12


List Of MicroNations No Trouble – Don’t Mess

With several important qualifications, a micronation is any entity which purports to be or has the appearance of being a sovereign state but isnt. Micronations are typically created and maintained by one person or family. Many exist solely on the internet, or in the imagination of their creators. Some have a more corporeal existence, making ambit claims over, or occasionally even physically occupying defined geographical locations albeit often tiny, remote or uninhabitable ones and producing physical artefacts such as stamps, coins, banknotes, passports, medals and flags. Micronations are generally viewed as ephemeral, eccentric and somewhat amusing by most external observers. Micronations should not to be confused with, which are small extant sovereign states such as the Andorra, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, San Marino and the Vatican. Nor should they be confused with, or exile government groups, which typically have many hundreds or thousands of active supporters, and are often engaged in armed campaigns in support of their aims against the governments of one or more sovereign states. The purpose of this website is to serve as a portal to the world of micronations, document the micronation phenomenon in as objective, accurate, comprehensive and accessible a manner as possible, and to facilitate communication between micronationalists and those interested in micronations.

Read more:

List Of MicroNations No Trouble – Don’t Mess

Talossa – Wikipedia

Kingdom of Talossa

Regipts Talossan

Flag

Anthem:Chirluscha l Glhe Stand Tall, Talossans

Declared

Total

Estimate

Total

Talossa, officially the Kingdom of Talossa (Talossan: Regipts Talossan [redipts tsan](listen)), is one of the earliest micronations founded in 1979 by then 14-year-old Robert Ben Madison of Milwaukee and at first confined to his bedroom; he adopted the name after discovering that the word means “inside the house” in Finnish. Among the first such projects still maintained, it has kept up a web presence since 1995.[1][2] Its internet and media exposure since the late 1990s contributed to the appearance of other subsequent internet micronations.

Talossa claims several places on Earth as its territory, especially a portion of Milwaukee, calling it the “Greater Talossan Area”; no such claim, however, is recognized by the United Nations or by any other nation. As of June 23, 2016, the number of active citizens is said to be 213.[3] Including those who are no longer citizens for various reasons, those who are under the age of 14 and so are not yet citizens, and those from the ESB Affair[4] there are 493 total registered individuals.

Talossan culture has been developed over the years by Robert Madison and other fans. The Talossan language, also created by Madison in 1980,[5] claims a vocabulary of 35,000 root words and 121,000 derived words[6] including fieschada, meaning “love at first sight”.[7][8]

Talossa was supposedly founded as a kingdom on December 26, 1979,[9] by Madison, shortly after the death of his mother. Madison maintained Talossa throughout his adolescence, publishing a handwritten newspaper and designing a flag and emblem. During this time its only other members were about a dozen relatives and acquaintances. This changed in the mid-1990s, when a series of stories in the New York Times[10][11] and Wired,[8] subsequently republished elsewhere, drew his website to popular attention. Several new “citizens” joined Talossa as a result, and Madison began to claim that he was the inventor of the term “micronation”.

Madison disestablished the “kingdom” in late 2005, but a number of online groups that have no connection with the original founder have since claimed to represent Talossa.[12]

Madison registered “Talossa”[13] as a service mark in 2005 and created Talossa, Inc., a Wisconsin not-for-profit corporation. By 2013 the service mark had been cancelled and the corporation had been administratively dissolved.[14]

Madison invented Talossan ([tsan] or el glhe Talossan [ e tsan]) as a constructed language for his so-called micronation. With its relatively large vocabulary, it is said to be one of the most detailed fictional languages ever invented.[8] The Association of Talossan Language Organisations (ATLO) maintains a website describing the language for new learners, providing language information, research and online translation to and from English.[16] The ISO 639 designation is “tzl”.[17]

The language is overseen by the Comit per l’tzil del Glhe (“Committee for the Use of the Language,” CG), a group formed by Madison which periodically issues both Arestadas (decrees) to describe and document changes in language usage of the language and Pienamaintschen (supplements), to update the vocabulary list. The CG maintains a multi-lingual website providing access to the recent recommendations of the Committee.[18]

See more here:

Talossa – Wikipedia

List Of MicroNations No Trouble – Don’t Mess

With several important qualifications, a micronation is any entity which purports to be or has the appearance of being a sovereign state but isnt. Micronations are typically created and maintained by one person or family. Many exist solely on the internet, or in the imagination of their creators. Some have a more corporeal existence, making ambit claims over, or occasionally even physically occupying defined geographical locations albeit often tiny, remote or uninhabitable ones and producing physical artefacts such as stamps, coins, banknotes, passports, medals and flags. Micronations are generally viewed as ephemeral, eccentric and somewhat amusing by most external observers. Micronations should not to be confused with, which are small extant sovereign states such as the Andorra, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, San Marino and the Vatican. Nor should they be confused with, or exile government groups, which typically have many hundreds or thousands of active supporters, and are often engaged in armed campaigns in support of their aims against the governments of one or more sovereign states. The purpose of this website is to serve as a portal to the world of micronations, document the micronation phenomenon in as objective, accurate, comprehensive and accessible a manner as possible, and to facilitate communication between micronationalists and those interested in micronations.

Originally posted here:

List Of MicroNations No Trouble – Don’t Mess

Talossa – Wikipedia

Kingdom of Talossa

Regipts Talossan

Flag

Anthem:Chirluscha l Glhe Stand Tall, Talossans

Declared

Total

Estimate

Total

Talossa, officially the Kingdom of Talossa (Talossan: Regipts Talossan [redipts tsan](listen)), is one of the earliest micronations founded in 1979 by then 14-year-old Robert Ben Madison of Milwaukee and at first confined to his bedroom; he adopted the name after discovering that the word means “inside the house” in Finnish. Among the first such projects still maintained, it has kept up a web presence since 1995.[1][2] Its internet and media exposure since the late 1990s contributed to the appearance of other subsequent internet micronations.

Talossa claims several places on Earth as its territory, especially a portion of Milwaukee, calling it the “Greater Talossan Area”; no such claim, however, is recognized by the United Nations or by any other nation. As of June 23, 2016, the number of active citizens is said to be 213.[3] Including those who are no longer citizens for various reasons, those who are under the age of 14 and so are not yet citizens, and those from the ESB Affair[4] there are 493 total registered individuals.

Talossan culture has been developed over the years by Robert Madison and other fans. The Talossan language, also created by Madison in 1980,[5] claims a vocabulary of 35,000 root words and 121,000 derived words[6] including fieschada, meaning “love at first sight”.[7][8]

Talossa was supposedly founded as a kingdom on December 26, 1979,[9] by Madison, shortly after the death of his mother. Madison maintained Talossa throughout his adolescence, publishing a handwritten newspaper and designing a flag and emblem. During this time its only other members were about a dozen relatives and acquaintances. This changed in the mid-1990s, when a series of stories in the New York Times[10][11] and Wired,[8] subsequently republished elsewhere, drew his website to popular attention. Several new “citizens” joined Talossa as a result, and Madison began to claim that he was the inventor of the term “micronation”.

Madison disestablished the “kingdom” in late 2005, but a number of online groups that have no connection with the original founder have since claimed to represent Talossa.[12]

Madison registered “Talossa”[13] as a service mark in 2005 and created Talossa, Inc., a Wisconsin not-for-profit corporation. By 2013 the service mark had been cancelled and the corporation had been administratively dissolved.[14]

Madison invented Talossan ([tsan] or el glhe Talossan [ e tsan]) as a constructed language for his so-called micronation. With its relatively large vocabulary, it is said to be one of the most detailed fictional languages ever invented.[8] The Association of Talossan Language Organisations (ATLO) maintains a website describing the language for new learners, providing language information, research and online translation to and from English.[16] The ISO 639 designation is “tzl”.[17]

The language is overseen by the Comit per l’tzil del Glhe (“Committee for the Use of the Language,” CG), a group formed by Madison which periodically issues both Arestadas (decrees) to describe and document changes in language usage of the language and Pienamaintschen (supplements), to update the vocabulary list. The CG maintains a multi-lingual website providing access to the recent recommendations of the Committee.[18]

Visit link:

Talossa – Wikipedia

We met 27 people who claim to be the rulers of their own countries … – VICE News

Molossia. Slobovia. The Aerican Empire. If you dont remember any of these countries from geography class, youre not alone. They are all micronations, self-declared sovereign states not formally recognized by any official authority (other than each other). This summer, representatives from 27 of these would-be fiefdoms gathered for a summit in Dunwoody, Georgia. While several of these micronations claim that they are their own autonomous countries, many are created as a political protest, for artistic reasons or as a social experiment.

MicroCon 2017 was hosted by Veronica Boritz, who also identifies as Queen Anastasia von Elphberg of Ruritania. The event, which lasted four days, included multiple outings for the micronational leaders, a symposium with speeches on subjectslike Micronational post system and Women in micronations: Starting your own or supporting your dictator husband.

This segment originally aired August 2, 2017, on VICE News Tonight on HBO.

View original post here:

We met 27 people who claim to be the rulers of their own countries … – VICE News

Apple Says It Will Overtake Samsung Pay By Year’s End – ChannelNews

Apple has indicated it plans to launch Apple Pay in a number of new territories before the start of 2018, a feat that would see it catch up to and overtake current digital wallet frontrunner Samsung.

Speaking at the companys earnings call yesterday, Apple CFO Luca Maestri says that the reach, usage, and functionality of Apple Pay continued to grow.

He claims that Apple Pay is by far the number one NFC payment service on mobile devices, with nearly 90 percent of all transactions globally. Momentum is strongest in international markets, where the infrastructure for mobile payments has developed faster than in the US.

In fact, three out of four Apple Pay transactions happen outside of the US. With the launch of iOS 11 in the fall, our users in the US will be able to make and receive person-to-person payments quickly, easily, and securely.

Maestri also confirmed that the company plans to have Apple Pay live in the UAE, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden before the end of this calendar year.

If Apple can follow through on this promise, itll see them retake the top spot from Samsung Pay when it comes to the amount of regions supporting the service.

As of now, Apple Pay is available in 16 countries (depending on whether or not you count micronations like Vatican City and the Isle of Mann).

In comparison, Samsung Pay operates in 19 countries and Googles Android Pay boasts only 14 regions.

Read more from the original source:

Apple Says It Will Overtake Samsung Pay By Year’s End – ChannelNews

Australia’s hidden micronations: It’s not the size of the country but how you rule it – 9news.com.au

Prince Paul created his principality after a stoush with Mosman council in 2004. (principalityofwy.com)

The self-proclaimed leader of a micronation on Sydney’s North Shore says he has a plan to ease hostility between the US and North Korea.

Prince Paul Delprat of the Principality of Wy told nine.com.au the tiny kingdom could act as negotiator between Trump and Kim Jong un through the power of art.

“If only humour could govern international relationships and if only art prizes could be the way that people solved their problems. If only Mr Trump and Mr Putin and the leader in North Korea all painted,” Prince Paul said.

“And every year the Principality of Wy could hold an exhibition of all the country’s leaders and they would all abide by the decision, there would be no more wars.”

There was a healthy amount of jest in the “royal’s” comments, reflecting his light-hearted outlook on life and the way he governs.

His tiny kingdom unofficially seceded from Mosman in 2004 after a bitter stoush with local council over a driveway.

“When we did create our little principality out of a true sense of injustice, people were prepared to say ‘hey, listen to them and give them a go’. We had support from the most extraordinary corners and it’s ongoing,” he said.

Prince Paul’s micronation is one of many that exist in Australia. Micronations claim independence, but are not officially recognised by the state.

The self-appointed royal leads with his wife, Princess Susan, and their children.

He believes it is not the size of the kingdom that counts, but how you rule it.

“There is an old saying, ‘an Englishman’s house is his castle’. Well, I just took it that extra step,” he said.

“Deep in the psyche of Australians is a little bit of Ned Kelly. We all look at Ned in his armour and his defiance of authority and let’s face it, there’s a little bit of him in all of us.”

When the Prince attends events and ceremonies he often wears his formal regalia of a crown, robe and sceptre.

“We do dress up when we go out on occasion and people like us coming in formal regalia to various functions,” he said.

“They see it adding a little bit of colour to the occasion and we are very happy to oblige with that.”

Prince Paul says despite the number of micronations scattered across the country, he has little contact with his fellow pioneers.

There were thought to be 12 micronations in Australia at the peak of the movement, but over the years those numbers have dwindled.

One of Australia’s other notable micronations is the Empire of Atlantium.

It started as a bit of fun between three Sydney cousins as a way to break away from society in 1981.

His Imperial Majesty George II (George Francis Cruickshank) told nine.com.au he may have taken his parent’s advice to “change the world” further than anticipated.

“My parents raised me with the idea that in Australia, with the right amount of luck and right amount of application anyone could really achieve anything,” he said.

“I think what they meant was that they wanted me to go off and join a political party to change the world, but what I did was paint a black and white border line in the backyard and create Atlantium.”

For many years Atlantium was simply an affectation shared amongst family members and a few of George’s university friends until the launch of the internet.

“People suddenly discovered us. We were suddenly everywhere from Peru to Azerbaijan and we discovered that there were all these people who thought Atlantium was a great idea and wanted to be a part of it,” he said.

“Our population exploded from about 10 to well over 1000 in the space of a few months.”

In 2006 Emperor George acquired part ownership of a property 300km south-west of Sydney and he dubbed it the Province of Aurora.

“We now have a territory that is about twice the size of the Vatican and about half the size of Monaco, so one of the world’s smaller countries. We have a government house, a post office and a number of monuments.”

Emperor George has used his status as leader of a growing empire – which now has more than 3000 citizens – to push for social change including marriage equality, assisted suicide, abortion rights and unrestricted international movements.

The tiny nation has its own anthem, the Auroran Hymn and its own currency with coins and banknotes.

Emperor George said his neighbours seem to enjoy living next door to the town’s “local eccentric”.

“My neighbours are perhaps bemused and slightly confused by the fact I’m running my own country across the road from their properties and that I have Australia’s only pyramid monument in my backyard,” he said.

The emperor dispelled a common misconception that micronations were somehow except from paying taxes based on arcane interpretations of the Magna Carta and ancient laws.

“There is no way that one country can secede legally from the Commonwealth of Australia. The way most micronations disguise this is by declaring their tax payments as ‘tribute payments,'” he said.

“Australian maintains sovereignty. We dont believe we are independent of Australia, we say that our territory is sort of like the status or an embassy.”

Nine Digital Pty Ltd 2017

Go here to read the rest:

Australia’s hidden micronations: It’s not the size of the country but how you rule it – 9news.com.au

Liberbeer Beer with a Taste of Freedom – Total Croatia News

The first Liberbeer was produced at the end of last year in the Kruohor brewery by a brewer who was recognised in 2016 as the most perspective brewer

The Liberbeer party took place recently in Osijek, hosted by the Fabrique bar&grill, conveniently located in Freedom Square, a logical venue for a beer that celebrates freedom. Liber beer is the official beer of Liberland a self-proclaimed state on the Danube River, in between Croatia and Serbia. It is interesting that Croatia claims Liberland is not part of her territory, and Serbia wants nothing to do with it.

The owner of this beer brand is Czech Jaroslav Falta, also owner of the beer e-shop Pivogrando, craft beer store and bar Galerija Piva and craft beer bar Ale!

Liberland is a controversial topic and some in it see a threat and a factor of permanent instability on this unpredictable geopolitical area, a security danger to the constitutional order, but others see in it an opportunity for tourism development and revitalisation of a demographically and economically devastated area. Micronations are not new, and have coexisted in western, democratic societies for decades, some generating significant economic benefit to the local community. Liberland has become known around the world and gathers hundreds of people at its conferences. Tourism connected with Liberland could generate thousands of overnight stays annually in Osijek and Baranja.

The first Liberbeer was produced at the end of last year in the Kruohor brewery by a brewer who was recognised in 2016 as the most perspective brewer. Jaroslav has the ambition to establish a global network of small breweries with local distribution. Besides the Czech Republic, he is also interested in finding partners in Croatia, Serbia and other countries.

The beer is of excellent quality and made from selected flower cones of hops, and water from Rudna Gora on the Czech-German border. Liberbeer is unfiltered, unpasteurised and contains no artificial additives. Jaroslav says of his beer that it seeks to blend the best traditions of Czech brewers with the global trend of craft beer.

They currently offer two beer styles_ Liberbeer Indian Pale Ale with 6.5% alcohol, and a bitterness of 57 IBU. It contains three types of hops Nelson Sauvin, Summit and Sorachi Ace, and two types of malt Marris Otter and T 50. Liberbeer lager has 5% alcohols and a bitterness of 25 IBU, contains hops Saazar, Sladek and Perle, and malts Pilsner and Munich. Liberbeer is sold in glass bottles of 0.5 and 0.75 litres, plastic bottles of 20 litres and kegs of 30 litres.

The Liberbeer party was visited by large numbers of free-thinking individuals, as well as many beer lovers. The promotion also attracted beer influencers such as Danijel Bouri, co-founder of the first Osijek craft brewery Black Hat and one of the foremost homebrewers in the region.

See the original post:

Liberbeer Beer with a Taste of Freedom – Total Croatia News

Micronations / Axis Powers Hetalia – TV Tropes

Click to go back to the character index.

open/close all folders

As a whole

Principality of Sealand – Peter Kirkland

Aim for it! Sealand will enter the G8!

Sealand: (holding up a fist) My punches are really strong! Do you wanna see?

Ladonia: (panicked) No, don’t!

Sealand: Sometimes I ride the goat while swabbing the deck, and that is not a euphemism for anything.

Principality of Seborga

So you must be little Wy! Hmmm, maybe I’ll hit on you after a couple hundred years go by.

Principality of Wy

Did you think we’re buddies? But I’m different from you… I’ve been re-cog-ni-zed!

Republic of Kugelmugel

Declaring my independence is…ART!!!!

Republic of Molossia

Sunnovabitch! You formally entered the country?!

Principality of Hutt River

Paying your respects to me, your senior, is simple etiquette, yes?

Republic of Nikko Nikko

A Halloween Party? I certainly would like to go, but I’ve already withdraw from nation status, so…

Voiced by: Dallas Reid (EN)

Nikko Nikko: If you believe and try your best, your dreams will come true, won’t they, Japan?

Japan: What on Earth did you try your best at?!

Ladonia

The only one with the power to gather all the micronations is a true blue like me!

Read this article:

Micronations / Axis Powers Hetalia – TV Tropes

List Of MicroNations No Trouble – Don’t Mess

With several important qualifications, a micronation is any entity which purports to be or has the appearance of being a sovereign state but isnt. Micronations are typically created and maintained by one person or family. Many exist solely on the internet, or in the imagination of their creators. Some have a more corporeal existence, making ambit claims over, or occasionally even physically occupying defined geographical locations albeit often tiny, remote or uninhabitable ones and producing physical artefacts such as stamps, coins, banknotes, passports, medals and flags. Micronations are generally viewed as ephemeral, eccentric and somewhat amusing by most external observers. Micronations should not to be confused with, which are small extant sovereign states such as the Andorra, Kiribati, Monaco, Nauru, San Marino and the Vatican. Nor should they be confused with, or exile government groups, which typically have many hundreds or thousands of active supporters, and are often engaged in armed campaigns in support of their aims against the governments of one or more sovereign states. The purpose of this website is to serve as a portal to the world of micronations, document the micronation phenomenon in as objective, accurate, comprehensive and accessible a manner as possible, and to facilitate communication between micronationalists and those interested in micronations.

See the article here:

List Of MicroNations No Trouble – Don’t Mess

Micronation – MicroWiki

A micronation is an entity intended to replace, resemble, mock, or exist on equal footing with recognised independent state. Some micronations are created with serious intent, while others exist as a hobby or stunt.

Micronations should not be confused with internationally recognised but geographically tiny nations such as Nauru, Vatican City, and Monaco for which the term ‘microstate’ is used.

The term ‘micronation’ literally means “small nation”. It is a neologism originating in the mid-1990s to describe the many thousands of small unrecognised state-like entities that have mostly arisen since that time. It is generally accepted that the term was invented by Robert Ben Madison.

The term has since also come to be used retrospectively to refer to earlier unrecognised entities, some of which date to as far back as the 19th century. Supporters of micronations use the term “macronation” for any UN-recognized sovereign nation-state.

Micronations generally have a number of common features, although these may vary widely. They may have a structure similar to established sovereign states, including territorial claims, government institutions, official symbols and citizens, albeit on a much smaller scale. Micronations are often quite small, in both their claimed territory and claimed populations although there are some exceptions to this rule, with different micronations having different methods of citizenship. Micronations may also issue formal instruments such as postage stamps, coins, banknotes and passports, and bestow honours and titles of nobility.

A criterion which distinguishes micronations from imaginary countries, eco-villages, campuses, tribes, clans, sects, and residential community associations, is that these entities do not usually seek to be recognised as sovereign.

The Montevideo Convention was one attempt to create a legal definition distinguishing between states and non-states. Some micronations meet this definition, while some do not, and others reject the Convention altogether.

The academic study of micronations and microstates is known as micropatrology, and the hobby of establishing and operating micronations is known as micronationalism.

Micronations have been known to be termed as a ‘cybernation’, ‘fantasy country’, ‘model country (or nation)’, ‘new country project’, ‘pseudonation’, ‘counternation’, ‘ephemeral state’, ‘online nation’ and many other variants.

Micronations may also be classified, although many different systems are used across the micronational world. One of the most commonly used systems is the Boodlesmyth-Tallini System of Cclassification.

The 17th century saw the rise to prominence of a world order dominated by the concept of the nation-state, following the Treaty of Westphalia. However, the earliest recognisable micronations can be dated to the 18th century. Most were founded by eccentric adventurers or business speculators, and several were remarkably successful. These include the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, ruled by the Clunies-Ross family, and Sarawak, ruled by the “White Rajas” of the Brooke family. Both were independent personal fiefdoms in all but name, and survived until well into the 20th century.

Less successful were the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia (1860-1862) in southern Chile and Argentina, and the Kingdom of Sedang (1888-1890) in French Indochina. The oldest extant micronation to arise in modern times is the Kingdom of Redonda, founded in 1865 in the Caribbean. It failed to establish itself as a sovereign nation-state, but has nonetheless managed to survive into the present day as a unique literary foundation with its own king and aristocracy although it is not without its controversies; there are presently at least four competing claimants to the Redondan throne.

M. C. Harman, owner of the UK island of Lundy in the early decades of the 20th century, issued private coinage and postage stamps for local use. Although the island was ruled as a virtual fiefdom, its owner never claimed to be independent of the United Kingdom. Thus, Lundy can at best be described as a precursor to later territorial micronations.

From at least 954 AD, the town and nearby monastery of Seborga in northern Italy was a self-governing state. However, in 1729 it was supposedly annexed by Sardinia-Piedmont; this is disputed as the Seborgans reviewed the facts and discovered that they had been accidentally left out of every treaty in that area’s history due to what has been described as “some kind of clerical error,” and even Mussolini admitted that Seborga did not belong to Italy. Thus, in 1995 Seborga asserted independence and currently runs its own affairs.

The 1960s and 1970s saw a ‘micronational renaissance’, with the foundation of a number of territorial micronations, some of which still persist to this day. The first of these, the Principality of Sealand, was founded in 1967 on an abandoned World War II gun platform in the North Sea, and has endured a military coup, court rulings and rough weather throughout its existence. Others were based on schemes requiring the construction of artificial islands, but only two are known to have risen above sea level.

The Republic of Rose Island was a 400 sq metre platform built in international waters off the Italian town of Rimini, in the Adriatic Sea in 1968. It is reported to have issued stamps, minted currency, and declared Esperanto to be its official language. Shortly after completion, however, it was destroyed by the Italian Navy.

The Republic of Minerva was set up in 1972 as a libertarian new country project by Nevada businessman Michael Oliver. Oliver’s group conducted dredging operations at the Minerva Reefs, a shoal located in the Pacific Ocean south of Fiji. They succeeded in creating a small artificial island, but their efforts at securing international recognition met with little success, and near-neighbour Tonga sent a military force to the area and annexed it.

On 1 April 1977, bibliophile Richard Booth, declared the UK town of Hay-on-Wye an “independent republic” with himself as its king. The town has subsequently developed a healthy tourism industry based literary interests, and “King Richard” (whose sceptre consists of a recycled toilet plunger) continues to dole out Hay-on-Wye peerages and honours to anyone prepared to pay for them. The official website for Hay-on-Wye, however, admits that the declaration of independence, along with the later claim to have annexed the USA and renaming it the “US of Hay” were all merely publicity stunts.

Micronationalism has since evolved mainly into hobbies, and with younger participants. Although no all-compassing authority on micronations exists, nor any comprehensive listing, it is known that a number of widely diverse communities and sectors persist throughout the micronational world, often on the internet.

The internet provided micronationalism with a new outlet, and the number of entities able to be termed as micronations skyrocketed the beginning of the twenty-first century as a result. Exact figures may never be known, but it is thought that many thousands of micronations now exist throughout the world. However, with this new outlet of the internet came a large anomaly between micronationalists and micronations. Before the advent of micronationalism on the internet, micronations were few and far between, and were able to coax many hundreds of people in their citizenry. At present, most micronations are ‘One-man micronations’ or ‘Egostans’, with only one or two people being citizens of the micronation.

The majority are based in English-speaking countries, but a significant minority arose elsewhere in other countries as well.

In the present day, the following categories are generally accepted as being standard:

Micronations of the first type tend to be fairly serious in outlook, involve sometimes significant numbers of relatively mature participants, and often engage in highly sophisticated, structured activities that emulate the operations of real-world nations. A few examples of these include:

These micronations also tend to be fairly serious, and involve significant numbers of people interested in recreating the past, especially the Roman or Mediaeval past, and living it in a vicarious way. Examples of these include:

With literally thousands in existence, micronations of this type are by far the most common. They are ephemeral, and tend to be Internet-based, rarely surviving more than a few months, although there are notable exceptions. They generally involve a handful of people, and are concerned primarily with arrogating to their founders the outward symbols of statehood. The use of grand-sounding titles, awards, honours, and heraldic symbols derived from European feudal traditions, and the conduct of ‘wars’ with other micronations, are common manifestations of their activities. Examples include:

Micronations of this type include stand-alone artistic projects, deliberate exercises in creative online and offline fiction, artistic creations, and even popular films. Examples include:

These types of micronations are typically associated with a political or social reform agenda. Some are maintained as media and public relations exercises. Examples of this type include:

A number of micronations have been established for fraudulent purposes, by seeking to link questionable or illegal financial actions with seemingly legitimate nations. Some examples of these are:

A small number of micronations are founded with genuine aspirations to be sovereign states. Many are based on historical anomalies or eccentric interpretations of law, and tend to be easily confused with established states. These types of micronations are usually located in small (usually disputed) territorial enclaves, generate limited economic activity founded on tourism, philatelic and numismatic sales, and are at best tolerated or at worst ignored by other nations. This category includes:

New-country projects are attempts to found completely new nation-states. They typically involve plans to construct artificial islands (few of which are ever realised), and a large percentage have embraced or purported to embrace libertarian or democratic principles. Examples include:

Seasteading is a lifestyle of making the oceans, or at least water-borne craft, one’s home. Most seasteads historically have been sailing craft, whether perhaps demonstrated by the Chinese Junk, modified canoes of Oceania, or even the famous Pirates of Libertaria. In modern times in the west the cruising sailboat has begun to be used in the same manner. The term seasteading is of uncertain origin, used at least as early as the turn of the century by Uffa Fox, and others; many feel that catamaran designer and historian James Wharram and his designs represent ideal seasteads. More recently, American sailor and ecological philosopher Jerome FitzGerald has been a leading and effective proponent of seasteading, mostly teaching the concept through the environmental/sailing organization “The Oar Club”. The Seasteader’s Institute in Hilo, Hawaii offers classes, boat-building opportunities, education in forage foods, diving, and other aspects of a Seasteading lifestyle.

Some theoretical seasteads are floating platforms which could be used to create sovereign micronations, or otherwise serve the ends of ocean colonization. The concept is introduced in a paper by Wayne Gramlich, and later in a book by Gramlich, Patri Friedman and Andy House, which is available for free online. Their research aims at a more practical approach to developing micronations, based on currently available technology and a pragmatic approach to financial aspects.

The authors argue that seasteading has the potential to drastically lower the barrier to entry to the governing industry. This allows for more experimentation and innovation with varying social, political, and economic systems. Potential business opportunities include data havens, offshore aquaculture, and casinos, as well as the gamut of typical business endeavors.

There has been a small but growing amount of attention paid to the micronation phenomenon in recent years. Most interest in academic circles has been concerned with studying the apparently anomalous legal situations affecting such entities as Sealand and the Hutt River Province, in exploring how some micronations represent grassroots political ideas, and in the creation of role-playing entities for instructional purposes.

In 2000, Professor Fabrice O’Driscoll, of the Aix-Marseille University, published a book about micronations: Ils ne sigent pas l’ONU (“They are not in the United Nations”), with more than 300 pages dedicated to the subject.

Several recent publications have dealt with the subject of particular historic micronations, including Republic of Indian Stream (University Press), by Dartmouth College geographer Daniel Doan, The Land that Never Was, about Gregor MacGregor, and the Principality of Poyais, by David Sinclair (ISBN 0-7553-1080-2).

In May 2000, an article in the New York Times entitled “Utopian Rulers, and Spoofs, Stake Out Territory Online” brought the phenomenon to a wider audience for the first time. Similar articles were published by newspapers such as the French Liberation, the Italian La Repubblica, the Greek “Ta Nea”, by O Estado de So Paulo in Brazil, and Portugal’s Viso at around the same time.

The Democratic Empire of Sunda, which claims to be the Government of the Kingdom of Sunda (an ancient kingdom, in present-day Indonesia) in exile in Switzerland, made media headlines when two so-called princesses, Lamia Roro Wiranatadikusumah Siliwangi Al Misri, 21, and Fathia Reza Wiranatadikusumah Siliwangi Al Misiri, 23, were detained by Malaysian authorities at the border with Brunei, on 13 July 2007, and are charged for entering the country without a valid pass.

In August 2003 a Summit of Micronations took place in Helsinki at Finlandia Hall, the site of the Conference for Security and Co-operation in Europe (CSCE). The summit was attended by delegations such as the Principality of Sealand, Neue Slowenische Kunst|NSK, Ladonia, the Transnational Republic, and by scholars from various academic institutions.

From 7 November through 17 December 2004, the Reg Vardy Gallery at the University of Sunderland hosted an exhibition on the subject of micronational group identity and symbolism. The exhibition focused on numismatic, philatelic and vexillological artefacts, as well as other symbols and instruments created and used by a number of micronations from the 1950s through to the present day. A summit of micronations conducted as part of this exhibition was attended by representatives of Sealand, Elgaland-Vargaland, New Utopia, Atlantium, Frestonia and Fusa. The exhibition was reprised at the Andrew Kreps Gallery in New York City from 24 June29 July of the following year. Another exhibition about micronations opened at Paris’ Palais de Tokyo in early 2007.

The Sunderland summit was later featured in a 5-part BBC light entertainment television series called “How to Start Your Own Country” presented by Danny Wallace. The series told the story of Wallace’s experience of founding a micronation, Lovely, located in his London flat. It screened in the UK in August 2005. Similar programs have also aired on television networks in other parts of Europe.

On 9 September 2006, The Guardian newspaper reported that the travel guide company Lonely Planet had published the world’s first travel guide devoted to micronations, the Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations (ISBN 1741047307).

Visit link:

Micronation – MicroWiki

MicroNation

Roughly seven nautical miles off the coast of England stands a World War II era sea fort with a history unlike any other. Since 1967, this abandoned fort has served as the home of the Principality of Sealand, one of the most successful and interesting MicroNations in the world. Paddy Roy Bates first landed on the platform in the 1960s with the intention of using it as a base for his pirate radio station. After a confrontation with British Royal Marines, he decided to declare the fort his own nation, and a loophole in British territorial law gave his claim enough legitimacy to get he and his son out of a British weapons charge. That loophole has since been closed, and though no recognized country recognizes Sealand as a sovereign nation, it still stands in the North Sea as perhaps the world’s most well-known MicroNation.

Visit their website, SealandGov.com, and you yourself can become a Lord, Lady, Baron or Baroness of Sealand.

Continued here:

MicroNation

DAVID MURDOCK: On fascinating things – Gadsden Times

By David MurdockSpecial to The Times

There are certain subjects that hold an inexplicable fascination for me. I have no idea why or where or when, for example, I became fascinated with rock strata. I am, though. Love em. Ive actually traveled just to see interesting rock strata. Luckily, Etowah County comes equipped with seemingly endless strata, so I stay pretty well satisfied in that department.

Some of these fascinations become subjects of columns. Ive written two columns on roadkill over the years, for example. How many times Ive rhapsodized about the sky night, cloudy or otherwise lies beyond easy recollection. How many times have I gone on about the birds and animals in my yard or the view from the front porch? I quit counting.

There are others I have never mentioned in the column my endless fascination with whaling, for example. That one, at least, makes some sense since Herman Melvilles Moby-Dick is not only one of my favorite novels, but one I teach several times a year. To mimic Melvilles phrasing, subjects like whaling have become fascinadoes to me seemingly unrelated subjects that trigger endless research. However, I recently decided to do something about some of the more odd ones that dont fit anywhere in the college classes I teach. I usually lead a class at the University of Alabamas Osher Lifelong Learning Institute every term, typically on a literary or cultural topic, but Ive decided to do something more quirky for the summer term. Were calling it Daves Summer Grab Bag, and the course begins at 3 p.m. Wednesday with one of my weirder topics, micronations.

A few years ago, I started tracking micronations in the press. A micronation is a legally non-existent country that has been formed for any of a variety of reasons by … well … dreamers, I guess. The most famous one near here is The Conch Republic. Back in the 1980s, the island of Key West seceded from the United States as a protest against a U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint that the locals found burdensome. This protest was mostly for the sake of humor, a political satire, but it quickly became a tourist draw, and the Conch Republic currently issues souvenir passports that some people mistakenly believe are real.

Other micronations are sincere attempts to secede from host countries and form ideal governments, and still more were formed for a variety of other reasons (some not always benign). Anyway, I read any article on micronations I stumble across.

Well continue the next week with invasive species plants and animals either knowingly or unknowingly introduced to non-native environments that have since taken over or otherwise become an issue. Think kudzu.

Next up my fascinado with sleeping and dreaming. Im still pursuing the ideal, perfect nap, and I may be on the verge of a breakthrough in my research. Just the other day, I napped past my bedtime. I literally woke up 45 minutes after I usually go to sleep and didnt quite know what to do. So, I watched a movie and went back to sleep. I was just a little exhausted that day. Sleeping and dreaming has been a subject of interest for me since my days as a psychology student, so that ones quite old.

After that, a more recent one the city of Alexandria. Not the one down the highway, the one in Egypt. And not the Alexandria of today, but the Alexandria of antiquity, the one with the ancient worlds most impressive library.

From there, well look at ruins and abandoned places in general. Thats also a recent fascinado for me, dating back to a trip I took a couple of years ago when I stumbled across the Windsor Ruins during my meandering in Mississippi. That experience was profoundly moving, even spiritual, so I never pass up a good ruin or abandoned place now in my travels. Theres even a wish list of places to visit.

Lastly, the granddaddy of all my fascinados dating to my childhood Native American mounds. I wrote an article about them for Gadsden Style a while back, and Ill be giving a talk about my visits to all the nearby mound structures to finish the Grab Bag.

Please come out and join us at OLLI, which offers an opportunity to learn new things, meet new people and go to new places. There are no tests, no homework and no degrees required. For information on how to join OLLI and sign up for sessions, either call 205-348-6482 or contact Shirley Dupont at 256-442-3769. I hope to see yall there.

A correction to last weeks column on the Battle of Midway: Ensign George Gays squadron consisted of 15 Devastator torpedo bombers, not 10 as appeared in the article. Its odd, I had the correct number in the first draft and, for some reason, corrected it. The error is mine.

David Murdock is an English instructor at Gadsden State Community College. He can be contacted at murdockcolumn@yahoo.com. The opinions reflected are his own.

Follow this link:

DAVID MURDOCK: On fascinating things – Gadsden Times

When Did We Become A Country? The (Not So) Great Chaplin/Cruz Debate – Above the Law

(Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

It started with a tweet about President Trumps decision to pull us out of the Paris Climate Agreement. Professor Chaplin who is the Chair of American Studies Department at Harvard and the James Duncan Phillips Professor, tweeted this:

That tweet somehow got picked up by Senator Ted Cruz, who, in the spirit of curiosity and intellectual inquiry, sought to clarify what Professor Chaplin meant. He asked, Dear Professor Chaplin, your tweet struck me as odd, given that we all usually think of July 4, 1776, as the birth of our nation. Can you clarify what you mean?

Just kidding! He completely dismissed her, and then in the right-wing press, was described as having owned her.

That led to Professor Chaplins clapback:

I jumped in because it was clear that Senator Cruz wasnt looking for intellectual debate, or he wouldnt have started out with the ad hominem and condescension. As one of my colleagues wrote, What did Senator Cruz say that was wrong? My reply was:

And then discussion degenerated. I dont have time to do a thorough statistical analysis, but the vast of majority of replies (at least to me) were insults. There were a few who came to Professor Chaplins defense, seeking to elaborate on her points (if they went to her twitter feed, they would have seen some more discussion). Many came to Senator Cruzs defense. But, at this point, the discussion became partisan, and all hope for any understanding was lost.

So, let me try to sum up the two positions, not doing justice to either side.

A country requires international recognition to exist. I could declare myself the great state of LawProfBlawg, but no one is going to acknowledge my country. I wont be a player on any international arena, and I might very well get invaded. Throughout history there were many nations that lacked international recognition, such as the Republic of Lakotah, the Principality of the Hutt River, or other micronations. Some countries have varying degrees of international recognition, which makes the notion murkier, but it is still a necessary condition for statehood. Professor Chaplin takes a more eloquent position here.

A country begins at conception. Perhaps Orin Kerr said it best in his tweet:

In other words, the Declaration of Independence created the United Colonies, which then undertook a name change on September 9, 1776, to the United States of America. The only trouble here is that the founders spoke of free and independent states, so perhaps then we should be talking about multiple countries. Regardless, by the time of the Articles of Confederation and later the Constitution, it was very clear they were a single country, the good ol US of A.

Blog length makes my summary of both arguments incomplete, with many unanswered questions. For example, was the Confederate States of America a country? It did declare independence, and under the second standard, would have to be historically recognized as a country. Under the first standard, the Confederacy was not a country because it received no international recognition. But there are countries that exist without full international recognition. In short, its murky.

While the answer may be murky a few things about the great debate are clear:

I wondered about the gender implications of the debate. I wondered if this is what it is like to be a female faculty member at a University.

I wonder why Im even calling it a debate. Professor Chaplin was doing what most of us do on Twitter. She wasnt expecting a Cruzian call-out. She was expressing outrage at the United States, a member of the international community since birth, pulling out of that community. Even as other tweeters got involved, it was never a debate. It had all the trappings of the famous Monty Python Argument Clinic.

Thats not the fault of Twitter. Those with differing viewpoints refuse to seek common understanding, as traditional debate becomes an increasingly lost art. The loss will eventually destroy us, if it hasnt already.

UPDATE (2:45 p.m.): After hearing from Senator Cruzs staff members, I must add that I was remiss in not pointing out that Senator Cruz did lay out his argument in two subsequent tweets:

I would characterize this more along the lines of the conception argument, but might eliminate the problem of what to call the Confederacy (because they lost). Ill incorporate my previous assertions to apply to these tweets as well.

LawProfBlawg is an anonymous professor at a top 100 law school. You can see more of his musingshereand onTwitter. Email him atlawprofblawg@gmail.com.

Read the original here:

When Did We Become A Country? The (Not So) Great Chaplin/Cruz Debate – Above the Law

Doryeon – MicroWiki – micronations.wiki

Doryeon (nissiian ) is one of sacred symbols of Wakeism. It’s an equivalent of the Yin and yang symbol from Daoism. The colors of Doryeon means the dorabora cycle, the nyal () and krum () powers and so on. The name comes from two nissiian words, dora – life and yeon – round. The symbol also symbols the unity, duality (sun – earth, moon – sky, life – death…) and trinity (mother – dad – kid, earth – sun – sky…).

Link:

Doryeon – MicroWiki – micronations.wiki

Inside the plan to replace Trump’s border wall with a high-tech … – The Verge

The year is 2030. Former president Donald Trumps border wall, once considered a political inevitability, was never built. Instead, its billions of dollars of funding were poured into something the world had never seen: a strip of shared territory spanning the border between the United States and Mexico. Otra Nation, as the state is called, is a high-tech ecotopia, powered by vast solar farms and connected with a hyperloop transportation system. Biometric checks identify citizens and visitors, and relaxed trade rules have turned Otra Nation into a booming economic hub. Environmental conservation policies have maximized potable water and ameliorated a new Dust Bowl to the north. This is the future envisioned by the Made Collective, a group of architects, urban planners, and others who are proposing what they call a shared co-nation as a new kind of state.

Many people have imagined their own alternatives to Trumps planned border wall, from the plausible like a bi-national irrigation initiative to the absurd like an inflatoborder made of plastic bubbles. Mades members insist that theyre serious about Otra Nation, though, and that theyve got the skills to make it work. Thats almost certainly not true but its also beside the point. At a time when policy proposals should be taken seriously but not literally, and facts are up for grabs, Otra Nation turns the slippery Trump playbook around to offer a counter-fantasy. In the words of collective member Marina Muoz, We can really make the complete American continent great again.

If nothing else, the Made Collectives members who say theyve delivered their Otra Nation proposal to the US and Mexican governments are ambitious. The proposal calls for an agreement that would turn the border into an unincorporated territory for both nations, with an independent local government and non-voting representatives in the US and Mexican legislatures. The new territory would stretch for 2,000 kilometers, covering 20 kilometers on each side of the border. (That would bring Tijuana, El Paso, and San Diego, among other cities, into Otra Nation.) Residents of the co-nation would retain their previous citizenship, but they would be granted a new ID microchip and could rely on Otra Nations independent health care and education systems.

You have to take Otra Nation seriously, but not literally

Once established, Otra Nation would supposedly produce enough energy to power itself and neighboring areas, thanks to 90,000 square kilometers of solar panels that would be installed across the deserts. Its new government would dismantle the central US-Mexico border in favor of biometric checkpoints on each side of Otra Nation, preserving and restoring watersheds and local ecosystems. It would build an intercity hyperloop network across the country, starting in the sister cities of San Diego and Tijuana. A set of sharing principles would encourage the growth of companies like Airbnb and Lyft, but prohibit ones that look to minimize human employment with autonomous vehicles and drone technologies in other words, no Uber.

Parts of the proposal, like the hyperloop, feel like science fiction worldbuilding or Silicon Valley fanfic, and the whole thing is written with the casual confidence of someone proposing a landscaping project, not a massive political shift built on technology that doesnt even exist. Its not clear how serious its authors are about their proposal, even when you speak to them. On Skype, members admit theres a very, very slim chance the US and Mexican governments will be amenable to Otra Nation. But they say theyve formally applied for a US government contract, and theyre hoping to put the issue up for a popular referendum, which they compare to the 2016 Brexit vote. We should at least have the opportunity for both nations to vote on a solution, says architect and humanitarian Cameron Sinclair.

Sinclair, who co-founded the nonprofit Architecture for Humanity and won a TED Prize in 2006, was the most high-profile Made Collective member I spoke to. Team members decline to put their names or faces on the website; their group photo shows human figures with animal heads pasted above their shoulders. Sinclair and others say that the group remains quasi-anonymous in order to keep the focus on Otra Nation, rather than the people behind it. In addition to generalist architects and designers, Made supposedly includes members with close ties to past US and Mexican government administrations. One person also claims to be working on an undisclosed hyperloop-related project.

When I ask for a best-case scenario for founding Otra Nation, Sinclair outlines a complex but surprisingly compact roadmap. By 2018, the US and Mexico would sign a bilateral agreement to form the zone, and the estimated 40 million future members of Otra Nation would have their own vote, guaranteeing their consent. Meanwhile, the Made Collective would secure funding in the form of either government contracts or multi-billion-dollar private investments. The group would begin working with companies to lay hyperloop and solar power infrastructure, while also creating the biometric ID system for citizens. I would say by 2022 we would be underway, he says. if everything went well, including getting the vote from the people that would now become residents of Otra Nation, I would say [it could open] by the mid-2020s.

Could it work in practice? Hard to say.

In reality, getting past the first step would be extraordinary. The US has unincorporated territories like Puerto Rico, and there are plenty of disputed areas, micronations, and special economic zones. But University of Colorado professor John OLoughlin, who studies quasi-recognized de facto states, called Otra Nation a pie-in-the-sky idea. I have never heard of such an arrangement, he told The Verge. University of York professor Nina Caspersen, who also works on de facto states, was intrigued but skeptical. This sounds like a fascinating idea, but without much precedent, said Caspersen, who suggested Andorra a small nation headed by co-princes from its neighbors France and Spain as a possible precedent. But even if the US and Mexico agreed to share the border, many questions would remain. Could it work in practice? Hard to say, said Caspersen. The countries could end up in disputes over defense, border security, or anything else Otra Nations government couldnt manage alone.

Basic questions about Otra Nation remain unsettled. The team describes a sophisticated biometric ID program at the borders of Otra Nation, but theres also a heavy dose of utopianism as architect and collective member Tegan Bukowski puts it, people will respect borders because the borders are no longer oppressive. I think what were proposing is a trust-based enforcement, rather than the idea that its a security based enforcement, says Sinclair. Its not even clear how the nation will keep itself running after the initial investment period. I dont think weve actually figured out the tax system yet, Sinclair admits.

Whether Otra Nation is a long-shot proposal or a pointedly political art project, Made Collective is effectively mirroring the administrations approach to the wall: an unprecedented civil engineering initiative that exists more vividly in the realm of imagination than policy. As we talk, members argue that their plan would take less time and money than the border wall, even pledging the leftover funds to arts and education agencies. Otra Nations proposal can be vague and sweeping, but so is Trumps plan for a massive, constantly changing, possibly invisible, and supposedly Mexico-funded barrier. When real governmental goals are blatant fantasy, why not present your own wildest hopes as a viable alternative?

See the original post here:

Inside the plan to replace Trump’s border wall with a high-tech … – The Verge

Top 10 Most Densely-Populated Countries in Europe – JetPunk

(71)

Almost didn’t get the 2 biggest countries on here, since everything else is way smaller!

reply

delete

Oct 24, 2016

(41)

haha me too

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(44)

Missed Netherlands :I

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(53)

Amusingly, due to its size the population density of the Vatican (1,818/km2) is higher than its actual population of approx 850-1000.

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(68)

It’s not. Just the first number in the density figure is higher. If you divide it by square km, then it’s the same.

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(68)

Kind of like saying 6/3 is more than 2. It’s the same number.

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(42)

He is saying that the population of 1 square kilometer with the Vatican City’s density is greater than the population of the Vatican City. I found this fascinating as well, Corrode.

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(54)

Yep, only .44 sq km.

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(62)

No to be fair I see what Corrode’s getting at. Yeah it’s mathematically obvious, but it’s still a funny reflection on how tiny the Vatican is.

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(68)

Surprised theres no Andorra

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(52)

Me too. It’s the only one of the micronations missing. I imagine that, because it’s smack in the middle of the mountains, it can’t accommodate a high population density.

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(44)

But Liechtenstein is also in the middle of the mountains. Andorra is actually about 3 times bigger than Liechtenstein in area but less than twice as many people.

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(44)

Done all the micro countries (and others), was just a matter of guessing until I finally got Belgium and Netherlands xD 0:23 left

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(53)

Haha got UK with 1 second left, man UK and Germany were just not even on my radar

reply

delete

Dec 7, 2016

(41)

wow, too easy 🙂 1:28 on the clock

reply

delete

Dec 8, 2016

(47)

Not seeing andorra on these lists make me feel incomplete…

reply

delete

Dec 8, 2016

(42)

I agree.

reply

delete

Dec 19, 2016

(34)

How didn’t I get Luxembourg?!

reply

delete

Feb 12, 2017

Add comment

See the original post:

Top 10 Most Densely-Populated Countries in Europe – JetPunk

List of micronations | MicroWiki | Fandom powered by Wikia

This list of micronations provides an overview of micronations from around the world in alphabetical order.

The list is intended to include entities that claim independence but are not recognised by any major world government, and inclusion (or exclusion) should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms.

Entities that are currently inactive or defunct are in italics.

President Smith

P.M. Buchanan

King Valentin 1st

R

Prince Alban I, Prince Harland I, Prince Inigo I (President)

See more here:

List of micronations | MicroWiki | Fandom powered by Wikia

An LGBTQ Micronation Declared War On Australia In 2004 And A Senator Is Still Mad About It – Huffington Post Australia

CANBERRA — Ever heard of the Gay and Lesbian Kingdom of the Coral Sea Islands? Probably not. You’re about to, and it’s all got to do with a flag placed in the foyer of the Department of Finance building in Canberra.

During a Senate estimates hearing on finance and public administration on Tuesday, conversation turned to flags. Liberal Senator Eric Abetz, one of the most conservative members of parliament, was concerned about a rainbow flag — a symbol of the LGBTQ equality movement — being flown in the foyer of the finance department.

It sparked several minutes of questioning of department officials about flag protocols, who decides which flags are displayed and why, with Abetz saying rainbow flags were the symbol of a “political campaign” and “activist flag”.

He stopped short of implicitly criticising the rainbow flag being displayed in a government building, but said he had been tipped off by a department staffer who was “concerned” by the flag selection process.

“If that is allowed, one imagines the Marriage Alliance banner should be flown equally… if you allow one side of a debate, then you need to allow the other side,” Abetz said, referencing a group actively opposing marriage equality.

As the hearing started to move on, Abetz had one final bizarre thing to add to an already weird conversation.

“By way of some slight humour on this issue, this particular flag, you will realise, is the flag of the Gay and Lesbian Kingdom of the Coral Sea Islands which declared war on Australia… of course it’s the flag of a hostile nation, if we are to believe them, having declared war on Australia,” he said, grinning.

Wait, what? What?

Yes, the Gay and Lesbian Kingdom of the Coral Sea Islands is a place that exists. It’s what is called a “micro nation”, a tiny area of land which declares independence for itself from the country it is ostensibly part of.

The kingdom, like other micronations such as the famous Principality of Hutt River in Western Australia, is not an official nation of its own, and not recognised by the United Nations or any international bodies.

But it exists, and yes, it did declare war on Australia.

The Gay and Lesbian Kingdom of the Coral Sea Islands, according to its website (yes, it has a website, and a Facebook page) was established in 2004 by a group of LGBTQ activists protesting the government’s refusal to grant same-sex marriage. The kingdom is scattered over some one million square kilometres of ocean, in the Coral Sea off Australia’s northeast coast.

On its website, the kingdom claims its population is “100 percent homosexual”. Its capital is “Heaven, a camp site located on Cato Island”. It is a constitutional monarchy. Its currency is the Euro, but its only industries are tourism, fishing and “the sale of Gay & Lesbian Postage Stamps”. Its national anthem is titled ‘Zadok the Priest’ and its national flag, sparking the concern of Senator Abetz, is “the gay rainbow pride flag”.

“The Gay and Lesbian Kingdom formally raised the gay rainbow pride flag on Cato Island on the 14th of June 2004 and declared the territory an independent gay and lesbian state, a memorial plaque on the north eastern tip of Cato Island commemorates this historic event,” the website reports.

The plaque, pictured above, states: “On the 14th day of June 2004, at this highest point in the Coral Sea, Emperor Dale Parker Anderson raised the gay rainbow flag and claimed the islands of the Coral Sea in his name as homeland for the gay and lesbian peoples of the world. God Save our King!”

The title ‘kingdom’ is not just a fancy name, with the micronation’s sovereign claiming to descend from actual English royalty.

“The sovereign of the Gay and Lesbian Kingdom is Dale Parker Anderson, who is directly descendant from the murdered gay King of England, Edward II (1284-1327) this makes the Sovereign distantly related to all the major royal houses of Europe,” its website states.

However, as Abetz pointed out, its not all peace in the gay kingdom. In September 2004, the kingdom declared war on Australia (it must be noted that the kingdom claims to have “a small army of gay activist located around the world it can call on in times of emergency”.)

“On the 13th of September 2004, the Gay Kingdom declared war on the Commonwealth of Australia. Notification of acceptance and notification of the Geneva Convention of August 12, 1949, were given to the Prime Minister of Australia John Howard, both directly and through the Swiss Federal Government. This is a ratified Law of Australia, and conveys the responsibility to Govern to the Occupying Power,” the kingdom said on its website.

“Therefore, by the Law of Australia, only the Gay Government is the Authority to Govern the Territory and the people of the Coral Sea Islands. The 1 week state of War, which was Officially declared, brought into effect the Law of War, under whose Sovereignty goes automatically to a State undefeated in a State of War. As Australia did not respond to the declaration The Gay & Lesbian Kingdoms independence was assured.”

Back in estimates, Finance Minister Mathias Cormann — as tongue-in-cheek as Abetz was — promised a “flag enquiry”.

“It’s certainly not the government’s intentions in any of our official buildings to fly the flag of hostile nations,” the stone-faced Cormann said.

“We’ll make sure there are no flags of hostile nations anywhere in any government building.”

So there you go. A nation whose economy is built on postage stamps and occupies a beautiful island chain off the Great Barrier Reef once declared war on Australia, and claimed victory by default. And 13 years later a federal senator complained because a rainbow flag was flown in the Department of Finance.

See the rest here:

An LGBTQ Micronation Declared War On Australia In 2004 And A Senator Is Still Mad About It – Huffington Post Australia

Anthelia – MicroWiki – micronations.wiki

(This article was teased back out of the ozone. It appears to have been written in 2005 or 2006.)

The Republic of Anthelia (pronounced:ant-HEEL-ee-yuh), known in short as Anthelia, is a democratic micronation founded in July 2004. Anthelia is an Anglophone Sector micronation and a member of the Micronational Cartography Society and the Novasolum Treaty.

Anthelia was founded on 27 July 2004 by John Darcy, an Australian micronationalist with past involvement in the hobby but no other known micronational citizenships. The Republic – it has always been called a “republic” – was established with democratic and pluralistic objectives but with low membership and activity there were two consequences: Firstly, Darcy held de facto autonomous power as “Administrator” and secondly, inactivity saw the fledgling micronation virtually shut down from September 2004 to April 2005.

The Republic was woken up on 11 April 2005 by a message of inspiration and intent posted by prominent citizen Koen Nevens. Nevens’ energy pushed Anthelia to the attention of other Anglophone micronationsthrough the Micronations.net forums, and this in turn attracted several possible citizens as well as interested foreign observers. Anthelia’s profile was also significantly raised at this time through a dispute over its Micronational Cartography Society map presence. This dispute was resolved amicably in due course.

The revival sparked by the Nevens Communique of 11 April was indeed – energetic and rapid. By the end of April a draft Constitution was readyfor referendum and the groundwork had been laid for immediate Executive Council elections. Duly, the Constitution was enacted and came into force on 4 May 2005, and John Darcy and Koen Nevens were elected unopposed as the inaugural Executive Council, taking office on 13 May.

The Constitution of the Republic provides for an elected Executive Council to run the nation in everyday matters. The Executive Council can appoint Ministers to assist in this, and Ministers can propose new or amended laws for the control and benefit of national affairs. Through direct democracy, all citizens of the Republic have the right to debate proposed laws and all citizens participate in the vote to approve a law. (The policy of the present government is to establish an elected legislative body at a future time when the population can sustain it). The Constitution also provides detailed protection of individual and general rights, and a number of superior provisions regarding citizenship and other matters to which all normal laws must conform.

Justice is to be administered through courts presided over by judges who will be appointed as the need arises. The President of the Republic is a largely symbolic position, as the President is one of the Executive Councillors and has very few and limited exclusive powers and duties of his own. John Darcy is the inaugural and current President.

A micronation with less than a year of serious activity cannot be said to have developed a strong individual culture; however, a number of stylistic aspects promoted by the incumbent government give an indication of “national identity”.

Firstly, Anthelia is strongly grounded in the letter and substance of its laws. Darcy and Nevens have consistently sought to write laws, executive orders and a Constitution which are thorough, explicit and strong. The possible criticism of this is that Anthelia is legalistic and complicated by micronational standards, but the government’s choice + is based on both instinct and training. Nevens is a practising lawyer in his macronational life, and Darcy brings to his hobby a lifelong interest in politics and the law. A micronation headed by these two could not in good conscience be governed loosely by clumsily-written laws.

Secondly, Anthelia seeks to keep its community simulation firmly anchored in “reality”. Anthelia’s fictional world is set in the same time period as the real world and has no technology or capability which is beyond the first decade of the 21st century. This is notwithstanding Anthelia’s choice to be involved in, for example, the MCS fictional world map, which in substance is merely a tool for interaction with other micronations

Thirdly, the combination of lawful order and realistic simulation underpins Anthelia’s economic simulation. Economics and money appears,from all reports, to be the weak underbelly of micronations the reasons for this are many and not least of them is the microscopic size of the market which makes economic modeling irrelevant. (Imagine trying to impose the rules of fluid dynamics on a few dozen water molecules floating in a vacuum). Nevertheless, the Republic has enacted laws and established an institutional framework to base its currency, and the monetary sector of its economy, on real-world principles. This is an ongoing source of disagreement between Anthelia and at least one other micronation (Gotzborg) and that situation is still developing at the time of writing.

Finally, it is the combination of a realism-grounded simulation and a monetary economy which is driving, or will drive, the future development of the community. The policy of the government is to encourage and develop new and diverse aspects for the simulation which will assist the community to look and behave like a real-world community. This is, needless to say, a long-term strategy. +

Anthelia began as a micronation in isolation, although the wider micronational community was known to the founder. The months since therevival have seen Anthelia interact more widely with other English-language micronations (the “Anglophone Sector”). The Micronational Cartography Society more than any other person or body has provided the main impetus for this interaction. By virtue of its place on the MCS map, Anthelia has chosen primarily to seek + discourse and interaction with its neighbours on that mapGotzborg, Natopia, Alexandria, Rio Grande and Lavalon. This is not to say that other micronations have been ignored, but the main focus of diplomacy has been on these few and in particular Gotzborg and Natopia.

It was this regional focus which led to the Novasolum Treaty. A conference was held in May and June of 2005 for micronations which shared the same continent as Anthelia on the MCS map. The aim of this conference at its outset was to seek a mutual treaty for “the creation of an area of freedom, security and justice” there was no intent to create a formal association of micronations and no multilateral policies (such as economic policy) were to be imposed.

During the course of this conference, a related (but separate) project was begun by President Darcy to enhance the geographic details of the micronations involved, and it was from this project that the continent’s name “Novasolum” was agreed. In course, the treaty (which was ratified by four of the parties by 8 July 2005) was named the Novasolum Treaty. In August 2005, the Republic was a party to the Treaty of BBC, which is a treaty with the micronation founded on BBC TV in the United Kingdom by King Danny Wallace.

The first point of contact for Anthelia is a website, and the forums can be reached from there for a complete picture of the community’s day-to-day activities.

An independent media also operates, with The Anthelia Quarterly available by subscription (see information on the forums). Anthelian affairs are also reported in the RIMA Journal and in general discussions on Micronations.net. Citizenship is available to residents of the Republic who fulfill a 10-day residency waiting period, but there are no restrictions on general immigration. Given the importance placed on the now-operating monetary economy, the government has enacted Income Support to provide for those people in Anthelia who do not yet have a job.

The President is happy to answer direct personal inquiries at president@anthelia.net

Go here to see the original:

Anthelia – MicroWiki – micronations.wiki


12