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Category Archives: Immortality Medicine

Study Shows Cancer-Causing Virus Masters Cell’s Replication, Immortality – Scicasts (press release) (blog)

Posted: May 6, 2017 at 3:07 am

Durham, NC (Scicasts) Viruses are notorious for taking over their host's operations and using them to their own advantage. But few human viruses make themselves quite as cozy as the Epstein-Barr virus, which can be found in an estimated nine out of ten humans without causing any ill effects.

That is, until this virus causes mononucleosis in adolescents or various cancers of the lymph nodes, including Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, in immune compromised people.

In a paper appearing in the open access journal eLife, a team of researchers from Duke's School of Medicine details just how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist so well inside the immune system's B cells, a type of white blood cell that is normally responsible for recognizing and responding to foreign invaders.

"The challenge is that it's a really efficient pathogen," and evades the host's immune system well even when it's recognized as an invader, said Micah Luftig, an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology and co-author on the new study.

Luftig's team has found that with a few select chemical signals used early in the course of an infection, Epstein-Barr mimics the beginning of the B cell's normal response to an infectious agent. From within, the virus manages to ramp up the B-cell's reproduction of itself, while at the same time helping the cell resist its own self-destruct signals.

"The virus actually taps into the B cell's normal protection against apoptosis," the programmed cell death that takes B cells out of circulation, Luftig said.

Once the infection is established, Epstein-Barr prefers to hide out in what are known as "memory B cells," relatively slowly reproducing cells that circulate throughout the body. "All of this is about establishing latency," Luftig said, or the ability to hide quietly in plain sight.

Using a new technique developed elsewhere called BH3 profiling that allowed them to test the critical cellular pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins individually, the team was able to see which of these the virus was controlling and then watch the transition from an uninfected cell to the active early infection phase to the latent infection in an immortal cell. The key piece they've uncovered is a viral protein called EBNA3A which manages apoptosis resistance in infected B cells.

The risk for cancers "is largely an issue if you're immune suppressed," Luftig said. But, for example, a recent National Cancer Institute study found that children who receive organ transplants have a 200-times higher chance of getting Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, one of the cancers caused by Epstein-Barr.

The team thinks BH3 profiling could prove useful in guiding treatment decisions on Epstein-Barr associated cancers such as these.

Article adapted from a Duke University news release.

Publication: Epstein-Barr virus ensures B cell survival by uniquely modulating apoptosis at early and late times after infection. Alexander M Price et al. eLife (2017): Click here to view.

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Study Shows Cancer-Causing Virus Masters Cell's Replication, Immortality - Scicasts (press release) (blog)

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Cancer-causing virus masters cell’s replication, immortality – Science Daily

Posted: May 4, 2017 at 2:44 pm

Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortality
Science Daily
In a paper appearing in the open access journal eLife, a team of researchers from Duke's School of Medicine details just how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist so well inside the immune system's B cells, a type of white blood cell that is ...

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Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortality - Science Daily

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Cancer-causing virus masters cell’s replication & immortality – Drug Target Review

Posted: at 2:44 pm

news

Viruses are notorious for taking over their hosts operations and using them to their own advantage. But few human viruses make themselves quite as cozy as the Epstein-Barr virus, which can be found in an estimated 9/10 humans without causing any ill effects. That is, until this virus causes mononucleosis in adolescents or various cancers of the lymph nodes, including Hodgkins and non-Hodgkins lymphomas, in immune compromised people.

A team of researchers from Dukes School of Medicine details just how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist so well inside the immune systems B cells, a type of white blood cell that is normally responsible for recognising and responding to foreign invaders.

The challenge is that its a really efficient pathogen, and evades the hosts immune system well even when its recognised as an invader,

said Micah Luftig, an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology and investigator on the new study.

Luftigs team has found that with a few select chemical signals used early in the course of an infection, Epstein-Barr mimics the beginning of the B cells normal response to an infectious agent. From within, the virus manages to ramp up the B-cells reproduction of itself, while at the same time helping the cell resist its own self-destruct signals.

The virus actually taps into the B cells normal protection against apoptosis, the programmed cell death that takes B cells out of circulation, Luftig said.

Once the infection is established, Epstein-Barr prefers to hide out in what are known as memory B cells, relatively slowly reproducing cells that circulate throughout the body. All of this is about establishing latency, Luftig said, or the ability to hide quietly in plain sight.

Using a new technique developed elsewhere called BH3 profiling that allowed them to test the critical cellular pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins individually, the team was able to see which of these the virus was controlling and then watch the transition from an uninfected cell to the active early infection phase to the latent infection in an immortal cell. The key piece theyve uncovered is a viral protein called EBNA3A which manages apoptosis resistance in infected B cells.

The risk for cancers is largely an issue if youre immune suppressed, Luftig said. But, for example, a recent National Cancer Institute study found that children who receive organ transplants have a 200-times higher chance of getting Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, one of the cancers caused by Epstein-Barr.

The team thinks BH3 profiling could prove useful in guiding treatment decisions on Epstein-Barr associated cancers such as these.

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Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication & immortality - Drug Target Review

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Scientists are waging a war against human aging. But what happens next? – Vox

Posted: at 2:44 pm

We all grow old. We all die.

For Aubrey de Grey, a biogerontologist and chief science officer of the SENS Research Foundation, accepting these truths is, well, not good enough. He decided in his late twenties (hes currently 54) that he wanted to make a difference to humanity and that battling age was the best way to do it. His lifes work is now a struggle against physics and biology, the twin collaborators in bodily decay.

He calls it a war on age.

Grey considers aging an engineering problem. The human body is a machine, he told me in the following interview, and like any machine, it can be maintained for as long as we want.

This is not an isolated view. There is a broader anti-aging movement afoot, which seems to be growing every day. As Tad Friend describes colorfully in a recent New Yorker essay, millions of venture capital dollars are being dumped into longevity research, some of it promising and some of it not. Peter Thiel, the billionaire co-founder of PayPal, is among the lead financiers (hes a patron of Greys organization as well).

Greys work is particularly interesting. For too long, he argues, scientists have been looking for solutions in all the wrong places. There is no monocausal explanation for aging. We age because the many physical systems that make up our body begin to fail at the same time and in mutually detrimental ways.

So hes developed what he calls a divide-and-conquer strategy, isolating the seven known causes of aging and tackling them individually. Whether its cell loss or corrosive mitochondrial mutations, Grey believes each problem is essentially mechanical, and can therefore be solved.

But even if this Promethean quest to extend human life succeeds, several questions persist.

If we develop these anti-aging technologies, who will have access to them? Will inequality deepen even further in a post-aging world? And what about the additional resources required to support humans living 200 or 300 or 500 years? The planet is stretched as it is with 7 billion people living roughly 70 years on average (women tend to live three to five years longer than men) and is already facing serious stresses around food, water, and global warming going forward.

Grey, to his credit, has thought through these problems. Im not sure hes alive to the political implications of this technology, specifically the levels of state coercion it might demand.

But when pressed, he defends his project forcefully.

Is there a simple way to describe theoretically what the anti-aging therapies youre working on will look like what theyll do to or for the body?

Oh, much more than theoretically. The only reason why this whole approach has legs is because 15 or 17 or so years ago, I was actually able to go out and enumerate and classify the types of damage. We've been studying it for a long time, so when I started out in this field in the mid-90s so I could learn about things, I was gratified to see that actually aging was pretty well understood.

Scientists love to say that aging is not well understood because the purpose of scientists is to find things, out so they have to constantly tell people that nothing is understood, but it's actually bullshit. The fact is, aging is pretty well understood, and the best of it is that not only can we enumerate the various types of damage the body does to itself throughout our lives, we can also categorize them, classify them into a variable number of categories

So I just talked about seven categories of damage, and my claim that underpins everything that we do is that this classification is exhaustive. We know how people age; we understand the mechanics of it. There is no eighth category that were overlooking. More importantly, for each category there is a generic approach to fixing it, to actually performing the maintenance approach that I'm describing, repairing the damage.

Can you give me an example of one of these categories and what the approach to fixing it looks like?

One example is cell loss. Cell loss simply means cells dying and not being automatically replaced by the division of other cells, so that happens progressively in a few tissues in the body and it definitely drives certain aspects of aging. Let's take Parkinson's disease. That's driven by the progressive loss of a particular type of neuron, the dopaminergic neuron, in a particular part of the brain.

And what's the generic fix for cell loss? Obviously it's stem cell therapy. That's what we do. We preprogram cells in the laboratory into a state where you can inject them into the body and they will divide and differentiate to replace themselves that the body is not replacing on its own. And stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease is looking very promising right now.

Is it best to think of aging as a kind of engineering problem that can be reversed or stalled?

Absolutely. It's a part of technology. The whole of medicine is a branch of technology. It's a way of manipulating what would otherwise happen, so this is just one part of medicine.

But you're not trying to solve the problem of death or even aging, really. Its more about undoing the damage associated with aging.

Certainly the goal is to undo the damage that accumulates during life, and whether you call that solving aging is up to you.

What would you say is your most promising line of research right now?

The great news is that we have this divide-and-conquer strategy that allows us to split the problem into seven subproblems and address each of them individually. That means we're constantly making progress on all of them. We pursue them all in parallel. We actually don't pursue stem cell therapy very much, simply because so many other people are doing it and basically everything really important is being done by somebody else, so it's not a good use of our money.

We're a very small organization. We only have $4 million a year to spend, so we're spread very thin. We're certainly making progress. Over the past year we've published really quite high-profile papers relating to a number of main research programs, so there's no really one thing that stands out.

What do you say to those who see this as a quixotic quest for immortality, just the latest example of humanity trying to transcend its condition?

Sympathy, mainly. I understand it takes a certain amount of guts to aim high, to actually try to do things that nobody can do, that nobody's done before. Especially things that people have been trying to do for a long time. I understand most people don't have that kind of courage, and I don't hate them for that. I pity them.

Of course, the problem is that they do get in my way, because I need to bring money in the door and actually get all this done. Luckily, there are some people out there who do have courage and money, and so we're making progress.

Ultimately, the fact is aging has been the number one problem of humanity since the dawn of time, and it is something that, until I came along, we have not had any coherent idea how to address, which means the only option available to us has been to find some way to put it out of our minds and find a way to get on with our miserably short lives and make the best of it, rather than being perpetually preoccupied with this ghastly thing that's going to happen to us in the relatively distant future. That makes perfect sense. I don't object to that.

The problem is that suddenly we are in a different world where we are in striking distance of actually implementing a coherent plan that will really work, and now that defeatism, that fatalism, that resignation, has become a huge part of the problem, because once you've made your peace with some terrible thing you know, it's very hard to reengage.

Are there any ethical questions or reservations that give you pause at all?

Not at all. Once one comes to the realization that this is just medicine, then one can address the entire universe of potential so-called ethical objections in one gut. Are you in favor of medicine or not? In order to have any so-called ethical objection to the work we do, the position that one has to take is the position that medicine for the elderly is only a good thing so long as it doesn't work very well, and thats a position no one wants to take.

Ive no doubt youve been asked this question before, but I think its too important to gloss over. You talk enthusiastically about transitioning to a post-aging world, but there are many people who worry about what it means to increase the humans time on earth. We dont necessarily have an overpopulation problem, but we certainly have an inequality problem, and we seem to need more resources than we have. If 90 percent of people die from aging now, and suddenly people are living for 200 or 300 years, how will we be able to sustain this kind of growth?

First of all, thank you for prefacing the question with the thought that I've probably heard this question a lot, because of course I have. But you'd be astonished at how many people have presented this question to me starting with, "Have you ever thought of the possibility that..." as if they genuinely had a new idea.

But yes, overpopulation is the single biggest concern that people raise, and I have basically three levels of answers to these questions. First, the answer is specific to the individual question. So in the case of overpopulation, essentially I point to the fact that fertility rates are already plummeting in many areas. And people often forget: Overpopulation is not a matter of how many people there are on the planet but rather the difference between the number of people on the planet and the number of people that can be on the planet with an acceptable level of environmental impact, and that second number is of course not a constant; it's something that is determined by other technologies.

So as we move forward with renewable energy and other things like desalinization to reduce the amount of pollution the average person commits, we are increasing the carrying capacity of the planet, and the amount of increase that we can expect over the next, say, 20 years in that regard far exceeds what we could expect in terms of the trajectory of rise in population resulting from the elimination of death from aging. So that's my main answer.

The second level of answer is at the level of sense of proportion. Technology happens or doesn't happen, whatever the case may be, and maybe the worst-case scenario is that we will end up with a worse overpopulation problem than what we have today.

What does that actually mean? It means we're faced with a choice in a post-aging world, in a world where the technology exists a choice between either, on the one hand, using these technologies and having more people and having fewer kids than we would like or, on the other hand, letting stuff go on the way it is today, which involves not using technology that will keep people healthy in old age and therefore alive.

Ask yourself, which of those two things would you choose? Would you choose to have your mother get Alzheimer's disease or to have fewer kids? It's a pretty easy choice, and people just don't do this.

The third level is perhaps the strongest of all, which is that it's about who has the right to choose. Essentially if we say, Oh, dear, overpopulation, let's not go there. Let's not develop these technologies, then what we are doing as of today is we are delaying the arrival of our technology. Of course it will happen eventually. The question is how soon? That depends on how hard we try.

If we know that, then what we're doing is we're delaying the arrival of the technology and thus condemning a whole cohort of people of humanity of the future to the same kind of death and disease and misery that we have today in old age, when in fact we might have relieved that suffering had we developed the therapies in time.

I dont want to be responsible for condemning a vast number of people to death. I dont want to be in that position. I think theres a strong argument that we should get on developing these technologies has quickly as we can.

I take your points there, but those questions are far easier to answer in theory than they are to solve in practice. For instance, we cant simply decide that people will have fewer children without potentially dangerous levels of state coercion. The politics of this is complicated at best, dystopian at worst.

In any event, let me at least raise one more concern. What is your sense of the cost and the accessibility of these therapies should they become available? People concerned with bioengineering, for example, worry that technologies like this, if they arent equally distributed, will produce inequalities of the sort weve never seen before and cant sustain.

Its a valid concern. It needs to be addressed, but luckily, like the overpopulation one, it's a really easy one to address. Today what we see with high-tech medicine is that it is even in countries with a single-payer system it's pretty much limited by the pay because there's only so much resources available.

But part of the problem now is that our current therapies for elderly people dont work well. It postpones the ill health of old age by a very small amount if we're lucky, and then people get sick anyway, and we spend all the money that we would have spent in absence of the medicine just keeping the person alive for a little longer in a miserable state.

Now compare that with the situation where the medicine actually does work, where the person actually stays healthy. Yes, they live a lot longer, and sure enough, it may be that we have to supply these therapies multiple times because they are inherently periodic therapies, so we could be talking about a substantial amount of money. But the thing is these people would be healthy, so we would not be spending the money on the medicine for the sick people that we have today.

Plus, on top of that, there would be massive indirect savings. The kids of the elderly would be more productive because they wouldn't have to spend time looking after their sick parents. The elderly themselves would still be in an able-bodied state and able to actually contribute wealth to society rather than just consuming wealth.

Of course, there are lots and lots of big uncertainties in these kinds of calculations, but there is absolutely no way to do such a calculation that does not come to the absolutely clear conclusion that the medicines would pay for themselves many times over, really quickly.

So what that means, from the point of view of government setting aside the fact that it would be politically impossible not to support this is that it would be suicidal from a purely mercenary economic point of view not to do this. The country will go bankrupt because other countries will be making sure their workforce is able-bodied. The world will be frontloading their investments to ensure that everybody who is old enough to need them will get these therapies.

When will the therapies youre developing be ready for human experimentation?

That will happen incrementally over the next 20 years. Each component of the SENS panel will have standalone value in addressing one or another disease of old age, and some of them are already in clinical trials. Some of them are a lot harder, and the full benefit will only be seen when we can combine them all, which is a long way out.

How confident are you that someone alive today will not die of aging?

It's looking very good. Of course this is primary technology, so we can only speculate. It's very speculative what the time frame is going to be, but I think we have a 50-50 chance of getting to work on longevity escape velocity, the point where we are postponing the problem of aging faster than time is passing and people are staying one step ahead of the problem. I think we have a 50-50 chance of reaching that point within 20 years of now, subject only to improved funding on the early-stage research that's happening at the moment.

Escape velocity is an interesting analogy. The idea is to keep filling up the biological gas tank before it runs out, staying a step ahead of the aging process?

Right. The point is that these are rejuvenation therapies, which means they are therapies that genuinely turn back the clock. They put the body into a state that is analogous or similar to how it was at an earlier [stage] rather than just stopping or slowing down the clock. Every time you do this, you buy time, but the problem gets harder because the types of damage that the therapy reverses will catch up, and those imperfections just need to be progressively partially eliminated. The idea, then, is that you asymptotically approach the 100 percent repair situation but you never need to get there. You just need to keep the overall level of damage below a certain tolerable threshold.

For more about de Grey's work, visit the SENS website.

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Scientists are waging a war against human aging. But what happens next? - Vox

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Scientists develop novel chemical ‘dye’ to improve liver cancer imaging – Science Daily

Posted: at 2:44 pm


Science Daily
Scientists develop novel chemical 'dye' to improve liver cancer imaging
Science Daily
A research team led by Assistant Professor Edward Chow (right), Principal Investigator from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS and Department of Pharmacology at NUS Yong Loo Lin of Medicine, has developed a novel nanodiamond-based ...

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Scientists develop novel chemical 'dye' to improve liver cancer imaging - Science Daily

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Cancer-causing virus masters cell’s replication, immortality – Phys.Org

Posted: May 2, 2017 at 10:31 pm

May 2, 2017 by Karl Leif Bates The Epstein-Barr virus takes control of the body's immune B-cells so that it can hide in plain sight. Up to 90 percent of all adults carry the virus without consequence, but it can cause cancers of the lymph system. Credit: National Cancer Institute

Viruses are notorious for taking over their host's operations and using them to their own advantage. But few human viruses make themselves quite as cozy as the Epstein-Barr virus, which can be found in an estimated nine out of ten humans without causing any ill effects.

That is, until this virus causes mononucleosis in adolescents or various cancers of the lymph nodes, including Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, in immune compromised people.

In a paper appearing in the open access journal eLife, a team of researchers from Duke's School of Medicine details just how the Epstein-Barr virus manages to persist so well inside the immune system's B cells, a type of white blood cell that is normally responsible for recognizing and responding to foreign invaders.

"The challenge is that it's a really efficient pathogen," and evades the host's immune system well even when it's recognized as an invader, said Micah Luftig, an associate professor of molecular genetics and microbiology and co-author on the new study.

Luftig's team has found that with a few select chemical signals used early in the course of an infection, Epstein-Barr mimics the beginning of the B cell's normal response to an infectious agent. From within, the virus manages to ramp up the B-cell's reproduction of itself, while at the same time helping the cell resist its own self-destruct signals.

"The virus actually taps into the B cell's normal protection against apoptosis," the programmed cell death that takes B cells out of circulation, Luftig said.

Once the infection is established, Epstein-Barr prefers to hide out in what are known as "memory B cells," relatively slowly reproducing cells that circulate throughout the body. "All of this is about establishing latency," Luftig said, or the ability to hide quietly in plain sight.

Using a new technique developed elsewhere called BH3 profiling that allowed them to test the critical cellular pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins individually, the team was able to see which of these the virus was controlling and then watch the transition from an uninfected cell to the active early infection phase to the latent infection in an immortal cell. The key piece they've uncovered is a viral protein called EBNA3A which manages apoptosis resistance in infected B cells.

The risk for cancers "is largely an issue if you're immune suppressed," Luftig said. But, for example, a recent National Cancer Institute study found that children who receive organ transplants have a 200-times higher chance of getting Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, one of the cancers caused by Epstein-Barr.

The team thinks BH3 profiling could prove useful in guiding treatment decisions on Epstein-Barr associated cancers such as these.

Explore further: Disrupting cell's supply chain freezes cancer virus

More information: Alexander M Price et al, Epstein-Barr virus ensures B cell survival by uniquely modulating apoptosis at early and late times after infection, eLife (2017). DOI: 10.7554/eLife.22509

Journal reference: eLife

Provided by: Duke University

When the cancer-causing Epstein-Barr virus moves into a B-cell of the human immune system, it tricks the cell into rapidly making more copies of itself, each of which will carry the virus.

About 90 percent of people are infected at some time in their lives with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), usually with no ill effects. But individuals with compromised immune systems, such as people with organ transplants or HIV ...

(HealthDay)Children given an organ transplant have a substantially higher risk of developing cancerin some cases up to 200 times higherthan the general population, a new study finds.

After an infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the virus persists in the body throughout a person's lifetime, usually without causing any symptoms. About one third of infected teenagers and young adults nevertheless ...

Scientists at the University of Sussex, trying to uncover how the common Epstein-Barr virus causes blood cancer in adults and children, have discovered how the virus takes control of two genes involved in cancer development ...

A small, preliminary study may show promise of a new type of treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Results from the first six people enrolled in the phase 1 study, a study designed to enroll 10 people, are being ...

Viruses are notorious for taking over their host's operations and using them to their own advantage. But few human viruses make themselves quite as cozy as the Epstein-Barr virus, which can be found in an estimated nine out ...

Chickens were domesticated from Asian jungle fowl around 6000 years ago. Since domestication they have acquired a number of traits that are valuable to humans, including those concerning appearance, reduced aggression and ...

Young mongooses may conceal their identityeven from their own parentsto survive.

On a research dive in 2011 off the Aegean Sea coast of the fishing village e?mealt?, Turkey, a lucky pair of graduate students bore accidental witness to a phenomenon scientists have otherwise only ever seen in the lab: ...

A hormone called FGF21 that is secreted by the liver after eating sweets may determine who has a sweet tooth and who doesn't, according to a study in Cell Metabolism published May 2. Researchers at the Novo Nordisk Foundation ...

William Shakespeare wrote with a quill, Helen Keller liked her typewriter, and the oval squid prefers to use its body, when it comes to expressing love. But unlike these famous authors, the romanticisms of Sepioteuthis lessoniana ...

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Cancer-causing virus masters cell's replication, immortality - Phys.Org

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An Important Voice Dr. Roland Pattillo’s Work Led to Henrietta Lacks’ Immortality – The Milwaukee Community Journal

Posted: at 10:31 pm


The Milwaukee Community Journal
An Important Voice Dr. Roland Pattillo's Work Led to Henrietta Lacks' Immortality
The Milwaukee Community Journal
After medical school, Dr. Pattillo completed his fellowship training at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School. At Johns Hopkins, Dr. Pattillo trained with George Gey, MD, who in 1951 cultured the first immortalized cell ...

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Steve Hansen: What do escort services and universities have in common? – Lodi News-Sentinel

Posted: at 10:31 pm

Question: What do shady escort services and universities have in common?

Answer: Theyll both love you if you give them enough money.

No kidding. Schools of higher education have been known to name benches, buildings, hospitals even entire schools after their generous donors. Solicitations just seem to come with the academic territory.

Take my old alma mater, for example. I used to get letters from the alumni association on a regular basis. But one day, a note arrived saying they were sick of me ignoring requests for panhandled funds. It included a threat that if I slighted the association one more time, I would never hear from them again.

These guys werent fooling around. Its been years, and theyve kept their word.

For all I know, failing to pay my fair share in donations may cause the school to deny they ever knew me. Its good I dont need proof of a degree to write for a living just a good seventh grade home-schooled education.

You dont see too many things at colleges and universities named after newspaper columnists these days. Besides, based on what we get paid, we couldnt donate enough to get a paper plaque on a well-used fire hydrant frequented by a roving Rottweiler.

But thats OK. We work for the love of writing and readily reject frivolous fame not that I wouldnt mind buying a medical or law school someday. At least I could count on free advice from the deans. That could come in quite handily in todays era of insurance capitation and litigious lunacy.

It wasnt always this way. There were times in the past when schools named their halls and laboratories (not to be confused with lavatories) after people who had actually contributed something to the betterment of humanity. I dont consider making a killing in real estate foreclosures or an instant dotcom millionaire necessarily fits that category.

Theres the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (he didnt make enough money to buy a haircut), the Thurgood Marshall School of Law, and Lincoln University.

As of this date, no one has been able to remove these names and replace them with his or (rarely) her own, using an eight-figure cashiers check. But there is still opportunity, and schools are always looking for ways to fill their coffers. Its just a matter of time until the price is right.

Now Im not trying to be critical here. Lord knows we all have to make a buck, and academia is no exception.

Perhaps Im just envious, but I have used other options to try and keep my name in play for posterity.

For example, a few years ago, my wife and I donated a good sum of money to a public zoo in order to build a mountain lion exhibit.

But our quest for perpetuity was not to be. The mountain lions have gone to kitty heaven, the exhibit has become overgrown with native grasses and our bronze plaque is nowhere to be found (probably oxidizing under those native grasses somewhere).

We also are regular contributors to an automobile museum and sponsor a 1937 Cord. But the last time we were there, our plaque was gone, our car was gone and soon, so were we.

But before we left, I asked the management: What happened to our Cord?

Oh, was the reply. We loaned it to a museum in Indiana. It should be back in a couple of years. Hope you dont mind.

As you can see, buying fame and immortality for us little guys is not an easy task. Without a big checkbook, we just fade into the sunset with the rest of the rubes.

But there is always optimism. Ill keep writing my column and hope that someday, my genius will be discovered, and a multimillion-dollar book contract will be in my high-five hardened little hands.

Then I can look forward to that glorious day when my everlasting name will shine in splendor over the entrance of a prominent university washroom too!

Steve Hansen is a Lodi writer.

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About Us The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont

Posted: April 30, 2017 at 9:55 pm

Allison Bransfield Morse is an Ayurvedic Lifestyle Counselor and Panchakarma Specialist, with 15 years of experience as an AyurvedicPractitioner, she is also certified in massage and yoga therapy. After 5 years with The Ayurvedic Institute, Allison founded The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont in 2006, where she has had the privilege of guiding clients from all over the country in Ayurvedic care and Panchakarma. Allison spent 5 full time years at The Ayurvedic Institute, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, under the direct guidance of Dr.Vasant Lad. She completed two years of study under Dr. Lad, before embarking on a four year clinical apprenticeship in The Ayurvedic Institutes Panchakarma clinic. In 2005, she joined Dr. Lad in Pune, India, for advanced clinical studies. The prevailing focus of her work is the integration of Ayurveda with conventional medical approaches, to promote healing through the bodys intuitive wisdom. She is experienced in applying herbal medicine, diet and Ayurvedic remedies to a variety of clinical disorders including cancer, hypertension, musculoskeletal disorders, digestive disorders, weight-loss, depression, anxiety, insomnia, womens health issues, and many other ailments. Allison began studying yoga in 1995 at the Sivananda Yoga Center in New York City and traveled to Kerala, India, in 1999 to complete their Yoga Teacher Training Program. In 1998, she graduated from the Swedish Institute of Massage Therapy in New York City. Allison has a Bachelor of Science from Long Island University in New York.

Scott Marion is a Ayurvedic Lifestyle Counselor, Massage Therapist and Ayur-Yoga Teacher. Beginning in 1997, Scott traveled to India and Nepal, where he spent a total of 3 years and studied Vipassana, Hinduism and Tibetan Buddhism.

Born out of his love of nature, Scott began studying Ayurveda and herbs. He attended Touchstone Healing Arts School of Massage in Burlington in 1998 and furthered his studies at The Ayurvedic Institute under the guidance of Dr. Vasant Lad. He completed the two year program at The Ayurvedic Institute as well as their Ayur Yoga Teacher Training program.

In 2001, he met his principal teacher Lopon Tenzin Namdak while in France and Katmandu and started his studies in the Bon tradition. Over the last 4 years he has studied with Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche at the Ligmincha Institute in Virginia. Scotts other interests include art, music and dance.

Adena is an Ayurvedic Practitioner and Ayurvedic Yoga Specialist certified by the Kripalu School of Ayurveda. Adena teaches yoga to Panchakarma clients, and is a therapist for Abhyanga, Swedana and Shirodhara.

Adena is also certified in Maya Abdominal Therapy, and her work focuses on food as medicine and womens health and fertility. Adena is passionate about the local food movement, and became interested in Ayurveda through a desire to connect more deeply with the seasonal rhythms of Vermont. Ayurveda is about a deep connection with nature, the environment within and without, cultivating wholeness. Visit Adenas website and blog to learn more.

Janavi Allison Smith is a nationally board certified massage therapist specializing in Panchakarma therapies. She had the privilege of working with Dr. Vasant Lad at the Ayurvedic Institute in New Mexico for 8 years in its Panchakarma clinic, where she gave thousands of Ayurvedic treatments from 2006 to 2014. She completed the Ayurvedic Studies Lecture program with Dr. Lad in 2008.

In Albuquerque, Janavi founded Sandalwood Healing Arts, where she provided abhyanga, shirodhara, basti therapies, therapeutic massage, reiki, and cranio sacral therapy.

She graduated in 2003 from the Brenneke School of Massage in Seattle, Washington. In 2000, she received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting from the University of Montana-Missoula. Janavi has a deep love for her work, and a strong vocation for holistic health and service. She considers it an honor to assist her clients on their healing paths.

Anne graduated from the Kripalu School of Yoga & Ayurveda program to receive her 650 Hour certification as an Ayurvedic Health Counselor and offers Diet & Lifestyle Consultations. She is also a therapist for Abhyanga, Swedana and Shirodhara.

Annes depth of knowledge in the areas of the Subtle Energies, comes from her extensive 20+ years of study from many ancient traditions which allows her to empower her individual clients to create profound shifts in awareness which ultimately supports them to move towards wholeness and overall well-being. She offers beautiful individual sessions which include Aromatherapy, Pranayama, Reiki, Chakra Balancing, Advanced Reflexology, and Advanced Sound Healing, as well as her background in Ayurvedic body & lifestyle therapies and using Food as Medicine.

Anne is a Certified Clinical Aromatherapist with 18 years experience and over 1,000 hours of extensive coursework in this area. She completed her 300 hour certification at ISHA-Institute for Spiritual Healing and Aromatherapy. Anne is also a Reiki Master Practitioner & Reiki Teacher; and a Certified Advanced Sound Healer with Tibetan Singing Bowls thru the International Sound Healing Academy with Satya Brat, from India. Anne offers relaxing individual Sound Healing sessions to Panchakarma clients whove described these sessions as absolutely celestial, deepest peace and floating in higher awareness.

Anne is committed to assisting others as they embrace their own healing and move towards wholeness & peacefulness in their lives and begin to align with their intentions for body, mind, and soul healing. Her capacity for listening deeply to her clients and being able to hold space for them, allows the trust needed to partner in this healing process. Anne has a Masters Degree in Education and is a member of the VRA (Vermont Reiki Association) and a member of NAMA (National Ayurvedic Medical Association).

To learn more, go to Annes website: http://www.annecameron.com

A graduate and former intern of the Kripalu Schools of Yoga & Ayurveda. Lauren is a practicing Ayurvedic Health Counselor as well as a certified 500-Hour Kripalu Yoga Teacher. She specializes in teaching Ayurvedic yoga- tailoring postures, meditation and pranayama to ones unique constitution or to seasonal/temporal factors. In addition, Lauren has trained in Restorative Yoga as well as Yoga 4 Cancer.

Passionate about the art of cooking, Lauren can often be spotted paging through cookbooks on a quest for the next best recipe. Youll find her cooking up massive cauldrons of nourishing and delicious kitchari at the Ayurvedic Center.

Lauren is an inspired educator and teaches about Yoga and Ayurveda through workshops, her blog and serves as the content manager for Everyday Ayurveda.

Reshma Sinu studied Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) atthe Ashwini Ayurvedic Medical College Hospital and Research Centre. There she alsocompleted an internship in House Surgeryin Karnataka, India (2014-15)

Reshma graduated with her BAMS from Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Science, Karnataka India, in 2015. As of April 6, 2015, she became a qualified Ayurvedic doctor in the state register, maintained under the Travancore-Cochin Medical Council for Indian System of Medicine. She is alsoa registered practitioner in AYUSH. In addition, Reshma was the former joint secretary of OISCA International Thrissur chapter.

Dr Sinu worked for one year as a medical officer at Oushadhi Panchakarma Hospital and Research Institute, in Thrissur, Kerala, India, an undertaking by the Kerala government.

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