is a natural disaster or an economic or political game among superpowers. I guess we will never know, as up until now we do not know who killed John F. Kennedy, who did 9/11 and who is doing this corona. I guess we have to live with these conspiracy theories. If this virus is doing human to human transmission, I hope the next virus after corona will not be airborne.

All these economic disasters have to be investigated, and those people or countries responsible should be punished to the fullest extent, so we can all live a normal life.

(Dr. Mohammad Khalid is a Todt Hill resident.)

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Did America Use Bioweapons in Korea? Nicholson Baker Tried to Find Out – The New York Times

Posted: at 11:45 am

To my nonscientists eye. Similar caveats we may never have incontrovertible proof, its remotely possible, though perhaps eternally unprovable, we may never know, its at least possible, will we ever know?, let me just blurt out what I think happened, etc. infest Bakers narrative, usually preceded or followed by wild accusations (and, occasionally, by a sign of self-awareness: I lay in bed some of today reading more of this book, hating it, excited by it, embarrassed by it).

At times, the book is framed as a deliberate challenge to the intelligence community: I could be completely wrong. The only way to prove me wrong is by declassifying the entire document. But this is not how a historian proceeds. Again and again, Baker bristles with anger over actions that were seriously contemplated by the C.I.A., other intelligence agencies and the military but never undertaken. I felt trembly and disgusted at the same time, he writes of Operation Sphinx, a proposal to gas millions of Japanese from the air during World War II. Its a horrible and disillusioning thing to know that your own country was passing around a paper like Sphinx in the Pentagon. Really? To know that in a brutal war men thought brutal things?

At another point, he questions the long, interesting, confusing letter he got from Floyd ONeal, one of some 30 captured American airmen and Marines who confessed to germ-warfare bombing in Korea. ONeals confession is surprising and moving, though, whether or not its true, Baker tells us. ONeal recanted completely after he was released, and writes in his letter of sustaining torture so awful he still wont describe it to Baker more than 50 years later: What they did for the next days I dont care to discuss but I finally agreed to sign their confession. There is nothing surprising or moving about a coerced confession, save for ONeals ability to endure the price it exacted.

Baker concedes that Americans individually have done good things, a gesture followed by a banal list that includes sunglasses, topiary, no-hitters and the midcentury New Yorker. Yes, and also little baby ducks and old pickup trucks. This is another affectation of virtue, not a moral argument.

I share Bakers disgust with all the crazy, wasteful, illegal, counterproductive and murderous things the C.I.A. has done, and no doubt continues to do. Hell, I even like dogs. Bakers Olympian worldview, though, takes him to almost the same place he landed in Human Smoke, his paste-up 2008 history of the road to World War II: immobilized by purity and concluding that we should never have intervened, even to stop the Nazis. Americans are neither beasts nor angels, just human beings trying to forge our way through the murky moral choices this world poses. To pretend otherwise is perhaps the worst deception of all.

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The Politics of Pandemics – NewsClick

Posted: at 11:45 am

Representational image. | Image Courtesy: UZreport.uz

When we think of epidemics, smallpox comes to mind, but we remember it as a disease which was successfully eradicated by a vaccine; but it was also a virus used as a weapon for biological warfare 33 years before the vaccine was invented.

In India, we have grown up listening to stories of dreaded diseases and every family has a memory of some epidemic or the other. The most dreaded was the smallpox, a disease for which the only cure seemed to be desperate prayers to Sheetla Mata, the goddess of smallpox'.

Smallpox was one of the deadliest diseases known to humans and it affected people around the globe. But the history of smallpox holds a unique place in the history of medical sciences; it is the only human disease to have been eradicated by vaccination.

The smallpox vaccine was the first successful vaccine to be developed. It was introduced by Edward Jenner (1749-1823. He observed that milkmaids, who previously had caught cowpox, did not catch smallpox.

The global eradication effort initially used a strategy of mass vaccination campaigns to achieve 80% vaccine coverage in each country, and thereafter by case-finding, followed by ring vaccination of all known and possible contacts to seal off the outbreak from the rest of the population.

The vaccine was discovered in 1796 and in 1980 the World Health Organisation (WHO) announced that the disease had been successfully eradicated from the world.

While so much effort had gone into the eradication of the dreaded disease, there were some people who saw the smallpox as a weapon for war; a weapon to defeat their enemies. In other words, smallpox was used as a biological weapon.

Sir Jeffrey Amherst, the commander of the British forces in North America, deliberately used smallpox to diminish the native American population hostile to the British. An outbreak of smallpox in Fort Pitt provided Amherst with the means to execute his plan. On June 24, 1763, Captain Ecuyer, one of Amhersts subordinate officers, gifted the Native Americans with smallpox-infected blankets from the smallpox hospital. He recorded in his journal: I hope it will have the desired effect. As a result, a large outbreak of smallpox occurred among the Native American tribes in the Ohio River Valley.

This was not the first use of a biological weapon in history and unfortunately not the last.

Biological warfare (BW)also known as germ warfarehas been defined as the use of biological toxins or infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, insects, and fungi with the intent to kill or incapacitate humans, animals or plants as an act of war. The use of biological weapons is prohibited under customary international humanitarian law, as well as several international treaties. The use of biological agents in armed conflict is a war crime.

Biological warfare was banned by the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). The Convention was the result of prolonged efforts by the international community to establish a new instrument that would supplement the 1925 Geneva Protocol, which prohibits the use but not possession or development of chemical and biological weapons.

The same year the Convention was passed by the United Nations, a young scientist-turned-journalist by the name of Dr K S Jayaraman (born 1936) read about some strange experiments on mosquito control being conducted in villages outside Delhi.

When Jayaraman contacted Rajendra Pal in WHO about the project since the international organisation was associated with it, he was told that there were orders from the WHO Director-General not to discuss the project with the Indian press. Dr. Pal showed Jayaraman a confidential letter addressed to Mr. Willard at WHO regional office in Delhi which said the project is considered sensitive to the Indian Press.

Jayaraman left the room, telling Dr. Pal that under these conditions, he could only write what he knew and the WHO Director-Generals injunction to keep Genetic Control Mosquito Unit (GCMU) out of the Indian press.

At this point Dr. Pal invited the correspondent back again and agreed to an interview. The interview ended with the first question of Jayaraman, namely, the reason why GCMU was studying yellow fever mosquitoes instead of malarial mosquitoes. As everyone knows, India does not have yellow fever.

Jayaraman was the science correspondent for the Press Trust of India, which was headed at the time by the formidable C Raghavan. I remember clearly that Raghavan had come to see my father, who had just retired from the Prime Ministers Office, to tell him about these experiments.

A Google search revealed that the New Scientist of October 9, 1975, carried a news report with a headline: Germ War allegations force WHO out of Indian mosquito project

The report stated: The PAC report declares that the Genetic Control of Mosquitoes Research Unit (GCMRU) project has been ill conceived and is of no utility whatsoever to India. It does, however, have a vital and direct bearing on biological warfare or is likely that the ultimate and only beneficiary of the GLMO experiment is the US machine.

However, the original PAC reports cannot be found on the internet so I wrote to Raghavan, now more than 90 years old, to ask whether my memory was right and he had indeed told my father about these bizarre experiments.

We did some extensive investigations - the PTI Science Correspondent, K.S.Jayaraman, and I - and did an expose of several foreign-funded "research" activities in India, most US-funded (PL-480 funds), and with some military significance, including biological warfare. We were denounced in Parliament by Health Minister Karan Singh, but inquiries by two Public Accounts Committees, vindicated us. I am attaching summary of their findings.

The PAC report is very lengthy but the first paragraph of the Conclusions shows how extensive were the experiments which were being conducted and how many institutions were involved in the projects under the auspices of the WHO.

7.1.1. The examination by the Committee of some of the research projects in the country conducted in collaboration with foreign organisations raise a number of interesting questions. The Committee find that the Genetic Control of Mosquitoes Unit Project, the bird migration and arbovirus studies at the Bombay Natural History Society, the Ultra Low Volume Spray experiments for Urban malaria control at Jodhpur, the Pantnagar Microbial Pesticides Project and some of the research projects undertaken in West Bengal and Nargwal in collaboration with the John Hopkins University establish beyond doubt a definite pattern. This is that agencies of foreign governments, in some cases explicitly military agencies of those governments (as in the case of the collaboration between the Bombay Natural History Society and the Miugratory Animal Pathological Survey - MAPS - of the United States Armed Forces Institute of Pathology have been conducting basic research through Indian scientists and Indian scientific organisations.

Even in cases where such research is carried out in collaboration with philanthropic civilian organisations from abroad, the Committee find that some of these civilian organisations also have active liaison and communication at several levels with military agencies. No doubt, some of these research programmes have been shown as developmental or basic research. These projects, however, have been closely concerned with the collection of vital viral, epidemiological or ecological data, which are well capable of being used against the security of the country and that of our neighbouring countries.

The utility of some of these projects to India, especially the Genetic Control of Mosquitoes Unit project seems to be only doubtful or potential, whereas the primary data obtained from these projects are likely to be of vital importance to foreign governments interested in developing techniques of chemical, biological, bacteriological, herbicdal and anti-subversive warfare.

These revelations exposed the Ministry of Healths complicity in these projects. The Minister of Health at the time was Karan Singh.

Among the documents Raghavan sent to me was a letter from Jyotirmoy Basu (CPI(M) Member of Parliament) to Prime Minister Indira Gandhi which was an annexure to the PAC report.

Letter from PAC Chairman, Jyotirmoy Basu, to Prime Minister of India, vide para 2 above (PAC167-p225)

New Delhi, 31st January, 1975

Dear Mrs. Gandhi

The G.C.M.U. Programme has given rise to serious suspicion in my mind. I have tried to collect information from various unconnected sources and I have come to the conclusion that this programme has been financed by P.L.480 for execution through WHO and is primarily meant for the three things mentioned below:

(1) To carry on certain experiments in India which are harmful to the population and which are not allowed to be done in their own country i.e. U.S.A.

(2) They are experimenting and keeping things in readiness in case the U.S.A. Government ever wanted to wage a chemical, bacteriological or virus warfare against this country.

(3) To prepare themselves to wage a chemical, bacteriological or virus warfare against another country keeping India as base.

The agreement between P.L.480 Fund Administrator and W.H.O. has expired on 31 December 1974. In spite of that this is continuing and out of these experiments all the results and findings will be the property of U.S. Government. To make sure that this does not progress any more, I am writing this because I am very apprehensive of this programme and I am doing in the best interests of the country and the people.

I earnestly suggest that a thorough probe should be done by the most competent Intelligence Agency at your command.

Yours sincerely,

(Jyotirmoy Basu)

Mrs. Indira Gandhi

Prime Minister of India

New Delhi.

Because of the timely intervention and persistence of several journalists, including Raghavan and Jayaraman, the projects were wound up. But research in biological warfare, no doubt, continues and the threat it poses is greater today than it was in 1975.

There have been many conspiracy theories suggesting that the novel coronavirus is linked to biological warfare. There are many conspiracy theories, some even link US tech magnate Bill Gates to having an interest in the spread of the virus. A briefing prepared for the European Parliament in April 2020 alleged that Russia and China are driving parallel information campaigns, conveying the overall message that democratic state actors are failing and that European citizens cannot trust their health systems.... to undermine democratic debate.

The report comes as Hungary an EU member state faces criticism for preparing a national survey that includes a question on a coronavirus crisis proposal by investor George Soros that experts say will force nations into debt slavery.

In the national consultation due to be mailed to all Hungarian citizens, the government asks whether people should reject George Soross plan, which would in-debt our homeland for an unforeseeable long time.

According to Rasem 'Abidat, an activist of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) and a columnist for the Palestinian daily, Al-Quds, based in East Jerusalem, the coronavirus is a biological weapon that the US and Israel decided to employ against China and Iran after failing to harm them by conventional means.

At this stage we do not know if any of these claims have any truth. But we do know that it is a pathogen dispersed globally though free trade and international travel. But this we do know that even if the pandemics effect on the world isnt a conventional attack on government targets or the military, its a widespread and indiscriminate attack on global citizens and the economy. This outbreak has directly impacted the lives of billions of people, making it the most effective model for future terrorist activities and a new model for circumventing the conventions of modern warfare.

Governments across the globe are using the pandemic to lower labour standards, wipe out human rights of millions of people and mobilising fear to equip themselves with powers of control and surveillance over entire population. The vaccine, when it comes, will have no way to protect us against the authoritarian measures put in place by democratic governments.

Nandita Haksaris a human rights lawyer, teacher, campaigner and writer. The views are personal.

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The Politics of Pandemics - NewsClick

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Ed Hardin: Get ready to face that football isn’t happening this fall – Roanoke Times

Posted: at 11:45 am

What about this are we missing?

Does anyone in his right mind think were going to unleash our children upon each other in two-hour contests of germ warfare? Were going to let high school and college students slam into each other in a toxic cocktail of sweat, blood and spit and pretend its safe?

Stop it. Its not happening. Were better than this.

In Missouri, where parents and youth coaches have thrown their kids back onto playing fields, health officials now say a rise in coronavirus cases among youth aged 10 to 19 is the primary source of COVID-19 spreading into the community.

Colleges from Chapel Hill to Clemson to Alabama and yes, LSU, are reporting shocking numbers of positive cases among football players. And at fraternities across the South and in college bars across the country, outbreaks are being reported every day.

All this before the students even return to campus.

We seem frozen by an inability to do the right thing.

Its time the adults started acting like adults.

The NFL seems hell-bent on its players playing the role of guinea pigs if not lemmings, willing to die if not kill, to play football. We know what thats about, and it has nothing to do with the health and welfare of the workers.

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Stranger than fiction: Did the CIA conduct secret mosquito experiments in India in the 1970s? – Scroll.in

Posted: at 11:45 am

In an era of post-truth and scepticism about information, especially on social media, I have been taken aback to realise how many people believe the Bill Gates microchip conspiracy theory. Fanned by people who oppose vaccinations, the theory maintains that the coronavirus pandemic is part of a plan to implant trackable microchips in humans and that the Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is behind it.

The claim was widespread enough for the BBC to do an article to debunk it. It quoted the the head of the Russian Communist party, who, without mentioning Gates, said that globalists supported a covert mass chip implantation which they may in time resort to under the pretext of a mandatory vaccination against coronavirus.

The BBC failed to ask the Russian Communist Party head on what basis he had made his outlandish claims. After all, the Cold War has not quite ended and Russian claims can be dismissed just as easily as the claims made by Soviet Union in the Cold War era.

In his book in 1995, Vasili Mitrokhin, the Soviet spy who defected to Britain with volumes of secrets, said that the greatest successes of the Soviet Unions measures in India was the impact of bogus conspiracies attributed to the Central Intelligence Agency planted by the KGB.

Among them was a story about the United States being responsible for the Aids virus. It was first published in the Patriot, a leftist daily, in early 1980s and then spread around the world.

India under Indira Gandhi was also probably the arena for more KGB-active measures than anywhere else in the world, Mitrokhin said.

But not all such conspiracy stories could be dismissed so easily. There were other stories that proved to be true and terrifying. Listening recently to videos of the controversial Indian-American figure Shiva Ayyadurai pushing the conspiracy theory that the coronavirus was being spread by Americas deep state, I remember the day I heard of a strange experiment with mosquitoes being carried out by the Americans in India.

I did not know how to contact him. But to my utter amazement I suddenly received an email from him, more than 40 years since we had met. Raghavan had written to congratulate me on an article I had written. He was now over 90. On impulse I asked him whether my memory of the story about yellow fever was true. He replied promptly.

I was sitting in my fathers study sometime in 1974. My father, a bureaucrat, was secretary to Prime Minister Indira Gandhi at the time. The study was air-conditioned and lined with books. It was in this room that I heard many stories of covert operations. That day, a young journalist came by and told my father of a strange experiment with mosquitoes being conducted right near Palam airport, as Delhi airport was then called.

The man said it was an experiment on yellow fever. But we dont have yellow fever in India, my father had exclaimed. The journalist said that this was exactly his point. He claimed it was a part of a biological warfare experiment. We all sat in shocked silence.

The journalists name is Chakravarti Raghavan and he went on to become the head of the Press Trust of India.

During the Emergency, he opposed the measures taken by Indira Gandhi and he left India. A Google search showed that he had been living in Geneva since 1978 and was editor emeritus of the South-North Development Monitor, covering trade, finance and development issues.

Raghavan had a solid reputation. Journalist Chitra Subramaniam described him in these words: Chakravarti Raghavan is to trade and development issues what Amitabh Bachchan is to world of Indian cinema god.

We did some extensive investigations the PTI Science Correspondent KS Jayaraman and I and did an expose of several foreign-funded research activities in India, most US-funded...and with some military significance, including biological warfare, Raghavan wrote. We were denounced in Parliament by Health Minister Karan Singh, but inquiries by two Public Accounts Committees, vindicated us. I am attaching a summary of their findings.

Raghavan said that he and his colleague started digging into the story when my father was working at the Prime Ministers Office and Ashok Parthasarathy was the scientific advisor. He said that my father asked the Intelligence Bureau, the Research and Analysis Wing and Military Intelligence to meet with him and Jayaraman.

By the time Raghavan wrote the story, my father was out of the Prime Ministers Office, at the Planning Commission. ...Sanjay [Gandhi] and Gang were in control, with the US and its CIA local boss Kreisberg close to Sanjay, Raghanan wrote. We stuck to our guns; and though Indira was angry with me, she still did act, and ultimately the projects were wound up.

Raghavan said that he was now too old to keep at the story. Jayaraman was planning to put some of the past material together and get it all published, he said. But he himself, after some heart problems, has had to go slow.

He also gave me contact details of the persons concerned; perhaps thinking I would follow up the story. But I am not so young either and no longer an aspiring journalist. Despite this, I felt we, as a country needed to be reminded of it. But I needed to confirm the story from another reliable source.

A Google search revealed that the New Scientist of October 9, 1975, carried a news report with a headline: Germ War allegations force WHO out of Indian mosquito project. The report said, The PAC [Public Accounts Committee] report declares that the Genetic Control of Mosquitoes Research Unit [GCMRU] project has been ill conceived and is of no utility whatsoever to India. It does, however, have a vital and direct bearing on biological warfare or is likely that the ultimate and only beneficiary of the GLMO experiment is the US machine.

And then, quite by accident, I discovered a slim volume, Raising Hackles, edited by Dinesh C Sharma published in April 2020. The book celebrates Jayaraman as a pioneering science journalist rather than documenting his actual investigation. But it is a valuable contribution nonetheless.

The Public Accounts Committee report from 1975 is too long to reproduce but the first section in the summary brings out the extent of the involvement of scientists and scientific institutions involved in this diabolical project:

7.1.1. The examination by the Committee of some of the research projects in the country conducted in collaboration with foreign organisations raise a number of interesting questions.

The Committee find that the Genetic Control of Mosquitoes Unit Project, the bird migration and arbovirus studies at the Bombay Natural History Society, the Ultra Low Volume Spray experiments for Urban malaria control at Jodhpur, the Pantnagar Microbial Pesticides Project and some of the research projects undertaken in West Bengal and Nargwal in collaboration with the John Hopkins University establish beyond doubt a definite pattern.

This is that agencies of foreign governments, in some cases explicitly military agencies of those governments (as in the case of the collaboration between the Bombay Natural History Society and the Migratory Animal Pathological Survey MAPS of the United States Armed Forces Institute of Pathology have been conducting basic research through Indian scientists and Indian scientific organisations.

Even in cases where such research is carried out in collaboration with philanthropic civilian organisations from abroad, the Committee find that some of these civilian organisations also have active liaison and communication at several levels with military agencies. No doubt, some of these research programmes have been shown as developmental or basic research.

These projects, however, have been closely concerned with the collection of vital viral, epidemiological or ecological data, which are well capable of being used against the security of the country and that of our neighbouring countries.

The utility of some of these projects to India, especially the Genetic Control of Mosquitoes Unit project, seems to be only doubtful or potential, whereas the primary data obtained from these projects are likely to be of vital importance to foreign governments interested in developing techniques of chemical, biological, bacteriological, herbicdal and anti-subversive warfare.

There is a paragraph on the experiment being carried out in Delhi:

7.1.20. The selection of Delhi for field studies on Culex Fatigans is also shrouded in mystery. The Committee finds from the comments of the then Director, National Institute of Communicable Diseases, furnished in 1968, on the WHO proposal of the GCMU project that the Director had observed that the criteria for the selection of Delhi area are not known.

Reading about the coronavirus conspiracy theories reminded me of the mosquito experiment. At this time, those who believe in conspiracy theories turn to quacks and others become gullible victims of conmen offering ancient cures.

Many scientists and scientific institutions are compromised by politics of profits. We must continuously expose these vested interests without giving up on the gains of modern science and what it has to offer by way of cures and containment of coronavirus and indeed many other diseases.

It is a battle between politics for profits and politics for the people; not a battle between science and religion.

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James Bond movies in order of release from Dr. No to No Time To Die – The Sun

Posted: at 11:45 am

NO Time To Die marks the 25th James Bond film in the franchise.

We have put together the comprehensive chronological list of Bond movies so you know what order to binge-watch them in. Why not? You only live twice.

26

26

Dr. No is the first-ever Bond movie, based on the Ian Fleming book of the same name.

It introduces Sean Connery in the iconic role.

James Bondis sent toJamaicato investigate the disappearance of a fellow British agent. He finds the underground base ofDr No, who is plotting to disrupt an American space launch with a radio beam weapon.

26

Seeking revenge againstJames Bondfor defeating their agentDr. No,international criminal organisationSPECTREassigns Irish assassin Donald "Red" Grant to kill him.

The sequel had a much larger budget than Dr No, which can be seen in its array of exotic filming locations.

26

Goldfinger is arguably the most iconic Bond theme song, sung by the legend Shirley Bassey.

After destroying adrug laboratoryinLatin America,James Bond travels toMiami for a vacation. He receives instructions from Mto observe bullion dealerAuric Goldfinger and his manservant Oddball.

26

James must save the world from the one-eyed evil mastermind Emilio Largo.

The terrorist group SPECTRE hijacks two warheads from a NATO plane and threatens widespread nuclear destruction to extort 100 million pounds.

26

James Bond is sent to investigate the hijacked NASA spacecraft, Jupiter 16.

The Americans think that the Russians are involved in the hijacking, but the British believe that the Japanese are somehow behind it.

26

Bond, now played by George Lazenby, and Tracy Di Vicenzo team up to take down SPECTRE in the Swiss Alps.

Blofeld is putting together a germ warfare plot that could kill millions.

26

Sean Connery reprised his role as James Bond after refusing to star in On Her Majesty's Secret Service.

James Bond infiltrates a Las Vegas diamond-smuggling ring in a bid to foil a plot to target Washington with a laser in space.

26

Roger Moore takes on the role as agent 007 for Live and Let Die.

Bond investigates the murders of three fellow agents.

James has a bounty put on him and has to fight off many trained assassins as he closes in on powerful Kananga, who is making his fortune selling heroine.

26

Bond searches for a stolen invention that can turn the sun's heat into a destructive weapon.

He crosses paths with hitman Francisco Scaramanga whose weapon of choice is (you guessed it) a golden gun.

26

Bond unites with sexy Russian agent Anya Amasova to defeat shipping magnate Karl Stromberg and his right-hand man Jaws, who are threatening to destroy New York City with nuclear weapons.

26

The eleventh Bond instalment takes the agent to Venice, Rio De Janeiro and outer space.

When Bond investigates the hijacking of an American space shuttle, he soon comes up against Hugo Drax, an industrialist who plots to destroy all human lif on earth.

26

James Bond is sent to recover a strategic communications device before it finds its way into the hands of the Russians. Roger Moore on set with Carole Bouquet

The secret device that controls Britain's Polaris submarines goes missing after the spy ship carrying it sinks.

26

James Bond is assigned to solve the murder of agent 009, killed in East Germany clutching a fake Faberg egg.

The trail leads to India, where an enigmatic woman operates a smuggling ring under the cover of a travelling circus.

26

After recovering a microchip from the body of a deceased colleague in Russia, James Bond discovers that the technology has the potential to kill.

Investigating further, Bond is led to Max Zorin, the head of Zorin Industries and his bodyguard May Day.

26

Timothy Dalton takes on the iconic role in The Living Daylights

James Bond helps KGB officer Georgi Koskov defect from Russia.

During his debriefing, Koskov reveals that a policy of assassinating defectors has been instated. As Bond explores this threat, a counterplot surfaces, involving a shady American arms dealer.

26

James Bond disobeys his orders and goes on a mission of revenge when his best friend's wife is killed by a drug baron.

A CIA pilot flies him to Sanchez's South American headquarters where disguised as a hitman, Bond is hired by the villainous drug dealer.

26

GoldenEye is Pierce Brosnan's first Bond movie.

James Bond must defeat a former ally-turned-enemy Alec Trevelyan AKA Agent 006 when a powerful satellite system falls into his hands.

26

Media mogul Elliot Carver wants his news empire to reach every country on the globe, but the Chinese government will not allow him to broadcast there.

Carver doesn't take no for an answer and plans to use his media empire to fuel flames of war between the Western world and China.

26

Bond must race to defuse an international power struggle with the world's oil supply hanging in the balance, with the help of nuclear weapons expert Dr. Christmas Jones.

He must battle Renard, who has a bullet lodged in his brain rendering him unable to feel pain.

26

James Bond is captured by North Korean agents. Once he's finally released, he is convinced that someone in his own agency betrayed him. Bond travels to Cuba, hot on the heels of Zao, the agent who put Bond behind bars.

Meanwhile, he uncovers a scheme concocted by Zao and British millionaire Graves, involving a highly destructive laser.

26

James Bond heads to Madagascar, where he uncovers a link to Le Chiffre, a man who finances terrorist organizations.

Learning that Le Chiffre plans to raise money in a high-stakes poker game, MI6 sends Bond to play against him.

26

Following the death of Vesper Lynd, James Bond makes his next mission personal. The hunt for those who blackmailed his lover leads him to ruthless businessman Dominic Greene, a key player in the organization which coerced Vesper.

Bond learns that Greene is plotting to gain total control of a vital natural resource.

26

Undercover agents around the world are exposed, and MI6 is attacked, forcing M to relocate the agency. With MI6 now compromised inside and out, M can only trust Bond, whose previous mission had gone horribly wrong.

Bond follows a trail to Silva, a man from M's past who wants to settle an old score.

26

James Bond travels to Mexico City and Rome. After infiltrating a secret meeting, 007 uncovers the existence of the sinister organisation SPECTRE.

As Bond ventures toward the heart of SPECTRE, he discovers a chilling connection between himself and his enemy.

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26

No Time To Die comes out later this year.

The plot summary reads: "Recruited to rescue a kidnapped scientist, globe-trotting spy James Bond finds himself hot on the trail of a mysterious villain, who's armed with a dangerous new technology."

Continued here:

James Bond movies in order of release from Dr. No to No Time To Die - The Sun

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Recovering From COVID-19- The Long Road Ahead – Forbes India

Posted: June 17, 2020 at 12:42 am

Image: Shutterstock

It's time to forget the world as we knew it. What Covid-19has offered us is the opportunity to think long term. It will be a pity to let the crisis go waste.

It is evident that Covid-19 will transform the world in tectonic ways, just likeWorld War 2 brought in major cultural and economic transformation like new technologies and business models, including accelerated entry of women into the industrial complex as labour. Unfortunately, we are on shaky ground, because a large part of decision making is based on past examples and comparatives; past precedents will not guide our trajectory in the technology and knowledge-driven society of today. I am confident we will find viable new decision making models.

I shall focus on healthcare and pharma as together, they are one of the largest employers in the organised sector and will play a vital role in the post Covid-19 world. Like most countries, the pandemic has exposed serious lacunae and at the same time great opportunities for India.

1. Reimagining Healthcare Policy: In India, you cannot win an election by talking about health. Hence, our healthcare policies are non-existent or at best, archaic. But, as Bill Gates says, it is time we plan and practice our capability and preparedness with regular germ warfare games (just like military war games) with proper command structure. In the future, the greatest threat to the country or humanity will less likely come from war or nuclear bombs, but from germs. There have been three near-pandemics (Sars, Mers, Ebola) and one pandemic (Covid-19) within just 20 years. Hence,

a. We must change the archaic MCI rules to bring medical education standards to the 21st century, and allow private hospitals to give training like elsewhere in the world. This will bring down the cost of medical education drastically and increase manpower without any additional spend by the government. Our ratio of 0.7 doctors per 1,000 population is among the lowest in the world; and is primarily because of outdated rules restricting medical education and extremely high cost of private medical education.

b. As per WHO, India stands at 184 out of 190 countries in terms of healthcare spending as a percent of GDP, with a measly 1.15 percent of GDP spent bygovernment on healthcare; another 2.4 percent of the healthcare spending tab is taken up by the private sector or out of pocket expense. This pushes millions to bankruptcy from healthcare-related debts. On an urgent basis, thegovernment healthcare spending must increase substantially with the largest provision in the healthcare budget reserved for prevention and public health including building infrastructure.

c. Technology has changed the definition of teaching, including the number of teachers required. This should substantially improve quality, reach and as I have mentioned earlier, the cost of healthcare education.

d. We have to improve the ease of doing business and allow medical innovation to become mainstream. India is 63rd on the ease of doing business rankings among 190 countries, despite the fact that we are the home of IITs, IT and jugaad.

e. Of the total spending on healthcare, only seven percent is spent on preventive healthcare, while more than 80 percent is spent on treatment and cure as of FY17 (National Health Accounts). This has to change.

2. Building Capacity: This will be in the areas of infrastructure and manpower both.

While we always knew we were not equipped to handle a pandemic, Covid-19 has laid our failings threadbare.

The government cannot pass on the role to the private sector and has to spend more on health. Only 1/3rd of hospital beds are located in rural areas to serve 69 percent population, while 75 percent beds are in the private sector mostly in urban or semi urban areas. About 65 percent of all health expenditure in India (approx. 2.5 percent of GDP) is borne privately by households, despite the fact that they cannot afford private healthcare. In the post-Covid world, we need a robust public health system with private healthcare providers playing a secondary role. The government has to build more public hospitals and focus more on health management, rather than disease management.

Not only do we have a serious shortage of doctors but equally the shortage of other paramedical and technical staff like nurses, pharmacists, laboratory technicians, etc., to manage various functions of the hospital. We need to create training programmes for them, which will also help solve the unemployment crisis.

The good thing is that in India, every family wants to make their child a doctor. We should turn this sentiment into a massive opportunity and open up medical education to fill the massive need of doctors.

3. Boosting Manufacturing:There is a palpable boycott-China sentiment the world over, which India can turn to its advantage, to become the healthcare manufacturing hub to the world. Unfortunately, even today, much of the key equipment for the Covid-19 crisistesting kits, personal protective equipment, ventilators, masksall come from China. We have only 25,000 ventilators in the country, whereas the requirement is ten times that. This could be a huge fillip to good quality Indian manufacturing.

India is totally dependent on China for 70 percent import of APIs; even as common a medicine like paracetamol is 100 percent imported from China. This is in contrast to the fact that pharma has been a silent winner for India.

We are the worlds largest supplier of generic drugs and control around 18 percent of the global market. India accounts for about 10 percent of worlds pharmaceutical production by volume but only 1.5 percent by value. This can change in a post-Covid-19 world. In fact, Doctors Without Borders, a humanitarian organisation, estimates that treatment of AIDS using generic Indian drugs is two to three times cheaper as compared to treatment using branded drugs.

Without health for all there is no progress.

One good thing that has come out of this horrible pandemic and all this suffering, is that finally, everyone is realising the importance of healthcare and application of technology like tele-health, telemedicine, remote connectivity and communication.

The old adage health is wealth stares at us in the face as we have to ramp up on the four pillarsnutrition, immunisation, prevention and adequate public healthcare facilities to build a post-CovidIndia.

The writeris Cardiovascular Thoracic Surgeon, Vice Chairman & Managing Director at Asian Heart Institute, Mumbai

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Recovering From COVID-19- The Long Road Ahead - Forbes India

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In Williamsville, old favorites and new keep tradition alive – Buffalo News

Posted: June 1, 2020 at 3:10 am

After a fruitless hour of research, I cannot tell you whether the Haudenosaunee operated any sort of kitchen operation where the trail met the creek in the present-day Village of Williamsville. Most of the time since European settlers showed up, though, this stretch has rarely lacked places dedicated to feeding and watering locals and passers-by alike.

Pondering two centuries of good cheer and grub helped ground me after a head-spinning week of trying to imagine how restaurants are supposed to survive at half speed while training their staff as germ warfare combatants.

One bite of Ross Warhols ramp kimchi cheesesteak ($14) at BriteSmith Brewery (5611 Main St., 650-4080) knocked all that right out of my noggin for now. Restaurant types are reassuringly good at figuring things out.

Like how to griddle a pillowy split-top roll in butter lobster-roll style, and fill it with an original composition: sweet sesame-scented bulgogi-ish braised beef short rib chopped with American cheese, crowned with fermented pickle heavy with ramps and wild forest onions. The collision of melty richness and tang made me glad to be alive.

BriteSmith Brewing's ramp kimchi cheesesteak. (Andrew Galarneau/Buffalo News)

Choices of BriteSmiths wood-fired Neapolitan-style pizzas ($13-$19) run from margherita to three-meat, with a lobster number ($18) over garlic cream, fontina and chives. Sunday brunch features craggy apple fritters ($6) and chicken with cheddar-chive waffles ($18) and chile-honey butter.

Across the street, Eagle House (5578 Main St., 632-7669) is on the other end of the spectrum. As the area's oldest restaurant approaches 200 years in service, its comfort food-centered menu has never seemed more of the moment.

The rare Welsh rarebit ($11, $14 with bacon) makes its home here. A thick sauce built on beer and extra-sharp Canadian cheddar, further honed with mustard and Tabasco, hits like a hug spooned out onto toast.

Banana pepper chicken ($18 with salad and side) led the entrees. Ordered on aromatic rice pilaf, a chicken breast had been stuffed with spinach, Gorgonzola and more cheeses, crumbed and fried to golden. Served on a mildly rousing pepper cream, with caponata-like tomato compote, its mix-and-match pleasures were diverting.

Simpler satisfactions were in store just a few blocks away at another historic watering hole, Glen Park Tavern (5507 Main St., 626-9333).

Whether from general squeamishness or simple inattention, rare roast beef has of late been an endangered species among beef-on-weck specimens Ive collected.So when the woman who took my order and credit card information asked how I wanted my meat done on the beef on weck ($14.95 large), you could call it a rare thrill.

Eagle House's stuffed pepper chicken. (Andrew Galarneau/Buffalo News)

Enjoy yourself. When I keep getting reminded Im mortal, this is the sort of beef on weck Im going for: one for the ages. That means a thick mattress of hand-cut tenderness to put me in the pink, a roll stout enough to cope, and fresh enough to notice. On the side, horseradish to get your sinuses activated, and rarest of all, au jus that tasted like beef drippings rather than the usual cheap bouillon, drab as dishwater.

The beef can be ordered as a hot open-faced sandwich with gravy ($13.95), just like Glen Parks other stalwart, roasted turkey. A sandwich piled high with better-than-fair fowl, plus lettuce, tomato, onion and cranberry sauce, would please any fans of the form.

A mile east, at Lloyd Taco Factory (5933 Main St., 863-9781) the leading homegrown practitioner of un-Mexican tacos and master of the sub-$10 meal, has made the contactless restaurant transaction frictionless as well. A simple and effective online ordering system leads to a heads-up text, which leads to bags handed out a delivery window.

Lloyd Taco Factory's carne asada camino bowl. (Andrew Galarneau/Buffalo News)

Unless you have a real thing for picking up your food, Id suggest the camino bowls, which are deconstructed burritos minus the flour tortilla shell, proteins bedded on your choice of shredded cabbage, rice and black beans.

Crack-ed potatoes ($4.99) are a must, crispy-jacketed spuds duded up in ssamjang sauce and fried garlic, vegan if you hold the mayonnaise. Vegans have a legitimate contender in the Skinny Thai ($8.99), fried tofu with kicky peanut sauce, radishes and more. Grilled citrus-and-chile-marinated steak stars in the carne asada ($9.49) under fresh-cut pico de gallo.

The Big Lloyd ($8.99) has all the flavors of a Big Mac, down to the sesame seeds, except better, because its built on locally raised grass-fed beef. Then theres my guilty go-to, Dirty South ($8.99): fried chicken, waffle crisps, maple syrup and bacon aioli. Thats right, mayonnaise made with bacon fat instead of oil.

Lloyd Taco Factory's Dirty South burrito bowl. (Andrew Galarneau/Buffalo News)

So when it comes to recovering from our current unpleasantness, I would look to the restaurant people for hope. For hundreds of years, theyve found a way to keep feeding people, and they will again, taking lessons from old and new.

You know what they say: It takes a village.

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In Williamsville, old favorites and new keep tradition alive - Buffalo News

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Letter: The coronavirus was not created by humans – Thehour.com

Posted: May 24, 2020 at 3:21 pm

Published 12:00am EDT, Friday, May 22, 2020

It has been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt, COVID-19 is not man-made or genetically modified..

The major research labs in the U.S. all agree (and our allies worldwide) as does the U.S. national Director of Intelligence who released a statement on April 30.

They can tell because human engineered viruses all have common obvious components not present in this virus.

It is also highly unlikely that it was a science experiment gone wrong as the new coronavirus is way different genetically than the SARS virus that originated in bats and was being studied in the Wuhan lab.

No one knows what the animal host source of the new virus is yet, but so far its not bats. Im no scientist so I listen to the experts on this.

So why President Trump would say, the day after this announcement was made by his Director of Intelligence that he has reason to believe it is man made?!

It is mind boggling that our president would make inaccurate statements during a major worldwide pandemic and scare and confuse the people at a time when they are looking for and need calm and reassurance.

The only reason Im bringing this up is because a lot of people Ive spoken to, mainly the presidents supporters, still think its man-made because of President Trumps statements.

So everyone lets remain calm, we are not under a germ warfare attack!

Yes, China probably tried to cover it up and yes, China is moving into world domination.

But lets not get fooled into starting WWIII over false information.

Matt Yordon

Norwalk

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Jesse Jackson: ‘The gated community does not protect you from the pandemic’ – The Guardian

Posted: at 3:21 pm

The Rev Jesse Jackson was born in the racially segregated south when Franklin Roosevelt occupied the White House and war raged in Europe. He was an eyewitness to the assassination of Martin Luther King, campaigned against the Vietnam war and twice ran for US president.

But, now an elder statesman of 78, he has never seen anything like the coronavirus pandemic, which has infected more than 1 million Americans and killed more in April alone than died in Vietnam over 15 years. The worlds most powerful and wealthy country also bears by far its biggest death toll: almost 90,000. It is enough to shake faith in American exceptionalism.

Our military cannot defeat this germ, Jackson says by phone from Chicago, one of the hardest-hit cities. Having the biggest banks, having the biggest military has no meaning in this kind of germ warfare. The frontline is not soldiers; the frontline is doctors and nurses. The planes are grounded, the bombs are irrelevant. It turns out that pride precedes a fall. Sometimes people have to learn that we dont control everything.

Despite lockdown and Parkinsons disease, Jackson is still working with gusto at the Rainbow Push Coalition, a progressive organisation he founded in 1996. It has convened thousands of black doctors and lawyers and released a manifesto suggesting that high-risk groups, including African Americans, be prioritised for coronavirus testing.

Jackson has twice written to Donald Trump urging testing for the 2.2 million people currently in prison. At a time when most Americans are looking inward, he has also called for massive intervention in Africa, a particularly vulnerable continent that is close to his heart.

Were working virtually, making conference calls, using this time to organise people, he says. Weve talked to about 2,000 ministers around the nation over the past 10 days, trying to convince their congregations to honour the protocols and stay in the house.

For a brief while it became voguish to indulge a comforting myth that the coronavirus was the great equaliser, touching the bus driver and Prince of Wales alike. But while infections do not discriminate, humans do. Despite making up only 13% of the US population, African Americans represent 30% of the deaths from the coronavirus.

A Senate Democratic Policy and Communications Committee report last month concluded that people of colour have less access to quality healthcare, are more likely to have a pre-existing health condition and suffer greater exposure to air pollution that puts them at higher risk of asthma. They also make up a disproportionate share of frontline workers, are less likely to be able to work from home and more likely to rely on public transport, and are hit hardest by poverty as layoffs continue to rise.

We know that people should honour the [social distancing] protocols, but some find it more difficult because of congested conditions or their transportation, says Jackson. A lot are untested and uninsured. If youre uninsured, you can go to the hospitals only to be told you cant get service, so you end up resorting to your own home remedies, or you end up in the hospital too late.

That points to disparity in income and education and healthcare. It shows the black condition in America. The legacy of slavery and Jim Crow is very clear.

Like Trumps regressive presidency, the virus is a shock to the system that forces a confrontation with class, race and structural inequality. What had been ambient noise for the privileged is suddenly vividly clear and difficult to ignore.

After 400 years of slavery, segregation and discrimination, why would anybody be shocked that African Americans are dying disproportionately from the coronavirus? Jackson asked in a statement published on 7 April, arguing that all past US presidents have failed to end the virus of white superiority and fix the multifaceted issues confronting African Americans.

He adds, by phone: America has decided the place of blacks in this society, which is beneath that of European immigrants. People say America is 244 years old, but Africans have been here 157 years before the constitution. We shouldnt say America was founded in 1776 it started with slavery in 1619; so were still invisible to that extent.

We still make less, live under stresses and dont live as long. Were still looked upon as the other based upon skin colour, as some kind of irreparable sin in the society. People try to adjust to it but, when a pandemic sets in, the data comes out.

Were about 60% of prisoners in this country. People are sick behind those walls. You can have 200 inmates sick with Covid-19 and the workers go home and they spread it. So the prisons become the epicentre of the untreated and untested and undetected.

Itching to revive their economies, several southern states led by mostly white male governors are already reopening bowling alleys, cinemas, hairdressers, restaurants and other outlets against federal guidelines. A group of activists, mostly black women, warned in a petition that reopening now is irresponsible and a death sentence for many of us.

White privilege will offer no immunity in an interconnected society, says Jackson. If blacks are the drivers and unprotected, the driven are hurt. If the cooks and waiters are unprotected, those they cook for are all unprotected. So were more integrated than we realise on a daily basis.

So we really must have healthcare for all as one of the by-products of this pandemic. Anybody whos left out is a threat to those who are left in. When people as affluent as Prince Charles and Boris Johnson and athletes are affected, it means that the gated community did not protect you from the pandemic. If the poor are not protected, the rich are in jeopardy, because you cannot separate by community the poor from the rich, the white from the black.

Roosevelt was tested by the Great Depression and second world war and rose to the challenge. George W Bush faced the 9/11 terrorist attacks; Barack Obama the financial crisis. Trump had his shot at greatness with the coronavirus pandemic and few, outside his most ardent supporters, would dispute he threw it away.

The first president elected with no previous political or military experience squandered a precious six weeks, instead golfing, holding rallies and prophesying that the virus would disappear like a miracle in warm weather rather than following the pandemic emergency plan bequeathed by Obama and building a rigorous nationwide testing programme.

Is Trump responsible for tens of thousands of deaths? He had an opportunity to move early on it and did not move early on it. The infrastructure that [George W] Bush and Barack had put together on pandemics was ignored. He dismantled the infrastructure and did not pay adequate attention to the threat.

As the threat changed, we didnt have ventilators and respirators. All our preparation was for a financial fight or a military fight. He should have declared a national testing mechanism. There should have been a national lockdown to break the back of it. The attention should have been early; it was not.

Trump has sought absolution at press briefings that sometimes run for more than two hours with a mix of self-congratulation, bloated exaggerations, broadsides at reporters and bad science. He recently ad libbed a jaw-dropping proposal to study the merits of injecting disinfectant into coronavirus patients. It has left his opponent in Novembers election, the former vice president Joe Biden, struggling to get a share of the limelight.

Trump is using the daily press briefing as a platform to promote his politics while Biden is facing lockdown in his basement. But theres a real chance the more he talks, the weaker he gets.

Jackson whose activism began as a student trying to desegregate the public library in his birthplace of Greenville, South Carolina ran against Biden in the 1988 Democratic primary. Bidens campaign fell apart after he quoted without attribution the then British Labour leader, Neil Kinnock, and was accused of plagiarism. Jackson, bidding to become the USs first black president, gathered 7m votes and finished first or second in 46 out of 54 primary contests. But he lost the nomination to Michael Dukakis, who went down to George HW Bush.

Does it hurt that he will never be president? No, it doesnt, he says firmly, because I was a trailblazer, I was a pathfinder. I had to deal with doubt and cynicism and fears about a black person running. There were black scholars writing papers about why I was wasting my time. Even blacks said a black couldnt win.

Some of his foreign policy positions at the time, he points out, became widely adopted: a two-state solution for Israel and the Palestinians, the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in South Africa (he met Margaret Thatcher to plead for Britain to drop its support for the apartheid regime). In 2000 he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the USs highest civilian honour.

When Obama won in 2008, he praised Jackson for making his run possible. As Obama delivered his election night victory speech at Grant Park in Chicago before a crowd of 240,000, Jacksons tear-stained face was among the most indelible images. It was a big moment in history, he recalls. I cried because I thought about those who made it possible who were not there People who paid a real price: Ralph Abernathy, Dr King, Medgar Evers, Fannie Lou Hamer, those who fought like hell [at the Democratic national convention] in Atlantic City in 64, those in the movement in the south.

Some felt that Obama should have pushed faster and further on racial justice in his two terms. But Jackson ranks him among the USs top presidents. First, given Americas history in terms of race, he inspired indescribable pride. No 2, his family and their decency and dignity were a big deal.

He points to the Paris climate accords, Iran nuclear deal, rapprochement with Cuba and rescue of the economy as signal achievements. He stabilised the ship when the ship was sinking and got it back above the water. And no scandal. Trump creates a desire for Barack all over again. When he travelled around the world, he was the best face Americas ever had.

In March, Jackson endorsed Bernie Sanders, returning a compliment from 1988 when Sanders backed his campaign. His ideas made the most sense to me, he explains. But after a promising start Sanders fell away, partly because of his failure to connect with older African American voters, where Biden dominated.

His campaign was [about] class without appreciating the caste dimension of poverty, Jackson explains by way of post-mortem. There are 55 black members of Congress and he didnt have one. Maybe one or two black mayors, but he didnt cultivate an African American constituency.

Biden, meanwhile, benefited from his kinship with Obama as well as Trumps repeated attacks that kept his profile up and his name on the front pages. The opposition had no infrastructure for the black vote. In many ways, he inherited votes he didnt campaign for.

In recent weeks, Biden has been endorsed by Sanders, Obama, Hillary Clinton, House speaker Nancy Pelosi and the civil rights hero John Lewis in a show of party unity. Will Jackson support him enthusiastically? Yeah, as an alternative to the present administration, but weve not had a meeting with the black constituency on what our demands are.

The ground is shifting under Trump and Bidens feet. Sanders argues that the pandemic, which has put more than 30 million Americans out of work, shows the failure of the US healthcare system. As an opportunity to reimagine the social contract, the present moment is being compared with Roosevelts New Deal or the post second-world-war consensus in Britain.

Biden won the delegates but Sanders won the issues, Jackson reflects. Sanders agenda will dominate the [Democratic national] convention. One of the by-products of this pandemic is going to be the need for healthcare for all. We cant afford not to have healthcare for all because if you see the gap between the 1% and 99%, the 1% cant hide from who it is thats caring for the masses. The real soldiers are not the investment bankers. Its the doctors and nurses. There is a new appreciation of the common people, doctors and janitors and truck drivers, what they call essential workers.

In many ways, he says, as African Americans, were at the the bottom of the foundation. The foundation is where it starts from. So when the foundations in trouble, the whole buildings in trouble.

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