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Category Archives: Alternative Medicine

To win the fight against health and wellness bunk, we must leave the post-truth era in the past – The Globe and Mail

Posted: January 4, 2020 at 12:50 pm

Timothy Caulfield is a Canada Research Chair in Health Law and Policy at the University of Alberta and host of the documentary series A Users Guide to Cheating Death.

While pseudoscience and quackery have been around a long time, the 2010s were truly the decade of bunk. The reach and influence of misinformation has intensified to the point that it feels near impossible to find the truth in the churning sea of falsehoods, exaggerated claims and fear mongering.

Social media advertising pushes anti-vaccine myths, celebrity health brands aggressively sell rubbish ideas and products, health-care providers and research institutions hype unproven therapies and there are wild conspiracy theories about everything from GMOs to fluoride to milk. And the media reporting on all these topics often adds more confusion than clarity.

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As someone who studies the public representations of science, the decade was both exhausting and a bit depressing. But there is good news. More and more entities including governments, universities and professional organizations are recognizing the importance of this issue. This year, the World Health Organization declared the spread of vaccine misinformation one of the top threats to public health.

The 2010s have been called the post-truth decade. What can we do to make the next decade more, if only a little, about the truth? What can we do to create a cultural shift that allows science and critical thinking to rise above the noise of nonsense? While this is obviously a complicated issue that will require us to deploy a host of strategies, here are a few to get us started.

Correcting misinformation is a complex and increasingly difficult endeavour. Falsehoods and exaggerated claims are injected into an information environment that is already clouded by a tangle of values, ideological agendas and preconceived ideas about what is healthy and what is not. As such, merely making the science-informed facts publicly available be it about the value of vaccines or the uselessness of detox diets will often have little impact.

A body of evidence suggests that just correcting misinformation (debunking) will not change minds and may even cause some to become more entrenched in their misplaced views. While the influence and prevalence of this backfire effect is frequently overstated, its existence highlights how challenging the battle against misinformation can be.

In addition, because of our strong tendency to consume information that confirms our beliefs a psychological phenomenon called the confirmation bias we often do not even see, read or consider alternative views.

But despite these and many other psychological barriers that can make us less than receptive to evidence that might correct misinformation, presenting people with the facts can still make a difference. A 2015 study, for example, found that emphasizing the strength and breadth of the scientific consensus on a topic is an effective strategy, perhaps because this helps to correct perceptions of false balance (that is, the perception that the evidence on either side of an issue is more balanced or contested than it actually is). A 2019 study found that not responding publicly to science deniers on topics such as vaccination can have a negative effect on public beliefs and actions. The silence leaves inaccuracies unchecked. But the researchers also found that a fact-filled rebuttal that corrects specific inaccuracies can make a difference. The study found that not engaging on the issue that is, silence from the experts results in "the worst effect.

So, yes, while facts alone will often not be enough, facts still matter. We should not shy away from battling bunk with the good science. But how we provide that science also matters.

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There is some evidence that humans are biologically predisposed (thanks, evolution) to respond to stories and anecdotes. This is one reason misinformation can have such a persuasive punch: it is often wrapped in a compelling narrative. And, unfortunately, those pushing bunk health products and ideas are particularly adept with anecdotes. They are used to hawk all sorts of science-free hokum, such as miracle cures for debilitating diseases, celebrity diets and anti-vaccine fear mongering.

In many ways, social media are platforms for sharing personal narratives. Even if you dont want to, it is easy to come across a post reflecting on a personal experience that, intentionally or not, pushes a science-free position. For example, a recent study found that even though Instagram has more pro-vaccine posts, the anti-vaccine ones have more engagement. And this is because, at least in part, the opponents of vaccines are more likely to use powerful narratives, usually about harm.

These kinds of health-related anecdotes leverage several of our hardwired psychological tendencies: the negativity effect (we respond more strongly to negative than positive information); the availability bias (dramatic examples that are easy to recall can be more influential); and our natural attraction to a relatable story.

Anecdotes are also often used as the primary rationale for science-free health-care services. A study I did with my colleague Alessandro Marcon found that those arguing for alternative medicine in this case, chiropractic services most often support their position with anecdotes, rather than science. Unfortunately, despite the fact that anecdotes should not be considered good evidence, they can be very convincing, as they can interfere with our ability to think scientifically.

Given this reality, the battle against health misinformation will require science advocates to use a variety of engaging and creative communication strategies, including stories, images and art, and shareable messages that are social-media friendly (remember MediaSmarts House Hippo campaign?). Science needs to be inserted into the broader conversation in a way that will allow it to compete with the narrative-filled misinformation circulating in popular culture. Absorbing and entertaining science stories are everywhere. Lets use them.

While correcting misinformation is essential, the best way to stop it from having an adverse impact on public health is to encourage the application of critical thinking. Studies have consistently found that it is possible to teach such skills, even to the relatively young, and that this can help to inoculate individuals from the sway of health bunk. This should include providing basic tools to evaluate claims of efficacy, such as the reality that an anecdote or a testimonial is not good evidence, no matter how compelling.

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Lets encourage a culture of fact-checking and a reverence for accuracy. We need to constantly remind ourselves (and others) to think before sharing. In most situations, people do not intentionally spread misinformation because they have some malevolent agenda (although this certainly happens). In the kerfuffle of our daily lives, we are simply too distracted to pause and consider, for instance, the veracity of that post that claimed tanning your bum is health-enhancing (an actual story, and, no, its not a good health strategy). However, a recent study found that simply reminding people to think about the concept of accuracy can increase the quality of the news they share (please consider this a reminder).

Rising public distrust of science institutions (44 per cent of Canadians think scientists are elitist), ideological polarization and frustration (right or not) with the health-care system has created an environment that has allowed misinformation to thrive. And, of course, the spreading of misinformation has facilitated the growth of these kinds of sentiments, making people even more distrustful and receptive to misleading health information. A destructive feedback loop is creating a science-sucking vortex that is pulling us into an all knowledge is relative and not to be trusted Dark Age.

So while we need to fight health misinformation with creative communication strategies and critical thinking, we also need to tackle the systemic issues that make the misinformation so intuitively appealing and believable. When people feel as if conventional health-care providers ignore them, or they hear about pharmaceutical scandals, it is much easier for them to believe stories about the efficacy of alternative therapies and conspiracy theories about Big Pharma. When regulated health professionals are allowed to market unproven therapies, it may seem hypocritical to condemn the pseudoscience pushed by celebrity wellness gurus.

Good research, robust oversight and scientific integrity are essential to the struggle against misinformation. Without good science and public trust in that science, Im not sure if the fight against misinformation is winnable.

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To win the fight against health and wellness bunk, we must leave the post-truth era in the past - The Globe and Mail

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PMDs and Pofma among issues on MPs’ agenda – The Straits Times

Posted: at 12:50 pm

MPs will seek greater clarity on the issue of active mobility and personal mobility devices (PMDs) when Parliament sits next Monday.

Four MPs have filed questions on cycling paths and footpaths, e-scooters and electric bicycles, as well as food delivery riders, according to the agenda for the sitting - or Order Paper - issued by the Clerk of Parliament yesterday.

These include whether there are plans to regulate electric bike use on roads, how many more kilometres of cycling paths will be built by the year's end and whether there are measures to ensure the increase in e-bike riders as a result of the PMD ban will not lead to more accidents, or road traffic and active mobility offences.

Their questions follow the implementation on New Year's Day of the Land Transport Authority's zero-tolerance stance on PMDs on footpaths.

The footpath ban kicked in on Nov 5 after a series of e-scooter-related accidents but, until New Year's Eve, the authorities had been issuing warnings to errant riders.

Under the new rules, e-scooters, which have already been banned from roads, are now confined to cycling paths.

Workers' Party Non-Constituency MP Dennis Tan noted that new e-bike users who previously rode e-scooters are used to a different piece of equipment and different set of rules.

"The willingness and ability of the delivery riders to adhere to the corresponding laws applicable to e-bikes will ensure a smooth and safe transition, and hopefully preclude new incidents of traffic or active mobility offences or accidents," he said.

Other issues MPs will raise include the application of Singapore's fake news law and the Ministry of Education's policy on withholding results slips from students who have not paid in full their school fees.

Nominated MP Anthea Ong has filed two questions for Communications and Information Minister S. Iswaran on the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (Pofma).

She wants to know how the threshold of public interest is determined and measured in the case of online falsehoods, whether the Ministry of Communications and Information will consider creating a central listing of all issued directions on the Pofma website, and what steps are being taken to maintain public trust in the light of perceptions of a partisan political bias over recent applications of the law.

Said Ms Ong: "Now that the Pofma office is set up and Pofma has been used, it's important and timely to seek further clarification regarding accountability and implementation, especially given the partisan nature of all the corrections so far."

Dr Teo Ho Pin (Bukit Panjang) and Mr Lim Biow Chuan (Mountbatten) have filed questions for Education Minister Ong Ye Kung, asking how many students' results slips have been withheld by schools in the last few years and whether the Education Ministry will review the practice.

Said Mr Lim: "It is important to understand the intent of withholding the PSLE certificate. If it embarrasses the student or parent, then it should not be done. We should find another way to ensure that students or parents do their part to pay the fees. To me, the financial assistance route would be the preferred option."

Workers' Party chief Pritam Singh's (Aljunied GRC) question for Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is whether the Electoral Boundaries Review Committee has completed its deliberations and when its report will be released to the public.

Mr Louis Ng (Nee Soon GRC) and Mr Ong Teng Koon (Marsiling-Yew Tee GRC) will raise the issue of cat ownership in Housing Board flats.

Three Bills are up for debate on Monday, including the Health Ministry's Healthcare Services Bill that would replace the Private Hospitals and Medical Clinics Act.

The new law has a wider scope that includes traditional medicine, allied healthcare such as physiotherapy, as well as complementary and alternative medicine to reflect changes in the healthcare scene.

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Growing Marijuana: What you Need to Know – Baltimore Post-Examiner

Posted: at 12:50 pm

With the growing, selling, and consumption of marijuana being legalized in many states in the US, it has become a lucrative investment for those who are forward-thinking enough to get into the market early.

There are now so many more studies showing the benefits of marijuana-derived products like CBD and THC, that more people are willing to try this alternative medicine for themselves.

At first, it might seem like growing and selling marijuana products is a simple thing to do, but there is a lot to consider before you plant your first seed. We are going to go over some things that you need to know about before you start growing marijuana.

If you want to start a business growing cannabis, you need to consider the legalities before doing so. Firstly, is it legal in the state in which you reside? There are 1o states where marijuana is legal and more could follow soon.

Some states allow recreational and medical use, but they do not allow the production of commercialization. The states that allow the legal distribution of marijuana are Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Massachusetts, Maine, Colorado, California, and Alaska.

To sell legally, you need to get a license from the state authorities where you live. The basic requirements include a business format, a tax ID number, DBA filing, general business license, sales tax permit, and various other permissions particular to individual states.

Once you have all of this in order, you can start producing marijuana.

Marijuana plants, just like all other living things, need the right environment to flourish. There are many strains of cannabis that have different growing preferences, and they have different effects when smoked or ingested. Now, it is easy to order seeds online with the exact description of the product and what is required to grow it successfully.

It is also important to note that even in states where selling and growing is sanctioned there are restrictions as to where the growing can be done. There are usually restrictions about how close it is to a school, park, library, or other public areas.

You have two options when thinking about where to grow, outdoor or indoor.

When considering an outdoor facility, you have to look into your local state requirements. Most states require a fence or boundary around the plantation with minimum height requirements. Also, some states limit the plant height to 10 feet tall.

With outdoor plants, you have to consider the climate. Is there enough sunlight during the average day? Is there too much rain, snow, or other extreme weather conditions? These are all things to consider when planning outdoor cultivation.

Indoor facilities are generally considered a better option because you can control the growing environment much more precisely. However, the costs of setting up an indoor grow can be prohibitive.

You must consider temperature, humidity, lighting, irrigation, growing mediums, and pest control. If you get all these things right, you can expect to produce a lot of quality cannabis and make substantial profits.

When running a business, it is important to be as efficient as possible. To attract more clients, having a reputation as an environmentally friendly grower is important, too.

It is a good idea to invest in solar panels to power lighting, watering systems, and your other production energy requirements. You should also recycle water and install a rainwater collection system to supply your plants. A few years after the initial capital outlay, your reduced energy and water bills will increase the profitability of your business.

Above is a general overview of what you need to know about growing cannabis. However, selling is another challenge. You have to consider the security of your plants, proper employee training, and background checking, packaging, transportation, product testing, and marketing.

Producing marijuana is a growing business that is set to progress further as more states legalize the production and sales of cannabis. It requires some effort and planning in the early stages, but having the first-mover advantage will ensure the best possible chance of success. Now is a great time to consider this pioneering industry.

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Growing Marijuana: What you Need to Know - Baltimore Post-Examiner

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PMDs and fake news law are among issues MPs will raise in Parliament on Monday – The Straits Times

Posted: at 12:50 pm

SINGAPORE - MPs will seek greater clarity on the issue of active mobility and personal mobility devices (PMDs) when Parliament sits on Monday (Jan 6).

The questions four MPs have filed were on cycling paths and footpaths, e-scooters and electric bicycles, as well as food delivery riders, according to the agenda for the sitting - or Order Paper - issued by the Clerk of Parliament on Friday (Jan 3).

These include whether there are plans to regulate electric bicycle use on roads, how many more kilometres of cycling paths will be built by year's end and whether there are measures to ensure the increase in electric bike riders as a result of the PMD ban will not lead to more accidents, or road traffic and active mobility offences.

Their questions follow the implementation on New Year's Day of the Land Transport Authority's zero-tolerance stance on PMDs on footpaths.

The footpath ban kicked in on Nov 5 following a series of e-scooter-related accidents but until New Year's Eve, the authorities had been issuing warnings to errant riders.

Under the new rules, e-scooters, which had been banned on roads previously, are now confined to cycling paths.

Other issues MPs will raise include the application of Singapore's fake news law and the Ministry of Education's policy on withholding results slip from students who have not paid in full their school fees.

Nominated MP Anthea Ong has filed two questions for the Communications and Information Minister S. Iswaran on the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (Pofma).

She wants to know how the threshold of public interest is determined and measured in the case of online falsehoods, whether the Ministry of Communications and Information will consider creating a central listing of all issued directions on the Pofma website, and what steps are being taken to maintain public trust in the light of perceptions of a partisan political bias over recent applications of the law.

Dr Teo Ho Pin (Bukit Panjang) and Mr Lim Biow Chuan (Mountbatten) have filed questions for Education Minister Ong Ye Kung, asking how many students' results slips have been withheld by schools in the last few years and whether the Education Ministry will review the practice.

Workers' Party chief Pritam Singh's (Aljunied GRC) question for Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong is whether the Electoral Boundaries Review Committee has completed its deliberations and when its report will be released to the public.

Mr Louis Ng (Nee Soon GRC) and Mr Ong Teng Koon (Marsiling-Yew Tee GRC) will raise the issue of cat ownership in Housing Board flats.

Seven Bills will also be introduced at Monday's session.

They include the Transport Ministry's new Bill on the control and licensing of shared mobility enterprises, which may include bike- and car-sharing firms, as well as amendments to the Merchant Shipping (Maritime Labour Convention) Act and the Active Mobility Act.

The Law Ministry's new Bill is on the Singapore Convention on Mediation, an international treaty named after Singapore that was signed by 46 countries in August last year, plus an amendment to the Geographical Indications Act.

The Ministry of the Environment and Water Resources will file amendments to the Hazardous Waste (Control of Export, Import and Transit) Act and the National Environment Agency Act.

Three Bills are up for debate, including the Health Ministry's Healthcare Services Bill that would replace the Private Hospitals and Medical Clinics Act.

The new law has a wider scope that includes traditional medicine, allied healthcare such as physiotherapy, as well as complementary and alternative medicine to reflect changes in the healthcare scene.

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Can CBD Help Inflammation? What To Know – Odisha Diary

Posted: at 12:49 pm

The CBD industry is booming because of the promising health benefits that this cannabinoid compound provides. Cannabidiol or CBD has truly gained so much popularity in the world of health and wellness. It is a great pain reliever and helps reduce signs and symptoms of inflammation or infection. Is CBD a promising alternative medicine to protect and boost immunity?

In this post, youll learn more about how CBD can help ease inflammation so that you can choose the best CBD product for you and your loved ones.

CBD Has Anti-inflammatory Properties

Cannabidiol or CBD is effective for inflammation because it has natural anti-inflammatory properties. The human body is composed of an endocannabinoid system or ECS comprised of endocannabinoids, or endogenous lipid-based neurotransmitters that attach to cannabinoid receptors. The proteins of cannabinoid receptors are present in the immune system, as well as the peripheral and central nervous system, including the vertebrae and the brain.

Here are the good-to-know facts about CBDs anti-inflammatory properties:

CBD Reduces Pain and Inflammation

As CBD enters the human body, it attaches itself to CB2 receptors, which trigger the body to produce natural cannabinoids. These natural cannabinoids attach themselves to CB2 receptors to counteract pain and inflammation.

In a CBD pain management study, cannabinoids, including CBD, can help treat pain. CB2 receptors are confined to immune and lymphoid tissues, which are proven to be essential mediators for suppressing inflammation and pain. CBD promotes the signaling of adenosine receptors, a neurotransmitter or nervous system chemical, which inhibits the perception of pain and promotes relaxation and sleep.

CBD Lowers the Risk of Heart Disease

Heart disease can be caused by different reasons, such as stress, an unhealthy lifestyle, diet, and bacteria. One type of heart disease is endocarditis or inflammation of the inner lining of the heart valves and chambers. Endocarditis occurs when fungi, bacteria, or other microorganisms spread and reach the heart from other parts of your body, such as the mouth and lungs.

For your heart health, its high time to consider taking high-quality CBD. It will help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. You may consume CBD oil every day as a daily supplement to your heart medications.

Here are the different ways you can administer CBD for your cardiovascular health:

CBD Is Immunosuppressive

The mechanism of CBD involves the direct suppression of immune cell activation. It promotes regulatory cells to help control other immune cells, thus reducing or eliminating signs and symptoms of inflammation, such as the following:

Conclusion

Yes, CBD can help inflammation. Cannabidiol or CBD is a potent cannabinoid compound that can help reduce the signs and symptoms of inflammation, pain, stress, and anxiety. Its good for the heart, nervous system, and the immune system because CBD attaches to cannabinoid receptors to stimulate immune, nervous, and heart responses, promoting health and wellness.

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CAT Score and SGRQ Definitions of Chronic Bronchitis as an Alternative | COPD – Dove Medical Press

Posted: December 30, 2019 at 12:46 pm

Joon Young Choi,1 Hyoung Kyu Yoon,2 Kyeong-Cheol Shin,3 So-Young Park,4 Chang Youl Lee,5 Seung Won Ra,6 Ki Suck Jung,7 Kwang Ha Yoo,4 Chang-Hoon Lee,8 Chin Kook Rhee9

1Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincents Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Republic of Korea; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yeouido St Marys Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Division of Pulmonology and Allergy, Regional Center for Respiratory Disease, Yeungnam University Medical Center, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 5Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University Medical Center, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea; 6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan, Republic of Korea; 7Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University Medical School, Anyang, Republic of Korea; 8Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 9Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Marys Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Correspondence: Chin Kook RheeDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Marys Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpodaero, Seochogu, Seoul 06591, Republic of KoreaTel +82 2 2258 6067Fax +82 2 599 3589Email chinkook77@gmail.com

Purpose: Previous studies have used various definitions to classify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients into chronic bronchitis (CB) and non-CB patients. This study was performed to identify differences among three definitions of CB based on the classical method, St. Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and the CAT (COPD Assessment Test) score.Patients and methods: We extracted data from the multicenter Korea COPD Subgroup Study (KOCOSS) cohort, for which patients recruited from among 47 medical centers in South Korea beginning in April 2012. Patients were classified according to three different definitions of CB: 1) classical definition; 2) SGRQ (using questions regarding cough and sputum); and 3) CAT score (comprising cough [CAT1] and sputum [CAT2] subscale scores).Results: A total of 2694 patients were enrolled in this study. The proportions of CB were 10.8%, 35.8%, and 24.0% according to the classical, SGRQ, and CAT definitions, respectively. The three definitions yielded consistently significant differences between CB and non-CB patients in modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale CAT score, SGRQ score, number of moderate-to-severe exacerbations per year and forced expiratory volume in 1 second. By three definitions, CB consistently predicted future risk of exacerbation. The kappa coefficient of agreement between the classical definition and SGRQ definition was 0.29, that of the classical definition and CAT definition was 0.32, and that of the SGRQ definition and CAT definition was 0.44.Conclusion: Patients with CB according to the new definitions based on SGRQ or CAT score showed similar clinical characteristics to those defined according to the classical definition. The new CB definitions may be used as alternatives to the classical definition.

Keywords: chronic bronchitis, CAT score, SGRQ score, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, KOCOSS database

This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License.By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

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Alternative therapy: France to lower homeopathy reimbursement on 1 January – RTL Today

Posted: at 12:46 pm

Traditional medicine vs homeopathy has been a battle occupying France for the past two years and is soon reaching its conclusion. As of 1 January, the reimbursement rate will drop before reaching a rate of no reimbursement in a year's time.

Currently, homeopathic products in France are reimbursed up to 30% by social security services, a rate due to drop to 15% as of Wednesday. In 2021, homeopathy will be completely delisted from social security reimbursement in France.

The decision, made official over the course of several decrees in October and November, was announce on 9 July. The announcement came as a conclusion to a long and controversial debate. The move will affect some 1,200 homeopathic products, some of which are well known in France (like Gelsemium, purported to help again anxiety).

The notorious Oscillococcinum, which allegedly treats flu symptoms, is not on the list of products due to be delisted, as the product was never initially on the list of products to receive a partial reimbursement.

To come to the decision, French Minister of HealthAgns Buzyn referred back to a report provided by the Health High Authority (HAS) in June. The institution concluded that homeopathic products do not have sufficient scientific proof to justify reimbursement.

The transition period ahead of homeopathic products being delisted in 2021 will allow time for education amongst patients and allow manufacturers to organise themselves, the minister explained in July.

The new year will not bring the end of this decision, as the laboratories that produce homeopathic products have taken steps to dispute the decree. Two laboratories (Boiron and Lehning) have submitted complaints to the state council.

Over the past years, the debate experience a spectacular high point in March 2018 when the newspaper le Figaro published a strong letter against homeopathy and other alternative medicines. The letter was signed by 124 health professionals who consequently founded a collective named Fakemed.

Although the fate of homeopathy and its reimbursement has been decided, some of those professionals who signed the letter have been subject to disciplinary procedures in the medical order. The National Syndicate of Homeopathic Doctors (SNMHF) accused the signatories of not adhering to a medical brotherhood. The complain was addressed to around 60 doctors working throughout France. 20 verdicts have been made, varying depending on the region. Eight doctors received warnings, three complaints were dismissed, and one was released.

Fakemed expects remaining decisions to be pronounced mid-January. The collective is concerned that some doctors could be suspended.

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Oldest cure that never spoils: Honey – Daily Sabah

Posted: at 12:46 pm

With winter months come runny noses, scratchy throats and headaches. Maybe not a cure to all but honey can be used to relieve and prevent many of our little and sometimes big aches and illnesses.

Alternative cough syrup

There are many remedies made out of honey to ease the raspy throat, especially for children. One version that is a traditional Turkish remedy, which personally helped me. Black radish is carved out, cut off a bit of the lower part (the root) and add a spoonful of honey into the radish bowl. Put that into a glass so that the radish infused honey can drip into it. Drinking that usually helps with throat aches. Doctors warn pregnant or breastfeeding women from consuming this, as it might have negative effects on them.

A second very popular remedy is paring up the honey with another healthy ingredient: lemons! Putting a few lemon slices into a cup of honey not only helps with the throat but with other symptoms of the common cold as well.

Honey itself is considered a good cough suppressant, a study published on "Jama Pediatrics" shows. In the study, parents preferred honey for the symptomatic relief of the children's coughs at night and their difficulty to sleep, which was caused by upper respiratory tract infections.

Toothaches

Cloves are known for their numbing properties so chewing on them when you get a toothache makes sense. But adding honey into the mix makes for a mixture that might prevent infections, which could make the toothaches worse. The traditional remedy recommends adding a few cloves onto a few tablespoons of honey and let it rest in it.

Lowers cholesterol levels

Honey itself does not have any cholesterol and with the vitamins and microelements, it lowers the "bad" cholesterol levels in the blood. Several pieces of research suggest that the so-called "bad" LDL cholesterol can be lowered by 6-11% with the consumption of honey.

The classic: Helping you fall and stay asleep

The reason why people sometimes wake up in the middle of the night might be the lack of glycogen in our brain, the kidneys releasing adrenaline and cortisol making you wake up, studies suggest. As honey contains glycogen it should be consumed before you go to sleep, lowering your adrenaline low and helping you at least stay asleep.

Wounds

Even in ancient Egypt honey was used to seal off wounds and help them heal faster. And with its antimicrobial properties, the wound won't get infected. This is even supported by several studies, researching alternative medicine.

Some scientists even claim that it helps to heal extreme eczema and eliminated dry patches, initiating new skin growth. The best way to help with eczema is to mix the honey with equal parts of ground cinnamon and apply it to the affected areas, they suggest.

While honey has even more benefits than the ones listed here it should be noted that honey is dangerous for children under 1-year-old. But mind you, this content which includes advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for a qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information.

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Whole-Person Healing: Celebrating 20 Years of Integrative Medicine at MSK – On Cancer – Memorial Sloan Kettering

Posted: at 12:46 pm

Yoga therapist Tina Paul (back) and Lori Weisenberg-Catalano work on form.

Chief of the Integrative Medicine Service Jun Mao performs acupuncture on a patient.

Music therapist Alessandro Ricciarelli and an MSK Kids patient play the guitar.

Summary

The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering is celebrating 20 years of incorporating complementary medicine into the care plans of people with cancer.Read on to learn about its first days and whats to come.

As a new millennium approached in 1999, another beginning was underway: the creation of the Integrative Medicine Service (IMS) at Memorial Sloan Kettering. The IMS was built on the premise that healing from cancer goes beyond standard medical treatments promoting wellness in mind and spirit can help people feel whole again, too.

For 20 years, the IMS staff has cared for hundreds of thousands of people with cancer and led studies that have furthered the field of integrative oncology. The program has always been rooted in evidence-based medicine, says IMS Chief Jun Mao. Unlike alternative medicine, which uses unproven methods instead of conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, the IMS works with a persons primary MSK cancer care team to support them holistically. Specialized integrative medicine doctors consult with patients and create a road map for their therapeutic needs. Services such as fitness training, acupuncture, meditation, yoga, massage, music therapy, and more are tailored to the individuals symptoms and promote restoration.

The blend of programs at MSK was the brainchild of philanthropist Laurance Rockefeller, who was on MSKs Boards of Overseers and Managers for more than 50 years. He believed that we have to take care of quality-of-life issues for people affected by cancer, Dr. Mao says. The first IMS Chief, Barrie Cassileth, established the prototype for the IMS and later founded the Society for Integrative Oncology, a multidisciplinary international society with more than 500 members from over 30 countries.

Integrative Medicine

Our Integrative Medicine Service offers a range of wellness therapies that are designed to work together with traditional medical treatments. Visit us today.

Barrie wanted me to continue to build upon the strong foundation she created and take this program to the next level, Dr. Mao says. Mr. Rockefellers legacy is now being carried forward by his daughter Lucy R. Waletzky, an MSK Board member who continues to support the IMS.

Integrative medicine services at MSK are more accessible than ever. Today, patients can receive acupuncture at all of MSKs regional locations. Through telemedicine, they can consult with an IMS doctor and take mindfulness classes from home. They can also access an online video library of mind-body programs guided by IMS specialists, including a series of instructional tai chi videos. In 2019, the IMS began offering pediatric integrative medicine consultations through MSK Kids. The IMS continues to lead integrative oncology research. In April 2019, Dr. Maos team published findings showing that changes to sleep behavior and acupuncture can offer persistent relief for insomnia.

Dr. Mao envisions an even more robust future, with expanded in-person and digital offerings. MSKs About Herbs database, an online hub of information on vitamins and supplements, has had roughly seven million visitors from 194 countries over the past 15 years. We really want to harness the power of technology so that patients have access to MSKs experts and services at their fingertips, he says.

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Whole-Person Healing: Celebrating 20 Years of Integrative Medicine at MSK - On Cancer - Memorial Sloan Kettering

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VIDEO: Plymouth wellness center combines alternative therapy, modern medicine for optimal healing – Wicked Local Plymouth

Posted: at 12:46 pm

When Tara Green decided to open Green Tara Wellness Center in Plymouth, she wasnt trying to get cute with the name. OK, maybe she was just a little.

When Tara Green decided to open Green Tara Wellness Center in Plymouth, she wasnt trying to get cute with the name. OK, maybe she was just a little, but her companys title actually has another, more significant meaning.

"Green Tara is the Hindu goddess of compassion," Green said. "Were not a religious organization, but we are spiritually based. We bridge traditional mental health services with alternate therapies to provide an integrated approach to wellness. We encourage people to make a physical, spiritual and emotional connection to find healing and inner peace."

Located at 147 Court St., next to Christ Church, the new center offers a variety of programs, including breath work, psychological services, health coaching, reiki, intuitive energy healing, acupressure, oracle card reading, Ayurvedic therapies, infinity healing, essential oils and more.

Green Tara Wellness Center opened in September with practitioners from around the South Shore. Green wanted to create a place where likeminded specialists could provide a variety of therapies to help people find the medical solutions traditional, alternative or a combination of the two that work best for them.

"We are a group of heart-centered professionals that have come together a as team to help people with their issues," she said. "The common thread is that we are all kind and compassionate people working together to help others transform and heal."

Green said her team can help individuals and families with a range of health issues by working on the connection between

mind, body and soul. This holistic approach integrates modern medical practices to help people achieve maximum wellness.

"One of the areas we specialize in is PANS, or pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome," she said. "This is an autoimmune disorder that often affects children and is usually caused by a virus or bacterial infection, such as strep or Lymes disease, that have triggered this response and often goes misdiagnosed and mistreated."

To treat PANS, the professionals at Green Tara Wellness Center work in concert with traditional health professionals to help the child. A regimen of antibiotics coupled with alternative therapies is often used to reverse the illness, which can cause children to exhibit a variety of neuropsychiatricsymptoms, including obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety, ADHD behaviors, personality changes and sleep disorders.

Green Tara Wellness Center offers a range of services and workshops. There are 10 practitioners based at the Plymouth location:

"We believe in living a life full of joy, gratitude and compassion," Green said. "We focus on helping clients better connect to themselves and to live vibrantly so they can achieve healthier bodies, minds and spirits."

For more information, contact Green Tara Wellness Center at 781-724-6510 or visit https://www.greentarawellnesscenter.com/.

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VIDEO: Plymouth wellness center combines alternative therapy, modern medicine for optimal healing - Wicked Local Plymouth

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