When and where to see the International Space Station above Cornwall this week – Falmouth Packet

Posted: October 4, 2020 at 3:04 am

The International Space Station will once again be visible above the skies of Cornwall this week - weather permitting of course.

The station flies above our heads constantly, and orbits the planet every 90 minutes at a height of over 250 miles.

Of course, it's impossible to see during the day, but at night - and with the space station's orbit passing over Britain just so - it takes on the appearance of a bright star moving across the sky.

It resembles a glowing orb without the telltale flashes of an aircraft's wing drifting silently through the dark.

It goes through periods when we won't be able to see it for months, as its diagonal orbit crosses other parts of the planet, but every now and then, there comes a space of a few weeks when it flies overhead - and at night.

Times vary ever so slightly depending on your location, but we've used those given by NASA's Spot the Station website for Truro, the location it gives for Cornwall.

Here are the dates and times of when the station will become visible:

September 28

Passing over at 8.49pm, for two minutes, appearing at 33 above WNW and leaving at 54 above E.

September 29

First passing over at 8.01pm, for four minutes, appearing at 33 above WNW and leaving at 18 above E.

Later passing over at 9.37pm for less than one minute, at 17 above W leaving 25 above W.

September 30

Passing over at 8.50pm, for two minutes, appearing at 26 above W and leaving at 59 above SSE.

October 1

First passing over at 8.03pm, for three minutes, appearing at 33 above WNW and leaving at 22 above ESE.

Later passing over at 9.e9pm, for one minute, appearing at 11 above W and leaving at 16 above WSW.

October 2

First passing over at 7.20pm, for less than one minute, appearing at 15 above E and leaving at 10 above E.

Later passing over at 8.52pm, for two minutes, appearing at 19 above W and leaving at 32 above SSW.

October 3

First passing over at 8.05pm, for three minutes, appearing at 30 above W and leaving at 19 above SE.

October 4

First passing over at 7.18pm, for four minutes, appearing at 40 above W and leaving at 12 above ESE.

Later passing over at 8.54pm, for two minutes, appearing at 12 above WSW and leaving at 15 above SSW.

October 5

Passing over at 8.07pm, for two minutes, appearing at 20 above WSW and leaving at 11 above SSE.

You should have no trouble spotting the International Space Station as it drifts overhead - we say 'drift', but it's actually travelling at over 17,000 mph.

You'll easily be able to spot it with the naked eye (cloud cover permitting of course), though even modestly priced binoculars may be able to pick out some of the station's details, like its large solar panels.

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When and where to see the International Space Station above Cornwall this week - Falmouth Packet

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