Health care reforms not keeping pace with needs of Canadians, says report

The Health Council of Canada releases annual report on health care renewal

SASKATOON, SK, May 23, 2013 /CNW/ – Today, the Health Council of Canada releases Progress Report 2013: Health care renewal in Canada, highlighting the progress achieved by governments in five key areas: wait times, primary health care and electronic health records, pharmaceuticals management, disease prevention/health promotion and Aboriginal health.

The report finds that, overall, efforts at reform are not keeping pace with the changing health care needs of Canadians. There is variability of access to services across the country.

“Regardless of where you live in Canada, Canadians should be able to access a primary care provider when care is needed, they should have timely access to surgeries, and the cost of medications should not cause undue financial hardship,” says Dr. Jack Kitts, Chair of the Health Council of Canada. “However, because of the variability across the country, this is not the case.”

To achieve better health care for all Canadians, the report calls for governments to set clear policy goals with clear lines of responsibility, to continue the spread of innovative practices, and to support collaborative efforts across all jurisdictions, including the federal government.

“Progress is made when comprehensive strategies with clear targets are put in place,” says Dr. Kitts. “And once those strategies are in place, we need to constantly monitor the performance of the governments and Canadians need to hold them accountable.”

The report points out that Canadian premiers have begun working together on select initiatives, such as the joint pricing of prescription drugs, which saves significant health care dollars. The Health Council recommends this continue, because when governments work together with common goals, the quality of health care and access to it improve for all Canadians.

Along with the need for accountability and collaboration, the report also calls for the sharing of innovative practices. “Sharing innovative practices allows provinces to implement programs we know are making a difference without having to ‘reinvent the wheel’,” says John G. Abbott, CEO of the Health Council of Canada. “The Health Council helps identify and expand the reach of innovative practices across the country through our Health Innovation Portal – a database of over 360 innovative practices.”

An example of an innovative practice highlighted in the report is the First Nations Health Authority in British Columbia, which was established in 2012 and puts health care delivery and decision-making in the hands of First Nations people. This shift is the result of several agreements made between BC First Nations and the provincial and federal governments, in efforts to close gaps in health status between First Nations people and other residents of British Columbia.

Key report findings include:

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Health care reforms not keeping pace with needs of Canadians, says report

Health Council of Canada releases annual progress report on health care renewal

Progress Report focuses on innovative practices that are achieving results

TORONTO, June 4, 2012 /CNW/ – Today, the Health Council of Canada releases Progress Report 2012: Health care renewal in Canada, highlighting the progress achieved by governments to date in five key areas: home and community care, health human resources, telehealth, access to care in the North, and comparable health indicators since the 2003 health accord was signed.

The report finds that, overall, provinces and territories have met most of what was expected of them in these five areas. They met their commitments to expand home care coverage, to increase the supply of health care providers, to expand use of telehealth services, to improve access to care in the North and to improve public reporting.

Key findings related to five of the accord commitments include:

Although, the report finds that most provincial and territorial governments met their commitments, it also questions whether it was enough to move health care forward. The evidence suggests that since the accords contained vague commitments with few targets, there was more emphasis on putting provinces and territories on similar footing than to push them towards achieving more change and advancements in health care delivery.

“Real progress is made when comprehensive strategies with concrete targets are put in place,” said Dr. Jack Kitts, Chair of the Health Council of Canada. “An improved approach to goal-setting and performance measurement in the health system will provide greater impetus to change and achieve higher levels of progress.”

The report found that the accords established a series of comparable health indicators for the provinces and territories to report on to the public beginning in 2004. However, comparable reporting only lasted a few years, largely because provinces and territories began to develop reporting frameworks to address their respective planning needs. As a result, the provinces and territories have not consistently reported on progress in the same manner, particularly in a way that is comparable and useful to other governments, the health system and the public. This lack of clear, consistent and comparable information about health system performance makes it challenging for agencies such as the Health Council to provide a national picture to Canadians on progress being made in health systems across Canada.

“What we found this year is that there is more work to be done, especially on comparable indicators. But there is good news. We found a wide array of innovative practices like telehealth services for First Nations in Manitoba or a model of care initiative in Nova Scotia, said John G. Abbott, CEO of the Health Council of Canada. “If practices like these are adopted more widely, they could accelerate progress across Canada.”

Progress Report 2012: Health care renewal in Canada describes overall progress in Canada highlighting innovative practices from across Canada demonstrating how this progress has been achieved. The Health Council website provides additional details on the progress being achieved by each of the federal, provincial and territorial governments on these five themes. And, for the first time, the report includes activities from Alberta which recently joined the Health Council this year.

About the Health Council of Canada Created by the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care Renewal, the Health Council of Canada is an independent national agency that reports on the progress of health care renewal. The Council provides a system-wide perspective on health care reform in Canada, and disseminates information on innovative practices and innovation across the country. The Councillors are appointed by the participating provincial and territorial governments and the Government of Canada.

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Health Council of Canada releases annual progress report on health care renewal

Client Build 5 UPDATE: Personal Super Computer 2011 (SR-2 X5690 OCZ Vertex 3 GTX590 Nvidia Tesla) – Video


06-06-2011 12:48 Ok everyone, here is the much anticipated update and progress report on my Client Build 5: PSC 2011. We’ve had somewhat of a rough going on things, fitment issues on the mobo tray, defective motherboard and some paint issues. Allow these setbacks have been unfortunate, we’ve made a lot of progress as well. This build is going to be epic! 🙂 Enjoy, Trubyd44 T

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Client Build 5 UPDATE: Personal Super Computer 2011 (SR-2 X5690 OCZ Vertex 3 GTX590 Nvidia Tesla) – Video