Jitsi – Should I Remove It?

Should I remove Jitsi?

What percent of users and experts removed it?

4% remove it96% keep it

What do people think about it?

(click star to rate)

How common is it?

Global Rank #12,966

United States Rank #14,521

Reach 0.0285%

Lifespan of installation (until removal)

307.99 days >

Average installed length: 161.82 days

Jitsi is Open Source / Free Software, and is available under the terms of the LGPL. Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is an audio/video and chat communicator that supports protocols such as SIP, XMPP/Jabber, AIM/ICQ, Windows Live, Yahoo! and many other useful features.

The most common release is 2.4.4997, with over 98% of all installations currently using this version. It adds registry entry for the current user which will allow the program to automatically start each time it is rebooted. Upon being installed, the software adds a Windows Service which is designed to run continuously in the background. Manually stopping the service has been seen to cause the program to stop functing properly. It adds a background controller service that is set to automatically run. Delaying the start of this service is possible through the service manager. It adds a Browser Helper Object (BHO) to Internet Explorer. A scheduled task is added to Windows Task Scheduler in order to launch the program at various scheduled times (the schedule varies depending on the version). The software is designed to connect to the Internet and adds a Windows Firewall exception in order to do so without being interfered with. The setup package generally installs about 124 files. Relative to the overall usage of users who have this installed on their PCs, most are running Windows 7 (SP1) and Windows 8. While about 32% of users of Jitsi come from the United States, it is also popular in France and Germany.

Help link: jitsi.org

Installation folder: C:Program Filesjitsijrelibziamerica

Uninstaller: MsiExec.exe /I{45A78051-9B86-40D4-9D4E-77436F9EC5F8}

(The Windows Installer is used for the installation, maintenance, and removal.)

Language: French (France)

2 Internet Explorer BHOs

Internet Explorer Extension

Scheduled Task

Service

2 Startup Files (User Run)

3 Windows Firewall Allowed Programs

Network connections

Quickly and completely remove Jitsi from your computer by downloading “Should I Remove It?”, its 100% FREE and installs in seconds (click the button below).

Or, you can uninstall Jitsi from your computer by using the Add/Remove Program feature in the Window’s Control Panel.

If your web browser homepage and search settings have been modfied by Jitsi you can restore them to their previous default settings.

Microsoft Internet Explorer

Mozilla Firefox

Google Chrome

OS VERSIONS

Win 7 (SP1)60%

Win 7 0%

WHEN IT STARTS

Auto-starting?Yes

(Found in the run registry)

USER ACTIONS

Uninstall it4%

Keep it96%

Which Windows OS versions does it run on?

Which OS releases does it run on?

32.14% of installs come from the United States

Which countries install it?

What PC manufacturers (OEMs) have it installed?

Common models

Excerpt from:

Jitsi – Should I Remove It?

Jitsi Alternatives and Similar Software – AlternativeTo.net

Jitsi (previously SIP Communicator) is an audio/video and chat communicator with full end-to-end encryption that supports protocols such as SIP, XMPP/Jabber, ICQ/AIM, Windows Live, Yahoo!, GTalk/Hangouts extensions, as well as OTR, ZRTP, etc. It can handle every firewall, and has many other useful features.

Jitsi is completely open source / free software, and is freely available under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License. More Info

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Jitsi Alternatives and Similar Software – AlternativeTo.net

Jitsi (64-Bit) – Free download and software reviews – CNET …

From Jitsi: Jitsi (64-Bit) is an audio or video and chat communicator that supports protocols such as SIP, XMPP/Jabber, AIM/ICQ, Windows Live, and Yahoo. Jitsi (64-Bit)can encrypt your calls using the innovative ZRTP. Show you’re desktop to anyone with a video-capable XMPP or SIP client. Allow other Jitsi (64-Bit) users to interact with your applications regardless of your OS. It features secure video calls, conferencing, chat, desktop sharing, file transfer, support for your favorite OS, and IM network.

Read the rest here:

Jitsi (64-Bit) – Free download and software reviews – CNET …

Downloads | Jitsi

Here, you can download Jitsi Desktop, Jitsi Meet and all Jitsi related projects. Use the stable builds for more consistent behavior. Latest nightlies are also quite usable and contain all our latest and greatest additions.

Android

iOS

Stable Ubuntu & Debian packages

You can also use our Ubuntu/Debian repository:

or only the packages you need like for example:

Nightly Ubuntu & Debian packages

Just as with stable you can also use our Ubuntu/Debian repository for nightlies:

or only the packages you need like for example:

If you are using our stable build line, you can switch to nightly builds using the following provisioning URLs:

We would like to support as many distribution specific packages as possible. If you would like to be a maintainer of such a package please let us know

Follow this link:

Downloads | Jitsi

Jitsi for Windows – Secure Instant Messaging and VoIP

Posted10 August 2016

Jitsi is cross-platform, free and open-source software client that supports Instant Messaging (IM), voice and video chat over the internet. It supports many of the most popular and widely used IM and telephony protocols, including Jabber/XMPP (used by Facebook and Google Talk), AIM, ICQ, MSN, Yahoo! Messenger and the SIP Voice-over-IP (VoIP) protocol. It supports additional independent encryption for IM through the OTR (Off-the-Record) protocol and for voice and video sessions through ZRTP and SRTP.

Jitsi is cross-platform, free and open-source software client for Instant Messaging (IM), Voice over IP (VoIP) and video chat. It is compatible with many popular IM and telephony protocols, including Jabber/XMPP, Facebook Messenger, AIM, ICQ, MSN, Yahoo! Messenger and SIP. It provides end-to-end encryption for text chats through the Off-the-Record (OTR) protocol. It also supports end-to-end encrypted voice chat using ZRTP over SIP, though it tends to be somewhat unstable when used in this way.

Important: If you and those with whom you communicate use OTR encryption for text chats and ZRTP encryption for voice calls, Jitsi will protect the content of your conversations from service providers like Google and Facebook. However, these providers can still monitor certain metadata about the conversations you have through Jitsi. Examples include:

They can share this information with third parties, including other companies and governments. For conversations where such metadata could be sensitive, you and those with whom you communicate should consider using a trusted, independent service provider for your XMPP/Jabber chats and SIP calls.

Jitsi allows you to communicate securely through your existing accounts by using end-to-end encryption. This not only makes the content of your communication inaccessible to various third parties, such as government or corporate surveillance platforms, but it also protects your conversations from those who operate the chat services themselves (such as Facebook, if you are using Facebook Messenger, or Google, if you are using Google Talk).

Note: Jitsi was written in the Java programming language. As such, Java must be installed on your computer in order for it to work. Though Java itself does not represent a significant security risk, Java browser extensions are often found to contain vulnerabilities that allow malicious websites to install malware or assume control of your computer. If your browser has a Java plugin installed, we strongly recommend that you disable it.

Jitsi is available for MS Windows, GNU Linux and Mac OS. It can be used to communicate with other XMPP or SIP clients that support end-to-end encryption through OTR (for text chat) or ZRTP (for voice calls). Examples are recommended below:

To install Jitsi, follow the steps below:

Step 1. Browse to the Jitsi download page: https://jitsi.org/Main/Download

Figure 1: The Jitsi download page

Step 2. Scroll down and click [Microsoft Windows Installers] to download Jitsi.

Figure 2: Downloading the Jitsi package

Step 3. Right-click on the downloaded Jitsi file and select [Open], as illustrated below:

Figure 3: Opening the downloaded Jitsi file

Step 4. Click [Next] to start installing Jitsi on your computer.

Figure 4: Jitsi Setup Wizard

Step 5. Read Jitsi’s License Agreement and check [I accept the terms in the License Agreement].

Figure 5: Jitsi End-User License Agreement

Step 6. Click [Next] to proceed with the installation process.

Step 7. Click [Next] to install Jitsi to the default folder. Alternatively, click [Change…] to select the folder you would like to install Jitsi to.

Figure 6: Jitsi installation destination folder

Step 8. Select shortcuts, settings and associated protocols through the following window and click [Next]. The default settings here are fine.

Figure 7: Jitsi Setup Wizard Addtional Tasks

Step 9. Click [Install] to install Jitsi on your computer.

Figure 8: Installation of Jitsi

Wait while Jitsi gets installed.

Figure 9: Installing Jitsi

Step 10. Click [Finish] to complete the installation process.

Figure 10: Completing the installation process of Jitsi

Jitsi supports many different protocols and services for chat. The first time you launch it, you will see the window shown in Figure 1, which allows you to add the accounts you want to access through Jitsi.

Figure 1: Jitsi’s initial account configuration screen

Note: Both Google Talk and Facebook may require that you change certain account settings before you can access their chat services through Jitsi. To learn how, see the following two sections:

You can use this screen to enter a username and password for each of the services displayed, thereby adding up to four accounts in one easy step. But you must already have accounts on these services to do so. The sections below describe how to set up accounts for various IM and VoIP service providers.

As shown in Figure 1 of the previous section, the first time you launch Jitsi, you will see an account configuration screen that allows you to add various chat services to the application. After you have added at least one account, this screen will no longer appear. In order to add additional accounts, follow the steps below.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Adding a new account

Step 2. Select [Google Talk] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting Google Talk

Step 3. Type your Google username and passphrase.

Figure 3: Entering a Google username and password

Step 4. (Optional) Uncheck the Remember password box

Important: If you want Jitsi to remember your passphrases for you, you should first enable its Master Password feature.

Step 5. Click [Add].

You can now use Jitsi to communicate through the Google Talk account you have added.

Note: If you are using 2-step verification to protect access to your Gmail account, you might see an error like the one shown in Figure 4 when Jitsi tries to access your account. (It will display the same error if you get your passphrase wrong.) To log in using Jitsi, you will need to generate an “application-specific password”. To learn how, see Google’s instructions.

Figure 4: Google Talk authentication failed (possibly as a result of “2-step verification” settings)

There are two settings that you might need to change, on the Facebook website, for Jitsi to use Facebook as a chat service.

Facebook Username

Before Jitsi can connect to Facebook, you must assign a username to your Facebook account. Unlike most Web services, Facebook does not require you to select a username when you create your account, but it does allow you to create one if you wish. You can confirm your username by signing into your Facebook account. Your username is what appears in the location bar of your browser after https://www.facebook.com/ when you view your Timeline or Page. So, if your username is elena.s.katerina, you should see https://www.facebook.com/elena.s.katerina in your browser’s location bar when viewing your Timeline. Your username is also part of your Facebook email address (elena.s.katerina@facebook.com, for example).

If you do not have a Facebook username, you can choose one by signing into your account and selecting Settings > General or by browsing to https://www.facebook.com/username. Facebook might require that you verify your account before allowing you to select a username. This might require giving Facebook a mobile phone number at which you can receive a text message. For more details see Facebooks explanation of usernames.

App Settings

You must turn on Facebooks application platform in order to give Jitsi access to your account. To do this, sign in, select Settings > Apps and confirm that the Apps, Websites and Plugins setting is Enabled.

Note: Turning on Facebooks application platform opens up much of your Facebook data to third-party application developers. This data is available not only to the Facebook applications that you use, but also to the Facebook applications used by your friends. After turning on Facebooks Apps, Websites and Plugins, be sure to check the settings under Apps others use. This setting allows you to hide some personal information from applications used by your friends. Unfortunately, Facebook does not offer settings to hide all personal information. As long as the application platform is Enabled, certain categories of data (including your friend list, your gender, and any information you have made public) are accessible to apps used by others. If this is unacceptable, you should disable Apps, Websites and Plugins and avoid using Jitsi with Facebook Messenger.

Once you have chosen a Facebook username and enabled the application platform, you can add your Facebook account to Jitsi.

As shown in Figure 1 of the Add accounts to Jitsi section, the first time you launch Jitsi, you will see an account configuration screen that allows you to add various chat services to the application. After you have added at least one account, this screen will no longer appear. In order to add additional accounts, follow the steps below.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Adding a new account

Step 2. Select [Facebook] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting Facebook

Step 3. Type your Facebook username and password.

Figure 3: Entering a username and password into the Add New Account screen

Step 4. (Optional) Uncheck the Remember password box.

Important: If you want Jitsi to remember your passphrases for you, you should first enable its Master Password feature.

Step 5. Click [Add].

You can now use Jitsi to communicate through the Facebook account you have added.

XMPP and Jabber are different names for the same instant messaging protocol. It is an open standard, and there are many providers who offer free Jabber/XMPP accounts that you can use with Jitsi. The IM Observatory allows you to evaluate some security properties of public Jabber/XMPP services.

If you have experience running online services, you can also install a Jabber/XMPP server (such as ejabberd or Prosody IM) on your own server and provide accounts to members of a particular community or organization.

Below, we recommend a few services that have a great deal of experience protecting their users’ privacy.

Note: Even if you trust your service provider, It is still important that you use OTR encryption to keep your instant messages confidential. So make sure that you and those with whom you communicate know how to use it properly. This is covered in the section on Using Jitsi for secure instant messaging

The Chaos Computer Club (CCC) hosts a free Jabber service. Their servers are located in Germany. From within Jitsi, you can simultaneously create an account on jabber.ccc.de and add it to Jitsi. This works for many traditional Jabber/XMPP services.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Add new accounts

Step 2. Select [XMPP] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting XMPP

The steps below assume that you do not yet have a jabber.ccc.de account. (If you do, just enter your username and passphrase and click [Add].)

Step 3. Select [Create a new XMPP account].

Figure 3: Creating a new jabber.ccc.de account, within Jitsi, using the Add New Account screen

Step 4. Type [jabber.ccc.de] in the Server box.

Step 5. Choose a username and type it into the XMPP username box.

Step 6. Choose a passphrase and type it into the Password and Confirm Password boxes.

Step 7. Click [Add] to request the username you have chosen.

If the username you requested is unavailable, the registration process will fail, and Jitsi will announce that it: failed to create your account due to the following error: Could not confirm data. You can try again by repeating the process with a different username.

If you do not log in to your jabber.ccc.de account for 12 months, your account will be removed, and your username will be made available for registration by others.

Riseup is a collective dedicated to providing secure services for individuals and organizations committed to political and social justice. Their servers are located in the United States.

If you already have a Riseup.net email account, you can use the same account for their Jabber/XMPP service. In order to create an account, you will need two invitation codes from two different Riseup.net members. You can then visit https://user.riseup.net and create an account. Once your account is active, you can add it to Jitsi by following the steps below.

As shown in Figure 1 of the Add accounts to Jitsi section, the first time you launch Jitsi, you will see an account configuration screen that allows you to add various chat services to the application. After you have added at least one account, this screen will no longer appear. In order to add additional accounts, follow the steps below.

Step 1. Click [File] in Jitsi’s menu bar and select [Add new account…] to choose the service or protocol you want to use.

Figure 1: Adding new accounts

Step 2. Select [XMPP] from the Network list.

Figure 2: Selecting XMPP

Step 3. Type the username for your Jabber/XMPP account on this service.

Figure 3: Entering a username and password into the Add New Account screen

Your username should include the **@** symbol and the hostname of the service. For example

Step 4. Type the passphrase for your Jabber/XMPP account on this service.

Step 5. (Optional) Uncheck the Remember password box.

Important: If you want Jitsi to remember your passphrases for you, you should first enable its Master Password feature.

Step 6. Click [Add].

You can now use Jitsi to communicate through this Jabber/XMPP account.

In this section, we recommend only a single Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) provider, ostel.co. Their servers are located in United States. There are many free SIP services online, but ostel.co appears to offer the most reliable support for end-to-end encryption through ZRTP.

Follow this link:

Jitsi for Windows – Secure Instant Messaging and VoIP

jitsi.org | Jitsi

Jitsi Desktop- Open Source Video Calls and Chat

Secure video calls, conferencing, chat, desktop sharing, file transfer, support for your favorite OS, and IM network. All this, and more, in Jitsi – the most complete and advanced open source communicator.

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jitsi.org | Jitsi

Jitsi for Mac : Free Download : MacUpdate

Jitsi (previously SIP Communicator) is an audio/video and chat communicator that supports protocols such as SIP, XMPP/Jabber, AIM/ICQ, Windows Live, Yahoo!, Bonjour, and many other useful features. Jitsi supports the ZRTP protocol stack by Phil Zimmerman for encrypted private communications.

Jitsi is Open Source / Free Software, and is available under the terms of the LGPL and performs secure video calls, conferencing, chat, desktop sharing, file transfer, support for your favorite OS, and IM network. All this, and more, in Jitsi – the most complete and advanced Open Source communicator.

No similar apps have been recommended yet. You can add your suggestions to the right.

Jitsi (previously SIP Communicator) is an audio/video and chat communicator that supports protocols such as SIP, XMPP/Jabber, AIM/ICQ, Windows Live, Yahoo!, Bonjour, and many other useful features. Jitsi supports the ZRTP protocol stack by Phil Zimmerman for encrypted private communications.

Jitsi is Open Source / Free Software, and is available under the terms of the LGPL and performs secure video calls, conferencing, chat, desktop sharing, file transfer, support for your favorite OS, and IM network. All this, and more, in Jitsi – the most complete and advanced Open Source communicator.

Read more:

Jitsi for Mac : Free Download : MacUpdate

Jitsi softphone for Windows OnSIP Support

Updated 10/26/2015

Jitsi version 2.8.5426 for Windows. Tested on Windows 7 64bit with SP1.

Each user has a set of credentials which will be needed to configure each phone. For each phone that you are configuring, obtain the following:

You can find this information in the user detail pages under the Users tab in the Phone Configuration section.

These images are based on using a Windows 7 64bit computer.

A. When you first open Jitsi after installation it will open setup wizard. DO NOT enter any data, click on Cancel to continue.

B. Click on Tools then Options

C.Click on Add

D. Choose SIP for Network then click on Advanced, DO NOT enter any user info

E. Enter User Name and SIP Password in Account page

F. In Connection page, enter the following information

G. On Encoding page, move up the following codec and uncheck all the other codec

H. Click Next, then click on Sign In. Jitsi should now beregistered and ready for use.

See our top business VoIP phone recommendations for 2017

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Jitsi softphone for Windows OnSIP Support

Gladstone gold does club proud | Gladstone Observer – Gladstone Observer

MARTIAL ARTS: The Gladstone Martial Arts Academy’s stocks continue to pack a punch with its latest achievements yielding more medals.

Nine students collected a total of 18 medals at the recent Queensland Brazilian Jiu-Jitsi State Titles on the Gold Coast.

The tally was made up of five gold, six silver and seven bronze in an event that attracted 515 competitors.

Among those was 13-year-old Trinity McKenzie who beat more experienced boys on her way to a gold medal for Gi and No-Gi divisions.

The teenager said enjoyment is the key to her success.

“All the people at GMAA are like my family now and it’s just so much fun every class I love it, Trinity said.

What’s more impressive is that she has been doing BJJ for just two years and she also trains in Mixed Martial Arts, Muay Thai and Zen Do Kai under GMAA head coach Rob McIntyre

“This was her sixth BJJ tournament, McIntyre said.

“Her favourite submission is definitely the rear naked choke and her second is the arm bar.

McIntyre said the club’s athletes have excelled in the competitions they have competed in.

“It has been a big year for GMAA in Jiu Jitsu and after only three competitions, the club has earned an amazing 40 gold, 27 silver and 11 bronze medals, McIntyre said.

“The club will travel to three more tournaments this year in Rockhampton, the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast.

The BJJ competition is based on grappling only, with competitors earning points for take-downs, controlling top positions and reversing positions.

They can win outright with a submission making their opponent tap from chokes, arm locks or leg locks and has been made famous by its skills being used in the UFC.

People interested in BJJ can contact McIntyre on 0439739619 or visit the club’s Facebook site or website http://www.gladstonemartialarts.com.au.

Visit link:

Gladstone gold does club proud | Gladstone Observer – Gladstone Observer

Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog – prometheism.net

Featured questions (hide)

How do I get the latest Jitsi source code?

You could either clone the Git repository from GitHub (see Retrieving and Building the Sources for details) or use one of the nightly source snapshots (check the Download page).

Ive discovered a bug, what can I do?

Please, report it to the developers! Take a look at the Reporting bugs guidelines page describing the steps to report bugs effectively.

Where is the user profile directory?

Jitsis user profile directory is where Jitsi keeps its configuration, logs, etc. Its location depends on the operating system.

Where do I find the log files?

The easiest way to get hold of the log files is to save them to a location of your choice using Jitsis GUI. You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Logging form. Youll see the Archive Logs button in there.

Check out the screenshot for an even better description.

Important Note: When asked for logs, please make sure that you provide the full set of logs, or better yet, the zip that Jitsi generates when following the above instructions. Please do not send separate files or file snippets as those are likely to be insufficient. If you need to provide the logs for a GitHub issue, send them to Dev Mailing List and link to the thread in the archive or create a Gist and link to it. Please DO NOT paste the log as a comment.

Otherwise, if you really want to know, the log files are located in:

Where is the configuration file?

Jitsis main configuration file is called sip-communicator.properties and is in the user profile directory.

How do you spell Jitsi and what does it mean?

The correct spelling of the application name is Jitsi (jitsi also works). The origin of the name is Bulgarian (spelled ). It means wires and the point is that the application allow you to connect to many network and people just as wires do. Of course no one other than Bulgarians is supposed to know what this means and we picked the name mainly because it was short and sounded good.

Id like to see a new feature in Jitsi, can you do that for me?

Yes, developers take feature requests into account. Send an email to the development list with a detailed description of the requested feature. After we examine its feasibility and decide whether it can be included in the Jitsi distributions you would likely be asked to open a ticket in our issue tracker. It is worth mentioning though, that handling feature requests is highly dependent of the developers availability and there is no guarantee that all requests will be satisfied.

How do I subscribe to mailing lists?

Please visit the Mailing Lists page to learn more about Jitsis mailing lists.

How do I contact the project developers?

You can ask questions concerning usage of the Jitsi on the dev mailing list (Note that the mailing lists are moderated, so, unless you subscribe to them, there may be a delay before your post shows up). For all urgent queries you could also use IRC at irc.freenode.net, channel #jitsi.

How do I send a patch?

Mail patches to the dev mailing list, with a subject line that contains the word PATCH in all uppercase, for example

A patch submission should contain one logical change; please dont mix N unrelated changes in one submission, send N separate emails instead.

The patch itself should be generated from within the project root directory using unified diff format. The following example shows one way to generate it:

You should give your patch files meaningful names. For instance if you fix a socket bug in the foo class do not call your patch file patchfile.txt but instead call it foo-socket.patch.

If the patch implements a new feature, make sure to describe the feature completely in your mail; if the patch fixes a bug, describe the bug in detail and give a reproduction recipe. An exception to these guidelines is when the patch addresses a specific issue in the issues database in that case, just make sure to refer to the issue number in your log message.

Note that unless you are describing a change rather than posting one, we would probably need you to sign our contributor agreement as either an individual or a corporation

I would like to update this wiki what can I do?

Currently, only project developers are permitted to update the wiki. Please send your suggested changes to the dev mailing list.

A wiki page can be updated by appending the string ?action=edit to the current url and refreshing the page. The page will then be displayed with an extra menu line that includes a Page Edit item.

If you click on the Page Edit item, you will be redirected to a logon page. Enter your developer username and password and you should be redirected back to the original page. Click on Page Edit again to access the source content of the page (a quick reference to wiki markup syntax is also displayed).

How do I reset my XMPP or jit.si password?

You can reset your jit.si password from within Jitsi. You can do the same for any XMPP account that allows it.

In the case of jit.si, you can also change your password via the web

Why cant I connect to ekiga.net?

NB: the problems described in this section also apply to other providers such as 1und1.de

Short Answer: The ekiga.net SIP servers are configured in a way that prevent Jitsi (and many other SIP user agents for that matter) to register with the service. Please use iptel.org or ippi.com instead.

Slightly Longer Answer: The service at ekiga.net is configured to only accept SIP REGISTER requests that contain a public IP address in their Contact header. This means that registration from Jitsi would fail unless you actually have a public IP address. The Ekiga client circumvents this by using STUN to learn the address and port that have been allocated for the current session. It then uses the pair in the SIP Contact header. This kind of use was common for the first version of the STUN protocol defined in RFC 3489 which was sometimes referred to as classic STUN.

The IETF has since significantly reviewed the way STUN should be used. The new version of the protocol is now defined in RFC 5389 which, among other things, advises against the use of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility:

Today STUN represents one of the tools used by complete traversal mechanisms such as SIP OUTBOUND (RFC 5626) or ICE (RFC 5245). Neither of these includes sending a STUN obtained address in a Contact header.

So, where does Jitsi currently stand on all this? At the time of writing, we support the ICE protocol but only use it with XMPP. Use with SIP is likely to come in the near future. The reason we havent implemented it yet is that most SIP servers currently open to use over the Internet, use a technique called latching. When such servers detect you are connecting from behind a NAT, they would start acting as a relay, receiving media from your peers and then forwarding it to you (and vice versa). While this is by far the most reliably way of traversing NATs, it does indeed imply some scalability constraints.

ICE on the other hand would only fall back to relaying if no other way was found to connect the two participants. This is why it is considered as a more optimal solution and why its also on our roadmap.

Note however that the constraints on ekiga.net would continue preventing Jitsi from connecting even when we do implement support for ICE.

Why do I see ICE failed errors when trying to make calls.

Jitsi implements a number of NAT traversal methods as described here. In many situations we will be able to setup a call directly between you and other users but in order to be able to reliably establish calls, your XMPP or SIP provider has to provide relaying capabilities such as TURN, Jingle Nodes or . If looking for services that support these you can try jit.si or ippi. Also note that both you and your partner need to have unhindered outgoing UDP access to the Internet or at least to your VoIP service provider. You DO NOT however need to map any port numbers on your home router. At best this is going to have no effect.

Does Jitsi support STUN? (and how about TURN, UPnP and Jingle Nodes?)

STUN, together with TURN, Jingle Nodes, IPv6 and UPnP, is one of the techniques that Jitsi uses as part of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol to handle NAT traversal for calls made over XMPP.

For its SIP calls, Jitsi currently relies on servers to relay media (a technique also known as Hosted NAT Traversal or latching, which would be the case of the majority of the SIP servers used on the Internet today. Note that in terms of reliability Hosted NAT Traversal gives the same results as use of ICE. It even works better in some ways because the connection is setup immediately and no time is waisted for gathering candidates and making connectivity checks. The only downside of HNT is that it may put a strain on SIP providers requiring more bandwidth. This could become a problem especially in environments with a high number of all IP high quality video calls.

It is likely that ICE support for SIP calls would also be added to Jitsi in 2014 especially since this would also help with WebRTC compatibility.

Standalone support for STUN is NOT going to be part of Jitsi. Check out the ekiga entry for more information on the shortcomings of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility.

I have a few questions regarding ZRTP, SRTP and VoIP security in general. Where can I find some answers?

Check out our ZRTP FAQ.

Why does my call stay in the Initiating Call status and I can never connect?

A common reason for providers not to respond to calls is that they simply dont get the INVITE request Jitsi sends to them. This can happen if you are using UDP. The Jitsi INVITE requests may often exceed the maximum allowed packet size (MTU) for your network or that of your server. In such cases packets may be fragmented by your IP stack and fragmentation for UDP does not always work well in certain networks. This is what happens when a client supports multiple features ;). To resolve the issue you can do one of the following:

How does on-line provisioning work?

On-line provisioning is the feature that allows Jitsi to connect to an http URI every time it starts and retrieve part or all of its configuration there. On-line provisioning is often used by providers to remotely configure the clients they maintain. It can be used to set any property in Jitsi such as the codecs used, the features that users can manually configure and even protocol accounts.

When requesting its provisioning information Jitsi can transmit any of a number of parameters to the server, like for example: the OS it is running on, user credentials, a unique ID and others. This way the provisioning server can fine-tune the parameters it sends to Jitsi.

For more information, please check our on-line provisioning manual

Are my chat sessions protected and if so, how?

Jitsi supports the OTR encryption protocol. OTR stands for Off-the-Record Messaging and once youve set it up (i.e. clicked on that padlock icon in a chat window and verified the identity of your contact) it allows you to make sure that no one other than you two can read your messages, not even your service provider. You can find more on the OTR mechanisms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-the-Record_Messaging

Should logging be disabled by default when using OTR?

By default Jitsi stores all chats so that if you need any information from them it would always be available. If you would like to disable this behavior you can currently do so by opening Jitsis Options/Preferences, selecting the General pane and then unchecking the Log chat history option near the top. It is also possible to disable chats for specific contacts, to erase their history. An indicator in the chat window makes it aware at all times whether history is on or off while chatting with someone.

OTR protected chats follow the same pattern and some users have expressed concerns that this might be incompatible with their security expectations. Our position on this is that Jitsis role is to protect your communication. We also strive to offer usability. The current defaults represent these objectives: most people would prefer for their private communication not to be readable by third parties and most of the time people use Jitsi from personal devices where they are in control of the access policy.

In some cases users may wish for their communications not to be stored locally. This can be the case when using Jitsi on devices that others may also have access to. In such cases users need to be able to easily see whether history is being logged. They would also need to easily turn this off and potentially even erase previous history.

Note however that this subject is entirely different from the encryption one. They are separate measures meant to protect you against separate attacks or problems. We dont believe that the need for one would necessarily imply the need for the other. We are hence committed to also keeping that separation in the user interface.

Force SIP Message support.

Some SIP servers (Asterisk in particular) do not announce the MESSAGE support, despite supporting it. If you enable the account property FORCE_MESSAGING, Jitsi will attempt to use MESSAGE for chats, despite your configured SIP server not explicitly announcing this support to connected clients. For example, if your SIP account is john.smith@example.com, go to property editor type that in the search field and look for something like

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.ACCOUNT_UID with the value SIP:john.smith@example.com

The property to add in that case would be:

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.FORCE_MESSAGING with the value true.

How to add/edit configuration properties.

You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Property Editor form. There you can search edit/delete or create new properties.

Is there an an Android version of Jitsi?

Yes, but it is still in an early alpha stage and further development has been put on hold until further notice. A lot of the user interface is not yet implemented. You can find the apk on the Download page.

Is there an iPhone/iPad version of Jitsi?

No. Due to the restrictions imposed by the platform it is highly unlikely this answer is going to change.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: Could not create task or type of type: junitreport.

On some Linux distributions such as Debian, the ant package is actualy subdivided into multiple packages. So when you chose to install junit and ant with the distribution specific package system, dont forget to install ant-optional too.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: No test with id=IcqProtocolProviderSlick.

Have you created your own accounts.properties file in the lib directory? Youll need to define two ICQ test accounts at least, and preferably some test accounts for the other supported protocols.

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FAQ | Jitsi

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FAQ | Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog | Prometheism.net

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Continue reading here: Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog euvolution.com

Continue reading here:

Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog – prometheism.net

FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net euvolution.com | Futurist

Featured questions (hide)

How do I get the latest Jitsi source code?

You could either clone the Git repository from GitHub (see Retrieving and Building the Sources for details) or use one of the nightly source snapshots (check the Download page).

Ive discovered a bug, what can I do?

Please, report it to the developers! Take a look at the Reporting bugs guidelines page describing the steps to report bugs effectively.

Where is the user profile directory?

Jitsis user profile directory is where Jitsi keeps its configuration, logs, etc. Its location depends on the operating system.

Where do I find the log files?

The easiest way to get hold of the log files is to save them to a location of your choice using Jitsis GUI. You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Logging form. Youll see the Archive Logs button in there.

Check out the screenshot for an even better description.

Important Note: When asked for logs, please make sure that you provide the full set of logs, or better yet, the zip that Jitsi generates when following the above instructions. Please do not send separate files or file snippets as those are likely to be insufficient. If you need to provide the logs for a GitHub issue, send them to Dev Mailing List and link to the thread in the archive or create a Gist and link to it. Please DO NOT paste the log as a comment.

Otherwise, if you really want to know, the log files are located in:

Where is the configuration file?

Jitsis main configuration file is called sip-communicator.properties and is in the user profile directory.

How do you spell Jitsi and what does it mean?

The correct spelling of the application name is Jitsi (jitsi also works). The origin of the name is Bulgarian (spelled ). It means wires and the point is that the application allow you to connect to many network and people just as wires do. Of course no one other than Bulgarians is supposed to know what this means and we picked the name mainly because it was short and sounded good.

Id like to see a new feature in Jitsi, can you do that for me?

Yes, developers take feature requests into account. Send an email to the development list with a detailed description of the requested feature. After we examine its feasibility and decide whether it can be included in the Jitsi distributions you would likely be asked to open a ticket in our issue tracker. It is worth mentioning though, that handling feature requests is highly dependent of the developers availability and there is no guarantee that all requests will be satisfied.

How do I subscribe to mailing lists?

Please visit the Mailing Lists page to learn more about Jitsis mailing lists.

How do I contact the project developers?

You can ask questions concerning usage of the Jitsi on the dev mailing list (Note that the mailing lists are moderated, so, unless you subscribe to them, there may be a delay before your post shows up). For all urgent queries you could also use IRC at irc.freenode.net, channel #jitsi.

How do I send a patch?

Mail patches to the dev mailing list, with a subject line that contains the word PATCH in all uppercase, for example

A patch submission should contain one logical change; please dont mix N unrelated changes in one submission, send N separate emails instead.

The patch itself should be generated from within the project root directory using unified diff format. The following example shows one way to generate it:

You should give your patch files meaningful names. For instance if you fix a socket bug in the foo class do not call your patch file patchfile.txt but instead call it foo-socket.patch.

If the patch implements a new feature, make sure to describe the feature completely in your mail; if the patch fixes a bug, describe the bug in detail and give a reproduction recipe. An exception to these guidelines is when the patch addresses a specific issue in the issues database in that case, just make sure to refer to the issue number in your log message.

Note that unless you are describing a change rather than posting one, we would probably need you to sign our contributor agreement as either an individual or a corporation

I would like to update this wiki what can I do?

Currently, only project developers are permitted to update the wiki. Please send your suggested changes to the dev mailing list.

A wiki page can be updated by appending the string ?action=edit to the current url and refreshing the page. The page will then be displayed with an extra menu line that includes a Page Edit item.

If you click on the Page Edit item, you will be redirected to a logon page. Enter your developer username and password and you should be redirected back to the original page. Click on Page Edit again to access the source content of the page (a quick reference to wiki markup syntax is also displayed).

How do I reset my XMPP or jit.si password?

You can reset your jit.si password from within Jitsi. You can do the same for any XMPP account that allows it.

In the case of jit.si, you can also change your password via the web

Why cant I connect to ekiga.net?

NB: the problems described in this section also apply to other providers such as 1und1.de

Short Answer: The ekiga.net SIP servers are configured in a way that prevent Jitsi (and many other SIP user agents for that matter) to register with the service. Please use iptel.org or ippi.com instead.

Slightly Longer Answer: The service at ekiga.net is configured to only accept SIP REGISTER requests that contain a public IP address in their Contact header. This means that registration from Jitsi would fail unless you actually have a public IP address. The Ekiga client circumvents this by using STUN to learn the address and port that have been allocated for the current session. It then uses the pair in the SIP Contact header. This kind of use was common for the first version of the STUN protocol defined in RFC 3489 which was sometimes referred to as classic STUN.

The IETF has since significantly reviewed the way STUN should be used. The new version of the protocol is now defined in RFC 5389 which, among other things, advises against the use of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility:

Today STUN represents one of the tools used by complete traversal mechanisms such as SIP OUTBOUND (RFC 5626) or ICE (RFC 5245). Neither of these includes sending a STUN obtained address in a Contact header.

So, where does Jitsi currently stand on all this? At the time of writing, we support the ICE protocol but only use it with XMPP. Use with SIP is likely to come in the near future. The reason we havent implemented it yet is that most SIP servers currently open to use over the Internet, use a technique called latching. When such servers detect you are connecting from behind a NAT, they would start acting as a relay, receiving media from your peers and then forwarding it to you (and vice versa). While this is by far the most reliably way of traversing NATs, it does indeed imply some scalability constraints.

ICE on the other hand would only fall back to relaying if no other way was found to connect the two participants. This is why it is considered as a more optimal solution and why its also on our roadmap.

Note however that the constraints on ekiga.net would continue preventing Jitsi from connecting even when we do implement support for ICE.

Why do I see ICE failed errors when trying to make calls.

Jitsi implements a number of NAT traversal methods as described here. In many situations we will be able to setup a call directly between you and other users but in order to be able to reliably establish calls, your XMPP or SIP provider has to provide relaying capabilities such as TURN, Jingle Nodes or . If looking for services that support these you can try jit.si or ippi. Also note that both you and your partner need to have unhindered outgoing UDP access to the Internet or at least to your VoIP service provider. You DO NOT however need to map any port numbers on your home router. At best this is going to have no effect.

Does Jitsi support STUN? (and how about TURN, UPnP and Jingle Nodes?)

STUN, together with TURN, Jingle Nodes, IPv6 and UPnP, is one of the techniques that Jitsi uses as part of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol to handle NAT traversal for calls made over XMPP.

For its SIP calls, Jitsi currently relies on servers to relay media (a technique also known as Hosted NAT Traversal or latching, which would be the case of the majority of the SIP servers used on the Internet today. Note that in terms of reliability Hosted NAT Traversal gives the same results as use of ICE. It even works better in some ways because the connection is setup immediately and no time is waisted for gathering candidates and making connectivity checks. The only downside of HNT is that it may put a strain on SIP providers requiring more bandwidth. This could become a problem especially in environments with a high number of all IP high quality video calls.

It is likely that ICE support for SIP calls would also be added to Jitsi in 2014 especially since this would also help with WebRTC compatibility.

Standalone support for STUN is NOT going to be part of Jitsi. Check out the ekiga entry for more information on the shortcomings of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility.

I have a few questions regarding ZRTP, SRTP and VoIP security in general. Where can I find some answers?

Check out our ZRTP FAQ.

Why does my call stay in the Initiating Call status and I can never connect?

A common reason for providers not to respond to calls is that they simply dont get the INVITE request Jitsi sends to them. This can happen if you are using UDP. The Jitsi INVITE requests may often exceed the maximum allowed packet size (MTU) for your network or that of your server. In such cases packets may be fragmented by your IP stack and fragmentation for UDP does not always work well in certain networks. This is what happens when a client supports multiple features ;). To resolve the issue you can do one of the following:

How does on-line provisioning work?

On-line provisioning is the feature that allows Jitsi to connect to an http URI every time it starts and retrieve part or all of its configuration there. On-line provisioning is often used by providers to remotely configure the clients they maintain. It can be used to set any property in Jitsi such as the codecs used, the features that users can manually configure and even protocol accounts.

When requesting its provisioning information Jitsi can transmit any of a number of parameters to the server, like for example: the OS it is running on, user credentials, a unique ID and others. This way the provisioning server can fine-tune the parameters it sends to Jitsi.

For more information, please check our on-line provisioning manual

Are my chat sessions protected and if so, how?

Jitsi supports the OTR encryption protocol. OTR stands for Off-the-Record Messaging and once youve set it up (i.e. clicked on that padlock icon in a chat window and verified the identity of your contact) it allows you to make sure that no one other than you two can read your messages, not even your service provider. You can find more on the OTR mechanisms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-the-Record_Messaging

Should logging be disabled by default when using OTR?

By default Jitsi stores all chats so that if you need any information from them it would always be available. If you would like to disable this behavior you can currently do so by opening Jitsis Options/Preferences, selecting the General pane and then unchecking the Log chat history option near the top. It is also possible to disable chats for specific contacts, to erase their history. An indicator in the chat window makes it aware at all times whether history is on or off while chatting with someone.

OTR protected chats follow the same pattern and some users have expressed concerns that this might be incompatible with their security expectations. Our position on this is that Jitsis role is to protect your communication. We also strive to offer usability. The current defaults represent these objectives: most people would prefer for their private communication not to be readable by third parties and most of the time people use Jitsi from personal devices where they are in control of the access policy.

In some cases users may wish for their communications not to be stored locally. This can be the case when using Jitsi on devices that others may also have access to. In such cases users need to be able to easily see whether history is being logged. They would also need to easily turn this off and potentially even erase previous history.

Note however that this subject is entirely different from the encryption one. They are separate measures meant to protect you against separate attacks or problems. We dont believe that the need for one would necessarily imply the need for the other. We are hence committed to also keeping that separation in the user interface.

Force SIP Message support.

Some SIP servers (Asterisk in particular) do not announce the MESSAGE support, despite supporting it. If you enable the account property FORCE_MESSAGING, Jitsi will attempt to use MESSAGE for chats, despite your configured SIP server not explicitly announcing this support to connected clients. For example, if your SIP account is john.smith@example.com, go to property editor type that in the search field and look for something like

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.ACCOUNT_UID with the value SIP:john.smith@example.com

The property to add in that case would be:

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.FORCE_MESSAGING with the value true.

How to add/edit configuration properties.

You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Property Editor form. There you can search edit/delete or create new properties.

Is there an an Android version of Jitsi?

Yes, but it is still in an early alpha stage and further development has been put on hold until further notice. A lot of the user interface is not yet implemented. You can find the apk on the Download page.

Is there an iPhone/iPad version of Jitsi?

No. Due to the restrictions imposed by the platform it is highly unlikely this answer is going to change.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: Could not create task or type of type: junitreport.

On some Linux distributions such as Debian, the ant package is actualy subdivided into multiple packages. So when you chose to install junit and ant with the distribution specific package system, dont forget to install ant-optional too.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: No test with id=IcqProtocolProviderSlick.

Have you created your own accounts.properties file in the lib directory? Youll need to define two ICQ test accounts at least, and preferably some test accounts for the other supported protocols.

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FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net euvolution.com | Futurist

Jitsi Meet (advanced) Projects | Prometheism.net

How to join Jitsi Meet video conferences over the Web

If you do not already know what Jitsi Meet is, here is the official homepage. Jitsi Meet allows you to create and join video calls over the Web (even as a simple viewer). Some of its features are: encrypted by default, no account needed, invite by pretty URL https://mysite.com/myroom

Thanks to UV4L it is possible to create or join an existing room and broadcast live video and audio to all the participants or viewers in the room from a camera and a microphone connected to the Raspberry Pi. Its also possible to automatically hear and see other participants if you have speakers and display (HDMI, touchscreen, etc) connected to the Raspberry Pi. Of course, other participants can be other Raspberry Pis. The great news is that you do not need any browser installed on the Raspberry Pi to do this.

Its necessary to install the required packages before proceeding: uv4l, uv4l-server, uv4l-webrtc, uv4l-xmpp-bridge and one video driver (e.g. uv4l-raspicam, uv4l-uvc, etc). Please refer to these installation instructions for more details.

To start and stop streaming to a particular Jitsi Meet server (called videobridge), its enough to invoke the corresponding commands by means of the UV4L Streaming Server installed on the Raspberry Pi. This can be done in two ways.

The first convenient way is through a browser by using the Jitsi Meet control page available at the URL the Streaming Server itself is listening to (e.g. http://myraspberrypi:8080), from which its possible to specify all the mandatory informations (i.e. XMPP and/or BOSH signalling server, chat room, your username and password) required to establish a connection and to click on start/stop buttons in order to join or leave the specified room respectively.

The second way is to invoke the start/stop commands via HTTP/GET requests sent to the Streaming Server from command line. For example, to start streaming to the videobridge which is at the base of the official, free-access Jitsi Meet service at meet.jit.si, type (in one line):

where raspberrypi will have to be replaced with the real hostname of your Raspberry Pi in your network (it can be localhost if you are executing the command from within your Raspberry Pi) and port will have to be replaced with the real port number the Streaming Server is listening to (8080 is the default). The above command will make the Raspberry Pi create or join a conference at http://meet.jit.si/testroom.

If the UV4L Streaming Server is providing HTTPS instead of HTTP, be careful to specify https://[] in the URL. You may also desire to add the insecure option to curl to turn off the verification of the servers certificate (see the curl manual for more details).

Please note the parameters in the URL that you are allowed to specify:

server (XMPP server hostname or ip address) port (port the XMPP server is listening to) muc (multiuser chat domain) room (desired room you want to join or create) room_password (room password, if the room is protected) username (desired username in the chat room) password (password if the server is password protected) reconnect (try to reconnect after disconnection) bosh_enable (1 if you want to use BOSH signalling, 0 otherwise) bosh_server (usually HTTP(S) server hostname for BOSH) bosh_tls (1 for HTTPS, 0 otherwise) bosh_port (typically 443 for HTTPS, 80 for HTTP) bosh_hostname (connection manager hostname, typically the same as bosh_server) action (Start or Stop streaming)

All the above settings can be optionally specified once for all in the UV4L configuration file (except action) (see the uv4l-server manual for more details).

Similarly, to stop streaming:

If you are protecting the UV4L Streaming Server with a password, then the above URL will not work. In this case, you must specify user and password in the URL as in the below example:

Go here to read the rest: Jitsi Meet (advanced) Projects

Original post:

Jitsi Meet (advanced) Projects | Prometheism.net

FAQ | Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog | Prometheism.net

Featured questions (hide)

How do I get the latest Jitsi source code?

You could either clone the Git repository from GitHub (see Retrieving and Building the Sources for details) or use one of the nightly source snapshots (check the Download page).

Ive discovered a bug, what can I do?

Please, report it to the developers! Take a look at the Reporting bugs guidelines page describing the steps to report bugs effectively.

Where is the user profile directory?

Jitsis user profile directory is where Jitsi keeps its configuration, logs, etc. Its location depends on the operating system.

Where do I find the log files?

The easiest way to get hold of the log files is to save them to a location of your choice using Jitsis GUI. You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Logging form. Youll see the Archive Logs button in there.

Check out the screenshot for an even better description.

Important Note: When asked for logs, please make sure that you provide the full set of logs, or better yet, the zip that Jitsi generates when following the above instructions. Please do not send separate files or file snippets as those are likely to be insufficient. If you need to provide the logs for a GitHub issue, send them to Dev Mailing List and link to the thread in the archive or create a Gist and link to it. Please DO NOT paste the log as a comment.

Otherwise, if you really want to know, the log files are located in:

Where is the configuration file?

Jitsis main configuration file is called sip-communicator.properties and is in the user profile directory.

How do you spell Jitsi and what does it mean?

The correct spelling of the application name is Jitsi (jitsi also works). The origin of the name is Bulgarian (spelled ). It means wires and the point is that the application allow you to connect to many network and people just as wires do. Of course no one other than Bulgarians is supposed to know what this means and we picked the name mainly because it was short and sounded good.

Id like to see a new feature in Jitsi, can you do that for me?

Yes, developers take feature requests into account. Send an email to the development list with a detailed description of the requested feature. After we examine its feasibility and decide whether it can be included in the Jitsi distributions you would likely be asked to open a ticket in our issue tracker. It is worth mentioning though, that handling feature requests is highly dependent of the developers availability and there is no guarantee that all requests will be satisfied.

How do I subscribe to mailing lists?

Please visit the Mailing Lists page to learn more about Jitsis mailing lists.

How do I contact the project developers?

You can ask questions concerning usage of the Jitsi on the dev mailing list (Note that the mailing lists are moderated, so, unless you subscribe to them, there may be a delay before your post shows up). For all urgent queries you could also use IRC at irc.freenode.net, channel #jitsi.

How do I send a patch?

Mail patches to the dev mailing list, with a subject line that contains the word PATCH in all uppercase, for example

A patch submission should contain one logical change; please dont mix N unrelated changes in one submission, send N separate emails instead.

The patch itself should be generated from within the project root directory using unified diff format. The following example shows one way to generate it:

You should give your patch files meaningful names. For instance if you fix a socket bug in the foo class do not call your patch file patchfile.txt but instead call it foo-socket.patch.

If the patch implements a new feature, make sure to describe the feature completely in your mail; if the patch fixes a bug, describe the bug in detail and give a reproduction recipe. An exception to these guidelines is when the patch addresses a specific issue in the issues database in that case, just make sure to refer to the issue number in your log message.

Note that unless you are describing a change rather than posting one, we would probably need you to sign our contributor agreement as either an individual or a corporation

I would like to update this wiki what can I do?

Currently, only project developers are permitted to update the wiki. Please send your suggested changes to the dev mailing list.

A wiki page can be updated by appending the string ?action=edit to the current url and refreshing the page. The page will then be displayed with an extra menu line that includes a Page Edit item.

If you click on the Page Edit item, you will be redirected to a logon page. Enter your developer username and password and you should be redirected back to the original page. Click on Page Edit again to access the source content of the page (a quick reference to wiki markup syntax is also displayed).

How do I reset my XMPP or jit.si password?

You can reset your jit.si password from within Jitsi. You can do the same for any XMPP account that allows it.

In the case of jit.si, you can also change your password via the web

Why cant I connect to ekiga.net?

NB: the problems described in this section also apply to other providers such as 1und1.de

Short Answer: The ekiga.net SIP servers are configured in a way that prevent Jitsi (and many other SIP user agents for that matter) to register with the service. Please use iptel.org or ippi.com instead.

Slightly Longer Answer: The service at ekiga.net is configured to only accept SIP REGISTER requests that contain a public IP address in their Contact header. This means that registration from Jitsi would fail unless you actually have a public IP address. The Ekiga client circumvents this by using STUN to learn the address and port that have been allocated for the current session. It then uses the pair in the SIP Contact header. This kind of use was common for the first version of the STUN protocol defined in RFC 3489 which was sometimes referred to as classic STUN.

The IETF has since significantly reviewed the way STUN should be used. The new version of the protocol is now defined in RFC 5389 which, among other things, advises against the use of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility:

Today STUN represents one of the tools used by complete traversal mechanisms such as SIP OUTBOUND (RFC 5626) or ICE (RFC 5245). Neither of these includes sending a STUN obtained address in a Contact header.

So, where does Jitsi currently stand on all this? At the time of writing, we support the ICE protocol but only use it with XMPP. Use with SIP is likely to come in the near future. The reason we havent implemented it yet is that most SIP servers currently open to use over the Internet, use a technique called latching. When such servers detect you are connecting from behind a NAT, they would start acting as a relay, receiving media from your peers and then forwarding it to you (and vice versa). While this is by far the most reliably way of traversing NATs, it does indeed imply some scalability constraints.

ICE on the other hand would only fall back to relaying if no other way was found to connect the two participants. This is why it is considered as a more optimal solution and why its also on our roadmap.

Note however that the constraints on ekiga.net would continue preventing Jitsi from connecting even when we do implement support for ICE.

Why do I see ICE failed errors when trying to make calls.

Jitsi implements a number of NAT traversal methods as described here. In many situations we will be able to setup a call directly between you and other users but in order to be able to reliably establish calls, your XMPP or SIP provider has to provide relaying capabilities such as TURN, Jingle Nodes or . If looking for services that support these you can try jit.si or ippi. Also note that both you and your partner need to have unhindered outgoing UDP access to the Internet or at least to your VoIP service provider. You DO NOT however need to map any port numbers on your home router. At best this is going to have no effect.

Does Jitsi support STUN? (and how about TURN, UPnP and Jingle Nodes?)

STUN, together with TURN, Jingle Nodes, IPv6 and UPnP, is one of the techniques that Jitsi uses as part of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol to handle NAT traversal for calls made over XMPP.

For its SIP calls, Jitsi currently relies on servers to relay media (a technique also known as Hosted NAT Traversal or latching, which would be the case of the majority of the SIP servers used on the Internet today. Note that in terms of reliability Hosted NAT Traversal gives the same results as use of ICE. It even works better in some ways because the connection is setup immediately and no time is waisted for gathering candidates and making connectivity checks. The only downside of HNT is that it may put a strain on SIP providers requiring more bandwidth. This could become a problem especially in environments with a high number of all IP high quality video calls.

It is likely that ICE support for SIP calls would also be added to Jitsi in 2014 especially since this would also help with WebRTC compatibility.

Standalone support for STUN is NOT going to be part of Jitsi. Check out the ekiga entry for more information on the shortcomings of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility.

I have a few questions regarding ZRTP, SRTP and VoIP security in general. Where can I find some answers?

Check out our ZRTP FAQ.

Why does my call stay in the Initiating Call status and I can never connect?

A common reason for providers not to respond to calls is that they simply dont get the INVITE request Jitsi sends to them. This can happen if you are using UDP. The Jitsi INVITE requests may often exceed the maximum allowed packet size (MTU) for your network or that of your server. In such cases packets may be fragmented by your IP stack and fragmentation for UDP does not always work well in certain networks. This is what happens when a client supports multiple features ;). To resolve the issue you can do one of the following:

How does on-line provisioning work?

On-line provisioning is the feature that allows Jitsi to connect to an http URI every time it starts and retrieve part or all of its configuration there. On-line provisioning is often used by providers to remotely configure the clients they maintain. It can be used to set any property in Jitsi such as the codecs used, the features that users can manually configure and even protocol accounts.

When requesting its provisioning information Jitsi can transmit any of a number of parameters to the server, like for example: the OS it is running on, user credentials, a unique ID and others. This way the provisioning server can fine-tune the parameters it sends to Jitsi.

For more information, please check our on-line provisioning manual

Are my chat sessions protected and if so, how?

Jitsi supports the OTR encryption protocol. OTR stands for Off-the-Record Messaging and once youve set it up (i.e. clicked on that padlock icon in a chat window and verified the identity of your contact) it allows you to make sure that no one other than you two can read your messages, not even your service provider. You can find more on the OTR mechanisms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-the-Record_Messaging

Should logging be disabled by default when using OTR?

By default Jitsi stores all chats so that if you need any information from them it would always be available. If you would like to disable this behavior you can currently do so by opening Jitsis Options/Preferences, selecting the General pane and then unchecking the Log chat history option near the top. It is also possible to disable chats for specific contacts, to erase their history. An indicator in the chat window makes it aware at all times whether history is on or off while chatting with someone.

OTR protected chats follow the same pattern and some users have expressed concerns that this might be incompatible with their security expectations. Our position on this is that Jitsis role is to protect your communication. We also strive to offer usability. The current defaults represent these objectives: most people would prefer for their private communication not to be readable by third parties and most of the time people use Jitsi from personal devices where they are in control of the access policy.

In some cases users may wish for their communications not to be stored locally. This can be the case when using Jitsi on devices that others may also have access to. In such cases users need to be able to easily see whether history is being logged. They would also need to easily turn this off and potentially even erase previous history.

Note however that this subject is entirely different from the encryption one. They are separate measures meant to protect you against separate attacks or problems. We dont believe that the need for one would necessarily imply the need for the other. We are hence committed to also keeping that separation in the user interface.

Force SIP Message support.

Some SIP servers (Asterisk in particular) do not announce the MESSAGE support, despite supporting it. If you enable the account property FORCE_MESSAGING, Jitsi will attempt to use MESSAGE for chats, despite your configured SIP server not explicitly announcing this support to connected clients. For example, if your SIP account is john.smith@example.com, go to property editor type that in the search field and look for something like

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.ACCOUNT_UID with the value SIP:john.smith@example.com

The property to add in that case would be:

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.FORCE_MESSAGING with the value true.

How to add/edit configuration properties.

You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Property Editor form. There you can search edit/delete or create new properties.

Is there an an Android version of Jitsi?

Yes, but it is still in an early alpha stage and further development has been put on hold until further notice. A lot of the user interface is not yet implemented. You can find the apk on the Download page.

Is there an iPhone/iPad version of Jitsi?

No. Due to the restrictions imposed by the platform it is highly unlikely this answer is going to change.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: Could not create task or type of type: junitreport.

On some Linux distributions such as Debian, the ant package is actualy subdivided into multiple packages. So when you chose to install junit and ant with the distribution specific package system, dont forget to install ant-optional too.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: No test with id=IcqProtocolProviderSlick.

Have you created your own accounts.properties file in the lib directory? Youll need to define two ICQ test accounts at least, and preferably some test accounts for the other supported protocols.

Read the original:

FAQ | Jitsi

. Bookmark the

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See original here: FAQ | Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog

See original here:

FAQ | Jitsi | Futurist Transhuman News Blog | Prometheism.net

FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net euvolution.com

Featured questions (hide)

How do I get the latest Jitsi source code?

You could either clone the Git repository from GitHub (see Retrieving and Building the Sources for details) or use one of the nightly source snapshots (check the Download page).

Ive discovered a bug, what can I do?

Please, report it to the developers! Take a look at the Reporting bugs guidelines page describing the steps to report bugs effectively.

Where is the user profile directory?

Jitsis user profile directory is where Jitsi keeps its configuration, logs, etc. Its location depends on the operating system.

Where do I find the log files?

The easiest way to get hold of the log files is to save them to a location of your choice using Jitsis GUI. You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Logging form. Youll see the Archive Logs button in there.

Check out the screenshot for an even better description.

Important Note: When asked for logs, please make sure that you provide the full set of logs, or better yet, the zip that Jitsi generates when following the above instructions. Please do not send separate files or file snippets as those are likely to be insufficient. If you need to provide the logs for a GitHub issue, send them to Dev Mailing List and link to the thread in the archive or create a Gist and link to it. Please DO NOT paste the log as a comment.

Otherwise, if you really want to know, the log files are located in:

Where is the configuration file?

Jitsis main configuration file is called sip-communicator.properties and is in the user profile directory.

How do you spell Jitsi and what does it mean?

The correct spelling of the application name is Jitsi (jitsi also works). The origin of the name is Bulgarian (spelled ). It means wires and the point is that the application allow you to connect to many network and people just as wires do. Of course no one other than Bulgarians is supposed to know what this means and we picked the name mainly because it was short and sounded good.

Id like to see a new feature in Jitsi, can you do that for me?

Yes, developers take feature requests into account. Send an email to the development list with a detailed description of the requested feature. After we examine its feasibility and decide whether it can be included in the Jitsi distributions you would likely be asked to open a ticket in our issue tracker. It is worth mentioning though, that handling feature requests is highly dependent of the developers availability and there is no guarantee that all requests will be satisfied.

How do I subscribe to mailing lists?

Please visit the Mailing Lists page to learn more about Jitsis mailing lists.

How do I contact the project developers?

You can ask questions concerning usage of the Jitsi on the dev mailing list (Note that the mailing lists are moderated, so, unless you subscribe to them, there may be a delay before your post shows up). For all urgent queries you could also use IRC at irc.freenode.net, channel #jitsi.

How do I send a patch?

Mail patches to the dev mailing list, with a subject line that contains the word PATCH in all uppercase, for example

A patch submission should contain one logical change; please dont mix N unrelated changes in one submission, send N separate emails instead.

The patch itself should be generated from within the project root directory using unified diff format. The following example shows one way to generate it:

You should give your patch files meaningful names. For instance if you fix a socket bug in the foo class do not call your patch file patchfile.txt but instead call it foo-socket.patch.

If the patch implements a new feature, make sure to describe the feature completely in your mail; if the patch fixes a bug, describe the bug in detail and give a reproduction recipe. An exception to these guidelines is when the patch addresses a specific issue in the issues database in that case, just make sure to refer to the issue number in your log message.

Note that unless you are describing a change rather than posting one, we would probably need you to sign our contributor agreement as either an individual or a corporation

I would like to update this wiki what can I do?

Currently, only project developers are permitted to update the wiki. Please send your suggested changes to the dev mailing list.

A wiki page can be updated by appending the string ?action=edit to the current url and refreshing the page. The page will then be displayed with an extra menu line that includes a Page Edit item.

If you click on the Page Edit item, you will be redirected to a logon page. Enter your developer username and password and you should be redirected back to the original page. Click on Page Edit again to access the source content of the page (a quick reference to wiki markup syntax is also displayed).

How do I reset my XMPP or jit.si password?

You can reset your jit.si password from within Jitsi. You can do the same for any XMPP account that allows it.

In the case of jit.si, you can also change your password via the web

Why cant I connect to ekiga.net?

NB: the problems described in this section also apply to other providers such as 1und1.de

Short Answer: The ekiga.net SIP servers are configured in a way that prevent Jitsi (and many other SIP user agents for that matter) to register with the service. Please use iptel.org or ippi.com instead.

Slightly Longer Answer: The service at ekiga.net is configured to only accept SIP REGISTER requests that contain a public IP address in their Contact header. This means that registration from Jitsi would fail unless you actually have a public IP address. The Ekiga client circumvents this by using STUN to learn the address and port that have been allocated for the current session. It then uses the pair in the SIP Contact header. This kind of use was common for the first version of the STUN protocol defined in RFC 3489 which was sometimes referred to as classic STUN.

The IETF has since significantly reviewed the way STUN should be used. The new version of the protocol is now defined in RFC 5389 which, among other things, advises against the use of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility:

Today STUN represents one of the tools used by complete traversal mechanisms such as SIP OUTBOUND (RFC 5626) or ICE (RFC 5245). Neither of these includes sending a STUN obtained address in a Contact header.

So, where does Jitsi currently stand on all this? At the time of writing, we support the ICE protocol but only use it with XMPP. Use with SIP is likely to come in the near future. The reason we havent implemented it yet is that most SIP servers currently open to use over the Internet, use a technique called latching. When such servers detect you are connecting from behind a NAT, they would start acting as a relay, receiving media from your peers and then forwarding it to you (and vice versa). While this is by far the most reliably way of traversing NATs, it does indeed imply some scalability constraints.

ICE on the other hand would only fall back to relaying if no other way was found to connect the two participants. This is why it is considered as a more optimal solution and why its also on our roadmap.

Note however that the constraints on ekiga.net would continue preventing Jitsi from connecting even when we do implement support for ICE.

Why do I see ICE failed errors when trying to make calls.

Jitsi implements a number of NAT traversal methods as described here. In many situations we will be able to setup a call directly between you and other users but in order to be able to reliably establish calls, your XMPP or SIP provider has to provide relaying capabilities such as TURN, Jingle Nodes or . If looking for services that support these you can try jit.si or ippi. Also note that both you and your partner need to have unhindered outgoing UDP access to the Internet or at least to your VoIP service provider. You DO NOT however need to map any port numbers on your home router. At best this is going to have no effect.

Does Jitsi support STUN? (and how about TURN, UPnP and Jingle Nodes?)

STUN, together with TURN, Jingle Nodes, IPv6 and UPnP, is one of the techniques that Jitsi uses as part of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol to handle NAT traversal for calls made over XMPP.

For its SIP calls, Jitsi currently relies on servers to relay media (a technique also known as Hosted NAT Traversal or latching, which would be the case of the majority of the SIP servers used on the Internet today. Note that in terms of reliability Hosted NAT Traversal gives the same results as use of ICE. It even works better in some ways because the connection is setup immediately and no time is waisted for gathering candidates and making connectivity checks. The only downside of HNT is that it may put a strain on SIP providers requiring more bandwidth. This could become a problem especially in environments with a high number of all IP high quality video calls.

It is likely that ICE support for SIP calls would also be added to Jitsi in 2014 especially since this would also help with WebRTC compatibility.

Standalone support for STUN is NOT going to be part of Jitsi. Check out the ekiga entry for more information on the shortcomings of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility.

I have a few questions regarding ZRTP, SRTP and VoIP security in general. Where can I find some answers?

Check out our ZRTP FAQ.

Why does my call stay in the Initiating Call status and I can never connect?

A common reason for providers not to respond to calls is that they simply dont get the INVITE request Jitsi sends to them. This can happen if you are using UDP. The Jitsi INVITE requests may often exceed the maximum allowed packet size (MTU) for your network or that of your server. In such cases packets may be fragmented by your IP stack and fragmentation for UDP does not always work well in certain networks. This is what happens when a client supports multiple features ;). To resolve the issue you can do one of the following:

How does on-line provisioning work?

On-line provisioning is the feature that allows Jitsi to connect to an http URI every time it starts and retrieve part or all of its configuration there. On-line provisioning is often used by providers to remotely configure the clients they maintain. It can be used to set any property in Jitsi such as the codecs used, the features that users can manually configure and even protocol accounts.

When requesting its provisioning information Jitsi can transmit any of a number of parameters to the server, like for example: the OS it is running on, user credentials, a unique ID and others. This way the provisioning server can fine-tune the parameters it sends to Jitsi.

For more information, please check our on-line provisioning manual

Are my chat sessions protected and if so, how?

Jitsi supports the OTR encryption protocol. OTR stands for Off-the-Record Messaging and once youve set it up (i.e. clicked on that padlock icon in a chat window and verified the identity of your contact) it allows you to make sure that no one other than you two can read your messages, not even your service provider. You can find more on the OTR mechanisms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-the-Record_Messaging

Should logging be disabled by default when using OTR?

By default Jitsi stores all chats so that if you need any information from them it would always be available. If you would like to disable this behavior you can currently do so by opening Jitsis Options/Preferences, selecting the General pane and then unchecking the Log chat history option near the top. It is also possible to disable chats for specific contacts, to erase their history. An indicator in the chat window makes it aware at all times whether history is on or off while chatting with someone.

OTR protected chats follow the same pattern and some users have expressed concerns that this might be incompatible with their security expectations. Our position on this is that Jitsis role is to protect your communication. We also strive to offer usability. The current defaults represent these objectives: most people would prefer for their private communication not to be readable by third parties and most of the time people use Jitsi from personal devices where they are in control of the access policy.

In some cases users may wish for their communications not to be stored locally. This can be the case when using Jitsi on devices that others may also have access to. In such cases users need to be able to easily see whether history is being logged. They would also need to easily turn this off and potentially even erase previous history.

Note however that this subject is entirely different from the encryption one. They are separate measures meant to protect you against separate attacks or problems. We dont believe that the need for one would necessarily imply the need for the other. We are hence committed to also keeping that separation in the user interface.

Force SIP Message support.

Some SIP servers (Asterisk in particular) do not announce the MESSAGE support, despite supporting it. If you enable the account property FORCE_MESSAGING, Jitsi will attempt to use MESSAGE for chats, despite your configured SIP server not explicitly announcing this support to connected clients. For example, if your SIP account is john.smith@example.com, go to property editor type that in the search field and look for something like

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.ACCOUNT_UID with the value SIP:john.smith@example.com

The property to add in that case would be:

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.FORCE_MESSAGING with the value true.

How to add/edit configuration properties.

You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Property Editor form. There you can search edit/delete or create new properties.

Is there an an Android version of Jitsi?

Yes, but it is still in an early alpha stage and further development has been put on hold until further notice. A lot of the user interface is not yet implemented. You can find the apk on the Download page.

Is there an iPhone/iPad version of Jitsi?

No. Due to the restrictions imposed by the platform it is highly unlikely this answer is going to change.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: Could not create task or type of type: junitreport.

On some Linux distributions such as Debian, the ant package is actualy subdivided into multiple packages. So when you chose to install junit and ant with the distribution specific package system, dont forget to install ant-optional too.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: No test with id=IcqProtocolProviderSlick.

Have you created your own accounts.properties file in the lib directory? Youll need to define two ICQ test accounts at least, and preferably some test accounts for the other supported protocols.

Read this article: FAQ | Jitsi

Read the original:

FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net

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View original post here: FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net euvolution.com

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FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net euvolution.com

Tsirang vegetable vendors commit to selling local chillies – Kuensel, Buhutan’s National Newspaper

Going by the trend followed these days, Tsirang could soon become a chilli sufficient dzongkhag.

It has been more than a month that vegetable vendors in Tsirang have stopped buying chillies the youth business cooperative (YBC) imports from Kolkata and distributes to vegetable vendors across the country.

Tsirang residents have been consuming local chillies, which is grown abundantly. Farmers grow both local and the native Indian chillies grown in Bhutan, commonly known as jitsi ema.

Vendors in Tsirang say imported chilli gets damaged faster and is also expensive, whereas fresh chillies are available in the local market.

A vendor, Jyoti Nepal, said that importing chilli is not necessary when locally grown chillies are available.

She said when vendors buy chilli from the YBC, they have to buy in bulk, at least 200kgs to 300kgs and it rots before it reaches the destination. We have to throw more than half.

Jyoti also said the price for imported chilli was comparatively cheaper last year but ever since it was imported from Kolkata, the price hiked. We could instead buy and promote our local chilli at that price.

The initiative that vendors took by not buying importing chilli has come as a blessing for local chilli growers.

Most of the farmers, who brought locally grown jitsi ema to the Sunday market yesterday were from Gosarling gewog.

Sonam Choden, 52, has been selling chillies for last five weeks.

She said she brings at least 30kgs of jitsi ema grown in her garden every week and sells it for Nu 80 to Nu 130 a kilogramme.

Jitsi ema fetch a better price than any other variety of chillies we grow, she said. All we need is something hot on our plate.

Another farmer, Lhasang Dolma, sells her produce to vendors who supply chilli to Thimphu. She said she sold 49kgs in two weekends at Nu 100 a kg.

The price for Bhutanese chilli was Nu 30 a kg yesterday and the highest vendors fetched was Nu 300 a kg.

Vegetable vendors say farmers should grow more jitsi ema, as both require the same hard work in the fields.

Vendors say they decided that until the local chilli finishes in the market, they would not sell imported chillies.

Nirmala Pokhrel | Tsirang

Read the original here:

Tsirang vegetable vendors commit to selling local chillies – Kuensel, Buhutan’s National Newspaper

FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net

Featured questions (hide)

How do I get the latest Jitsi source code?

You could either clone the Git repository from GitHub (see Retrieving and Building the Sources for details) or use one of the nightly source snapshots (check the Download page).

Ive discovered a bug, what can I do?

Please, report it to the developers! Take a look at the Reporting bugs guidelines page describing the steps to report bugs effectively.

Where is the user profile directory?

Jitsis user profile directory is where Jitsi keeps its configuration, logs, etc. Its location depends on the operating system.

Where do I find the log files?

The easiest way to get hold of the log files is to save them to a location of your choice using Jitsis GUI. You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Logging form. Youll see the Archive Logs button in there.

Check out the screenshot for an even better description.

Important Note: When asked for logs, please make sure that you provide the full set of logs, or better yet, the zip that Jitsi generates when following the above instructions. Please do not send separate files or file snippets as those are likely to be insufficient. If you need to provide the logs for a GitHub issue, send them to Dev Mailing List and link to the thread in the archive or create a Gist and link to it. Please DO NOT paste the log as a comment.

Otherwise, if you really want to know, the log files are located in:

Where is the configuration file?

Jitsis main configuration file is called sip-communicator.properties and is in the user profile directory.

How do you spell Jitsi and what does it mean?

The correct spelling of the application name is Jitsi (jitsi also works). The origin of the name is Bulgarian (spelled ). It means wires and the point is that the application allow you to connect to many network and people just as wires do. Of course no one other than Bulgarians is supposed to know what this means and we picked the name mainly because it was short and sounded good.

Id like to see a new feature in Jitsi, can you do that for me?

Yes, developers take feature requests into account. Send an email to the development list with a detailed description of the requested feature. After we examine its feasibility and decide whether it can be included in the Jitsi distributions you would likely be asked to open a ticket in our issue tracker. It is worth mentioning though, that handling feature requests is highly dependent of the developers availability and there is no guarantee that all requests will be satisfied.

How do I subscribe to mailing lists?

Please visit the Mailing Lists page to learn more about Jitsis mailing lists.

How do I contact the project developers?

You can ask questions concerning usage of the Jitsi on the dev mailing list (Note that the mailing lists are moderated, so, unless you subscribe to them, there may be a delay before your post shows up). For all urgent queries you could also use IRC at irc.freenode.net, channel #jitsi.

How do I send a patch?

Mail patches to the dev mailing list, with a subject line that contains the word PATCH in all uppercase, for example

A patch submission should contain one logical change; please dont mix N unrelated changes in one submission, send N separate emails instead.

The patch itself should be generated from within the project root directory using unified diff format. The following example shows one way to generate it:

You should give your patch files meaningful names. For instance if you fix a socket bug in the foo class do not call your patch file patchfile.txt but instead call it foo-socket.patch.

If the patch implements a new feature, make sure to describe the feature completely in your mail; if the patch fixes a bug, describe the bug in detail and give a reproduction recipe. An exception to these guidelines is when the patch addresses a specific issue in the issues database in that case, just make sure to refer to the issue number in your log message.

Note that unless you are describing a change rather than posting one, we would probably need you to sign our contributor agreement as either an individual or a corporation

I would like to update this wiki what can I do?

Currently, only project developers are permitted to update the wiki. Please send your suggested changes to the dev mailing list.

A wiki page can be updated by appending the string ?action=edit to the current url and refreshing the page. The page will then be displayed with an extra menu line that includes a Page Edit item.

If you click on the Page Edit item, you will be redirected to a logon page. Enter your developer username and password and you should be redirected back to the original page. Click on Page Edit again to access the source content of the page (a quick reference to wiki markup syntax is also displayed).

How do I reset my XMPP or jit.si password?

You can reset your jit.si password from within Jitsi. You can do the same for any XMPP account that allows it.

In the case of jit.si, you can also change your password via the web

Why cant I connect to ekiga.net?

NB: the problems described in this section also apply to other providers such as 1und1.de

Short Answer: The ekiga.net SIP servers are configured in a way that prevent Jitsi (and many other SIP user agents for that matter) to register with the service. Please use iptel.org or ippi.com instead.

Slightly Longer Answer: The service at ekiga.net is configured to only accept SIP REGISTER requests that contain a public IP address in their Contact header. This means that registration from Jitsi would fail unless you actually have a public IP address. The Ekiga client circumvents this by using STUN to learn the address and port that have been allocated for the current session. It then uses the pair in the SIP Contact header. This kind of use was common for the first version of the STUN protocol defined in RFC 3489 which was sometimes referred to as classic STUN.

The IETF has since significantly reviewed the way STUN should be used. The new version of the protocol is now defined in RFC 5389 which, among other things, advises against the use of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility:

Today STUN represents one of the tools used by complete traversal mechanisms such as SIP OUTBOUND (RFC 5626) or ICE (RFC 5245). Neither of these includes sending a STUN obtained address in a Contact header.

So, where does Jitsi currently stand on all this? At the time of writing, we support the ICE protocol but only use it with XMPP. Use with SIP is likely to come in the near future. The reason we havent implemented it yet is that most SIP servers currently open to use over the Internet, use a technique called latching. When such servers detect you are connecting from behind a NAT, they would start acting as a relay, receiving media from your peers and then forwarding it to you (and vice versa). While this is by far the most reliably way of traversing NATs, it does indeed imply some scalability constraints.

ICE on the other hand would only fall back to relaying if no other way was found to connect the two participants. This is why it is considered as a more optimal solution and why its also on our roadmap.

Note however that the constraints on ekiga.net would continue preventing Jitsi from connecting even when we do implement support for ICE.

Why do I see ICE failed errors when trying to make calls.

Jitsi implements a number of NAT traversal methods as described here. In many situations we will be able to setup a call directly between you and other users but in order to be able to reliably establish calls, your XMPP or SIP provider has to provide relaying capabilities such as TURN, Jingle Nodes or . If looking for services that support these you can try jit.si or ippi. Also note that both you and your partner need to have unhindered outgoing UDP access to the Internet or at least to your VoIP service provider. You DO NOT however need to map any port numbers on your home router. At best this is going to have no effect.

Does Jitsi support STUN? (and how about TURN, UPnP and Jingle Nodes?)

STUN, together with TURN, Jingle Nodes, IPv6 and UPnP, is one of the techniques that Jitsi uses as part of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol to handle NAT traversal for calls made over XMPP.

For its SIP calls, Jitsi currently relies on servers to relay media (a technique also known as Hosted NAT Traversal or latching, which would be the case of the majority of the SIP servers used on the Internet today. Note that in terms of reliability Hosted NAT Traversal gives the same results as use of ICE. It even works better in some ways because the connection is setup immediately and no time is waisted for gathering candidates and making connectivity checks. The only downside of HNT is that it may put a strain on SIP providers requiring more bandwidth. This could become a problem especially in environments with a high number of all IP high quality video calls.

It is likely that ICE support for SIP calls would also be added to Jitsi in 2014 especially since this would also help with WebRTC compatibility.

Standalone support for STUN is NOT going to be part of Jitsi. Check out the ekiga entry for more information on the shortcomings of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility.

I have a few questions regarding ZRTP, SRTP and VoIP security in general. Where can I find some answers?

Check out our ZRTP FAQ.

Why does my call stay in the Initiating Call status and I can never connect?

A common reason for providers not to respond to calls is that they simply dont get the INVITE request Jitsi sends to them. This can happen if you are using UDP. The Jitsi INVITE requests may often exceed the maximum allowed packet size (MTU) for your network or that of your server. In such cases packets may be fragmented by your IP stack and fragmentation for UDP does not always work well in certain networks. This is what happens when a client supports multiple features ;). To resolve the issue you can do one of the following:

How does on-line provisioning work?

On-line provisioning is the feature that allows Jitsi to connect to an http URI every time it starts and retrieve part or all of its configuration there. On-line provisioning is often used by providers to remotely configure the clients they maintain. It can be used to set any property in Jitsi such as the codecs used, the features that users can manually configure and even protocol accounts.

When requesting its provisioning information Jitsi can transmit any of a number of parameters to the server, like for example: the OS it is running on, user credentials, a unique ID and others. This way the provisioning server can fine-tune the parameters it sends to Jitsi.

For more information, please check our on-line provisioning manual

Are my chat sessions protected and if so, how?

Jitsi supports the OTR encryption protocol. OTR stands for Off-the-Record Messaging and once youve set it up (i.e. clicked on that padlock icon in a chat window and verified the identity of your contact) it allows you to make sure that no one other than you two can read your messages, not even your service provider. You can find more on the OTR mechanisms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-the-Record_Messaging

Should logging be disabled by default when using OTR?

By default Jitsi stores all chats so that if you need any information from them it would always be available. If you would like to disable this behavior you can currently do so by opening Jitsis Options/Preferences, selecting the General pane and then unchecking the Log chat history option near the top. It is also possible to disable chats for specific contacts, to erase their history. An indicator in the chat window makes it aware at all times whether history is on or off while chatting with someone.

OTR protected chats follow the same pattern and some users have expressed concerns that this might be incompatible with their security expectations. Our position on this is that Jitsis role is to protect your communication. We also strive to offer usability. The current defaults represent these objectives: most people would prefer for their private communication not to be readable by third parties and most of the time people use Jitsi from personal devices where they are in control of the access policy.

In some cases users may wish for their communications not to be stored locally. This can be the case when using Jitsi on devices that others may also have access to. In such cases users need to be able to easily see whether history is being logged. They would also need to easily turn this off and potentially even erase previous history.

Note however that this subject is entirely different from the encryption one. They are separate measures meant to protect you against separate attacks or problems. We dont believe that the need for one would necessarily imply the need for the other. We are hence committed to also keeping that separation in the user interface.

Force SIP Message support.

Some SIP servers (Asterisk in particular) do not announce the MESSAGE support, despite supporting it. If you enable the account property FORCE_MESSAGING, Jitsi will attempt to use MESSAGE for chats, despite your configured SIP server not explicitly announcing this support to connected clients. For example, if your SIP account is john.smith@example.com, go to property editor type that in the search field and look for something like

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.ACCOUNT_UID with the value SIP:john.smith@example.com

The property to add in that case would be:

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.FORCE_MESSAGING with the value true.

How to add/edit configuration properties.

You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Property Editor form. There you can search edit/delete or create new properties.

Is there an an Android version of Jitsi?

Yes, but it is still in an early alpha stage and further development has been put on hold until further notice. A lot of the user interface is not yet implemented. You can find the apk on the Download page.

Is there an iPhone/iPad version of Jitsi?

No. Due to the restrictions imposed by the platform it is highly unlikely this answer is going to change.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: Could not create task or type of type: junitreport.

On some Linux distributions such as Debian, the ant package is actualy subdivided into multiple packages. So when you chose to install junit and ant with the distribution specific package system, dont forget to install ant-optional too.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: No test with id=IcqProtocolProviderSlick.

Have you created your own accounts.properties file in the lib directory? Youll need to define two ICQ test accounts at least, and preferably some test accounts for the other supported protocols.

Read this article: FAQ | Jitsi

Read the original:

FAQ | Jitsi | Prometheism.net

Provisioning | Jitsi

Intro

Provisioning is the feature that allows network and provider administrators to remotely configure Jitsi instances that they are responsible for.

Jitsis provisioning module uses http. This means that, based on a few parameters like an IP or a mac layer address, or a user name and a password, a simple script on a web server or an advanced provisioning system like JitsiProvS can feed to a freshly installed Jitsi all the details that it needs in order to start making calls, downloading updates or configure codec preferences.

Of course, in order for this to work, Jitsi would first need to find out where the provisioning web server is. This can happen either automatically, using discovery protocols like DHCP or mDNS (a.k.a. Bonjour), or by manually entering a provisioning URI in Jitsis configuration form.

The easiest way to have Jitsi connect to a provisioning server is to configure the provisioning URL in its configuration form. Jitsi also supports automatic provisioning discovery via DHCP and Bonjour both of which are discussed later in this document. To do so, go to options => advanced => provisioning and check Enable provisioning (if not already checked), then select Manually specify provisioning URI and enter a URI.

A provisioning URI is an HTTP or HTTPS URL optionally followed by several parameters. The URI would most often point to a provisioning server-side script (e.g. PHP, CGI, servlet, ). Please note that we strongly recommend you only use HTTPS unless you have very good reasons not to. Provisioning POST requests generally contain sensitive information like passwords and you definitely dont want that being sent in clear text.

Here is an example of a provisioning URI:

Note that in the above URI the names of the parameters to the left of an equal (=) sign only depend on you and the web script that you are using in your provisioning environment. Those to the right however are parameters supported by Jitsi and they always come surrounded by accolades and prefixed with a dollar sign (e.g. ${param_value} )

Currently, Jitsi supports the following parameters:

See Configure Jitsi With Provisioning for a list of parameters that allow for hiding various menu entries from the UI.

A provisioning script is something that you write and run on your web server. It handles incoming provisioning requests and it serves configuration properties to Jitsi according to the parameters that these requests contain.

A provisioning script MUST always return content formatted as a valid properties file. Thats pretty much the only limitation and other than that, you can have almost anything in it. You can certainly use the output to configure absolutely any aspect of Jitsi.

Quite often, a provisioning script would use the parameters from the provisioning URI to determine the exact properties that it is going to return. A common example is the provisioning of a SIP account that often depends on either the hardware address or the user name and password entered by the user.

In order to retrieve its configuration properties from the provisioning script, Jitsi would use an HTTP POST request. All the parameters that are present in the provisioning URL (e.g. username, password, osname, ) would then be encoded as parameters of that POST request. This is important to note and may be a bit confusing since the request makes it look as if we would be doing a GET.

JitsiProvS is one example of a Jitsi provisioning server written in python. You can use it as is or extend it to fit your needs. You are of course also free to create your own versions.

Following is a simple PHP provisioning file:

You can use the special property value ${null} when youd like to remove (unset) all properties beginning with the specified prefix. Note that properties are processed in the order that the provisioning script returns them. It is therefore possible to use ${null} in the beginning of a provisioning file, have it remove a group of properties like a SIP account for example, and then feed a new SIP account in the same provisioning file.

The property provisioning.ALLOW_PREFIX tells Jitsi that through the rest of the provisioning file, it should ignore any properties that do not match the specified prefixes. The value of the property would hence contain a number of strings separated by the | (pipe) character.

The provisioning.ENFORCE_PREFIX is somewhat similar to ALLOW_PREFIX. Jitsi would use this property to make sure that your Jitsis configuration file only contains properties matching the specified prefixes and it would remove all those that dont, regardless of whether they were provisioned through a provisioning script or were set by the user.

Important note: Your provisioning script should indicate authentication problems (e.g. wrong password) using a 401 HTTP error response. After receiving such a response, Jitsi would prompt the user to enter the credentials again.

DHCP is one way for Jitsi to discover a provisioning URI without user interaction. To make Jitsi use DHCP provisioning, go to options => advanced => provisioning, check Enable provisioning and then select the DHCP radio button.

In order to get the provisioning URL via DHCP, somewhere on the network a DHCP server has to be running on port 6767. This means that if you already have a DHCP server in your network, you would probably need to install a second one (although this one would be extremely simple to configure so dont worry 🙂 ).

We expect to find our provisioning URI in option 224 so thats where your server needs to serve it.

Following is a sample dhcpd.conf file that you can use almost as is in your own network. Youd probably only need to adjust the subnet and the URI itself:

Note: the provisioning DHCP server does not need to provide IP addresses to machines. All it does is return the provisioning URI to whoever asks.

To configure provisioning via Bonjour, go to options => advanced => provisioning, check Enable provisioning, and then select Bonjour.

In order to get the provisioning URI via Bonjour, you would need to make sure that an mDNS server is running somewhere on your network and that it is configured to advertise the provisioning URI.

Avahi is one of the most popular mDNS servers. Heres what you need to do in order to make it provision Jitsi

On Unix/Linux:

Note that name MUST not be changed since Jitsi will look for the service name Provisioning URL. The host-name is not a FQDN and has to be suffixed by .local, next step will tell avahi about the IP address of this host name. The URL parameters is added in this way paramname=$paramname.

match the one in parameter of provisioning.service file.

would become something like

More:

Provisioning | Jitsi

Provisioning | Jitsi | Prometheism.net

Intro

Provisioning is the feature that allows network and provider administrators to remotely configure Jitsi instances that they are responsible for.

Jitsis provisioning module uses http. This means that, based on a few parameters like an IP or a mac layer address, or a user name and a password, a simple script on a web server or an advanced provisioning system like JitsiProvS can feed to a freshly installed Jitsi all the details that it needs in order to start making calls, downloading updates or configure codec preferences.

Of course, in order for this to work, Jitsi would first need to find out where the provisioning web server is. This can happen either automatically, using discovery protocols like DHCP or mDNS (a.k.a. Bonjour), or by manually entering a provisioning URI in Jitsis configuration form.

The easiest way to have Jitsi connect to a provisioning server is to configure the provisioning URL in its configuration form. Jitsi also supports automatic provisioning discovery via DHCP and Bonjour both of which are discussed later in this document. To do so, go to options => advanced => provisioning and check Enable provisioning (if not already checked), then select Manually specify provisioning URI and enter a URI.

A provisioning URI is an HTTP or HTTPS URL optionally followed by several parameters. The URI would most often point to a provisioning server-side script (e.g. PHP, CGI, servlet, ). Please note that we strongly recommend you only use HTTPS unless you have very good reasons not to. Provisioning POST requests generally contain sensitive information like passwords and you definitely dont want that being sent in clear text.

Here is an example of a provisioning URI:

Note that in the above URI the names of the parameters to the left of an equal (=) sign only depend on you and the web script that you are using in your provisioning environment. Those to the right however are parameters supported by Jitsi and they always come surrounded by accolades and prefixed with a dollar sign (e.g. ${param_value} )

Currently, Jitsi supports the following parameters:

See Configure Jitsi With Provisioning for a list of parameters that allow for hiding various menu entries from the UI.

A provisioning script is something that you write and run on your web server. It handles incoming provisioning requests and it serves configuration properties to Jitsi according to the parameters that these requests contain.

A provisioning script MUST always return content formatted as a valid properties file. Thats pretty much the only limitation and other than that, you can have almost anything in it. You can certainly use the output to configure absolutely any aspect of Jitsi.

Quite often, a provisioning script would use the parameters from the provisioning URI to determine the exact properties that it is going to return. A common example is the provisioning of a SIP account that often depends on either the hardware address or the user name and password entered by the user.

In order to retrieve its configuration properties from the provisioning script, Jitsi would use an HTTP POST request. All the parameters that are present in the provisioning URL (e.g. username, password, osname, ) would then be encoded as parameters of that POST request. This is important to note and may be a bit confusing since the request makes it look as if we would be doing a GET.

JitsiProvS is one example of a Jitsi provisioning server written in python. You can use it as is or extend it to fit your needs. You are of course also free to create your own versions.

Following is a simple PHP provisioning file:

You can use the special property value ${null} when youd like to remove (unset) all properties beginning with the specified prefix. Note that properties are processed in the order that the provisioning script returns them. It is therefore possible to use ${null} in the beginning of a provisioning file, have it remove a group of properties like a SIP account for example, and then feed a new SIP account in the same provisioning file.

The property provisioning.ALLOW_PREFIX tells Jitsi that through the rest of the provisioning file, it should ignore any properties that do not match the specified prefixes. The value of the property would hence contain a number of strings separated by the | (pipe) character.

The provisioning.ENFORCE_PREFIX is somewhat similar to ALLOW_PREFIX. Jitsi would use this property to make sure that your Jitsis configuration file only contains properties matching the specified prefixes and it would remove all those that dont, regardless of whether they were provisioned through a provisioning script or were set by the user.

Important note: Your provisioning script should indicate authentication problems (e.g. wrong password) using a 401 HTTP error response. After receiving such a response, Jitsi would prompt the user to enter the credentials again.

DHCP is one way for Jitsi to discover a provisioning URI without user interaction. To make Jitsi use DHCP provisioning, go to options => advanced => provisioning, check Enable provisioning and then select the DHCP radio button.

In order to get the provisioning URL via DHCP, somewhere on the network a DHCP server has to be running on port 6767. This means that if you already have a DHCP server in your network, you would probably need to install a second one (although this one would be extremely simple to configure so dont worry ).

We expect to find our provisioning URI in option 224 so thats where your server needs to serve it.

Following is a sample dhcpd.conf file that you can use almost as is in your own network. Youd probably only need to adjust the subnet and the URI itself:

Note: the provisioning DHCP server does not need to provide IP addresses to machines. All it does is return the provisioning URI to whoever asks.

To configure provisioning via Bonjour, go to options => advanced => provisioning, check Enable provisioning, and then select Bonjour.

In order to get the provisioning URI via Bonjour, you would need to make sure that an mDNS server is running somewhere on your network and that it is configured to advertise the provisioning URI.

Avahi is one of the most popular mDNS servers. Heres what you need to do in order to make it provision Jitsi

On Unix/Linux:

Note that name MUST not be changed since Jitsi will look for the service name Provisioning URL. The host-name is not a FQDN and has to be suffixed by .local, next step will tell avahi about the IP address of this host name. The URL parameters is added in this way paramname=$paramname.

match the one in parameter of provisioning.service file.

would become something like

Go here to see the original: Provisioning | Jitsi

View original post here:

Provisioning | Jitsi | Prometheism.net

FAQ | Jitsi

Featured questions (hide)

How do I get the latest Jitsi source code?

You could either clone the Git repository from GitHub (see Retrieving and Building the Sources for details) or use one of the nightly source snapshots (check the Download page).

Ive discovered a bug, what can I do?

Please, report it to the developers! Take a look at the Reporting bugs guidelines page describing the steps to report bugs effectively.

Where is the user profile directory?

Jitsis user profile directory is where Jitsi keeps its configuration, logs, etc. Its location depends on the operating system.

Where do I find the log files?

The easiest way to get hold of the log files is to save them to a location of your choice using Jitsis GUI. You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Logging form. Youll see the Archive Logs button in there.

Check out the screenshot for an even better description.

Important Note: When asked for logs, please make sure that you provide the full set of logs, or better yet, the zip that Jitsi generates when following the above instructions. Please do not send separate files or file snippets as those are likely to be insufficient. If you need to provide the logs for a GitHub issue, send them to Dev Mailing List and link to the thread in the archive or create a Gist and link to it. Please DO NOT paste the log as a comment.

Otherwise, if you really want to know, the log files are located in:

Where is the configuration file?

Jitsis main configuration file is called sip-communicator.properties and is in the user profile directory.

How do you spell Jitsi and what does it mean?

The correct spelling of the application name is Jitsi (jitsi also works). The origin of the name is Bulgarian (spelled ). It means wires and the point is that the application allow you to connect to many network and people just as wires do. Of course no one other than Bulgarians is supposed to know what this means and we picked the name mainly because it was short and sounded good.

Id like to see a new feature in Jitsi, can you do that for me?

Yes, developers take feature requests into account. Send an email to the development list with a detailed description of the requested feature. After we examine its feasibility and decide whether it can be included in the Jitsi distributions you would likely be asked to open a ticket in our issue tracker. It is worth mentioning though, that handling feature requests is highly dependent of the developers availability and there is no guarantee that all requests will be satisfied.

How do I subscribe to mailing lists?

Please visit the Mailing Lists page to learn more about Jitsis mailing lists.

How do I contact the project developers?

You can ask questions concerning usage of the Jitsi on the dev mailing list (Note that the mailing lists are moderated, so, unless you subscribe to them, there may be a delay before your post shows up). For all urgent queries you could also use IRC at irc.freenode.net, channel #jitsi.

How do I send a patch?

Mail patches to the dev mailing list, with a subject line that contains the word PATCH in all uppercase, for example

A patch submission should contain one logical change; please dont mix N unrelated changes in one submission, send N separate emails instead.

The patch itself should be generated from within the project root directory using unified diff format. The following example shows one way to generate it:

You should give your patch files meaningful names. For instance if you fix a socket bug in the foo class do not call your patch file patchfile.txt but instead call it foo-socket.patch.

If the patch implements a new feature, make sure to describe the feature completely in your mail; if the patch fixes a bug, describe the bug in detail and give a reproduction recipe. An exception to these guidelines is when the patch addresses a specific issue in the issues database in that case, just make sure to refer to the issue number in your log message.

Note that unless you are describing a change rather than posting one, we would probably need you to sign our contributor agreement as either an individual or a corporation

I would like to update this wiki – what can I do?

Currently, only project developers are permitted to update the wiki. Please send your suggested changes to the dev mailing list.

A wiki page can be updated by appending the string ?action=edit to the current url and refreshing the page. The page will then be displayed with an extra menu line that includes a Page Edit item.

If you click on the Page Edit item, you will be redirected to a logon page. Enter your developer username and password and you should be redirected back to the original page. Click on Page Edit again to access the source content of the page (a quick reference to wiki markup syntax is also displayed).

How do I reset my XMPP or jit.si password?

You can reset your jit.si password from within Jitsi. You can do the same for any XMPP account that allows it.

In the case of jit.si, you can also change your password via the web

Why cant I connect to ekiga.net?

NB: the problems described in this section also apply to other providers such as 1und1.de

Short Answer: The ekiga.net SIP servers are configured in a way that prevent Jitsi (and many other SIP user agents for that matter) to register with the service. Please use iptel.org or ippi.com instead.

Slightly Longer Answer: The service at ekiga.net is configured to only accept SIP REGISTER requests that contain a public IP address in their Contact header. This means that registration from Jitsi would fail unless you actually have a public IP address. The Ekiga client circumvents this by using STUN to learn the address and port that have been allocated for the current session. It then uses the pair in the SIP Contact header. This kind of use was common for the first version of the STUN protocol defined in RFC 3489 which was sometimes referred to as classic STUN.

The IETF has since significantly reviewed the way STUN should be used. The new version of the protocol is now defined in RFC 5389 which, among other things, advises against the use of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility:

Today STUN represents one of the tools used by complete traversal mechanisms such as SIP OUTBOUND (RFC 5626) or ICE (RFC 5245). Neither of these includes sending a STUN obtained address in a Contact header.

So, where does Jitsi currently stand on all this? At the time of writing, we support the ICE protocol but only use it with XMPP. Use with SIP is likely to come in the near future. The reason we havent implemented it yet is that most SIP servers currently open to use over the Internet, use a technique called latching. When such servers detect you are connecting from behind a NAT, they would start acting as a relay, receiving media from your peers and then forwarding it to you (and vice versa). While this is by far the most reliably way of traversing NATs, it does indeed imply some scalability constraints.

ICE on the other hand would only fall back to relaying if no other way was found to connect the two participants. This is why it is considered as a more optimal solution and why its also on our roadmap.

Note however that the constraints on ekiga.net would continue preventing Jitsi from connecting even when we do implement support for ICE.

Why do I see ICE failed errors when trying to make calls.

Jitsi implements a number of NAT traversal methods as described here. In many situations we will be able to setup a call directly between you and other users but in order to be able to reliably establish calls, your XMPP or SIP provider has to provide relaying capabilities such as TURN, Jingle Nodes or . If looking for services that support these you can try jit.si or ippi. Also note that both you and your partner need to have unhindered outgoing UDP access to the Internet or at least to your VoIP service provider. You DO NOT however need to map any port numbers on your home router. At best this is going to have no effect.

Does Jitsi support STUN? (and how about TURN, UPnP and Jingle Nodes?)

STUN, together with TURN, Jingle Nodes, IPv6 and UPnP, is one of the techniques that Jitsi uses as part of the Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol to handle NAT traversal for calls made over XMPP.

For its SIP calls, Jitsi currently relies on servers to relay media (a technique also known as Hosted NAT Traversal or latching, which would be the case of the majority of the SIP servers used on the Internet today. Note that in terms of reliability Hosted NAT Traversal gives the same results as use of ICE. It even works better in some ways because the connection is setup immediately and no time is waisted for gathering candidates and making connectivity checks. The only downside of HNT is that it may put a strain on SIP providers requiring more bandwidth. This could become a problem especially in environments with a high number of all IP high quality video calls.

It is likely that ICE support for SIP calls would also be added to Jitsi in 2014 especially since this would also help with WebRTC compatibility.

Standalone support for STUN is NOT going to be part of Jitsi. Check out the ekiga entry for more information on the shortcomings of STUN as a standalone NAT traversal utility.

I have a few questions regarding ZRTP, SRTP and VoIP security in general. Where can I find some answers?

Check out our ZRTP FAQ.

Why does my call stay in the Initiating Call status and I can never connect?

A common reason for providers not to respond to calls is that they simply dont get the INVITE request Jitsi sends to them. This can happen if you are using UDP. The Jitsi INVITE requests may often exceed the maximum allowed packet size (MTU) for your network or that of your server. In such cases packets may be fragmented by your IP stack and fragmentation for UDP does not always work well in certain networks. This is what happens when a client supports multiple features ;). To resolve the issue you can do one of the following:

How does on-line provisioning work?

On-line provisioning is the feature that allows Jitsi to connect to an http URI every time it starts and retrieve part or all of its configuration there. On-line provisioning is often used by providers to remotely configure the clients they maintain. It can be used to set any property in Jitsi such as the codecs used, the features that users can manually configure and even protocol accounts.

When requesting its provisioning information Jitsi can transmit any of a number of parameters to the server, like for example: the OS it is running on, user credentials, a unique ID and others. This way the provisioning server can fine-tune the parameters it sends to Jitsi.

For more information, please check our on-line provisioning manual

Are my chat sessions protected and if so, how?

Jitsi supports the OTR encryption protocol. OTR stands for Off-the-Record Messaging and once youve set it up (i.e. clicked on that padlock icon in a chat window and verified the identity of your contact) it allows you to make sure that no one other than you two can read your messages, not even your service provider. You can find more on the OTR mechanisms here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-the-Record_Messaging

Should logging be disabled by default when using OTR?

By default Jitsi stores all chats so that if you need any information from them it would always be available. If you would like to disable this behavior you can currently do so by opening Jitsis Options/Preferences, selecting the General pane and then unchecking the Log chat history option near the top. It is also possible to disable chats for specific contacts, to erase their history. An indicator in the chat window makes it aware at all times whether history is on or off while chatting with someone.

OTR protected chats follow the same pattern and some users have expressed concerns that this might be incompatible with their security expectations. Our position on this is that Jitsis role is to protect your communication. We also strive to offer usability. The current defaults represent these objectives: most people would prefer for their private communication not to be readable by third parties and most of the time people use Jitsi from personal devices where they are in control of the access policy.

In some cases users may wish for their communications not to be stored locally. This can be the case when using Jitsi on devices that others may also have access to. In such cases users need to be able to easily see whether history is being logged. They would also need to easily turn this off and potentially even erase previous history.

Note however that this subject is entirely different from the encryption one. They are separate measures meant to protect you against separate attacks or problems. We dont believe that the need for one would necessarily imply the need for the other. We are hence committed to also keeping that separation in the user interface.

Force SIP Message support.

Some SIP servers (Asterisk in particular) do not announce the MESSAGE support, despite supporting it. If you enable the account property FORCE_MESSAGING, Jitsi will attempt to use MESSAGE for chats, despite your configured SIP server not explicitly announcing this support to connected clients. For example, if your SIP account is john.smith@example.com, go to property editor type that in the search field and look for something like

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.ACCOUNT_UID with the value SIP:john.smith@example.com

The property to add in that case would be:

net.java.sip.communicator.impl.protocol.sip.acc0123456789.FORCE_MESSAGING with the value true.

How to add/edit configuration properties.

You can do so by clicking on ToolsOptions (JitsiPreferences on OS X), then selecting the Advanced tab and opening the Property Editor form. There you can search edit/delete or create new properties.

Is there an an Android version of Jitsi?

Yes, but it is still in an early alpha stage and further development has been put on hold until further notice. A lot of the user interface is not yet implemented. You can find the apk on the Download page.

Is there an iPhone/iPad version of Jitsi?

No. Due to the restrictions imposed by the platform it is highly unlikely this answer is going to change.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: Could not create task or type of type: junitreport.

On some Linux distributions such as Debian, the ant package is actualy subdivided into multiple packages. So when you chose to install junit and ant with the distribution specific package system, dont forget to install ant-optional too.

The cc-buildloop target of ant fails with the following error message: No test with id=IcqProtocolProviderSlick.

Have you created your own accounts.properties file in the lib directory? Youll need to define two ICQ test accounts at least, and preferably some test accounts for the other supported protocols.

Read the original:

FAQ | Jitsi