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Home automation – Wikipedia

“Domotic” redirects here. For the vernacular form of a language, see Demotic.

Home automation or domotics[1] is building automation for a home, called a smart home[2] or smart house. It involves the control and automation of lighting, heating (such as smart thermostats), ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC), and security, as well as home appliances such as washer/dryers, ovens or refrigerators/freezers. Wi-Fi is often used for remote monitoring and control. Home devices, when remotely monitored and controlled via the Internet, are an important constituent of the Internet of Things. Modern systems generally consist of switches and sensors connected to a central hub sometimes called a “gateway” from which the system is controlled with a user interface that is interacted either with a wall-mounted terminal, mobile phone software, tablet computer or a web interface, often but not always via Internet cloud services.

While there are many competing vendors, there are very few worldwide accepted industry standards and the smart home space is heavily fragmented.[3] Popular communications protocol for products include X10, Ethernet, RS-485, 6LoWPAN, Bluetooth LE (BLE), ZigBee and Z-Wave, or other proprietary protocols all of which are incompatible with each other.[4] Manufacturers often prevent independent implementations by withholding documentation and by litigation.[5]

The home automation market was worth US$5.77 billion in 2013, predicted to reach a market value of US$12.81 billion by the year 2020.[6]

Early home automation began with labor-saving machines. Self-contained electric or gas powered home appliances became viable in the 1900s with the introduction of electric power distribution[7] and led to the introduction of washing machines (1904), water heaters (1889), refrigerators, sewing machines, dishwashers, and clothes dryers.

In 1975, the first general purpose home automation network technology, X10, was developed. It is a communication protocol for electronic devices. It primarily uses electric power transmission wiring for signalling and control, where the signals involve brief radio frequency bursts of digital data, and remains the most widely available.[8] By 1978, X10 products included a 16 channel command console, a lamp module, and an appliance module. Soon after came the wall switch module and the first X10 timer.

By 2012, in the United States, according to ABI Research, 1.5 million home automation systems were installed.[9]

According to Li et al. (2016) there are three generations of home automation:[10]

The word “domotics” (and “domotica” when used as a verb) is a contraction of the Latin word for a home (domus) and the word robotics.[1]

In a review of home automation devices, Consumer Reports found two main concerns for consumers:[21]

Microsoft Research found in 2011, that home automation could involve high cost of ownership, inflexibility of interconnected devices, and poor manageability.[23]

Historically systems have been sold as complete systems where the consumer relies on one vendor for the entire system including the hardware, the communications protocol, the central hub, and the user interface. However, there are now open source software systems which can be used with proprietary hardware.[23]

There are a wide variety of technology platforms, or protocols, on which a smart home can be built. Each one is, essentially, its own language. Each language speaks to the various connected devices and instructs them to perform a function.

The automation protocol transport has involved direct wire connectivity, powerline (UPB) and wireless hybrid and wireless.

Most of the protocols below are not open. All have an API.

Acronym explanation:

Home automation suffers from platform fragmentation and lack of technical standards[26][27][28][29][30][31] a situation where the variety of home automation devices, in terms of both hardware variations and differences in the software running on them, makes the task of developing applications that work consistently between different inconsistent technology ecosystems hard.[32] Customers may be hesitant to bet their IoT future on proprietary software or hardware devices that use proprietary protocols that may fade or become difficult to customize and interconnect.[33]

The nature of home automation devices can also be a problem for security, since patches to bugs found in the core operating system often do not reach users of older and lower-price devices.[34][35] One set of researchers say that the failure of vendors to support older devices with patches and updates leaves more than 87% of active devices vulnerable.[36][37]

Domestic patch panel, unstructured.

Laptop controller for automated sprinkler system

Well and booster pump automation

An ad for the Kitchen Computer in 1969.

See original here:

Home automation – Wikipedia

Bronto Software | Commerce Marketing Automation Software

We needed a powerful tool to fulfill our focus on engagement, interaction and personalization.

Noelia Guinn, Ecommerce Manager

Understanding what our customers are browsing on is critical to creating personalized emails. To do that from within our ecommerce marketing solution is amazing.

Derrick Riley, Digital Marketing Manager

We have stores, email, catalogs, website and social. We needed a commerce marketing automation solution that gets omnichannel.

Thomas Larson, Integrated Marketing Specialist

Read more:

Bronto Software | Commerce Marketing Automation Software

Hong Kong’s financial bosses want staff to adapt to automation at work and upgrade their skill sets, survey finds – South China Morning Post

Hong Kongs top financial executives are embracing automation in the workplace and urging employees to enhance their problem-solving skills and adapt as machines replace manual duties, a survey has found.

Recruitment consultancy Robert Half polled 100 chief financial officers and financial directors at major companies in a range of industries, including business services, marketing and logistics. The executives were questioned about their views on automation and expectations for finance staff.

Some 72 per cent agreed that office automation would not cause a loss of jobs, but instead a shift in the skills required of financial professionals.

Rather than simply hand over control to robots, finance professionals can actively equip themselves with the skills required to leverage the capabilities of automation, said Adam Johnston, managing director of Robert Half Hong Kong.

Using more advanced technology in the workplace requires additional, well-developed skills, such as advanced data analysis, interpretation skills, and decision-making skills.

The survey found 54 per cent of corporate financial bosses wanted employees to more deeply develop their problem-solving skills; 53 per cent said staff should have strategic vision for the company; 34 per cent wanted workers to adapt; and 33 per cent emphasised communication skills.

Automative solutions are increasingly being adopted in the corporate world, from technology that frees accountants from manual calculations and tax filings, to self-checkout machines at supermarkets and department stores.

The survey also showed 55 per cent of financial bosses believed automation could bring them better decision-making capabilities; 50 per cent thought it would free up employees to take on more value-added work; and 49 per cent said they foresaw increased efficiency and productivity.

Contrary to many perceptions about the potential dangers of automation, the benefits of new technologies are attainable for companies who embrace workplace automation rather than resist it, Johnston said.

While automation may diminish some routine manual roles, it will lead to faster decision making, reduce the risk of errors, and eliminate stresses associated with laborious task-management responsibilities.

The poll also found 51 per cent of financial chiefs believed their staff could learn new skills more quickly by embracing automation. But 69 per cent admitted companies still had a long way to go in adapting to the phenomenon.

Change is happening and companies need to adapt to an increasingly automated workforce though theres still a long way to go, Johnston said. It will be an ongoing process for companies to fully adapt to change, and Hong Kong organisations understand they need to refocus the workforce to truly realise the benefits of combining the right human skills with new technology.

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Hong Kong’s financial bosses want staff to adapt to automation at work and upgrade their skill sets, survey finds – South China Morning Post

HPE Automation :: Automation Specialists

About HPE Automation

Serving all of Florida, the Caribbean, and Central & South America since 1980!

HPE Automation originally started in business as Hydraulic & Pneumatic Engineering in 1980. Our primary mission at that time was helping customers design advanced hydraulic systems for heavy duty equipment.

Over the years we have selectively added additional lines: Intelligent Actuator, manufacturer of electric actuators and robots; Mitsubishi, one of the world leaders in robotics and motion control; and 80/20, manufacturer of aluminum extrusions used to build machine frames and guarding systems. HPE is proud to additionally represent a number of other fine companies that allow us to bring a complete automation solution to our customers.

It is our belief that having a thorough knowledge on a reasonable number of product lines serves our customers much better than having little knowledge on a long list of lines.

Thats what you get when you call HPE. Real people answer the phones, not machines, and we strive to answer your questions quickly. HPE Automation was founded on personal customer service. We know your time is valuable. Our knowledgeable staff can typically answer your technical questions without calling the factory.

Need part numbers or a pdf on a certain component? Our Inside Sales people are here for you. Have a customize project in mind? Our Outside Sales people will be happy to visit your facility to personally review your requirements. They will work with you during the entire project and not turn you over to other people after your order is placed.

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HPE Automation :: Automation Specialists

Will cities adapt when automation reshapes the job market? – Curbed

Watch out, Rust Belt: The robots are coming. And theyre after one of the more precious resources in these beleaguered U.S. manufacturing hubs: jobs.

That, at least, is the implication of a new analysis by the Brookings Institute, Where the robots are, that suggests the rise of robotics and automation will clobber the same areas hit by manufacturings decline, as technology radically changes how things get made (and how many workers are necessary to make them).

Since industrial robots work best where theres industry, its no surprise theyre currently clustered in the Midwest and upper South, according to the article, key areas in auto manufacturing. Michigan alone accounts for 28,000 of the nations industrial robots, 12 percent of the total, and metro Detroit boasts 8.5 industrial robots per 1,000 workers.

The Rust Belt, as some have said, is becoming the Robot Belt, knocking another serious blow to the region, where cities, like Pittsburgh, have only in the last decade or so really bounced back with advanced manufacturing, innovation hubs, and attempts to diversify their economy. As Mark Munro, Senior Fellow and Policy Director at Brookings, puts it, anxiety about robotslike their physical distributionwill also likely have its own geography.

The Brookings study joins a chorus of stories predicting a new type of robot apocalypse, different than the one we see in science fiction. Its man versus machine, with manufacturing, and many other parts of the economy at stake. The takes differ considerably, especially when it comes to which industries and sectors are most at risk, and how much were actually at risk: Some believe the real hits will come in transportation, storage, and retail, where more than 40 percent of jobs in these sectors will be replaceable due to this new wave of technology. Some reports even believe that these changes will result in economic growth and new job opportunities.

What all these predictions share, however, is a belief that we arent prepared for this shift toward automation. Automation has become a stand-in for economic anxiety, especially in areas that have already been hit by technological shifts, globalization, and increasing inequality. For city and local leaders, however, it should become a proxy for coming economic shifts, and challenge policymakers and corporate leaders to find the will to adjust. Like it or not, automation is making an impact and will only become more pronounced.

With the Trump administration more focused on changing trade policies as a means to improve employment and the economyTreasury secretary Steven Mnuchin has said this kind of technological displacement is not even on [the administrations] radar screenother levels of government need to step up.

Numerous other industries will likely be reshaped by automation, too, not just manufacturing. Telemarketers, insurance underwriters and appraisers, tax preparers, and cashiers may also be at risk, according to an Oxford University study. Many expect the retail industry, already clobbered by Amazon, to continue to shed jobs, according to a study by the Cornerstone Capital Group; up to 47 percent of the 16 million Americans currently working in retail could be made redundant.

Whats most distressing about these predictions is how automations impact is expected to move down the wage ladder; after hurting manufacturing employment, which often offered more stable and significant wages, now robots are coming after lower-wage jobs in the service sector. Thatll hurt some of the least well-off Americans, and based on the way certain industries have clustered, will mean some metro areas will feel the greatest effects, according to an analysis from the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis.

In Las Vegas and Riverside-San Bernardino in California, for example, each of which relies heavily on many of these industries, 65 and 63 percent of total jobs are at stake. Other vulnerable cities include El Paso, Texas; Orlando, Florida; and Louisville, Kentucky.

We felt it was really stunning, since we are underestimating the probability of automation, said Johannes Moenius, the director of the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis at the University of Redlands, told The Atlantic, about the extent of potential losses.

So many communities are still coping with early waves of technological shifts, manufacturing moves, and economic changes. How can cities recover while readying themselves for something perhaps more swift and unpredictable?

Many cities are trying to get ahead of the shift by pursuing and promoting new manufacturing and training initiatives to help prepare for the next generation of job shifts. Creating partnerships with regional educational leaders and corporate leaders to create new training and educational programs, and encouraging initiatives that focus on skills for new manufacturing can help build new job opportunities and new businesses.

As Voxs Ezra Klein, who is skeptical that AI will lead to massive unemployment, wrote in a story this week, as technology drives people out of the most necessary jobs, we invent less necessary jobs that we nevertheless imbue with profound meaning and even economic value. Automation may create the conditions for new types of jobs; in that case, education and training become even more necessary to help weather and even take advantage of the transition.

The manufacturing industry is changing and favoring small companies and the maker movement; in 2014, more than 350,000 manufacturing concerns consisted of a single owner/employee, a 17 percent boost from a decade ago. Small businesses can and are growing in this sector (and, ironically, can operate in part because of the efficiencies brought about by automation).

Programs that help promote these firms have been seen as pathways to jobs that pay well: New York City has set aside $64 million in its Industrial Developer Fund to make manufacturing centers and floorspace more affordable. And the citys Tech Talent Pipeline is helping to shape education in the region and create pipelines to funnel talent in regional businesses.

The Equitable Innovation Economies Initiative, a project of the Pratt Center for Community Development, has also promoted efforts in multiple cities to increase the pool of tech talent and incubate a more diverse range of firms, like the Local Initiatives Support Corporation in Indianapolis, which has turned an abandoned industrial district into a new tech corridor.

Experts say say with a period of even more rapid adjustment and shifting employment coming, changes at the federal level that build a more flexible and robust safety net would cushion the coming blows. The U.S. government could put more money toward retraining and educational readjustment programs for workers, including the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, which was set up to retrain and reskill workers.

No programs exist, and no funding is directly channeled, to those who have been economically displaced due to automation, and our total funding for these efforts lags far behind our peers: The U.S. currently spends about 0.1 percent of its GDP on programs to help workers adjust to workplace shifts; France spends nearly 10 times more (as measured in percent of their GDP).

With economic changes coming more rapidly than ever, improved vocational education and skills training are paramount to creating sustainable development and education. According to Preparing New York for the Next Wave of Automation, a report released by the Center for an Urban Future, with such a wide-range of urban jobs needing to evolve as automation reshapes industries, education needs to be fundamentally reformed. Industry and academia need to team up to create new ways to retrain workers faster, and with the latest technologies and job skills.

One example the new Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) education modelwhich teaches high school students core subjects and provides an Associates degree in an applied science, engineering, or a computer-related fieldhas been promoted as a way to teach immediately applicable skills early and often. City leaders need to take the initiative to build development programs and educational systems that reflect that new reality.

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Will cities adapt when automation reshapes the job market? – Curbed

Could cloud automation solve patient matching challenges … – Healthcare IT News

As providers drive patient engagement initiatives, population health management programs and quality improvement projects, they’re still stymied by challenges with patient identification.

In fact, many organizations have troves of electronic health records that can’t avail themselves of analytics because they can’t be matched with other records, according to a new report in the Journal of AHIMA.

In the article, “Applying Innovation to the Patient Identification Challenge,” Lorraine Fernandes, president-elect of the International Federation of Health Information Management Associations, Jim Burke, EMPI and HIE practice lead at Himformatics and Michele OConnor, services manager at data governance startup Collibra, spotlight “innovations that can move the healthcare industry beyond the traditional human resource-heavy, back-end retrospective approach to accurate, automated patient identification and record matching.”

[Also:Cloud-based master patient index could offer patient-matching relief]

Those new approaches might include augmentation using data from outside healthcare from credit bureaus and government programs, for instance or better leveraging emerging neural network technology to sift through ambiguous patient ID information or analyze digital fingerprints or facial recognition data.

That said, “the key to innovation in patient identity goes beyond staying up to date with recent technologies it involves a strategic data governance process, said AHIMA interim CEO Pamela Lane.

Once a solid plan is in place, professionals can leverage the digital assets, such as cloud-based services and other data services, to approach this issue in a complete manner,” she said.

Real-time automation offered by the cloud is a central focus of the AHIMA article, and the authors see big promise for cloud technology’s ability to ensure records stay up-to-date.

“The mainstream acceptance of cloud computing has opened an avenue to incorporate secure external data services into critical business processes such as patient registration, data exchange, and patient identification,” they said.

“Cloud-based data services enable the infusion of referential or authoritative data that may come from large public databases outside healthcare, such as credit bureaus, loan servicing organizations, or telecommunications. These non-healthcare databases and associated business processes capture and validate identity data, update it continuously with each transaction, and retain the history of the persons demographics.”

That could help address one of the key hurdles to accurate patient matching: the fact that patients’ demographics can change over time, and between encounters at different facilities.

“Real-time automation of patient matching with external data also addresses a critical latency issue associated with manual stewardship efforts, which typically dont resolve the ambiguous linkages/tasks (those records not automatically linked by an algorithm) until days or months after a patient presents for care.”

Twitter:@MikeMiliardHITN Email the writer: mike.miliard@himssmedia.com

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Could cloud automation solve patient matching challenges … – Healthcare IT News

Rockwell Automation: Falling Behind? – Barron’s


Barron’s
Rockwell Automation: Falling Behind?
Barron’s
Over the past decade, ROK management often claim that Process automation represents the #1 growth opportunity for the company, but its sales in this market have barely grown in recent years, despite its much smaller sales base compared with established …
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Rockwell Automation: Falling Behind? – Barron’s

Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration – Bloomberg – Bloomberg

Japantends to be less wary of automation, even in nursing homes.

Japan’s next boom may be at hand, driven by the very thing that is supposed to be bad for its economy.

Japan’s aging and shrinking populationhas been partly blamed for the on-again, off-again nature of growth and deflation the past three decades. Lately, it’s been drivingadifferent and just as powerful idea: In the absence of large-scale immigration, the only viable solution for many domestic industries is toplow money into robots and information technology more generally.

Humans will still be needed, of course, and that’s behind a separate by-product of Japan’s demographic challenges that I wrote about during a visit there last month. With unemployment down to 2.8 percent, companies are increasingly realizing they need to pay up to attract and keep qualified personnel.The other option — increased immigration — is politically difficult.

Japanese tech innovation in yesteryear was about gadgets and games designed to give pleasure. Think Sony’s iconic Walkman and Nintendo games. Now the demand in Japan comes from an older demographic. A nursing home may well be the place to look for the next wave.

As my colleagues Henry Hoenig and Keiko Ujikane wrote this week, an owner of nursing homes in the Tokyo area plans to spend 300 million yen ($2.7 million) on software to make life easier for employees and residents.

Hoenig, Toru Fujioka and I heard anecdotes like that numerous times during a December trip to Kadoma, a city near Osaka. The area was once an industrial powerhouse that rode Japan’s post-1945 industrial surge with local employers like Panasonic Corp. Now, Mayor Kazutaka Miyamoto frets openly about whether there will simply be enough wage earners to pay the taxes to maintain hospitals, public transport and schools (for those few children who are born and actually stay).

Miyamoto does not share the worries that dominate conversations about robots and AI in the West. He almost laughed when pressed on the issue in a conversation in his office. What if robots eliminate jobs? He said that would be a good thing. He told us to look around: There aren’t many people on the streets in the middle of a weekday.

He doesn’t see any real appetite for immigration on a scale that would substitute for more robots and AI. Few businesses we spoke to that day did. One small manufacturer insisted that immigration would dilute Japan’s homogeneous society. He would happily get a few robots if he could afford them. Wait until the price comes down.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch forecast IT investment in Japan to rise as much as 9 percent annually in coming years, with the difference in software investment per worker versus the U.S. falling to 5 to 1 by 2020 from about 10 to 1 now.

The budding surge isn’t limited to manufacturers. Non-manufacturing companies planned 2.4 trillion yen in software investment in the fiscal year ending in March 2018, according to the Bank of Japans Tankan survey, released in July. That would be the most since 2009. Retailers plan to spend 146.4 billion yen on software this fiscal year, the most on record for data going back to 1999.

Another reason Japanese people don’t share American angst about robotics: Astro Boy. Cultural affection for the anime character has made it easier for people to feel more relaxed about robots and technology in their lives.

Just as well. That nurse assisting you in retirement may soon be a robot, along with the dog that keeps you company.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story: Daniel Moss at dmoss@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Philip Gray at philipgray@bloomberg.net

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Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration – Bloomberg – Bloomberg

KPMG And Automation Anywhere Form Alliance To Deliver Robotic Process Automation Solutions To Clients – Markets Insider

NEW YORK, Aug. 23, 2017 /PRNewswire/ –KPMG LLP and Automation Anywhere, a global leader in enterprise robotic process automation (RPA), have announced an alliance to help clients automate manual business processes to achieve cost savings, manage capacity increases effectively, and increase operational efficiency.

“Across nearly every industry, business leaders are evolving their employees’ roles by shifting repeatable tasks like data entry and billing to RPA platforms, allowing their employees to remain more focused on driving innovative and creative approaches to solve larger business issues, such as enhancing a customer’s experience,” said Todd Lohr, Principal, Advisory, KPMG LLP. “During the past two years, KPMG has completed multiple implementations built on Automation Anywhere’s platform. Together, we’re helping clients improve decision making across the enterprise, enhance quality, reduce risk and effectively provide governance of RPA programs through a structured framework.”

The global market for RPA software and services reached $271 million in 2016 and is expected to grow to $1.2 billion by 2021 at a compound annual growth rate of 36 percent, according to HfS Research, The Services Research Company. This comesas organizations increasingly automate processes in most applications, including legacy apps where investment costs for traditional automation are prohibitive. KPMG’s 2017 Global CEO study noted that 57 percent of CEOs are investing in workforce training over the next three years to help employees keep pace with RPA and other emerging technologies.

“With this alliance, KPMG and Automation Anywhere will help companies define and execute their RPA strategies, improving efficiency and automating routine tasks,” said Mihir Shukla, CEO and cofounder, Automation Anywhere. “Our industry-leading technology, combined with KPMG’s experience and deep understanding of their client’s business challenges, will help organizations reap the greatest benefits from automation executed intelligently.”

Automation Anywhere offers a user-friendly platform with more than 100 prebuilt commands that can be configured to automate processes. Its technology can perform either surface or graphical user interface (GUI) automation in addition to more sophisticated methods, such as Web service and database calls.

The alliance with Automation Anywhere is the latest addition to KPMG’s growing alliance ecosystem of Intelligent Automation technology companies; offering clients tailored solutions to deliver the most viable automation scenarios.

Recently, industry analyst HfS Research named KPMG a “High Performer” in its HfS Blueprint Report: Intelligent Automation 2016. The HfS study says KPMG is “at the forefront of educating the market on the implications of Intelligent Automation from a sourcing and process consulting perspective,” and “building out the broadest Intelligent Automation capabilities among the Big 4,” citing its alliance network with technology companies, such as Automation Anywhere, as a proof point of its strong ranking.

About KPMG LLP KPMG LLP, the audit, tax and advisory firm (www.kpmg.com/us), is the independent U.S. member firm of KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”). KPMG International’s independent member firms have 189,000 professionals, including more than 9,000 partners, in 152 countries.Not permissible for KPMG audit clients and their affiliates.

About Automation AnywhereAutomation Anywhere is one of the leading companies with an enterprise-grade RPA platform with built-in cognitive solutions and analytics. Over 695 of the world’s largest brands use the platform to manage and scale their business processes faster, with near-zero error rates, while dramatically reducing operational costs. Based on the belief that people who have more time to create, think and discover build great companies, Automation Anywhere has provided one of the world’s leading RPA and cognitive technology to lead financial services, BPO, healthcare, technology and insurance companies across more than 90 countries for over a decade. For additional information visit http://www.automationanywhere.com.

Contact:

Derek Brown

KPMG LLP

603-496-5865

class=”prnews_a” rel=”nofollow”>derekbrown@kpmg.com

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KPMG And Automation Anywhere Form Alliance To Deliver Robotic Process Automation Solutions To Clients – Markets Insider

Home automation – Wikipedia

“Domotic” redirects here. For the vernacular form of a language, see Demotic.

Home automation or domotics[1] is building automation for a home, called a smart home[2] or smart house. It involves the control and automation of lighting, heating (such as smart thermostats), ventilation, air conditioning (HVAC), and security, as well as home appliances such as washer/dryers, ovens or refrigerators/freezers. Wi-Fi is often used for remote monitoring and control. Home devices, when remotely monitored and controlled via the Internet, are an important constituent of the Internet of Things. Modern systems generally consist of switches and sensors connected to a central hub sometimes called a “gateway” from which the system is controlled with a user interface that is interacted either with a wall-mounted terminal, mobile phone software, tablet computer or a web interface, often but not always via Internet cloud services.

While there are many competing vendors, there are very few worldwide accepted industry standards and the smart home space is heavily fragmented.[3] Popular communications protocol for products include X10, Ethernet, RS-485, 6LoWPAN, Bluetooth LE (BLE), ZigBee and Z-Wave, or other proprietary protocols all of which are incompatible with each other.[4] Manufacturers often prevent independent implementations by withholding documentation and by litigation.[5]

The home automation market was worth US$5.77 billion in 2013, predicted to reach a market value of US$12.81 billion by the year 2020.[6]

Early home automation began with labor-saving machines. Self-contained electric or gas powered home appliances became viable in the 1900s with the introduction of electric power distribution[7] and led to the introduction of washing machines (1904), water heaters (1889), refrigerators, sewing machines, dishwashers, and clothes dryers.

In 1975, the first general purpose home automation network technology, X10, was developed. It is a communication protocol for electronic devices. It primarily uses electric power transmission wiring for signalling and control, where the signals involve brief radio frequency bursts of digital data, and remains the most widely available.[8] By 1978, X10 products included a 16 channel command console, a lamp module, and an appliance module. Soon after came the wall switch module and the first X10 timer.

By 2012, in the United States, according to ABI Research, 1.5 million home automation systems were installed.[9]

According to Li et al. (2016) there are three generations of home automation:[10]

The word “domotics” (and “domotica” when used as a verb) is a contraction of the Latin word for a home (domus) and the word robotics.[1]

In a review of home automation devices, Consumer Reports found two main concerns for consumers:[21]

Microsoft Research found in 2011, that home automation could involve high cost of ownership, inflexibility of interconnected devices, and poor manageability.[23]

Historically systems have been sold as complete systems where the consumer relies on one vendor for the entire system including the hardware, the communications protocol, the central hub, and the user interface. However, there are now open source software systems which can be used with proprietary hardware.[23]

There are a wide variety of technology platforms, or protocols, on which a smart home can be built. Each one is, essentially, its own language. Each language speaks to the various connected devices and instructs them to perform a function.

The automation protocol transport has involved direct wire connectivity, powerline (UPB) and wireless hybrid and wireless.

Most of the protocols below are not open. All have an API.

Acronym explanation:

Home automation suffers from platform fragmentation and lack of technical standards[26][27][28][29][30][31] a situation where the variety of home automation devices, in terms of both hardware variations and differences in the software running on them, makes the task of developing applications that work consistently between different inconsistent technology ecosystems hard.[32] Customers may be hesitant to bet their IoT future on proprietary software or hardware devices that use proprietary protocols that may fade or become difficult to customize and interconnect.[33]

The nature of home automation devices can also be a problem for security, since patches to bugs found in the core operating system often do not reach users of older and lower-price devices.[34][35] One set of researchers say that the failure of vendors to support older devices with patches and updates leaves more than 87% of active devices vulnerable.[36][37]

Domestic patch panel, unstructured.

Laptop controller for automated sprinkler system

Well and booster pump automation

An ad for the Kitchen Computer in 1969.

Continue reading here:

Home automation – Wikipedia

Bronto Software | Commerce Marketing Automation Software

We needed a powerful tool to fulfill our focus on engagement, interaction and personalization.

Noelia Guinn, Ecommerce Manager

Understanding what our customers are browsing on is critical to creating personalized emails. To do that from within our ecommerce marketing solution is amazing.

Derrick Riley, Digital Marketing Manager

We have stores, email, catalogs, website and social. We needed a commerce marketing automation solution that gets omnichannel.

Thomas Larson, Integrated Marketing Specialist

Link:

Bronto Software | Commerce Marketing Automation Software

Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration – Bloomberg

Japantends to be less wary of automation, even in nursing homes.

Japan’s next boom may be at hand, driven by the very thing that is supposed to be bad for its economy.

Japan’s aging and shrinking populationhas been partly blamed for the on-again, off-again nature of growth and deflation the past three decades. Lately, it’s been drivingadifferent and just as powerful idea: In the absence of large-scale immigration, the only viable solution for many domestic industries is toplow money into robots and information technology more generally.

Humans will still be needed, of course, and that’s behind a separate by-product of Japan’s demographic challenges that I wrote about during a visit there last month. With unemployment down to 2.8 percent, companies are increasingly realizing they need to pay up to attract and keep qualified personnel.The other option — increased immigration — is politically difficult.

Japanese tech innovation in yesteryear was about gadgets and games designed to give pleasure. Think Sony’s iconic Walkman and Nintendo games. Now the demand in Japan comes from an older demographic. A nursing home may well be the place to look for the next wave.

As my colleagues Henry Hoenig and Keiko Ujikane wrote this week, an owner of nursing homes in the Tokyo area plans to spend 300 million yen ($2.7 million) on software to make life easier for employees and residents.

Clear thinking from leading voices in business, economics, politics, foreign affairs, culture, and more.

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Hoenig, Toru Fujioka and I heard anecdotes like that numerous times during a December trip to Kadoma, a city near Osaka. The area was once an industrial powerhouse that rode Japan’s post-1945 industrial surge with local employers like Panasonic Corp. Now, Mayor Kazutaka Miyamoto frets openly about whether there will simply be enough wage earners to pay the taxes to maintain hospitals, public transport and schools (for those few children who are born and actually stay).

Miyamoto does not share the worries that dominate conversations about robots and AI in the West. He almost laughed when pressed on the issue in a conversation in his office. What if robots eliminate jobs? He said that would be a good thing. He told us to look around: There aren’t many people on the streets in the middle of a weekday.

He doesn’t see any real appetite for immigration on a scale that would substitute for more robots and AI. Few businesses we spoke to that day did. One small manufacturer insisted that immigration would dilute Japan’s homogeneous society. He would happily get a few robots if he could afford them. Wait until the price comes down.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch forecast IT investment in Japan to rise as much as 9 percent annually in coming years, with the difference in software investment per worker versus the U.S. falling to 5 to 1 by 2020 from about 10 to 1 now.

The budding surge isn’t limited to manufacturers. Non-manufacturing companies planned 2.4 trillion yen in software investment in the fiscal year ending in March 2018, according to the Bank of Japans Tankan survey, released in July. That would be the most since 2009. Retailers plan to spend 146.4 billion yen on software this fiscal year, the most on record for data going back to 1999.

Another reason Japanese people don’t share American angst about robotics: Astro Boy. Cultural affection for the anime character has made it easier for people to feel more relaxed about robots and technology in their lives.

Just as well. That nurse assisting you in retirement may soon be a robot, along with the dog that keeps you company.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story: Daniel Moss at dmoss@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Philip Gray at philipgray@bloomberg.net

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Aging Japan Wants Automation, Not Immigration – Bloomberg

HPE Automation :: Automation Specialists

About HPE Automation

Serving all of Florida, the Caribbean, and Central & South America since 1980!

HPE Automation originally started in business as Hydraulic & Pneumatic Engineering in 1980. Our primary mission at that time was helping customers design advanced hydraulic systems for heavy duty equipment.

Over the years we have selectively added additional lines: Intelligent Actuator, manufacturer of electric actuators and robots; Mitsubishi, one of the world leaders in robotics and motion control; and 80/20, manufacturer of aluminum extrusions used to build machine frames and guarding systems. HPE is proud to additionally represent a number of other fine companies that allow us to bring a complete automation solution to our customers.

It is our belief that having a thorough knowledge on a reasonable number of product lines serves our customers much better than having little knowledge on a long list of lines.

Thats what you get when you call HPE. Real people answer the phones, not machines, and we strive to answer your questions quickly. HPE Automation was founded on personal customer service. We know your time is valuable. Our knowledgeable staff can typically answer your technical questions without calling the factory.

Need part numbers or a pdf on a certain component? Our Inside Sales people are here for you. Have a customize project in mind? Our Outside Sales people will be happy to visit your facility to personally review your requirements. They will work with you during the entire project and not turn you over to other people after your order is placed.

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The self-driving car of security automation – CSO Online

By Kumar Saurabh, Contributor, CSO | Aug 22, 2017 7:01 AM PT

Opinions expressed by ICN authors are their own.

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When I speak with CISOs about automation in cybersecurity, it can conjure up parallels to self-driving cars. After all, if machine learning can create cars that drive themselves, why cant we have self-driving security?

Its a bit early and optimistic, however, to say machine learning and automation will immediately solve all cybersecurity challenges, if ever. Given the threat landscapes inevitable evolution, it will most likely remain an arms race between the defenders and the attackers for the near and long term.

Alternatively, the promise of a machine doing what we thought only humans could do is quickly approaching reality. Theres a lot of early results, hype and even more potential. In fact, this is also true for self-driving cars. The Washington Post highlighted the different levels of development in regards to autonomy in self-driving cars established by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE).

Specifically, the evolutionary path to the much-hyped fully autonomous car with each stage providing exponential value.

Similarly in cybersecurity, increasing levels of intelligent automation will also provide exponential benefits. If we compare the levels in the auto industry and apply them to the world of cybersecurity, level zero has very little automation while level five is most autonomous.

On one hand, you have solutions such as User Behavior Analytics and Network Traffic Analysis that profess to automatically analyze normal behavior and alert anything abnormal. The drawback is the inability to understand the full context of an environment or situation, which results in a tendency to generate too many false positives and requires significant analyst involvement to triage.

On the other hand, you have early orchestration solutions that can partially automate some of the easier and repeatable actions during an incident response process. While this solution is adequate to collect relevant information for an investigation process, the actual decision making is delegated to the analyst.

In essence, Level 2 automates actions and repeatable tasks, but not the decision making and judgments that require intelligence.

The first is full, end-to-end alert triage automation. This is where the system has the intelligence, based on context and awareness of an alerts severity, to make decisions and accept feedback from human analysts. Though more advanced systems are able to provide a full explanation of their scoring, analysts still need to review the systems results. However, 95 percent of the overhead work they used to have to do is effectively eliminated.

Second is automated threat hunting that is possible after expert analysts map out the logic they would use in an investigation. The system applies cognitive automation to intelligently hunt for threats 24/7, but at a scale with which human analysts cant keep up. This approach can be made more manageable with prescriptive logic flows for specific use cases, such as Threat Hunter for CloudTrail or Threat Hunter for Office 365.

Such a solution does not exist today, but is often what CISOs hope for when they hear security automation. Achieving this nirvana will require significant advancements in machine learning and computing power.

Security operations technologies have greatly evolved in the past decade. The first big wave was driven by log aggregation and analytics, followed by predictive technologies. The next generation of solutions will be Prescriptive Security Intelligence, offering specific solutions to typical security use cases. The industry will take time to enter a fully autonomous state. If security automation is your end goal, start by looking for Level 3 security solutions that can drive 80 percent of the way to your destination.

This article is published as part of the IDG Contributor Network. Want to Join?

Kumar Saurabh is the CEO and co-founder of security intelligence automation platform LogicHub. Kumar has 15 years of experience in the enterprise security and log management space leading product development efforts at ArcSight and SumoLogic, which he left to co-found LogicHub.

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The self-driving car of security automation – CSO Online

PMMI Set To Release Automation Report – Automation World

While the packaging and processing industries have always been key adopters of automation technologies, there is a growing trend across these industries to use greater amounts of automation than they previously have.

According to a new report from PMMI, The Evolution of Automation 2017 for the processing and packaging, food, beverage, pharmaceutical and personal care industries, there are six key trends driving greater plant floor automation use across these industries. (Editors note: PMMI Media Group, publisher of Automation World, is owned by PMMI, The Association for Packaging and Processing Technologies.) Those trends are:

Though these factors are driving greater interest in and use of automation across the industries surveyed, the actual implementation of automation technologies in these industries is progressing at a moderate rate due to several factors. The PMMI report highlights the following reasons for the steady, yet slow, adoption of increased levels of automation across the packaging and processing industries:

One chart in the report, A Projection of How Automation Will Advance in Processing and Packaging Companies, (shown above) indicates that all aspects of machine and software automation will increase significantly over the next decade. This prediction is based on the collective average response of survey participants, with larger companies automating and integrating faster; small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are also investing more, but at a slower rate.

The report notes that SMEs are embracing automation not just to optimize production processes, but also to survive in an increasingly faster-paced market driven by supply chain partner and consumer demands. Though one of the drawbacks to greater automation use for SMEs is the cost of the technology, the report highlights three key benefits that can help offset a significant portion of those costs:

When it comes to spending on automation technologies, over half of the end users taking part in the research said, There is not a separate line item specifically for automation, but capital budgets are increasing. Despite this lack of spending clarity from a majority of respondents, one quarter of respondents noted that they do have a budget specifically set aside for automation investments.

Breaking out respondents comments to assess spending trends across the vertical industries covered in the study, the PMMI report shows:

The full report from PMMI will be released following PACK EXPO 2017 at http://www.pmmi.org/research. Highlights from report will also be showcased during the PACK EXPO event in Las Vegas, September 25-27.

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PMMI Set To Release Automation Report – Automation World

Will cities adapt when automation reshapes the job market? – Curbed

Watch out, Rust Belt: The robots are coming. And theyre after one of the more precious resources in these beleaguered U.S. manufacturing hubs: jobs.

That, at least, is the implication of a new analysis by the Brookings Institute, Where the robots are, that suggests the rise of robotics and automation will clobber the same areas hit by manufacturings decline, as technology radically changes how things get made (and how many workers are necessary to make them).

Since industrial robots work best where theres industry, its no surprise theyre currently clustered in the Midwest and upper South, according to the article, key areas in auto manufacturing. Michigan alone accounts for 28,000 of the nations industrial robots, 12 percent of the total, and metro Detroit boasts 8.5 industrial robots per 1,000 workers.

The Rust Belt, as some have said, is becoming the Robot Belt, knocking another serious blow to the region, where cities, like Pittsburgh, have only in the last decade or so really bounced back with advanced manufacturing, innovation hubs, and attempts to diversify their economy. As Mark Munro, Senior Fellow and Policy Director at Brookings, puts it, anxiety about robotslike their physical distributionwill also likely have its own geography.

The Brookings study joins a chorus of stories predicting a new type of robot apocalypse, different than the one we see in science fiction. Its man versus machine, with manufacturing, and many other parts of the economy at stake. The takes differ considerably, especially when it comes to which industries and sectors are most at risk, and how much were actually at risk: Some believe the real hits will come in transportation, storage, and retail, where more than 40 percent of jobs in these sectors will be replaceable due to this new wave of technology. Some reports even believe that these changes will result in economic growth and new job opportunities.

What all these predictions share, however, is a belief that we arent prepared for this shift toward automation. Automation has become a stand-in for economic anxiety, especially in areas that have already been hit by technological shifts, globalization, and increasing inequality. For city and local leaders, however, it should become a proxy for coming economic shifts, and challenge policymakers and corporate leaders to find the will to adjust. Like it or not, automation is making an impact and will only become more pronounced.

With the Trump administration more focused on changing trade policies as a means to improve employment and the economyTreasury secretary Steven Mnuchin has said this kind of technological displacement is not even on [the administrations] radar screenother levels of government need to step up.

Numerous other industries will likely be reshaped by automation, too, not just manufacturing. Telemarketers, insurance underwriters and appraisers, tax preparers, and cashiers may also be at risk, according to an Oxford University study. Many expect the retail industry, already clobbered by Amazon, to continue to shed jobs, according to a study by the Cornerstone Capital Group; up to 47 percent of the 16 million Americans currently working in retail could be made redundant.

Whats most distressing about these predictions is how automations impact is expected to move down the wage ladder; after hurting manufacturing employment, which often offered more stable and significant wages, now robots are coming after lower-wage jobs in the service sector. Thatll hurt some of the least well-off Americans, and based on the way certain industries have clustered, will mean some metro areas will feel the greatest effects, according to an analysis from the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis.

In Las Vegas and Riverside-San Bernardino in California, for example, each of which relies heavily on many of these industries, 65 and 63 percent of total jobs are at stake. Other vulnerable cities include El Paso, Texas; Orlando, Florida; and Louisville, Kentucky.

We felt it was really stunning, since we are underestimating the probability of automation, said Johannes Moenius, the director of the Institute for Spatial Economic Analysis at the University of Redlands, told The Atlantic, about the extent of potential losses.

So many communities are still coping with early waves of technological shifts, manufacturing moves, and economic changes. How can cities recover while readying themselves for something perhaps more swift and unpredictable?

Many cities are trying to get ahead of the shift by pursuing and promoting new manufacturing and training initiatives to help prepare for the next generation of job shifts. Creating partnerships with regional educational leaders and corporate leaders to create new training and educational programs, and encouraging initiatives that focus on skills for new manufacturing can help build new job opportunities and new businesses.

As Voxs Ezra Klein, who is skeptical that AI will lead to massive unemployment, wrote in a story this week, as technology drives people out of the most necessary jobs, we invent less necessary jobs that we nevertheless imbue with profound meaning and even economic value. Automation may create the conditions for new types of jobs; in that case, education and training become even more necessary to help weather and even take advantage of the transition.

The manufacturing industry is changing and favoring small companies and the maker movement; in 2014, more than 350,000 manufacturing concerns consisted of a single owner/employee, a 17 percent boost from a decade ago. Small businesses can and are growing in this sector (and, ironically, can operate in part because of the efficiencies brought about by automation).

Programs that help promote these firms have been seen as pathways to jobs that pay well: New York City has set aside $64 million in its Industrial Developer Fund to make manufacturing centers and floorspace more affordable. And the citys Tech Talent Pipeline is helping to shape education in the region and create pipelines to funnel talent in regional businesses.

The Equitable Innovation Economies Initiative, a project of the Pratt Center for Community Development, has also promoted efforts in multiple cities to increase the pool of tech talent and incubate a more diverse range of firms, like the Local Initiatives Support Corporation in Indianapolis, which has turned an abandoned industrial district into a new tech corridor.

Experts say say with a period of even more rapid adjustment and shifting employment coming, changes at the federal level that build a more flexible and robust safety net would cushion the coming blows. The U.S. government could put more money toward retraining and educational readjustment programs for workers, including the Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) program, which was set up to retrain and reskill workers.

No programs exist, and no funding is directly channeled, to those who have been economically displaced due to automation, and our total funding for these efforts lags far behind our peers: The U.S. currently spends about 0.1 percent of its GDP on programs to help workers adjust to workplace shifts; France spends nearly 10 times more (as measured in percent of their GDP).

With economic changes coming more rapidly than ever, improved vocational education and skills training are paramount to creating sustainable development and education. According to Preparing New York for the Next Wave of Automation, a report released by the Center for an Urban Future, with such a wide-range of urban jobs needing to evolve as automation reshapes industries, education needs to be fundamentally reformed. Industry and academia need to team up to create new ways to retrain workers faster, and with the latest technologies and job skills.

One example the new Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) education modelwhich teaches high school students core subjects and provides an Associates degree in an applied science, engineering, or a computer-related fieldhas been promoted as a way to teach immediately applicable skills early and often. City leaders need to take the initiative to build development programs and educational systems that reflect that new reality.

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Will cities adapt when automation reshapes the job market? – Curbed

Germany’s Jenoptik buys US automation company Five Lakes – Reuters

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – German photonics group Jenoptik has bought U.S. process automation firm Five Lakes, a car industry specialist, for an undisclosed sum, it said on Tuesday.

Jenoptik said it would merge the company with its laser-machine business, enabling it to develop from a machine supplier to an integrated specialist for metal and plastic processing.

Reporting by Georgina Prodhan; Editing by Tom Sims

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Germany’s Jenoptik buys US automation company Five Lakes – Reuters

Automation, Unemployment and Moravec’s Paradox | National Review – National Review

Writing in the Guardian, heres Larry Elliott on automation.The whole article is well worth a read, even if its too simplistic to argue (as he does) that the Luddites were wrong. Over the longish term they most certainly were. The industrial revolution paved the way for an immense improvement in living standards. But what that happy history omits is the fact that it took a while to do so, a phenomenon known as the Engels pause:

In the first half of the nineteenth century, the real wage [in Britain] stagnated while output per worker expanded. The profit rate doubled and the share of profits in national income expanded at the expense of labour and land. After the middle of the nineteenth century, real wages began to grow in line with productivity, and the profit rate and factor shares stabilized.

Put another way, the Luddites were (broadly) right about what the new technology could do totheir prospects and those of their children, but hugely wrong about what it would mean for their grandchildren.

Its worth noting that the Engels Pause was also a time of growing popular political discontent in Britain,

Convinced by the logic that the hit to demand from mass unemployment will (to oversimplify) constrain the extent to which tasks are handed over to the robots, Elliott argues that the robots will create more jobs. More jobs? Im not convinced, but hes on stronger ground when he asks this:

[W]hat if these jobs are less good and less well paid than the jobs that automation kills off? Perhaps the weak wage growth of recent years is telling us something, namely that technology is hollowing out the middle class.

Robots are likely to result in a further hollowing out of middle-class jobs, and the reason is something known as Moravecs paradox. This was a discovery by AI experts in the 1980s that robots find the difficult things easy and the easy things difficult. Hans Moravec, one of the researchers, said: It is comparatively easy to make computers exhibit adult-level performance on intelligence tests or playing checkers, and difficult or impossible to give them the skills of a one-year-old when it comes to perception and mobility. Put another way, if you wanted to beat Magnus Carlsen, the world chess champion, you would choose a computer. If you wanted to clean the chess pieces after the game, you would choose a human being.

In the modern economy, the jobs that are prized tend to be the ones that involve skills such as logic. Those that are less well-rewarded tend to involve mobility and perception. Robots find logic easy but mobility and perception difficult.

It follows, says Joshi [an economist at BCA Research], that the jobs that AI can easily replicate and replace are those that require recently evolved skills like logic and algebra. They tend to be middle-income jobs. Conversely, the jobs that AI cannot easily replicate are those that rely on the deeply evolved skills like mobility and perception. They tend to be lower-income jobs. Hence, the current wave of technological progress is hollowing out middle-income jobs and creating lots of lower-income jobs.

Recent developments in the labour market suggest this process is already well under way. In both Britain and the US, economists have been trying to explain why it has been possible for jobs to be created without wage inflation picking up. The relationship between unemployment and pay the Phillips curve appears to have broken down.

But things become a bit easier to understand if the former analysts and machine operators are now being employed as dog walkers and waiting staff. Employment in total might be going up, but with higher-paid jobs being replaced by lower-paid jobs. Is there any hard evidence for this?

Well, Joshi says it is worth looking at the employment data for the US, which tends to be more granular than in Europe. For many years in America, the fastest-growing employment subsector has been food services and drinking places: bar tenders and waiters, in other words.

AI is still in its infancy, so the assumption has to be that this process has a lot further to run. Wage inflation is going to remain weak by historic standards, leading to debt-fuelled consumption with all its attendant risks. Interest rates will remain low. Inequality, without a sustained attempt at the redistribution of income, wealth and opportunity, will increase. And so will social tension and political discontent.

The Guardian is what it is, thus the call for sustained redistribution, but the risk of social tension and political discontent cannot be wished away. Andthe risk of that will rise significantly asautomation gnaws its way higher up the food chain.

And gnawing away is what its doing. Here (for example) is a recent story from CNBC on radiologists:

Arterys, a medical imaging startup, reads MRIs of the heart and measures blood flow through its ventricles. The process usually takes a human 45 minutes. Arterys can do it in 15 seconds.The remarkable power of todays computers has raised the question of whether humans should even act as radiologists. Geoffrey Hinton, a legend in the field of artificial intelligence, went so far as to suggest that schools should stop training radiologists. Those on the front lines are less dramatic.

Theres a misunderstanding that someone can program a bot that will take over everything the radiologist does, said Carla Leibowitz, head of strategy and marketing at Arterys. Radiologists still use the product and still make judgment calls. [We’re] trying to make products to make their lives easier.

According to Dreyer, a radiologist spends about half the day examining images. The rest is spent communicating with patients and other physicians. Theres only so much that automated systems can take over.

Our desire to have somebody in control, I dont think that will go away anytime soon, said General Leung, cofounder of MIMOSA Diagnostics, which is testing a smartphone device that uses AI to aid diabetics. Someones always going to want a person to have made the decision.

True, but what will they be paid to make that decision?

Meanwhile, at the lower end of the scale, the traditional retail sector is taking a battering from the impact of e-commerce, but so far as retail workers are concerned, the hit from the switch to online shopping will be both direct (store closings) and, in a sense, indirect, as those stores that survive turn to automation to defend their profitability:

A recent analysis by Cornerstone Capital Group suggests that 7.5m retail jobs the most common type of job in the country are at high risk of computerization, with the 3.5m cashiers likely to be particularly hard hit. Another report, by McKinsey, suggests that a new generation of high tech grocery stores that automatically charge customers for the goods they take no check-out required and use robots for inventory and stocking could reduce the number of labor hours needed by nearly two-thirds. It all translates into millions of Americans jobs under threat.

None of this will happen overnight, and there will still be room for employees to work alongside them, but there will be fewer of them and what will they be paid?

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Automation, Unemployment and Moravec’s Paradox | National Review – National Review

Global Terminal Automation Market in the Oil and Gas Industry 2017-2021 – Key Vendors are ABB, Emerson, Implico … – PR Newswire (press release)

The global terminal automation market in the oil and gas industry to grow at a CAGR of 6.72% during the period 2017-2021.

Global Terminal Automation Market in the Oil and Gas Industry 2017-2021, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. The report also includes a discussion of the Key vendors operating in this market. To calculate the market size, the report considers new installations, value, and aftermarket services market.

Terminal automation is a system that eases the product handling at the terminal and enables integration of these operations with the business software. It is used to measure, control, automate, and report all the exchanges and transfers. It offers complete management from receipt of the product to inventory control to dispatch recording. Terminal automation systems are deployed in various applications in the oil and gas terminals. Oil terminals include truck and pipeline terminals, whereas gas terminals include liquefaction liquid natural gas (LNG) and regasification LNG terminals.

One trend in the market is emergence of IoT and cloud integration. IoT is the next generation technology for all the applications due to its superior advantages in connectivity.

According to the report, one driver in the market is global expansion in oil terminals. Oil terminals are required to store the crude oil and petroleum products. The tank terminal industry is one of the spurring industries since last decade. The oil terminal owners made profits owing to the increased trade of oil and gas and increasing demand for storing the product in the high oil and gas prices scenario.

However, in low oil prices scenario, the industry is propelled by the trading and marketing activities by the countries. With low crude oil prices, oil and gas supply chain market structure is contango (a situation in which future value of the commodity is higher compared to spot pricing).

Further, the report states that one challenge in the market is huge capital investment and business downtime. Terminal automation provides several benefits ranging from increased operational efficiency to lowering the manual interference.

Key vendors

Other prominent vendors

Key Topics Covered:

Part 01:Executive summary

Part 02: Scope of the report

Part 03: Research Methodology

Part 04: Introduction

Part 05: Market landscape

Part 06: Market segmentation by product

Part 07: Market segmentation by application

Part 08: Geographical segmentation

Part 09: Decision framework

Part 10: Drivers and challenges

Part 11: Market trends

Part 12: Vendor landscape

Part 13: Key vendor analysis

Part 14: Appendix

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ccf8nt/global_terminal

Media Contact:

Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com

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Global Terminal Automation Market in the Oil and Gas Industry 2017-2021 – Key Vendors are ABB, Emerson, Implico … – PR Newswire (press release)

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